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Publication numberUS3756170 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1973
Filing dateApr 30, 1971
Priority dateApr 30, 1971
Publication numberUS 3756170 A, US 3756170A, US-A-3756170, US3756170 A, US3756170A
InventorsJ Lang
Original AssigneeCare Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-pollution liquid waste burning incinerator
US 3756170 A
Abstract
An incinerator capable of effecting maximum combustion of flammable liquid waste material introduced therein with a minimum amount of exhaust. The incinerator requires a pressurized flame means to be directed at a detailed location across a flue entrance opening thereby producing a restrictive air block of the flue opening to increase the pressure within the combustion chamber. The pressurized flame means includes a mixing valve means for receiving and atomizing a supply of liquid waste material to be burned and includes means for directing the atomized liquid waste material past flame ignition means for igniting and burning the atomized liquid waste material. The incinerator includes means operable for preheating the liquid waste material prior to introducing into the mixing valve means. Steam generating means is operatively associated with said combustion chamber for generating a predetermined amount of steam in response to burning the liquid waste material. The steam generating means includes nozzle dispensing means operable for directing an amount of steam into flue means associated with the combustion chamber for filtering the fly ash from the exhaust passing through the flue means.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Lang Sept. 4, 1973 57] ABSTRACT An incinerator capable of effecting maximum combus- [75 Inventor: W Lang Lindale tion of flammable liquid waste material introduced [73] Assi n C I T l T therein with a minimum amount of exhaust. The incinerator requires a pressurized flame means to be di- [22] 1971 rected at a detailed location across a flue entrance [21] A L N 138,902 opening thereby producing a restrictive air block of the flue opening to increase the pressure within the combustion chamber. The pressurized flame means in- [52] 110/7 110/18 110/119 cludes a mixing valve means for receiving and atomiz- [51] [1.1L Cl. F23g 5/12 g a pp y of liquid waste material to be burned and [58] Fleld f Search 110/7 R, 8 A, 119, i l means for directing h atomized q i waste 8 R material past flame ignition means for igniting and burning the atomized liquid waste material. The incin- [56] References cued erator includes means operable for preheating the liq- UNI D ST S PATENTS uid waste material prior to introducing into the mixing 3,357,375 12/1967 Brophy 110/7 valve m n team generating means is operatively as- 3,508,505 4/1970 Gatewood 110/8 R sociated with said combustion chamber for generating 5, 5/1968 Allen /7 R a predetermined amount of steam in response to burn- 1,002,564 9/1911 Cole... 110/ ing the liquid waste material. The steam generating f g 110/10 means includes nozzle dispensing means operable for arver et a S directing an amount of steam into flue means associated with the combustion chamber for filtering the fly Pmfwry Examnfer-wllham O Dea ash from the exhaust passing through the flue means. Assistant Examiner-James C. Yeung Attorney-Newt0n, Hopkins & Ormsby 8 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures MR a L b a 23:5 1 73 i Z i 5:522 74 L a 312? E E i l sz z; 3 l 35:: ZZ -If? 2 70 .1 it *1 i '11 -ED =3?? T::" i i q ii '75 7 7/ z/ 12 s 50 5/ T 20 /0 59 s: 42 45 29 33 I g 5 5 5:: cg Q qqq: :giq: :Isgpyg 11kg: Q} 1 :9 c :9 3 3 $1: :3: 3 2 s i ANTI-POLLUTION LIQUID WASTE BURNING INCINERATOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to incinerators capable of burning liquid waste material. More particularly, this invention involves an anti-pollution incinerator which is effective in controlling the amount of byproducts of combustion introduced into the atmosphere.

In the oil industry, crude oil pumped from oil wells is normally placed in storage tank means prior to distillation for producing a number of refined oil products, such as kerosene, gasoline, etc. While the crude oil is being held in the storage tanks, a certain amount of material will settle to the bottom of the tank and is not removed therefrom in the refining process. The oil sediment in a storage tank is referred to as tank bottom. After a period of time, the sediment or tank bottom accumulated in the storage tanks must be removed. In the past, the oil sediment or tank bottom was removed from the storage tank and transferred to remote sediment ponds. After the sediment or tank bottom has been transferred to a sediment pond, the material is ignited and burned. However, due to increasing amounts of combustion, our atmosphere is being heavily polluted, causing many areas to adopt strict burning codes to prevent the burning of waste products in sediment ponds.

