Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3753359 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1973
Filing dateOct 22, 1971
Priority dateOct 22, 1971
Publication numberUS 3753359 A, US 3753359A, US-A-3753359, US3753359 A, US3753359A
InventorsFrey M
Original AssigneeFrey M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Locking ski clamp
US 3753359 A
Abstract
A clamp is provided for locking together the curved tips of skis for the purpose of discouraging theft. A pair of outside clamp plates clamps the two skis securely on opposite sides of a center plate, the parts being fastened in clamped position by a padlock. By clamping together the curved end portions, bottom to bottom, the main flat portions of the two skis are disposed at a wide angle to each other making an awkard and very conspicuous bundle which a thief cannot carry away unnoticed. If the back ends of the skis are deeply embedded in a snow bank at such an angle to each other, the application of the clamp to the upstanding front ends makes the skis impossible to remove from the snow and carry away without first digging them out of the snow. By securing the ski pole straps in the clamp, a tripod is formed for standing the skis and poles on the ground or on a floor.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Patent 1191 Frey 111 3,753,359 [451 Aug. 21, 1973 LOCKING SKI CLAMP [76] Inventor: Max Frey, 3940 S.W. Altadena Ave.,

Portland, Oreg. 97201 [22] Filed: Oct. 22, 1971 211 Appl. No.: 191,755

[52] U.S. Cl. 70/19, 24/73 SG, 24/81 SK,

70/58, 70/232, 280/1 1.37 A [51] Int. Cl. A63c 11/00, EOSb 73/00 [58] Field of Search 70/18, 19, 58,232;

280/ll.13 T, 11.37 A, 11.37 C, 11.37 E, 11.37 K, 11.37 R; 24/73 SG, 81 SK [56] References Cited FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 108,704 10/1943 618,637 3/1927 489,149 12/1952 869,255 4/1971 Canada 70/58 Primary Examiner-Albert G. Craig, Jr. Attorney-Lee R. Schermerhorn [5 7 ABSTRACT A clamp is provided for locking together the curved tips of skis for the purpose of discouraging theft. A pair of outside clamp plates clamps the two skis securely on opposite sides of a center plate, the parts being fastened in clamped position by a padlock. By clamping together the curved end portions, bottom to bottom,

the main flat portions of the two skis are disposed at a 1 wide angle to each other making an awkard and very conspicuous bundle which a thief cannot carry away unnoticed. 1f the back ends of the skis are deeply embedded in a snow bank at such an angle to each other, the application of the clamp to the upstanding front ends makes the skis impossible to remove from the snow and carry away without first digging them out of the snow. By securing the ski pole straps in the clamp, a tripod is formed for standing the skis and poles on the ground or on a floor.

11 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEU M19 2 l 7 SHEEI- 1 [If 2 INVENTOR MAX FREY BY flfiorney LOCKING SKI CLAMP BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a clamp for clamping a pair of skis together in divergent positions so a to discourage theft.

The theft of expensive skis presents a serious problem at ski resorts where large numbers of skiers congregate Skis are so long and cumbersome to carry that they are ordinarily not carried along with the user when he goes indoors from time to time to seek warmth or obtain food. When the skis are left outside during such intervals of non-use, they present an irresistible attraction to thieves. Heretofore, the only way to prevent such theft has been for the user to carry the skis along with him at all times or lock them inside his automobile, both of which expedients are extremely inconvenient.

Objects of the invention are, therefore, 'to provide a clamp for clamping and locking a pair of skis securely together, to provide a clamp for clamping the curved tips together bottom to bottom so that the skis will be divergent from each other at a wide angle, making an awkward and conspicuous bundle for a thief to carry, to provide a locking clamp which will hold a pair of skis securely embedded in a snow bank in inverted V configuration, and to provide a clamp for both skis and ski poles securing them together in such a way as to form a tripod which will stand on the ground or on a floor.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The device comprises a pair of outer clamp plates arranged to clamp the curved end portions of a pair of skis bottom to bottom on opposite sides of a center plate with the skis extending at a wide divergent angle relative to each other. The parts are locked in clamped position. This presents a very awkward and conspicuous bundle for a thief to carry, making it impossible for him to carry the skis away unnoticed.

