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Publication numberUS3756253 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1973
Filing dateDec 17, 1971
Priority dateDec 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3756253 A, US 3756253A, US-A-3756253, US3756253 A, US3756253A
InventorsHonda M, Kawabe K, Miyazawa S
Original AssigneeMitsubishi Acetate Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cellulose acetate fiber tobacco smoke filter and process of manufacturing the same
US 3756253 A
Abstract
A tobacco smoke filter effective for removing harmful and irritating substances from the tobacco smoke comprises a rod-like cellulose acetate fiber mass and a lubricant applied to the fiber mass and comprising a polyalkylene glycol-fatty acid-succharose ester ether of the formula:
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ed States ate Honda et a1.

[ 1 Sept. 4, 1973 CELLULOSE ACETATE FIBER TOBACCO SMOKE FILTER AND PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING THE SAME [73] Assignee: Mitsubishi Acetate Company Limited, Tokyo, Japan [22] Filed: Dec. 17, 1971 [21] Appl. No; 209,434

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Dec. 18, 1970 Japan 45/113215 [52] US. Cl. 131/267, 131/269 [51} Int. Cl A241) 15/02 [58] Field of Search 131/261, 269

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,620,227 11/1971 Saito et a1 131/269 3,477,445 11/1969 Price et a1 131/267 3,443,566 5/1969 Yasuda et a1 131/267 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Organic Chemistry (Text) by Fieser and Fieser Third Edition pub. by The Reinhold Publishing Corp. New

York 1956, pages 412,413 and 41.4 cited.

Primary ExaminerMelvin D. Rein Attorney-James E. Armstrong et a1.

[5 7] ABSTRACT A tobacco smoke filter effective for removing harmful and irritating substances from the tobacco smoke comprises a rod-like cellulose acetate fiber mass and a lubricant applied to the fiber mass and comprising a polyalkylene glycol-fatty acid-succharose ester ether of the formula:

wherein one of R, to R is a polyalkylene glycol ether residue, at least one other is an acyl group having two to 19 carbon atoms and all the remainder are a hydrogen atom, and a polyglycerol-fatty acid ester in which the polyglycerol group has a degree of polymerization of two to three and the fatty acid has 12 to 22 carbon atoms, and, if desired, an edible mineral oil.

10 Claims, No Drawings CELLULOSE ACETATE FIBER TOBACCO SMOKE FILTER AND PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING THE SAME The present invention relates to a tobacco smoke filter and a process of manufacturing the same, more particularly, relates to a cellulose acetate fiber tobacco smoke filter containing a lubricant effective for removing substances harmful and irritating to health from the tobacco smoke and for enriching flavor and mildness of the tobacco smoke and a process of manufacturing the same.

In order to remove the harmful and irritating substances from the tobacco smoke, it is effective to filter the tobacco smoke through a filter composed of cellulose acetate fibers, filter paper, activated carbon, silica gel, polyethylene glycol or a composition of two or more of the above materials. Especially, it is wellknown that the cellulose acetate fiber is a very effective material for removing nicotine, tar and other substances harmful and irritating to health. Accordingly, the cellulose acetate fiber is generally utilized for man ufacturing a tobacco smoke filter.

In the manufacture of the tobacco smoke filter, it is necessary that the filter fibers have the following properties;

(1) high processability in the formation of filter tip from filament tow,

(2) high stability of filter form,

(3) high property of removed of harmful and irritating substance from the tobacco smoke, and

(4) a property of highly enriching the flavor and mildness of the tobacco smoke.

The tobacco smoke filter made of the filter fibers is required to have a pertinent smoke permeability and a high filtering efficiency to harmful and irritating substances such as tar, nicotine and other alkaloids.

Generally, the cellulose acetate filament tow usable for producing the tobacco smoke filter tips is prepared in a process wherein cellulose acetate flakes are dis solved into an organic solvent such as acetone, methylene chloride, and methanol, the solution is subjected to dry-spinning process, and then spun filaments are associated into a filament tow.