A number of attempts have been made to provide incinerator means which would burn liquid waste materials such as sediment from crude oil. These prior art incinerator means produced an excessive amount of combustion by-products which would not satisfy strictly enforced burning codes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The above disadvantages of the prior art have been overcome by the present invention which basically includes a substantially enclosed housing defining two internal cavity areas, one cavity area operable as a combustion chamber and a second cavity area operable as a preheat chamber. The combustion chamber includes flue means operatively associated therewith for exhausting by-products of combustion therethrough. An important feature of the present invention is the detailed location of a pressurized flame means relative to an entrance opening into the flue means whereby a restrictive air block is produced across the flue entrance opening thereby increasing the pressure within the combustion chamber. The pressurization of the combustion chamber improves the combustion efficiency to substantially reduce the amount of by-products of combustion exhausted into the atmosphere.

Another feature of the present invention is the provision of a shroud or shield means around the flue entrance opening to define an exhaust passageway into the flue means and wherein the pressurized flame means is located for directing the flame through the exhaust passageway.

An additional feature of the present invention is the provision of the preheat chamber for heating the liquid waste by-products to be burned and including means for transferring the preheated liquid waste to a burner means having mixer valve means capable of atomizing the liquid waste material. The burner means includes pressure developing means and flame ignition means operatively associated therewith for igniting and buming the liquid waste material and for directing the pressurized flame into the combustion chamber.

It is therefor a primary object of the present invention to provide an incinerator means capable of effecting a maximum combustion of liquid waste material placed therein with a maximum amount of exhaust.

Another object of this invention is to provide an incinerator means which includes a pressurized combustion chamber.

A further object of this invention is to provide a pressurized flame means operable for producing apressure within a combustion chamber.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a controlled entrance of exhaust into a flue means to reduce the amount of combustion by-products exhausted into the atmosphere.

Still another object of this invention isto provide incinerator means having means for preheating liquid waste material to be incinerated.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide an incinerator housing means having a combustion chamber and a preheat chamber with means for transferring heat from the combustion chamber to the preheat chamber.

Another object of this invention is to provide steam generating means operatively associated with the combustion chamber and including means for dispensing a quantity of steam into the combustion chamber flue means for washing the fly ash from the exhaust passing therethrough.

A further object of this invention is to provide, a burner means operatively associated with a combustion chamber which is effective for atomizing liquid waste material introduced therein and. including ignition means for burning the atomized material.

An additional object of this invention is to provide an incinerator means which is simple in construction and operation, economical to manufacture and reliable in performance.

These and other objects and advantages of the details of construction will become apparent upon reading the following description of the illustrative embodiment embodying the principles of the present invention, with reference to the attached drawing; wherein like reference numerals have been used to refer to like parts throughout the several figures, and wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an incinerator embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially longitudinally through the incinerator of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a horizontal sectional view tqken along lines DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawing, "the illustrative embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to an incinerator housing 10, flue means 40 burner means 50 preheat tank and steam generating means 90.

The function of the housing is to provide a supporting structure operative for supporting the flue means 40, burner 50 preheat tank 70 and steam generating means 90 in operative association relative to each other.

The function of the flue means 40 is to exhaust unburned by-products of combustion from within the combustion chamber.

The function of the burner means 50 is to provide means for atomizing the liquid waste material and including means for igniting and burning the liquid wastematerial.

The function of the preheat tank 70 is to provide a storage means for containing a quantity of liquid waste material to be incinerated and including means for preheating the liquid waste material sufficiently to have a viscosity capable of being introduced into a mixer valve of the burner means and atomized therein.

The function of the steam generating means 90 is to provide means operatively associated with the incinerator for developing steam in response to an incinerating operation and including dispensing means for washing fly ash from exhaust passing through the flue means, to prevent the fly ash from being transferred into the atmosphere.

