Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3756165 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1973
Filing dateMay 22, 1972
Priority dateMay 22, 1972
Publication numberUS 3756165 A, US 3756165A, US-A-3756165, US3756165 A, US3756165A
InventorsValiela J
Original AssigneeInterpace Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for printing on ceramic tableware
US 3756165 A
Abstract
A method for applying oil-based, relatively viscous colorants one at a time to ceramic tableware by silk-screen printing each of the colorants in a relatively thick layer onto a total-release transfer surface (preferably of silicone rubber), allowing at least 1 minute and up to 3 hours for the colorant layer to form a skinlike film and then causing intimate mechanical contact between the film and the tableware and thereafter withdrawing quickly the transfer surface from the film to transfer the colorant film in its entirety intact to the ware. Successive films of colorant may be applied to the ware even over previously-applied films of colorant and without waiting for previously-applied films of colorant to dry.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0 United States Patent 1 1 1111 3,756,165 Valiela Sept. 4, 1973 METHOD FOR PRINTING ON CERAMIC 3,554,836 1/1971 Steindorf 101/426 x TABLEWARE 3,688,695 9/1972 James 101/211 [75] Inventor: Jose Valiela, New York, NY. FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 73 A I t 763,572 12/1956 Great Britain 101/41 1 ss'gnee gi Corpommn Pamppany 1,067,448 10 1959 Germany 101 41 [22] Filed: May 1972 Primary Examiner-Edgar S. Burr {21] A N 255,73 Assistant ExaminerClifford D. Crowder Attorney-Charles E. Baxley et a]. Related U.S. Appllcatlon Data 63 c r s I l as; In part ofSer N0 43,044, June 3, 1970, [57] ABSTRACT A method for applying oi1-based, relatively viscous col- 3- C "l /426, 101/41, 10l/2 1 orants one at a time to ceramic tableware by silk-screen [51] Int. Cl 13411 17/28 printing each of the colorants in a relatively thick layer 3] F leld 0f swlch 101/2l onto a total-release transfer surface (preferably of sili- 123 B cone rubber), allowing at least 1 minute and up to 3 hours for the colorant layer to form a skinlike film and References Cited then causing intimate mechanical contact between the UNITED STATES PATENTS film and the tableware and thereafter withdrawing 2,077,790 4/1937 HakOgI 101/35 quiddy Surface from film transfer 2,202,465 5 1940 Pattison 101 41 the colorant film its entirety intact to the Ware-511C- 2,739,532 3/1956 Fernandez 101 41 x cessive films f l rant may be applied to the ware 2,745,339 5/1956 Fernandez IOl/4I even over previously-applied films of colorant and 3,255,695 6/1966 Johnson et a1 101/211 without waiting for previously-applied films of colorant 3,384,508 5/1968 Bopp et a1. 117 123 A to 3,418,926 12/1968 Hakogi 101/44 X 3,511,68! 5/1970 Huey, Jr. 117/123 A X 35 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures l4 l4 2 1 f 1 2 I I t 1 2 A k 6 2 A 1 12 7 i 4 :..1

PATENTEDSEP 4 ms 3.756.165

sum 1 or 3 INVENTOR.

uos VALIELA Attorney FIG. 6

I N VEN TOR.

Y JOS- VALIELA AHOFHQV METHOD FOR PRINTING ON CERAMIC TABLEWARE CROSS REFERENCE This application is a continuation in part of my copending application 43,044 filed June 3, 1970, now abandoned.

THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to new and useful improvements in decoration of ceramic tableware and seeks particularly to provide a novel method for transfer printing onto such ware.

It is well known that ceramic tableware may be decorated by hand painting, rubber stamping, stencilling, paper transfers, lithographic decals, silk screen decals, under glaze and over glaze decoration as well as direct and indirect silk-screen printing.

The present invention relates to a combined silkscreen and transfer printing technique in which one or more colorants organized in a decorative design is first silk-screen printed onto a total-release transfer surface (as defined herein), such as silicone rubber which initially will accept the colorant by silk-screen printing thereon, but will tend thereafter to repel the colorant therefrom. The colorant is then transferred to the ceramic tableware by mechanical impression. Due to the fact that the colorant has a much greater affinity for the tableware than it has for the total-release transfer surface, it is possible to apply sequentially successive colorants to complete an overall design without having to wait for any previously applied colorants to dry. Colorants may be applied directly over previously applied colorants which are still wet, thereby producing blends of colorants. Furthermore, by controlling properly formulation of the colorants, their drying can be regulated so as to accommodate use of the silk-screen printed total-release transfer elements after 1 minute or to accommodate preparation of a multiplicity of totalrelease transfer elements hours in advance without danger of their completely drying prematurely.