The filament tow thus produced is subjected to subsequent processing steps. In order to enhance the processability of the filament tow, the filament tow is generally impregnated with an aqueous emulsion containing a lubricant mainly consisting of mineral oil emulsified'by a neutral surface active agent.

Therefore, the lubricant is required to impart to the filament tow a high processability and stability in continuous drawing, winding and other steps, a high uniformity of crimp on the filament tow without skip which means non-crimped portions of about 3/16 inch to about [2/16 inch in length in the crimped filament, and a high opening property when the filament tow is opened'to a filament web. Further, it is desired that the lubricant enhance the effect of the filter tip on removal of nicotine, tar or other harmful and irritating substances, and increase the rigidity of the filter tip without increasing the resistance to smoke flow through the filter tip. Still further, it is preferable that the lubricant impart to the cigarette smoke an enriched flavor and mildness.

It is known that fatty acid saccharose ester is applied as a lubricant to the filament tow for tobacco smoke filter. However, it is difficult to apply the fatty acid saccharose ester lubricant to the filament tow uniformly due to low stability of the aqueous emulsion containing it.

That is, the low stability of the lubricant aqueous emulsion results in separation of the lubricant from the aqueous emulsion, so that the concentration of the lubricant in the aqueous emulsion changes with time and the separated lubricant deposits on the periphery of the roller disposed in the lubricant bath and carrying the aqueous emulsion to the filament tow.

Such non-uniform lubrication of the filament tow re sults in a number of disadvantages such as uneven crimps on the filament tow, high frictional resistance of the filaments to each other and to the processing device for example, the filament tow guide members, rollers and others, frequent breakages of the filament, and formation of numerous fibrils on the filament tows.

These disadvantages result in further uneven entanglements of the filaments in the tow and still further result in an unevenfilament web when the filament tow is opened.

When the tobacco smoke filter tip is made from an unevenly lubricated filament tow as above, there results frequent generation of electro-static charges on the filaments. The electro-static charge causes difficulty in rolling up of the filament web into a rod so that the rolling up operation is frequently stopped and the rolling up machine must be subjected to frequent regulation and cleaning thereof. Further, the tobacco smoke filters from the unevenly lubricated filament tow result in non-uniformity of the flavor and mildness of the tobacco smoke.

The inventors have searched for a long time for a neutral surface active agent effective for uniformly emulsifying the fatty acid saccharose ester and, if necessary, mineral oil into water without obstructing the beneficial properties of the fatty acid saccharose ester such as the ability to remove harmful and irritating substances from the tobacco smoke and the property of enriching the flavor and mildness of tobacco smoke.

From the study, it has been found that polyglycerine fatty acid ester is a neutral surface active agent suitable for use as the lubricant for the cellulose acetate filament tow.

One of objects of the present invention is to provide a cellulose acetate fiber tobacco smoke filter effective for removing harmful and irritating substances from tobacco smoke and a process of manufacturing the same.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a cellulose acetate fiber tobacco smoke filter effective for imparting enriched flavor and mildness to tobacco smoke and a process of manufacturing the same.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a cellulose acetate fiber tobacco smoke filter having a pertinent rigidity and resistivity against smoke flow and a process of manufacturing the same.

The tobacco smoke filter of the present invention comprises a short-length, rod-like cellulose acetate fiber mass and a lubricant applied to the cellulose acetate fiber mass and containing five to 35 parts by weight of a polyalkylene glycol-fatty acid saccharose ester ether of the formula:

wherein one of R,, R R R R R R and R represents a monovalent polyalkylene glycol ether residue, at least one other represents a monovalent acyl group having two to 19 carbon atoms and all the remainder represent a hydrogen atom, and five to 65 parts by weight of an ester of a fatty acid having 12 to 22 carbon atoms with a polyglycerin having a degree of polymerization of two to three.

