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Publication numberUS3754764 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 28, 1973
Filing dateApr 27, 1972
Priority dateApr 27, 1972
Also published asCA975017A, CA975017A1
Publication numberUS 3754764 A, US 3754764A, US-A-3754764, US3754764 A, US3754764A
InventorsManheck F
Original AssigneeManheck F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club impact marker
US 3754764 A
Abstract
An impact marker for golf clubs and the like. The marker is comprised of a self-contained imaging-type sheet material including minute rupturable capsules, which sheet material is applied to the face of the club by means of a pressure-sensitive non-permanent adhesive distributed uniformly over substantially all of the back side of the sheet material. The sheet material is suitably adapted to produce an image at the exact point at which the sheet is contacted by the ball during the golfer's swing. Prior to being attached to the club, the adhesive layer is covered by an easily removed protective sheet.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Waited States Patent [191 Maniieck Inventor:

Filed:

GOLF CLUB IMEACT MARKER Frederick J. Manheck, 8 Apache Rd., Nashua, NH. 03060 Apr. 27, 1972 Appl. No.: 248,254

References Cited UNITED STATES" PATENTS Grossman 273/186 D Novatnak 273/63 A Fischer 282/8 R Singer 282/28 R Worrell 273/186 A [111 3,754,764 Aug. 28, 1973 et al.

[57] ABSTRACT An impact marker for golf clubs and the like. The marker is comprised of a self-contained imaging-type sheet material including minute rupturable capsules, which sheet material is applied to the face of the club by means of a pressure-sensitive non-permanent adhesive distributed uniformly over substantially all of the back side of the sheet material. The sheet material is suitably adapted to produce an image at the exact point at which the sheet is contacted by the ball during the golfers swing. Prior to being attached to the club, the adhesive layer is covered by an easily removed protective sheet.

3 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures GOLF CLUB IMPACT MARKER DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION In playing the game of golf, there are many variables which contribute to how well or how poorly an individual plays the game. One of these variables is the point of impact between the striking surface or face of a golf club and the golf ball.

A golf club is designed to impart the greatest striking effect on the ball if the ball is struck by the center of the club face. Striking the ball off-center either vertically or horizontally produces various effects that in all cases result in an impact power loss as compared to the maximum impact power imparted to the ball if the ball is struck by the center of the club face. If, while practicing, a golfer can see exactly where his club hits the ball and then make the necessary adjustments to move the impact point to the center of the club face, he can improve the power of his hitting stroke by utilizing the club face for what it is designed to do.

The prior art devices which have heretofore been developed have failed to provide a satisfactory means of FIG. 3 is a sectional view through an impact marker of the present invention prior to its application to a club face; and,

FIG. 4 is a view in perspective of a plurality ofimpact markers in accordance with the present invention combined in book form.

Referring initially to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is shown a golf club generally indicated at having a head 12 and a shaft 14. The head 12 is shown positioned immediately to the rear ofa golf ball 16 supported on a tee 18. The club head 12 is provided with a face 20 having an impact marker 22 in accordance with the present invention attached thereto.

With further reference to FIG. 3, it will be seen that the impactmarker includes a first sheet 24 of a selfcontained imaging-type material which is of the type suitably adapted to produce an image at the point of application thereto of an external force. The sheet 24 can be of any known material such as for example type 100 carbonless paper sold under the trademark 3M BRAND" by the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company of St. Paul, Minn., and the selfachieving the above. These prior art devices are invariably complicated, expensive to manufacture and cumbersome, the latter disadvantage usually producing a change in the weight and balance of. the club head which in turn adversely affects the golfer's swing, thus negating any advantage that might otherwise be gained from determining where the impact point of the ball is on the club face. Another. available method might be to make a video tape of a golfers swing, concentrating on contained paper under the trademark NCR paper" by Appleton Papers, Inc. of Appleton, Wisc., a subsidiary of NCR. A pressure-sensitive non-permanent adhesive 26, preferably although not necessarily in the form of a uniform coating, is applied to one side of the sheet 24. The adhesive coating is covered by a second protective I carrier sheet 28 of the type which can be separated the ball at the instant of impact with the club face, and

' where the club hits the ball immediately after each swing. Other objects ofthe invention include the provision of a means for accomplishing the foregoing which is simple in construction and application, yet inexpensive to manufacture and thus available to golfers at a modest price. Further objects of the present invention include the provision of an impact marker which can be employed without altering either the ball or the impact surface of the club or other striking device, and which can be easily and quickly affixed and removed from the club face. Still further objects of the present invention are the provisions of an impact marker which can be affixed to a golf club without significantly altering the clubs weight or balance, and which is reusable for several strokes.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent as the description proceeds with the. aid of the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of a golf club, in this case a wood, having a device in accordance with the present invention affixed thereto:

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken through the club head shown in FIG. 1;

from the first sheet 24 without disturbing the adhesive 26. One example of the carrier sheet 28 might be a wax-finished paper.