Two types of total-release ink-transfer elements are contemplated; l. a pad onto which generally cylindriform articles of ware, such as cups and vases to which the decorations are to be applied externally, are rolled and 2. an elastic membrane that is expanded into contact with rims or cavity portions of plates, saucers or the like. Screen life is substantially increased because the colorant is silk-screen printed onto a smooth silicone rubber transfer surface, rather than onto more abrasive surfaces of the tableware. Therefore, an object of this invention is to provide a novel method for applying decorative colorants to ceramic tableware; such as over glaze, under glaze, earthenware or glass, but preferably under glaze; by silk-screen printing the colorant on a total-release transfer surface, allowing it at least 1 minute to form a skinlike film thereon and then causing intimate mechanical contact between that total-release transfer surface and the article of tableware to be decorated so as to transfer the colorant thereto.

A further object of this invention is to provide a method of the character stated in which the totalrelease transfer surfaces are silicone rubber or like elements.

A further object of this invention is to provide an elastic membrane ink-transfer element of the character stated which comprises a flat metal or plastic base ring having a normally relaxed elastic net secured to one face and covering the central opening and a flat ring of silicone rubber cast onto the exposed face of the elastic net within the area of the central opening of the base ring and coaxial therewith.

A further object of this invention is to provide an elastic membrane ink-transfer element of the character stated which can print continuous bands on deeply curved dishes without any need for overlap-avoiding techniques. Such overlap-avoiding techniques require skilled craftsmen and consume considerable time.

A further object of this invention is to provide a pad type ink-transfer element of the character stated which comprises a resilient pad having a silicone rubber or like surface.

A further object of this invention is to provide cool inks that are particularly useful in this new method of printing and transfer decorating of ceramic tableware.

A further object of this invention is to control drying of the inks so that ink-transfer elements may be prepared for use as soon as 1 minute after printing or for use up to several hours after printing.

A further object of this invention is to provide a method of the character stated in which a succeeding ink film may be applied to the tableware without having to wait for a preceding ink film to dry, thus markedly speeding the overall rate of decoration.

A further object of this invention is to provide a method of the character stated in which a succeeding ink film may be applied directly over a preceding ink, film thereby producing a blend of the preceding and succeeding inks.

A further object of this invention is to provide a method of the character stated in which the tableware may accept glazing and firing while ink film thereon are still wet.

A further object of this invention is to improve efficiency in decorating ceramics as well as to improve quality of ceramic decoration.

With these and other objects in view, the invention will be understood more fully by reference to the drawings, the accompanying detailed description and the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of an elastic membrane inktransfer element having open net portions and constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a second embodiment of an elastic membrane ink-transfer element having slit openings and also constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 3 is a transverse section of a pressing station showing the ink-transfer element of FIG. 1 in position relative to an inflatable annular balloon in preparation for transfer of the silk-screen printed ink film to a dish;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3, but with the annular balloon inflated to effect transfer of the ink film to the dish;

FIG. 5 is a transverse section of a pressing station showing the ink film-transfer element of FIG. 2 in position relative to an inflatable full diaphragm balloon in preparation for transfer of screen printed ink to a dish;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, but with the full diaphragm balloon inflated to effect transfer of the ink film to the dish;

FIG. 7 is a side elevation view of a pad ink-transfer element in accordance with this invention with a cup thereon;

FIG. 8 is an end view of FIG. 7.