The cellulose acetate fiber tobacco smoke filter of the present invention is manufactured by impregnating a cellulose acetate filament tow with an aqueous emulsion of a lubricant as mentioned above, crimping the filament tow, forming the crimped filament tow into tobacco smoke filter rod and cutting the rod into tips.

The fatty acid saccharose ester usable for the present invention is an ester ether of disaccharide having one polyalkylene glycol ether residue and one or more fatty acid ester residue, that is, a member of an acyl group, more concretely, in an ester ether of pyranose and furanose type disaccharide represented by the formula:

wherein one of R R R R R R R R is a monovalent polyalkylene glycol ether residue, at least one other of them is a monovalent fatty acid ester residue having two to 19 carbon atoms and all the remainder are a hydrogen atom.

In the saccharide ester ether, the fatty acid ester residue, namely, the acyl group may be selected from the group consisting of acid residues of lauric acid, coconut fatty acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, or beef tallow fatty acid, and the polyalkylene glycol ether reside may be an ether residue of polyethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, polyethylene-propylene glycol, polybutylene glycol and other polyalkylene glycol in which five to 30 mols of glycol units are polymerized.

The polyglycerine fatty acid ester usable for the present invention is prepared by the ester reaction of a fatty acid, for example, lauric acid, coconut fatty acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and beef tallow fatty acid with a polyglycerine having a degree of polymerization of two to three which is obtained by heatpolycondensation of glycerine at a high temperature. The lubricant usable for the present invention contains five to 35 parts by weight of the polyalkylene glycol fatty acid saccharose ester ether and five to 65 parts by weight of polyglycerine fatty acid ester, and if desired, a mineral oil usable as a food additive or medical additive. It is necessary that the edible mineral oil meets the Japanese Pharmacopoeia Standard Requirements as to phase, pH, contents of solid paraffins and sulfur compounds, nitronaphthalene test and sulfur color test and meets the U. S. Food Additive Standard Requirements as to the ultraviolet rays absorption test.

The lubricant usable for the present invention may contain certain neutral surface active agents other than the polyglycerine fatty acid ester and usable as a food additive and medical additive.

The lubricant is emulsified into water preferably in a concentration of 0.5 to l0 percent by weight and applied to the cellulose acetate filament tow so as to leave 0.5 to 5.0 percent of the lubricant based on the weight of the filament tow, on the filament tow.

The cellulose acetate filament tow thus lubricated is valuable for producing a tobacco smoke filter in a favourable condition and for obtaining tobacco smoke filter tips having high benefits in chemical and physical properties, that is, the removal of harmful and irritating substances from tobacco smoke and the enrichment of flavour and mildness of tobacco smoke.

In the manufacture of the tobacco smoke filter of the present invention, a cellulose acetate filament tow is impregnated with an aqueous emulsion containing a lubricant as stated hereinbefore so as to apply a desired amount of the lubricant to the filament tow, the impregnated filament tow is crimped at a desired crimp number by a crimper and then the crimped filament tow is formed into filter rod. In the formation of the filter rod, the crimped filament tow is conditioned to a desired moisture content, and opened into a filament web and rolled up with paper into a rod form using a filter plug making machine. The rod is cut into filter plugs and thereafter, further cut into filter tips of desired length.

The following specific examples will more particularly illustrate the present invention.

Example 1 A lubricant aqueous emulsion was prepared by emulsifying 3 percent by weight of a lubricant consisting of 25 parts by weight of polyoxyethylene palmitic acid saccharose ester ether wherein the polyoxyethylene group consisted of 20 mols of ethylene oxide, 15 parts by weight of polyglycerol laurate wherein the polyglycerol group had a degree of polymerization of three and 60 parts by weight of an edible mineral oil satisfying the Japanese Pharmacopoeia Standard and the U. S. Food Additive Standard and had an SSU viscosity of at a temperature of 37.8 C, into 97 percent by weight of water. The aqueous emulsion was charged into a lubrication bath having a rotatable roller lower half part of which was immersed in the aqueous emul- SlOl'l.