When the impact marker is to be employed, the protective carrier sheet 28 is removed to expose the adhesive 26. Thereafter, the first sheet 24 is applied to the face 20 of the club head 12 (as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2) and is temporarily but securely held thereagainst by the adhesive 26. Thereafter, the golfer can address the ball 16 and execute a stroke in the nonnal manner. The point at which the ball 16 is impacted or struck by the club will instantaneously and permanently be captured by the resulting image on the sheet material 24.

Thus it will be seen that by employing an impact marker 22 as described above, the user will be permitted to instantly and visually evaluate after each stroke whether the golf ball is being struck by that specific portion of the club face designed to impact the maximum desired striking effect to the ball. From the results of this evaluation, the user can make the necessary adjustments to move the point of impact to that exact portion of the club face designed for best impact results. For example, if it is seen that the impact point between the club face and the ball is consistently where it should be, i.e., the center of the face both vertically and horizontally, then the user will know that an adjustment in his golf address as to his standing distance from the ball or the height at which he tees the ball is not necessary. However, if it is observed that the impact point between the club face and the ball is consistently centered vertically on the club face, but is not centered horizon tally, the user will then know he must make an adjustment in his address of the ball as to the distance he is standing from the ball. Likewise, if it is observed that the impact point between the club face and ball is consistently centered horizontally on the club face, but is not centered vertically, then the user will know hemust make an adjustment in the height of teeing-up the ball or in his swing to raise or lower the arc of his swing to move the impact point up or down toward the correct center location. Finally, if it is observed that the impact point between the club face and the ball is consistently- One manner of packaging a plurality of impact markers 22 in book form is illustrated at 30 in FIG. 4. Here, each impact marker is provided with a perforated line 32 parallel to one edge 34. The area between the perforated lines 32 and edges 34 are permanently secured together. With this arrangement a user can separate one impact marker 22 from the book along the perforated line 32, and thereafter separate the first sheet 24 and its adhesive coating 26 from the protective carrier sheet 28 for application to the club face.

It is also preferable, although not necessary, for the first sheet 24 to be die-cut along a line 36 corresponding to the peripheral configuration of a striking face, for example the face of a golf club as shown in the drawings. This facilitates application by the user and permits special adaptation of the sheet material 24 to either woods or irons. The sheet material 24 may also be printed, as at 38, with suitable indicia to further assist the user.

In light of the foregoing, it will now be apparent to those skilled in the art that use of the present invention is not restricted to golf. The invention, in different forms, can be used in other sports, for example, baseball, ping pong, ice and field hockey, etc., where the evaluation of the point of impact is valuable to the improvement of the users game. Likewise, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that modifications may be made to the embodiments herein chosen for purposes of disclosure without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, the invention is not limited to any particular imaging-type material 24. The adhesive and its pattern of application to the back side of the sheet material 24 may be varied, and the type of protective carrier sheet 28 can also be changed. The impact markers may either be packaged individually, in book form as shown in FIG. 4, or perhaps in a continuous strip wherein the individual markers are separated by perforations.

I claim:

1. A golf practice aid for determining the exact point of impact ofa golf ball against a golf club face, said aid comprising:

a. a first sheet of impact sensitive material carrying at least one liquid substance contained in a multitude of minute capsules which rupture upon the application of impact thereto to release said substance to form a distinctive color in said sheet in the area of impact;

b. a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive distributed uniformly over substantially all of the back side of said first sheet; and

c. a second sheet of protective material disposed upon said adhesive layer, said adhesive being releasably adhered to said second protective sheet and being substantially permanently adhered to said first impact sensitive sheet, said second protective sheet being easily removable from said golf practice aid to permit the adhesive back side of said first impact sensitive sheet to be adhered flush against a golf club face, the front side of said first sheet producing a visible image thereon upon being impacted against a golf ball.

2. The golf practice aid of claim 1 wherein said first sheet is pre-cut to a configuration approximating that of a golf club face to which it is adapted to be adhered.