Referring to the drawings in detail, it will be seen from FIG. 1 that an elastic membrane ink-transfer element A includes rigid flat base ring 5 that may be formed from any suitable metal or plastic and has central opening 6 of a diameter compatible with that of the ceramic piece of tableware to be decorated. A fine mesh net 7, formed from an elastomeric material such as elastic fabric (for example, latex rubber), spans opening 6 and has its peripheral edge portions secured adhesively to one face of base ring 5. A flat ring 8 of a suitable silicone rubber or the like, such as Silastic A RTV (a trademark), commercially available from Dow Corning Corporation, provides a total-release transfer surface and is secured to net 7 by being molded thereon or by a silicone contact adhesive, such as SR-516" (a trademark) commercially available from General Electric Silicone Products, which bonds ring 8 to net 7 sufficiently to permit multiple transfer operations, yet to permit ready stripping of ring 8 therefrom when the necessity for replacement ultimately arises. As used herein a total-release transfer surface is one such as silicone rubber and others of those covered in U.S. Pat. 3,255,695 to Mr. C.R. Johnson et al., which will accept the colorant by silk-screen printing thereon but will tend thereafter to repel the colorant therefrom. It should be noted that there are many elastic fabrics from which net 7 can be made. Elastic synthetic materials which stretch in all directions are preferred, but a net 7 made of any material capable of stretching in the desired manner and of relaxing back to the same position in base ring 5 and capable of accommodating openings sufficient to allow passage of air therethrough can serve as net 7. Construction of flat ring 8 of a suitable silicone rubber or the like secured to net 7 is here regarded to be expedient. However, it should be understood that it is also contemplated that ring 8 and net 7 may be integral and of a single material. For example, net 7 and fiat ring 8 could be made of a single material which is perforated or slitted in areas to which ink is not to be applied.

In order to disclose further the nature of this invention, first it will be assumed by way of example, that the cavity border of an unglazed ceramic dish is to be decorated with a ring of circle. Shaped figures 9a and 9b in two separate inks alternately arranged around the periphery of the dish. In this case two silk screens are prepared, one for each of the two inks to be applied, and one ink 9a will be squeegee applied to positions on silicone rubber ring 8 of a first elastic membrane inktransfer element A; and a second ink 911 will be applied to the silicone rubber ring of a second elastic membrane ink-transfer element A in proper rotationally offset relation to the positions of the first ink 9a. The elastic membrane ink-transfer elements are provided with notches 10 to index their rotational offset relationship.

At this stage an article to be decorated such as dish 1 l is secured in a station of any known ceramic printing machine that is modified in accordance with this invention (see FIGS. 1, 3 and 4) to include an air-inflated vacuum-deflated annular balloon 12 having a central opening 13 corresponding to the central cavity of dish 1 l and an external surface adapted generally to be congruent with the silicone rubber ring 8. For most effective transfer contact of the total-release transfer surface with the ware should be practically instantaneous, say for from 0.1 to 0.5 seconds and the total-release transfer surface should be removed quickly from contact with the ink film. Other means for contacting inktransfer elements to the ceramic article are also feasible.

The first ink-transfer element A is interposed and held securely between balloon 12 and dish 11 as shown in FIG. 3 after which balloon 12 is inflated quickly by air to the position indicated in FIG. 4 which displaces net 7 and silicone rubber ring 8 so that ink film 9a is brought into contact with the adjacent surface of dish 11. Air within the central cavity of dish 11 readily passes through the openings of elastic net 7 and central opening 13 of the balloon as the balloon inflates, thus avoiding any air pocket adjacent the printed surface of dish 1 l and permitting a total clean impression transfer of ink film 9a intact thereto. Because a total release of the ink film from the transfer surface of silicone rubber or the like ring 8 is desired, it has been found preferable to inflate balloon 12 via conduits 14 with air under sufficient pressure to create a firm impression of the ink and then to deflate the balloon by vacuum via conduits 14 in order to permit elastic net 7 quickly to relax to its normal planar configuration and thus quickly withdraw the total-release transfer surface of silicone rubber or the like ring 8 away from ink film 9a therefor.

Now, dish 11 is retained in position while the second ink-transfer element A is brought into and is held in the station so that an ink film on its total-release transfer surface similarly may be transferred to the dish, thus completing the shown design.

Using an analogous printing method, a light ink film 16a can be overprinted with a dark ink film 16b as shown in FIG. 1. Also as shown in FIG. 1, ink film 15a and 15b can be overprinted to produce color areas 15a, 15b and 150. For example, ink film 15a could be yellow and ink film 15b blue so that color area would be yellow, 15b blue and 150 green.

FIGS. 5 and 6 depict the station of the known ceramic printing machine of FIGS. 3 and 4 and further adapted for use with an ink-transfer element such as that shown as B in FIG. 2. The ink-transfer element of FIG. 2 includes rigid flat base ring 5 with central opening 6 of a diameter compatible with that of the ceramic piece to be decorated. A fine mesh net 7 formed from elastomeric material has its peripheral edge portions secured adhesively to one face of base ring 5. A flat disk 8 of silicone rubber or the like is secured to net 7 to provide a total-release transfer surface which has slits 17 in areas which ink film design 24 does not cover. As shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, full diaphragm balloon 18 is used with ink-transfer element B and the station of the ceramic printing machine is further provided with plug 19 to seal balloon 18. Ink-transfer element B is held firmly between balloon l8 and dish 11 as shown in FIG. 5 after which balloon 18 is inflated quickly by air entering via conduits 14 so that ink design 24 is brought into contact with the adjacent surface of dish 11 as shown in FIG. 6. Air is then exhausted quickly from balloon 18 via conduits l4 quickly to withdraw elastic net 7 and ring 8.