As shown in FIGS. 1-4, the housing 10 is of substantially rectangular construction having a base or bottom wall 11, a pair of side walls 12, 13, a pair of end walls l4, l5 and a top wall 16. The wall structures ll-l6 are constructed of conventional metal stock material and are joined together by conventional means, such as welding (not shown), to define an internal cavity area. The incinerator internal cavity area includes a transverse wall structure l7 extending between side walls 12, 13 and bottom and top walls 11, 16 to define two cavity areas 18, 19. Cavity area 18 is operative as a combustion chamber and cavity area 19 is operative as a preheat chamber. Transverse wall 17 is provided with an opening 20 to define a passageway between combustion chamber 18 and preheat chamber 19, to allow heat developed in the combustion chamber to be transferred into the preheat chamber. Opening 20 is formed in a lower portion of transverse wall 17, adjacent bottom wall 11 and located substantially centrally thereof. Wall structures 11-17 are provided with a conventional refractory lining 33.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, adjacent closure means is provided for changing the effective size of opening 20. The closure means includes a pair of doors 21, 22. Doors 21, 22 are supported in a substantially vertically oriented relationship parallel to wall 17 by a transverse support shaft 23. Supporting shaft 23 is joumaled at its opposite end for rotation within the side walls 12, 13. Shaft 23 is provided with a set of left handed threads 24 and a set of right handed threads 25. The left handed threads 24 are threaded through a pair of bracket means 26 fixed to an upper edge of door 21. The right handed threads are threaded through a pair of brackets 27 fixed to an upper edge of door 22. The bracket means 26, 27 are provided with internal threaded portion complementary to the external threaded portions 24, 25. As shown in FIG. 2, the lower end of doors 21, 22 are trapped between a surface of Wall 17 and an angle bracket 29 fixed to the supporting base 11. Angle bracket 29 is detailed in location relative to transverse wall 17 to provide a guide track means for the lower edges of doors 21, 22 whereby they can be laterally adjusted relative to each other.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, shaft 22 extends through side wall 12 and includes a handle control means 30 fixed thereto. Handle control means 30 is operative for effecting rotation of shaft 23. Doors 21, 22 are detailed in lateral dimension such that when they are moved to a fully closed position, in abutting contact with each other, they will completely close opening 20 and when they are moved to their extended lateral spaced position, the doors 21, 22 will completely unmass opening 20.

As shown in FIG. 1, rotation of the handle control means 30 in a counterclockwise direction will effect movement of doors 21, 22 to their fully open position and rotation of the control handle 30 in a clockwise direction will effect movement of the doors to their fully closed position.

Incinerator 10 is supported by a pair of skid elements 31, 32. Skid elements 31, 32 are constructed of con' ventional I-beam material and are mounted in parallel relationship underneath the incinerator bottom wall 11. Skids 31, 32 are operable for supporting the incinerator and for providing the effective means for skidding or moving the incinerator from one location to another location.

Incinerator 10 is provided with flue means 40 including a flue stack 41 supported in the incinerator top wall 16. Flue stack 41 is supported in vertically oriented relationship adjacent end wall 14. Flue stack 41 is detailed to define an axially extending passageway 42 extending therethrough and having a lower depending end defining an entrance opening 43. Entrance opening 43 is directed into an exhaust passageway formed by a shroud or shield means 44. The shroud means 44 includes a pair of space vertically extending parallel arranged wall structures 45. Wall structures 45 extend from adjacent bottom 1 l upward to a position adjacent flue stack entrance opening 43. A top wall structure 46 is provided adjacent the upper extended ends of wall structures 45. Top wall structure 46 is oriented in substantially horizontal relationship and extends around the flue stack entrance opening 43. Wall structures 45, 46 extend from end wall 14 forward to a point located slightly ahead of the flue stack entrance opening 43, as shown in FIG. 2.