A cellulose acetate filament tow having a Y-shaped cross-sectional profile, a single filament denier of four and a total denier of 43,000 was impregnated with the aqueous emulsion by bringing the filament tow into contact with the rotatable roller periphery carrying the aqueous emulsion while continuously advancing it forwardly. By the above process, the lubricant was applied to the filament tow in a content of approximately of 0.8 percent based on the weight of the filament tow.

The filament tow thus impregnated was crimped by a crimper at a crimp number of approximately 18 crimps/25 mm, and the crimped filament tow was conditioned into a predetermined moisture content and thereafter, packed in a package box.

The filament tow was continuously drawn out from the package box and uniformly opened. Using a filter plug making machine, the open filament web was rolled up with paper to form a rod of 7.9 mm diameter and then the rod was cut into filter plugs of 102 mm length. The removal efficiency for alkaloid was determined- A filter plug was further cut to form it into filter tips of according to ultraviolet rays absorption spectrum anal- 17 mm length. ysis.

For comparison, three kinds of Comparison Exam- The organoleptic test was carried out by 20 panel l A, B and C were prepared by the same procedure 5 members with respect to the six items of flavor, taste, as above except that the lubr ca contained 110 P smell, mildness, general quality and others, and signifig y laul'ate (Comparison Example P Y Y' cant differences between the cigarettes for every item ethylene palmitic acid saccharose ester ether (Comparwere d d lson Example and P y y laul'ate and P Referring to Table I, it is clear that the lubricant of oxyethylene Palmitlc acid sacchal'ose ester ether Example 1 gives a higher stability to the aqueous emul- (Comparison Example sion, a more uniform appearance and a higher opening The filter tips from the present example and Comparproperty to the filament tow, a higher rigidity and ison Examples A, B and C were attached to cigarette moval efficiencies for tar and alkaloids to the filter tip ends by adhesive paper so as to obtain samples for orand richer mildness to the cigarette than those of Comganqlevtic test parison Examples A, B and C.

With respect to the present example and Comparison Examples A, B and C, the lubricant aqueous emulsions, E l 2 the impregnated filament tows, the filter tips and the cigarette with a filter tip were subjected to measure- The procedure of Example 1 was repeated us ng an ment in the items as shown in Table l. aqueous emulsion containing five percent by weight of Table 1 shows the results of the measurements. a lubricant consisting of 20 parts by weight of polyoxy- TABLE 1 Comparison example Material Item Example 1 A B C Emulsion Stability l. Excellent Good Goodl. Unstable.

Crimping property Good do do G d,

Appearance of crimped Substantially no skip. Small number of skips. Substantially no skip. Small number of skips. l'ilammit Tow tom Opening property. Weight (g.) .s Rigidity (1/10 mm. Resistivity against ve tl t .1-1 0 ae nioigii $212110; a 39.2 39.0 38.5 33.2.

tar (percent). Removal eificiency for 33.8 n 29.4 32.1 30.7.

alkaloids (percent). I Cigarette Organolcptic test R1011 mildness Good omewhat poor n1Ild- Poor mildness and a mess. slight oil-like smell.

Measuring methods for the items shown in Table l ethylene palmitic acid sacharose ester ether in which were as follows. the polyxoyethylene group consisted of 20 moles of The stability of the lubricant aqueous emulsion was ethylene oxide, 15 parts by weight of polyglycerol laudetermined by standing 3, 5 and 10 percent lubricant 40 rate in which the polyglycerol group had a degree of aqueous emulsions at a temperatures of 20, and polymenzimon of i by we'ght of y' 40 C for 10 days and observing changes during the ethylene P- m wh'ch the Y Y standing, and observed significant differences between group consisted of 15 P oxlfie and 55 the emulsions were recorded parts by weight of an edible mineral 01] which had an The crimping property of the filament tow and the SSU gz 9 C and sausfymg the P appearance of the crimped filament tow were deter- 32 g Standard and the Food mined according to the method of JIS L-l036, and sig- 1 we nificant differences between the filament tows were re- After the step cellulose acetatfi corded ament tow containing 1.0 percent of the lubricant based on the weight of the filament tow, was crimped at a crimp number of approximately 18 crimps/2S mm by a crimper. The crimped filament tow was conditioned into a predetermined moisture content and The opening property of the filament tow was determined using a Sleddit Roll type opening device, and significant differences between the filament tows were recorded. k d