When the exterior of an article of tableware generally of cylindrical form is to be decorated, a pad type of inktransfer element C (see FIGS. 7 and 8) is used, because an ink film is transferred by rolling contact between pad C and the ware. Pad C comprises a rigid plastic or metal base having layer 21 of sponge rubber cemented to one surface and sheet 22 of silicone rubber or the like cemented to the exposed face of the sponge rubber. Design elements 23 of ink are silk screen printed onto silicone rubber 22 for subsequent transfer as a film to the ware to be decorated. Here again, the required number of pads are printed in advance and the ink film are applied successively to the ware without waiting for a previously-applied ink film to dry.

It will be understood further that inks (or other colorants) used with this method and apparatus must be of a special nature because 1. they cannot contain any solvent that would attach or react with the silicone rubber or the like total-release surface; 2. they must have suffrcient adhesive affinity for silicone rubber that they will remain in place when initially printed thereon; 3. they must have a sufficiently greater adhesive affinity for the ware to be decorated that they will not delaminate therefrom by contact with the bare areas of the silicone rubber of successively employed ink-transfer elements used to complete the design without waiting for any previously-applied ink film to dry; 4. they must be deposited as a thick layer on the ware; 5. they must strip cleanly from the silicone rubber or the like without leaving a mark thereon when the transfer step takes place; and 6. they must have a suitable viscosity to make a clear and well-defined print. This latter requirement will also vary with the mesh of the silk screen used. For example, a 380 mesh nylon screen will require a lower viscosity ink than will a 160 mesh screen.

The following are typical examples of ink formulae that are useful in the practice of this invention:

EXAMPLE I grams Under glaze color black L000 Dehydrated castor oil 250 Pine oil 25 Balsam of Copaiba 20 Butyl lactate 10 Olive oil 10 EXAMPLE II Under glaze color black [,000 Boiled linseed oil 250 Pine oil Olive oil 20 Butyl lactate 10 These inks are applied cool, that is at room temperature, and do not require elevated temperatures or close temperature control for proper application. As mentioned before, the inks may be so formulated in each case that they may be silk-screen printed onto the inktransfer elements well in advance of the actual transfer printing operation without affecting either the totalrelease characteristic of silicone rubber, or the property to transfer readily to the ceramic surface to be decorated or without premature drying to the degree that they are no longer useful. The constituents of these inks may be varied to accommodate scheduling of printing and transferring. Scheduling may be rapid as from 1 minute to 10 minutes after printing or delayed 2 or 3 hours. Volatile constituents are increased for rapid printing after transfer and these volatile constituents are reduced for delayed printing after transfer. Accordingly the pine oil and butyl lactate constituents are reduced to avoid drying. The 30 grams of pine oil suggested in Example ll would be reduced to 5 grams and the 10 grams of butyl lactate would be reduced to 2' grams for a longer waiting period; but when these constituents are so reduced, transferring cannot be effected before 5 minutes after printing. Accordingly the volatile constituents control duration after printing during which inks may be transferred from the totalrelease transfer surfaces.

The pine oil and butyl lactate of the preceding formulae may be substituted for by acrylic resins dissolved in varnish. These acrylic resins are very useful in ceramic decoration because as a medium or vehicle of the color they do not show defects in glazes or carbon residue in finished products. If used in the preceding formulae, acrylic resins must be added in the same proportion as the pine oil and butyl lactate (and no more) together with the other oils and pigments.

After application of the colorant to the tableware, the ware may have a glaze applied to it and thereafter the ware is tired. Under glaze decorated ware is fired at from 2,000 F. to 2,050F. for vitreous hotel ware and porcelain and from l,850 F. to l,900 F. for domestic nonvitreous ware. Over glaze decorated ware is fired at from l,375 F. to l,400 F. for precious metals and from l,425 F. to l,475 F. for ordinary over glaze colors. For hard over glaze colors a firing temperature of 1,550 F. is usually employed. Generally speaking the practical range for firing of tableware is from 1,200 F. to 2,200 F.