The shroud means 44, including the wall structure 45 and 46, defines an exhaust passageway 48 for directing exhaust fumes into the flue stack entrance opening 43.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 5, the incinerator 10 includes a flame producing burner means 50. Flame producing burner means 50 is mounted on the incinerator end wall 14 and includes a nozzle 51 extending through end wall 14 and into the combustion chamber 18. The flame producing burner means 50 is detailed in location on the end wall 14 such that the nozzle 51 is located within the exhaust passageway 48 and positioned substantially midway between the shroud wall structures 45. The burner nozzle 51 is detailed in angular location within the end wall 14, such that a flame directed therefrom will extend along a path which is disposed in angular relationship relative to the lower peripheral edge of flue stack entrance opening 43. The angular relationship of the burner nozzle 51 relative to flue stack entrance opening 43 is detailed such that a pressurized flame extending across opening 43 will produce an air block restricting the flow of air through exhaust passageway 48, into opening 43 and along the flue stack passageway 42. The restriction of air flow into flue stack 41 will produce a pressure within the chambers 18, 19. The pressurization of the combustion chamber 18 will improve the burning of material located therein and will effectively eliminate any expelling of unburned pollution material through the flue stack into the atmosphere.

The optimum angular relationship between the plane of flue stack opening 43 and the path of flame nozzle 51 is approximately degrees with an angular tolerance of plus or minus 3 degrees. Should the angular relationship between burner nozzle 51 and flue stack entrance opening 43 be decreased below a predetermined angle, the burner nozzle will have a tendency to direct a flame and an excessive amount of exhaust material up through the stack 41. Should the angular relationship between burner nozzle 51 and flue stack entrance opening 43 be increased beyond a predetermined angle, the burner nozzle 51 will have an effect of producing a down draft through flue stack 41, thereby decreasing the effective incineration within combustion chamber 18.

Referring now particularly to FIG. 5, the flame producing burner means 50 includes a mixing valve chamber 52 operable for mixing liquid waste material entering through conduit 53 with air pressure entering mixing chamber 52 through conduit 54.

The internal cavity of mixing chamber 52 includes an elongated axially extending deflecting rod 55 having a flared end portion 56. Pressurized air introduced into conduit 54 will be directed outwardly through openings 57 formed around the circumference of rod 55. The pressurized air will flow axially along deflecting rod 55 and will be radiated outwardly by the flared end portion 56. Droplets of liquid waste material entering the conduit 53 will be trapped by the axial air flow along rod 55 and will be atomized as the air and droplets of liquid material pass over the flared end portion 56. Valve chamber 52 includes a formed portion 52a located on the upstream edge of conduit 53. The axial air flow through mixing valve 52 produces a vacuum downstream of formed portion 52a, which helps the flow of liquid waste material therethrough.

As shown in FIG. 2, pressurized air is generated by a conventional blower means 58 which is connected in flow communication with conduit 54 for directing a predetermined amount of air under pressure therethrough. Theconventional air blower means 58 includes conventional power input and control means.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 5, the mixing valve means 52 includes nozzle means 59 operatively associated therewith for introducing an amount of starter fuel. The starter fuel introduced through nozzle 59 is a highly flammable gas, such as butane, and will include conventional valve control and pilot light means (not shown) operatively associated therewith. The nozzle means 59 is operable for producing a first pressurized flame within the combustion chamber 18 for heating the combustion chamber 18 and preheat chamber 19 to a predetermined temperature. After the liquid waste material contained in the preheat chamber has been sufficiently heated, as will be described in more detail hereinbelow it is introduced into the mixing valve 52. The highly flammable gas introduced through nozzle 59 will then be reduced to a pilot light operable for igniting the atomized liquid waste material, causing the liquid waste material to be burned by a flame forced outwardly by pressure through the flame nozzle 51.

As shown in FIGS. 1-3, a preheat tank is operatively associated with the preheat chamber 19 for containing a predetermined amount of liquid waste material to be burned. Preheat tank 70 is operable for heating the liquid waste material to a proper temperature for the waste oil to flow easily through conduit means into the burner means 50.