The weight of the filter tips of 17 mm length was P36 6 mm a package measured, Filter tips similar to those of Example 1 were pre- Th i i i was expressed by the depth (in 0 mm) pared from the filament tow thus packed in the packof a recess formed on the periphery of the filter tip of age 17 mm length by pressing against it with a circle plate For comparison, a filter Up (Comparison Example D) of 12 mm diameter under a load of 300 was prepared by the same procedure as above using as The resistivity against ventilation was expressed by lubr'cam the mlxture of 'f Item of the pressure drop in mm "20 when the air was flowed Japanese Pat. No. 319,066, consisting of parts by through the filter tip of 17 mm length at a flow rate of weight of mirferal and 25 P by weight of a m]/Sec ture of sorbitan .rnonolaurate with poly-oxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate in which the polyoxyethylene group consisted of 20 mole of ethylene oxide in equiva' lent mol number.

The filter tips of Example 2 and Comparison Example D were attached to cigarette ends by adhesive The removal efficiency for tar was determined by 65 having a cigarette with a filter tip of 17 mm length smoked by an automatic smoking device and measuring the weights of the filter tip before and after smokmg. l

paper in order to prepare testing specimens for an organoleptic test.

With respect to Example 2 and Comparison Example D, the lubricant aqueous emulsions, impregnated filater tips of 12 mm length.

For comparison, the same procedure as above was repeated using a lubricant consisting only of the mineral oil same as above (Comparison Example E).

ment tows, filter tips and cigarettes with a filter tip were Th fil i f E l 3 d Comparison Exam- Subjec ed 1 measurement in the items 88 Show In ple E were attached to cigarette ends by adhesive paper Table 2. in order to prepare testing specimens for organoleptic Table 2 shows all the results of the measurements. test TABLE":

Material Item Example 2 Comparison Example D Emulsion Stability Excellent Good.

Crimping property. Goo Do. Filament tow Appearance of crimped tow. Substantially no skip... Substantially no skip.

Opening property Excellent Good. Weight (g.) 0.11 0.11, Rigidity (l/lOrnm.) 8. 8.5. Resistivityagainstventilation (mm. 29.7.... 29.2. Filter ti 2 I Removal efficiency for tar (percent). 26 24. Removal elliclcncy for alkaloids 22 21.

(pert-cut). Cigarette ()rgunoluntlc test Rich taste and good Good.

mildness.

Referring to Table 2, it is evident that the lubricant of Example 2 is superior in the stability of the aqueous emulsion, opening property of the filament tow, rigidity, resistivity against ventilating and removing efficiencies for tar and alkaloids of the filter tip and taste and mildness of the cigarette more than those of Comparison Example D.

Table 3 shows properties of the filter tips and the cigarettes of Example 3 and Comparison Example E. From the table, it is clear that the filter tips and the cigarettes of Example 3 are superior in rigidity, resistivity against ventilation, removal efficiencies for tar and alkaloids and organoleptic properties to those of Comparison Example E.

1 Rich taste and good mildness. I 2 Pool mildness and a slight oil-like smell.

Example 3 A cellulose acetate filament tow having regular crosssection, a single filament denier of 4 and a total denier of 55,000 was subjected to the same procedure as that of Example 1 using a 3 percent aqueous emulsion of a lubricant consisting of parts by weight of polyoxyethylene lauric acid saccharose ester ether wherein the polyoxyethylene group consisted of i2 mols of ethylene oxide, 20 parts by weight of polyglycerol laurate 'wherein said polyglycerol group had a degree of polymerization of two and 60 parts by weight of an edible mineral oil having an SSU viscosity of 120 at a temperature of 37.8 C and satisfying the Japanese Pharmacopoeia Standard and the U. S. Food Additive Standard. The cellulose acetate filament tow contained 1.0 percent of the lubricant based on the weight of the filament tow, crimped at a crimp number of approximately 18 crimps/ mm by a crimper, conditioned into a predetermined moisture content and then packed into a package box.