If the back ends of the skis are embedded in a snow bank with the front ends inclined toward each other bottom to bottom before the clamp is applied, they cannot be removed without digging them out of the snow. If the straps of the ski poles are looped into the clamp, a tripod is formed which will stand in stable position on the ground or on a floor. Two embodiments of the locking device are disclosed having the features described.

The invention will be better understood and the foregoing and other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Various changes may be made in the details of construction and arrangement of parts and certain features may be used without others. All such modifications within the scope of the appended claims are included in the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view with parts broken away, showing a first form of locking clamp embodying the features of the invention applied to a pair of skis shown in broken lines;

FIG. 2 is a view on the line 2--2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view on the line 33 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 shows how the ski poles may be included in the clamp to form a tripod;

FIG. 5 shows how the skis may be locked together while embedded in the snow;

FIG. 6 shows how the skis may be clamped together in nested relationship and locked to a cable;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 1 showing a modification;

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the clamp in FIG. 7 showing the clamp in partially open position in broken lines; and

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of the clamp showing all the parts in open position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The first embodiment, designated generally at 9, is illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 6. As viewed in FIG. 2, the device comprises, essentially, a lower clamp plate 10, a center plate 11 and an uppper outside clamp plate 12. The lower and upper clamp plates clamp a pair of skis S on opposite sides of the center plate 11. The center plate may be omitted but it is preferred to clamp the skis against a center plate rather than against each other.

In order to avoid marring the skis and provide more secure clamping action, the clamping surface of each lower and upper clamp plate 10 and 12 is covered with a layer of rubber or plastic 13 and a pair of plastic covered metal strips 14 is crimped on opposite edges of center plate 11. These resilient pads tightly engage the surfaces of the skis and apply clamping pressure to the skis as best shown in FIG. 3, preventing the skis from being forcibly removed. 1

The three plates 10, 11 and 12 are apertured to receive a pair of bolts 15 equipped with wing nuts 16. The distance between the bolts 15 is preferably less than the width of the main portions of the skis whereby the application of the clamp is limited to the curved and tapered front ends which are of less width than the main, flat portions of the skis. Thus, when the skis are disposed bottom to bottom and wing nuts 16 are tightened, the main portions of the skis will diverge downwardly from each other at a wide angle in inverted V configuration as shown. Ifdesired, however, the bolts 15 may be spaced apart sufficiently to admit the wider flat portions of the skis in other clamped relationships.

In tightening the wing nuts 16, care is taken to align them lengthwiseof plate 10. A channel-shaped lock bar 20 is pivotally connected to one end of plate 10 by a pin 21 in the flanges of the channel. The wing nuts 16 are at least partially contained within the channel of the lock bar 26 when the latter is closed thereby preventing turning of the wing nuts. The wing nuts may extend partially into longitudinal slots 22 and 23 in the web portion of lock bar 20, which slots likewise prevent rotation of the wing nuts.

In applying the clamp to the skis, lock bar 20 is pivoted to open position as shown in broken lines in FIG. 2, allowing the wing nuts 16 to be tightened, compressing the resilient pads 13 and 14. When lock bar 20 is closed to its solid line position, its side flanges overlie opposite sides of plate 10 as shown. Clamp plate 12 is of L-shape having an annular end 25 arranged to project through slot 22. This projecting end is apertured at 26 to receive a padlock 27 which prevents opening lock bar 20. Lock bar 20 is a form of hasp. Other types of lock may also be employed.

. 20 over the wing nuts 16 so that they cannot be rotated whereby the skis cannot be removed from the clamp. As shown in FIG. 2 the straps 30 on ski poles P may be looped over the end 25 of clamp plate 12 in order to secure the ski poles as well as the skis. Also, the clamps on several pairs of skis may be locked together by a loop of steel cable 31.

As shown in FIG. 4, the ski poles may be arranged to form the third leg of a tripod for standing the skis and poles upright on the ground or on a floor.

FIG. 5 shows how the clamp 9 may be utilized to prevent removal of the skis from a snow bank 35. If the back ends of the skis are pushed into the snow at divergent angles as shown and the clamp applied to the curved front ends as above described, it is impossible to remove the skis without first shovelling away the snow. Having done this, the thief would still have to carry the skis in the widely divergent relationship shown, making him quite conspicuous. Also, in this relationship it would be difficult to conceal the skis inside of a passenger automobile or to carry them on the car top.