As shown in FIG. 2, the preheat chamber 19 is pro vided with an upward opened area adapted to receive the preheat tank 70. Preheat tank 70 is of substantially rectangular construction having a bottom wall 71, upstanding side walls 72, 73 and end walls 74, 75. The preheat tank 70 is provided with atop 76 which is connected around the upper edges of the wall structure 72-75 to provide a substantially enclosed cavity area for receiving and containing liquid waste material to be preheated. The preheat tank 70 is constructed of conventional metal stock material with the edges thereof being joined together by conventional means, such as welding. The top 76 of preheat tank 70 is connected to incinerator top 16 in such a manner as to provide a sealing relationship around the edges thereof, to prevent exhaust material from escaping into the atmosphere. The preheat tank top 76 is provided with a movable closure means 77 pivotally secured thereto by conventional hinge means 78 and includes a releasable latch means 79. The closure means 77 is provided to allow entrance into the preheat tank for the purpose of cleaning material therefrom when needed.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the preheat tank 70 is provided with conduit means 80 adapted to be connected to liquid waste supply means for introducing the liquid waste material to be burned into the preheat tank. A conventional temperature gage means 81 is operatively associated with the preheat tank for indicating the temperature of liquid waste material heated therein. Conventional breather means 82 is supported in the preheat tank top portion 76 and is operatively associated therewith for venting the preheat tank to allow expansion of the liquid waste material located therein during a preheat operation.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, a conduit means 84 is connected at one end in fluid flow communication with preheat tank 70, adjacent a lower edge of end wall 74. An opposite end of conduit 84 is connected to the burner nozzle conduit means 53 whereby liquid waste material heated in the preheat tank 70 can flow through conduit means 84 into the burner nozzle conduit 53 and into the mixing chamber 52.

Conventional valve control means 85 is provided at an intermediate portion of conduit 84 for effecting opening and closure of the passageway extending through conduit 84, whereby the flow of liquid waste material from the preheat tank 70 into the burner nozzle 50 can be regulated.

A steam generating means is. operatively associated with the incinerator 10 for generating steam in response to heat being developed in the combustion chamber 18. The steam generator includes an elongated cylindrical tank means 91 supported in the incinerator top 16, above the combustion chamber 18. The elongated tank means 91 is constructed of conventional metal stock material and is sealed to the top 16 around the edges thereof to prevent leakage of exhaust material into the atmosphere.

As shown in FIG. 4, a supply of water is introduced into the steam generating tank 91 by a supply conduit 92. Supply conduit 92 includes a conventional valve control means 93 operatively associated therewith for regulating the flow of water into tank 91. The steam generating tank 91 could be provided with conventional automatic valve means (not shown) operatively associated with the supply conduit 92 whereby the liquid level within the steam generating tank could be maintained at a predetermined level.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the incinerator 10 includes a dispensing nozzle 94 connected in flow communication between the flue stack passageway 42 and steam generator means 90 whereby a predermined amount of steam can be dispensed into the flue stack passageway for washing any fly ash from the exhaust being expelled therethrough into the atmosphere. Dispensing nozzle 94 includes conventional valve control means 95 operatively associated therewith for regulating the amount of steam dispensed into the flue stack means.

Steam generating means 90 includes an output supply conduit means 96 having a conventional releasable fluid flow connection means 97 operatively associated therewith whereby additional steam supply conduit means can be connected thereto for supplying steam for other purposes, such as conventional steam cleaning apparatus. A temperature indicating means 98 and pressure regulator means 99 are connected to the steam supply conduit 96 for use in controlling a safe operation of the steam generating means.