3. The golf practice aid of claim 1 wherein said front side of said first sheet is provided with suitable printed indicia locating the desired impact area.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2660436 *Jun 24, 1950Nov 24, 1953Grossman Eugene FIndicating disk for golf club heads
US3334921 *May 18, 1966Aug 8, 1967Combined Paper Mills IncBusiness forms
US3342488 *Oct 13, 1964Sep 19, 1967Novatnak George FBowling ball and finger hole gripping insert
US3383121 *Jun 22, 1965May 14, 1968Avery Products CorpSelf-adhesive copy label
US3649029 *Jul 9, 1969Mar 14, 1972Eugene N WorrellGolf practice apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4323246 *Sep 28, 1979Apr 6, 1982Nehrbas Jr George MGolf practice putting aid
US4603862 *Feb 17, 1984Aug 5, 1986Chen Richard MGolf ball with alignment marker
US4974851 *Jan 16, 1990Dec 4, 1990Closser Daniel PGolf club impact making device and method
US4989876 *Nov 18, 1988Feb 5, 1991Hawkins Sr Arnold RPractice golf club and system
US5033746 *Jul 9, 1990Jul 23, 1991Jones Michael DGolf club ball-impact marker
US5120358 *Aug 24, 1989Jun 9, 1992Pippett Robert JGolf practice aid
US5142309 *Mar 8, 1991Aug 25, 1992Consumer Advantage Marketing Group, Inc.Golf club impact recording system
US5417427 *Oct 25, 1993May 23, 1995Doane; Maurice S.Golf training device
US5609530 *Aug 31, 1995Mar 11, 1997Emhart Inc.Dynamic lie determination device and method
US5779556 *Jul 16, 1996Jul 14, 1998Cervantes; EduardoGolf club point of impact and relative club velocity indicator
US5830077 *Jun 13, 1997Nov 3, 1998Yavitz; Edward Q.Impact detector for use with a golf club
US5885171 *Feb 20, 1997Mar 23, 1999Sharpe; Gary D.System for altering the coefficient of friction between a golf club face and a golf ball
US6217460 *Jul 30, 1999Apr 17, 2001John N. BroadbridgePutter having plastic insert
US6913544 *Nov 7, 2001Jul 5, 2005The Tiffin Company, Inc.Divot practice mat
US7086956 *Oct 16, 2004Aug 8, 2006Matthews John PApparatus and method for recording the impact location between a golf ball and a golf club
US7134967Jan 13, 2004Nov 14, 2006David LesterTraining aid that generates an impression on a hitting instrument
US7214137Apr 5, 2006May 8, 2007Louis ArsenaultPortable golf swing practice device having a separable cord shield incorporated therein
US7594858 *Jul 5, 2006Sep 29, 2009Hawknest Engineering LlcGolf swing practice system
US7985146 *Jun 27, 2007Jul 26, 2011Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head and face insert
US8092315Apr 13, 2007Jan 10, 2012Karsten Manufacturing CorporationMethods and apparatus to indicate impact of an object
US8684864Jun 13, 2011Apr 1, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head and face insert
US9409066Feb 19, 2014Aug 9, 2016Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head and face insert
US20020082119 *Sep 25, 2001Jun 27, 2002Jiro HamadaIron golf club heads, iron golf clubs and golf club evaluating method
US20040074125 *Oct 17, 2002Apr 22, 2004Johnson Patrick G.Iron-wood golf club head accessory
US20040209700 *May 11, 2004Oct 21, 2004Tiffin Richard EdwardGolf practice mat record sheet
US20040254026 *Jun 8, 2004Dec 16, 2004Tom David, Inc.Self-sticking pad for a golf club
US20050153790 *Jan 13, 2004Jul 14, 2005Lester David B.Training aid that generates an impression on a hitting instrument
US20050233820 *Oct 16, 2004Oct 20, 2005Matthews John PApparatus and method for recording the impact location between a golf ball and a golf club
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US20070155521 *Jul 5, 2006Jul 5, 2007Hauk Thomas DGolf Swing Practice System
US20080254907 *Apr 13, 2007Oct 16, 2008Karsten Manufacturing CorporationMethods and Apparatus to Indicate Impact of an Object
US20090005191 *Jun 27, 2007Jan 1, 2009Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head and face insert
US20140274438 *Mar 15, 2013Sep 18, 2014Nike, Inc.Fitting A Golf Ball Using A Strike Characteristics Detector
US20140371008 *Jun 12, 2013Dec 18, 2014Steven P. GeotsalitisBaseball bat swing training device
WO1989012214A1 *Jul 28, 1988Dec 14, 1989Lee James SGolf club impact recording system
WO1992000783A1 *Jul 8, 1991Jan 23, 1992Jones Michael DGolf club ball-impact marker
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/237, 462/69
International ClassificationA63B53/00, A63B69/36, A63B69/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3617, A63B69/0024, A63B69/0026
European ClassificationA63B69/00H2, A63B69/36C4, A63B69/00H