FIG. 6 shows another arrangement for safeguarding the skis. In this case the clamp 9 is applied with the skis in nested position and the end 25 of clamp plate 12 is hooked over a steel cable 36 before the padlock 27 is applied. The opposite ends of cable 36 are anchored to a pair of posts or trees 37. With this compact arrangement of the skis, a large number may be locked to a single cable 36 provided for the purpose.

A modified form of construction is embodied in the clamp 40 in FIGS. 7 to 9. As viewed in FIG. 8, this clamp has a lower outside clamp plate 41, a center plate 42 and an upper outside clamp plate 43. Here, again, the center plate 42 may be omitted but it is preferred to provide this means to separate and grip the skis. The upper and lower clamp plates are equipped with the rubber or plastic strips 13 and the center clamp plate is equipped with crimped plastic covered metal plates 14 as above described. The clamp 40 further includes a lock bar 45 and all of these parts are secured together in assembled relationship by a pair of links made in the form of spring wire loops 46 and 47.

A pair of adjusting screws 50 and 51 are threadedly mounted in tapped holes in opposite ends of upper clamp plate 43. A plate 52 is fixedly mounted in a slot in the upper end of screw 50 by a pin 49, this plate having a hole at 53 forming a bearing for one end of the wire loop 46. The opposite end of wire loop 46 is received in a bearing formed by a hole 54 in one end of lower clamp plate 41. The two legs of wire loop 46 extend slidably through holes at 55 in the corresponding end of center plate 42. The opposite ends of plate 42 are equipped with stop pins 56 adjacent the wire loops 46 and 47.

One end of lock bar 45 is pivotally connected to the head of adjusting screw 51 by a pin 59. Above and slightly to the right of pin 59 is a slot 60 to receive the upper end of wire loop 47. The lower end of wire loop 47 is contained in a bearing formed by a hole 61 in the end of lower clamp 41. The opposite legs of wire loop 47 extend through notches 62 in the corresponding end of center plate 42.

The central portion of lock bar 45 is spaced above upper clamp plate 43 to receive the ski pole straps 30 and a steel cable 31. The free swinging end portion of 4 lock bar 45 contains a U-shaped bend 65 which is longitudinally slotted at'66 to receive the plate 52. The end portion of plate 52 which enters slot 66 contains an opening 67 to receive the padlock 27 which prevents opening the lock bar. Lock bar 45 is a form of hasp. Other types of lock may also be employed.

Screws 50 and 51 are adjusted to provide a tight clamping action on the skis which are to be clamped, compressing the resilient pads 13 and 14. These screws provide a wide range of adjustment to accommodate skis of different thickness as indicated by the broken line position of upper clamp plate 43 in FIG. 8.

Starting with the upper parts in fully open position as shown in FIG. 9, the clamp is closed by swinging wire loop 46, center plate 42 and lower clamp plate 41 clockwise about hole 53 as a pivot to positions under the upper clamp plate 43, and the lock bar 45 is raised to upright position as shown in broken lines in FIG. 8. Then, with the skis in position on opposite sides of center plate 42, the free end of wire loop 47 is engaged in the slot and lock bar 45 is swung down to its solid line position so that it may be secured by the padlock 27. A lock bar 45 is rotated clockwise, the upper end of wire loop 47 is swung to overcenter position relative to pivot pin 59. This clamp has the same versatility as described in connection with FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 with reference to the first embodiment.

The advantage of the modification in FIGS. 7 to 9 is its quick and convenient clamp and release action. The parts are placed in tight clamping position by merely engaging wire loop 47 in slot 60 and swinging lock bar 45 into position to receive the padlock without tightening any clamp screws after they have once been adjusted to the skis. The clamping 40 is released by merely taking off the padlock and raising lock bar 45 to disengage wire loop 47 from the slot 60 without unscrewing any clamp nuts. Otherwise, the clamping action is essentially the same as in the first embodiment. When clamp screws 50 and 51 are properly adjusted, the resilient pads 13 and 14 prevent forcible removal of the skis.

It will be observed that screws 50 and 51 can be rotated only when the clamp is fully open as shown in FIG. 9. The engagement of plate 52 in slot 66 of lock bar 45 prevents rotation of both screws.