OPERATION Prior to initiating a liquid waste incenerating operation, an amount of liquid waste material such as oil tank bottom is pumped into the preheat tank through supply conduit 80. With an amount of oil tank bottom" located in the preheat tank 70, the control means for introducing the butane starter gas into the blower nozzle is opened allowing a conventional pilot light means to ignite and burn the starter gas. Simultaneous with the introduction of the starter gas, the blower means 58 is started by conventional automatic control means to direct the burning starter gas past the vent stack opening 43 and through the exhaust passageway 48. In a burning operation of the starter gas, the burner nozzle 51 will restrict the flow of exhaust material in the flue entrance opening 43 thereby increasing the pressure within the combustion chamber 18. Heat developed in the combustion chamber 18 will be transferred through opening 20 into the preheat chamber 19 to thereby preheat the liquid waste oil. After the liquid oil in preheat tank 70 has reached a predetermined temperature, to allow it to flow freely through the conduit 84, the control valve 85 is adjusted to allow a predetermined amount of the liquid waste oil to flow therethrough into the mixture valve 50. Droplets of liquid waste entering the mixer chamber 52 will be directed axially therethrough into contact with the deflecting rod flared end portion 56. The pressurized air moving axially through mixer valve 52 will atomize the liquid waste material to form an effective mist which will be directed across the path of the flame ignition burn nozzle 59. After the starter fuel heats the preheat tank to a proper temperature for the waste oil to flow into the mixer valve 52 and the burning of the atomized liquid waste oil is ignited, the supply of butane starter gas will be reduced substantially to a pilot light, thus igniting the atomized liquid waste material. As the liquid waste oil continues to burn and is forced outwardly by air pressure through nozzle 51, the burning of the waste oil will maintain the preheat tank at a proper temperature to continue the flow of liquid waste material through conduit 84.

In operation of the incenerator 10, the closure means, including door elements 21, 22 can be adjusted to effectively regulate the amount of heat transferred from the combustion chamber 18 into the preheat chamber 19, in order to control the temperature of the liquid waste material in the preheat tank 70.

The pressurization of the combustion chamber 18 due to the pressurized flame passing at the specific location across flue entrance opening 43, will increase the effective combustion of the liquid material introduced therein and thereby eliminate the expelling of undesirable fumes and by-products of combustion through the flue stack passageway 42 into the atmosphere. The liquid waste material pumped through supply conduit can be manually controlled or the preheat tank 70 can be provided with automatic flow control means which will maintain the liquid waste material at a predetermined elevation.

Prior to initiating a liquid waste burning operation, the steam generating means is supplied with an amount of water either automatically or manually. The heat from the combustion chamber 18 will generate steam in tank 91 which can be ejected through nozzle 94 into the flue stack passageway 42 for aiding in controlling polution, as indicated hereinabove. The steam generated in the tank 91 can also be used to operate conventional steam cleaning equipment.

It now becomes apparent that the above described illustrative embodiment embodying the principles of the present invention is capable of obtaining the above stated objects and advantages. It is obvious that those skilled in the art may make modification in the details of construction without departing from the spirit of the invention which is to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is 1. An incinerator capable of effecting maximum combustion of flammable liquid waste material introduced therein with a minimum amount of exhaust comprising, in combination:

a. means defining a combustion chamber;

b. pressurized burner means operatively associated with said combustion chamber, said burner means including mixing valve means, pressure means, and flame ignition means, with said mixing valve means detailed for receiving liquid waste material to be burned, said pressure means operable to atomize said liquid waste introduced into said mixing valve means and said flame ignition means operable to ignite and effect combustion of said atomized liquid waste material, and wherein the flame created by said burning liquid waste material is directed under pressure by said pressure means into said combustion chamber;

0. flue means operatively associated with said combustion chamber for conveying the unburned byproducts of combustion from said combustion chamber;

d. means operatively associated with said incinerator for developing a pressure within said combustion chamber during said liquid material burning operation whereby said-by-products of combustion will be maintained in said combustion chamber until said by-products have been reduced to a minimum;

e. said incinerator including a preheat chamber, said preheat chamber including a preheat tank support therein for containing an amount of liquid waste material to be burned, said preheat tank and said preheat chamber being operatively associated with said combustion chamber whereby said heat generated in said combustion chamber will effect a heating of said liquid waste material in said preheat tank, and

f. said incinerator means including a preheat opening located between said combustion chamber and said preheat chamber, and

g. adjustable closure means operatively associated with said preheat opening and operable for changing the effective size thereof.

2. An incinerator as in claim 1 wherein said adjustable closure means comprises a pair of doors and screw means for moving said doors simultaneously toward and from each other.