It is of course to be understood that variations in arrangements and proportions of parts and ingredients of this disclosure may be made within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A method for applying an oil-based relatively viscous colorant to an item of ceramic tableware and comprising steps of:

providing an element with a total-release transfer surface, silk-screen printing the colorant in a relatively thick layer onto the transfer surface,

providing for a time delay of from 1 minute to 3 hours for allowing the colorant layer to dry partially on the transfer surface so as to form a tacky skinlike film with cohesive integrity exceeding its bonding adhesion to the transfer surface,

causing intimate mechanical contact between the film and the item of ceramic tableware and thereafter withdrawing quickly the transfer surface from the film whereby the film is transferred in its entirety intact to the item,

firing the item at a temperature high enough to fuse the colorant.

2. The method according to claim 1 and the element discrete and portable,

performing the silk-screen printing at a first work station,

performing the intimate mechanical contact at a second work station, the first and second work stations spaced apart physically from each other.

3. The method according to claim 2 and providing a relatively large number of the elements,

providing a plurality of the second work stations.

4. The method according to claim 3 and providing an elastic membrane as the element, providing for gas passage through the membrane to improve the mechanical contact.

5. The method according to claim 3 and the totalrelease surface of silicone rubber cast on an elastic fabric net.

6. The method according to claim 3 and all of the steps conducted at room temperature.

7. The method according to claim 3 and the time delay in a range from minutes to 3 hours.

8. The method according to claim 2 and providing an elastic membrane as the element,

providing for gas passage through the membrane to improve the mechanical contact.

9. The method according to claim 2 and the totalrelease surface of silicone rubber cast on an elastic fabric net.

10. The method according to claim 2 and all of the steps conducted at room temperature.

11. The method according to claim 2 and the time delay in a range from 5 minutes to 3 hours.

12. The method according to claim 1 and providing an elastic membrane as the element,

providing for gas passage through the membrane to improve the mechanical contact.

13. The method according to claim 1 and the totalrelease surface of silicone rubber cast on an elastic fabric net.

14. The method according to claim 2 and all of the steps conducted at room temperature.

15. The method according to claim 1 and the time delay in a range from 5 minutes to 3 hours.

16. A method for applying a first and a second oilbased relatively viscous colorant to an item of ceramic tableware and comprising steps of:

providing a first element with a first total-release transfer surface,

silk-screen printing the first colorant in a relatively thick layer onto the first transfer surface, providing for a time delay of from 1 minute to 3 hours for allowing the first colorant layer to dry partially on the first transfer surface so as to form a tacky skinlike first film with cohesive integrity exceeding its bonding adhesion to the transfer surface, causing intimate mechanical contact between the first film and the item of ceramic tableware and thereafter withdrawing quickly the first transfer surface from the first film whereby the first film is transferred in its entirety intact to the item,

providing a second element with a second totalrelease transfer surface,

silk-screen printing the second colorant in a relatively thick layer onto the second transfer surface,

providing for a time delay of from 1 minute to 3 hours for allowing the second colorant layer to dry partially on the second transfer surface so as to form a tacky skinlike second film with cohesive integrity exceeding its bonding adhesion to the second transfer surface, causing intimate mechanical contact between the second film and the item of ceramic tableware and thereafter withdrawing quickly the second transfer surface from the second film whereby the second film is transferred in its entirety intact to the item,

firing the item at a temperature high enough to fuse the colorants.

17. The method according to claim 16 and the second film at least partially overlaying the first film on the item of ceramic tableware.

18. The method according to claim 17 and in which the total number of the elements is in excess of two and is equal to a total number of colorants to be applied to the item and in which each successive of the colorants is transferred to the item without waiting for previously transferred colorant on the item to dry.

19. The method according to claim 18 and providing elastic membranes as the elements,

providing for gas passage through each of the elastic membranes to improve the mechanical contact.

20. The method according to claim 18 and said totalrelease surfaces of silicone rubber cast on an elastic fabric net.

21. The method according to claim 18 and all of the steps conducted at room temperature.

22. The method according to claim 18 and the time delay in a range from 5 minutes to 3 hours.

23. The method according to claim 17 and providing elastic membranes as the elements, providing for gas passage through each of the elastic membranes to improve the mechanical contact.

24. The method according to claim 17 and the totalrelease surfaces of silicone rubber cast on an elastic fabric net.

25. The method according to claim 17 and all of the steps conducted at room temperature.

26. The method according to claim 17 and the time delay in a range from 5 minutes to 3 hours.

27. The method according to claim 16 and in which the total number of the elements is in excess of two and is equal to a total number of colorants to be applied to the item and in which each successive of the colorants is transferred to the item without waiting for previously transferred colorant on the item to dry.