I claim: a

1. A ski clamp comprising a pair of plates arranged to clamp a pair of skis together, resilient ski-engaging pads on said plates, adjustable screw means operable on said plates to apply clamping pressure against the skis, a lock bar arranged to prevent adjustment of said screw means, and locking means arranged to secure said lock bar in operative position, said adjustable screw means comprising a pair of screws in one of said plates, a pair of links connected with the other plates and adjustable by said screws, said lock bar being pivotally mounted on one of said screws and engageable with the other screw to prevent rotation of both screws.

2. A ski clamp as defined in claim 1 including a center plate having resilient ski engaging pads on its opposite faces.

3. A ski clamp as defined in claim 1, said locking means including a padlock.

4. A ski clamp as defined in claim 1, said lock bar comprising a hasp.

5. A ski clamp as defined in claim 1, said clamp having an open space to receive and lock ski pole straps or a cable to the clamp.

6. A ski clamp as defined in claim 1, one of said links having detachable engagement with said lock bar adjacent said one screw and the other link being pivotally connected to said other screw.

7. A ski clamp as defined in claim 6, said lock bar having a slot receiving said one link.

8. A ski clamp as defined in claim 6, said links comprising spring wire loops.

9. A ski clamp as defined in claim 1 applied to the upturned front end portion of a pair of skis with the skis disposed bottom to bottom in said clamp with their rear ends in widely divergent V configuration.

10. A ski clamping arrangement as defined in claim 9 including a pair of ski poles having strap loops secured in said clamp, said skis forming two legs of a tripod and said ski poles forming the third leg.

11. A ski clamp comprising a first clamp plate having a pair of bolt holes adjacent its ends, a second clamp plates having a pair of bolt holes aligned with said bolt holes in said first clamp plate, a pair of bolts in said holes, wing nuts on said bolts arranged to bear against said first clamp plate to clamp a pair of skis between said clamp plates, a channel-shaped lock bar pivotally mounted at one end on one end of said first clamp plate, the opposite end of said lock bar projecting beyond the opposite end of said first clamp plate, a pair of slots in said lock bar to receive said wing nuts and prevent rotation thereof on said bolts, one of said slots extending into said projecting end of the lock bar, and an L-shaped end on said second clamp plate arranged to pass beyond said opposite end of said first clamp plate and project through said one slot, said L-shaped end being apertured to receive a padlock and said locking bar forming a hasp to lock said clamp. I i I.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
CA489149A *Dec 30, 1952J Ralph TaitSki press
CA869255A *Jan 6, 1969Apr 27, 1971Kenneth E WilsonSki locking device
FR618637A * Title not available
SE108704A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3894414 *Dec 17, 1973Jul 15, 1975Peterson Stuart RTheft-deterring device for skis and poles and method of using same
US3896643 *Nov 23, 1973Jul 29, 1975Takagi Tekko Kabushiki KaishaLocking device for a motorcycle driver{3 s helmet
US3985275 *Apr 21, 1975Oct 12, 1976Electronic Chassis CorporationCarrier for skis and ski poles
US4020661 *Oct 20, 1975May 3, 1977Rich Edward LSki lock apparatus
US4078708 *Jul 21, 1975Mar 14, 1978Mayer Leo WRack for vehicle mounting of ski equipment
US4729336 *Jul 6, 1987Mar 8, 1988Rohne Richard EBoat seat bracket security device
US4732018 *Nov 6, 1986Mar 22, 1988Crosby Lyndon AAir coupling locking device
US4777809 *Sep 28, 1987Oct 18, 1988Charles WigginsOutboard motor lock
US5425525 *Feb 16, 1994Jun 20, 1995Vantine StudiosAnti-theft device
US5675999 *Jan 17, 1996Oct 14, 1997Carlstrom; Glenn LeviSnowboard lock
US6848718Feb 12, 2003Feb 1, 2005Arvik Enterprises, LlcSki caddy having means for utilizing ski poles as a support
US7232099 *Aug 27, 2004Jun 19, 2007Kenneth WilcoxBracket for holding accessories on a boat
US7434775Jun 11, 2007Oct 14, 2008Kennth WilcoxBracket for holding accessories on a boat
USRE30523 *Sep 18, 1978Feb 24, 1981 Ski lock apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/19, 280/814, 24/336, 70/58, 70/232
International ClassificationA63C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C11/006
European ClassificationA63C11/00F4