Thereafter, the filament tow was continuously drawn out from the package box and uniformly opened. Using a filter plug making machine, the open filament web was rolled up with paper to form a rod of 8.2 mm diameter, and the rod was cut into filter plugs of 72 mm length. The filter plug was further out to form it into fil- Example 4 The same procedure as that of Example 1 was repeated using a 5 percent aqueous emulsion of a lubricant consisting of 20 parts by weight of polyoxyethylene lauric acid saccharose ester ether in which the polyoxyethylene group consisted of 12 mols of ethylene oxide, 20 parts by weight of polyglycerol laurate in which the polyglycerol group had a degree of polymerization of two, 15 parts by weight of polyglycerol oleate in which the polyglycerol group had a degreeof polymerization of two, and 45 parts by weight of an edible mineral oil having an SSU viscosity of at 37.8 C and satisfying the Japanese Pharmacopoeia Standard and the U. S. Food Additive Standard. The cellulose acetate filament tow contained 1.0 percent of the lubricant based on the weight of the filament tow.

The properties of the resultant filter tip and the cigarette are illustrated in Table 4 shown below.

Example 5 The same procedure as that of Example 1 was repeated using a 5 percent aqueous emulsion of a lubricant consisting of 35 parts by weight of polyoxyethylene oleic acid saccharose ester ether in which the polyoxyethylene group consisted of 25 mols of ethylene oxide, 10 parts of polyglycerol oleate in which the polyglycerol group had a degree of polymerization of two and 55 parts by weight of an edible mineral oil satisfying the Japanese Pharmacopoeia Standard and the U. S. Food Additive Standard and having an SSU viscosity of 100 at 37.8 C. The cellulose acetate filament tow contained 1.3 percent of the lubricant based on the weight of the filament tow.

For comparison, the same procedure as above was repeated except that the lubricant consisted only of the mineral oil (Comparison Example F).

The resultant filter tips and the cigarettes of Example and Comparison Example F had the properties as shown in Table 4 below.

Example 6 which the polyglycerol group had a degree of polymerization of two, parts by weight of polyoxyethylene isostearate in which the polyoxye'thylene consisted of 15 mols of ethylene oxide and 70 parts byrweight of an edible mineral oil satisfying the Japanese Pharmacopoeia Standard and the U. S. Food Additive Standard and having an SSU viscosity of l at 37.8 C. The cellulose acetate filament tow contained 1.7 percent of the lubricant based on the weight of the filament tow.

The resultant filter tip and cigarette had the properties as shown in Table 4 below.

7 Example 9 15 The same procedure as that of Example 1 was re- The Same Procgdure as that of Example was peated using a 10 percent aqueous emulsion of a t d using a 5 percent aqueo eml1l$l0fl of a lubricant consisting of 20 parts by weight of polyprolubriCa consisting of 20 Parts y welght'of PQ Y Y' pylene glycol lauric acid saccharose ester ether in ethylene oleic acid saccharose ester ether in which the hi h h polypropylene glycol group had a molecular polyoxyethylene group consisted of mols of ethylene 20 weight of approximately 400, 20 parts by weight of oxide, 60 parts of polyglycerol laurate wherein t e polyglycerol laurate in which the polyglycerol group polyglycerol group had a degree of: polymerl p of had a degree of polymerization of two and 60 parts by twg d 20 parts by weight of an edible m e 011 weight of an edible mineral oil satisfying the Japanese isfying the Japanese Pharmocopoeia Standard and h Pharmacopoeia Standard and the u. 5. Food Additive 3, Food Additive Standard and having an SSU vls- 25 Standard and having an SSU viscosity of 120 at 37.8 cosity of l00 at 37.8 C. The cellulose acetate filament C. The cellulose acetate filament tow contained 1.0 tow contained 1.0 percent of the lubricant based on the percent of the lubricant based on the weight of the filaweight of the filament tow. ment tow.