3. An incinerator capable of effecting maximum combustion of flammable liquid waste material introduced therein, with a minimum of amount of exhaust comprising, in combination:

a housing defining at least two internal cavity areas, one cavity area operable as a combustion chamber and including burner means operatively associated therewith for burning material introduced therein, a second cavity area operable as a preheat chamber and including means for containing a predetermined amount of material to be heated and including means for transferring said preheated material from said preheat chamber to said combustion chamber to be burned by said burner means and wherein said housing includes means for transferring heat developed in said combustion chamber to said preheat chamber for heating material contained therein, said transfer means including an opening formed in said housing between said combustion chamber and said preheat chamber whereby heat developed in said combustion chamber can be transferred therethrough into said preheat chamber, and adjustable closure means associated with said opening and operable for changing the effective size thereof.

iii

4. An incinerator for combustion of flammable waste material comprising, a housing defining at least two internal cavity areas, one such area being operable as a combustion chamber and the other as a preheat chamber, means for introducing waste material into a container in said preheat chamber, a flue opening through the top of said combustion chamber at a point spaced from said preheat chamber, means for atomizing liquid waste material with air, means for igniting said atomized mixture to produce a pressurized flame, means for directing said flame into said combustion chamber across and directly below the opening of said flue and downwardly at an angle of not less than about seven nor more than about thirteen degrees with the horizontal, said combustion chamber having an opening connecting said combustion chamber and preheat chamber adjacent the bottoms of said chambers, said burner being directed toward said last mentioned opening, and adjustable means for wholly or partially closing said last mentioned opening between the combustion chamber and preheat chamber.

5. An incinerator as in claim 4 wherein said closure means includes a pair of slidable doors and means for simultaneously moving said doors toward and from each other.

6. An incinerator as in claim 4 further including a boiler located in said combustion chamber and means for supplying steam from said boiler to said flue.

7. An incinerator as in claim 5 wherein said shifting doors include axially aligned oppositely threaded openings and a member having correspondingly oppositely threaded portions is engaged in said openings, whereby rotation of said member will move said doors toward or from each other.

8. An incinerator as in claim 4 wherein said atomizing means comprises a cylindrical barrel closed at one end and opening at its other end into said combustion chamber, means for introducing waste material axially into said barrel through a conduit passing through said closed end and having an outwardly flaring opening, and a deflecting rod having a pointed end portion aligned with and spaced from said flared opening, said rod having a cylindrical body portion and a flared end portion at its end opposite said pointed end portion, said rod terminating short of the open end of said barrel.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4129081 *Sep 22, 1977Dec 12, 1978Etablissements P. Ferbeck & VincentRotary injector for liquid residue incinerating furnace
US5385402 *Aug 23, 1994Jan 31, 1995Sumter Transport, Inc.Hazardous waste transportation and disposal
US5626423 *Jan 30, 1995May 6, 1997The Maitland CompanyApparatus and method for transporting and agitating a substance
US6333446 *Apr 20, 1993Dec 25, 2001The Maitland Company, Inc.Hazardous waste transportation and disposal
US6532684Jul 9, 2001Mar 18, 2003General Electric CompanySystem for cleaning pressurized containers
US6539961 *Oct 12, 2000Apr 1, 2003General Electric CompanySystem for cleaning pressurized containers such as mobile railcars
US6635119 *Oct 12, 2000Oct 21, 2003General Electric CompanyInjecting heated nitrogen gas to vaporize; venting, incineration
US6641297Nov 5, 2001Nov 4, 2003Robert M. RumphHazardous waste transportation and disposal
US6758913Oct 12, 2000Jul 6, 2004General Electric CompanyInjecting quantity of heated nitrogen gas into pressurized container containing anhydrous ammonia to form anhydrous ammonia/nitrogen mixture, venting mixture to flare, repeating until concentration of ammonia equals 10,000 ppm or less
US6793740Jul 9, 2001Sep 21, 2004General Electric CompanyMethod for cleaning pressurized containers containing moisture sensitive chemicals
US6926776Jul 9, 2001Aug 9, 2005General Electric CompanyMethod for cleaning pressurized containers containing chlorine gas or sulfur dioxide gas
US20100086886 *Mar 2, 2008Apr 8, 2010Johnson Leighta MMethod and apparatus for oxy-fuel combustion
Classifications
U.S. Classification110/238, 110/219, 588/900, 110/215, 110/119
International ClassificationF23G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23G7/008, Y10S588/90
European ClassificationF23G7/00H