28. The method according to claim 27 and providing elastic membranes as the elements,

providing for gas passage through each of the elastic membranes to improve the mechanical contact.

29. The method according to claim 27 and the totalrelease surfaces of silicone rubber cast on an elastic fabric net.

30. The method according to claim 27 and all of the steps conducted at room temperature.

31. The method according to claim 27 and the time delay in a range from 5 minutes to 3 hours.

32. The method according to claim 16 and providing elastic membranes as the elements, providing for gas passage through each of the membranes to improve the mechanical contact.

33. The method according to claim 16 and the totalrelease surfaces of silicone rubber cast on an elastic fabric net.

34. The method according to claim 16 and all of the steps conducted at room temperature.

35. The method according to claim 16 and the time delay in a range from 5 minutes to 3 hours.

* I! I I! UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,756,165 Dated September ll, 19?} Inventor( JOSG Valie 18 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said'L'etters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 2, line 36, "ink film" should read in films Column line 28, after "ink film 9a" delete therefor" Column 1;, line 36, "before 15a ink; film" should read ink films Column 5, line 9, "ink film" should read films Column 5, line 10, "ink film" should read ink films Column 5, line ll "attach" should read attack I In Example II the quantity 1,000 should be in the right hand column under grams, rather than the leit hand column.

Column 7, line 26, "claim 2" should read claim 1 Signed and sealed this 21st day of May 1971;.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWAR I'LFLETCERJR. 0 MARSHALL DAI- IN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-IOSO (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 u.s, eovgnnunn- PRINTING orrlc: In! OS6$-JSI,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2077790 *Apr 27, 1935Apr 20, 1937Ichiro HakogiMethod of and apparatus for printing on curved faced bodies
US2202465 *Jan 29, 1938May 28, 1940Pattison Herbert JGraining machine
US2739532 *Dec 9, 1954Mar 27, 1956 fernandez
US2745339 *Mar 19, 1951May 15, 1956Valiela Fernandez JoseApparatus for decorating concave and convex surfaces
US3255695 *Oct 16, 1963Jun 14, 1966Markem Machine CoMethod of printing and apparatus therefor
US3384508 *Jan 8, 1964May 21, 1968Corning Glass WorksMethod of glazing semicrystalline glass-ceramic articles and resultant intermediate layer containing composite
US3418926 *Mar 15, 1966Dec 31, 1968Tomi Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaApparatus for printing on curved surface body
US3511681 *Jan 15, 1968May 12, 1970Corning Glass WorksDecoration for ceramic articles
US3554836 *Jul 19, 1968Jan 12, 1971Minnesota Mining & MfgTransfer process
US3688695 *Feb 25, 1970Sep 5, 1972Murray Curvex Printing LtdMethod of offset printing or decorating an article with thermoplastic color
*DE1067448B Title not available
GB763572A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4035214 *Jul 21, 1975Jul 12, 1977American Can CompanyMulticolor, flexography
US4412487 *Dec 30, 1980Nov 1, 1983Wavin B.V.Apparatus for manufacturing a printed plastic article
US4501714 *Feb 24, 1983Feb 26, 1985Hutschenreuther AktiengesellschaftApplying a design during pressing
US5054390 *Jan 28, 1988Oct 8, 1991British Ceramic Research Association Ltd.Off-set printing by silk screening an intermediate surface and transferring the image to an article by an off-set pad
US5888251 *Apr 28, 1998Mar 30, 1999Aveda CorporationMethod of coloring hair or eyelashes with compositions which contain metal containing pigments and a copaiba resin
US6045589 *Feb 1, 1999Apr 4, 2000Aveda CorporationMethods of coloring hair or eyelashes with compositions which contain metal containing pigments and a copaiba resin
US6604458 *Apr 10, 2000Aug 12, 2003Laurent De VolderPressurized pad for printing three-dimensional spherical or curved objects
US6981445Dec 24, 2003Jan 3, 2006Axela Biosensors Inc.Method and apparatus for micro-contact printing
CN100540320CDec 22, 2004Sep 16, 2009爱克瑟拉有限公司Method and apparatus for micro-contact printing
WO2005061237A1 *Dec 22, 2004Jul 7, 2005Axela Biosensors IncMethod and apparatus for micro-contact printing
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/483, 101/41, 101/211
International ClassificationB41F15/08
Cooperative ClassificationB41F15/0895
European ClassificationB41F15/08J