The properties of the resultant filter tip and the ciga- The resultant filter tip and the cigarette had the proprette are shown in Table 4 below. erties as shown in Table 4 below.

" T TABLE d Example Comparison Example xample Material Item 4 5 F 6 7 8 0 {Weight 0.12 0.11 0.11 0.11 0.13 0.11 0.11 Rigidity (1/10 mm.) 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.5 8.3 8.3 8.4 Resistivity against ventilation 20.0 30.0 29.3 30.8 30.2 29.0 20.0 Filter tip (mm. H2O).

Removal elliciency for tor (percent)- 25 26 24 26 27 26 25 Removal cllicienoy for alkaloids 22 22 21 22 23 22 21 (percent). Cigarette Organoleptic test (i) (a) (1) Good l Rich mildness. I A little Oil-like smoll.

Rich taste and good mildncss.

Example 7 The same procedure as that of Example 1 was repeated using a 2.5 percent aqueous emulsion of a lubricant consisting of 30 parts by weight of polyoxyethylene palmitic acid saccharose ester ether in which the polyoxyethylene group consisted of 20 mols of ethylene oxide, 60 parts by weight of polyglycerol laurate in which the polyglycerol group had a degree of poly-' GHzO 1 IIZCORIS merization of two and 10 parts by weight of polyoxy- 11 0 01120115 ethylene isostearate in which the polyoxyethylene RQCFCQ g group consisted of 15 mols of ethyleneoxide. The cellufi fi lose acetate filament tow contained 3.0 percent of the A) J) I lubricant based on the weight of the fiber tow. The resultant filter tip and cigarette had the properties as shown in Table 4 below. wherein one of Rh R2. R3, R R5 R8. R7 and R" Example 8 represents a polyalkylene glycol ether residue, at least The same procedure as that of Example 1 was reone other of them represents an acyl group having two peated using a 10 percent aqueous emulsion of a to 19 carbon atoms and all the remainder represent a lubricant consisting of five parts by weight of polyoxyhydrogen atom, and five to 65 parts by weight of a polyethylene lauric acid saccharose ester ether in which the polyoxyethylene group consisted of 20 mols of ethylene oxide, 10 parts by weight of polyglycerol laurate in glycerine fatty acid ester in which the polyglycerine residue has a degree of polymerization of two to three and the fatty acid residue has 12 to 22 carbon atoms.

2. A tobacco smoke filter as claimed in claim 1, wherein said lubricant further comprises to 70 parts by weight of an edible mineral oil.

3. A tobacco smoke filter as claimed in claim 1, wherein the amount of said lubricant in said fiber bundle is 0.5 to 5.0 percent based on the weight of said fiber bundle.

4. A tobacco smoke filter as claimed in claim 2, wherein the amount of said lubricant in said fiber bundle is 0.5 to 5.0 percent based on the weight of said fiber bundle.

5. A tobacco smoke filter as claimed in claim 1, wherein said polyalkylene glycol ether residue is selected from the group consisting of the ether residues of polyethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, polyethylene-propylene glycol and poly-butylene glycol.

6. A tobacco smoke filter as claimed in claim 1, wherein said polyalkylene glycol ether residue consists of five to 30 moles of glycol units.

7. A tobacco smoke filter as claimed in claim 1, wherein said acyl group is selected from the group consisting of acid residues of lauric acid, palmitic acid stearic acid, oleic acid, coconut fatty acid and beef tallow fatty acid.

8. A tobacco smoke filter as claimed in claim 1, wherein the fatty acid residue of said polyglycerine fatty acid ester is selected from the group consisting of acid residues of lauric acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid,

oleic acid, coconut fatty acid and beef tallow fatty acid.

9. A process of manufacturing a cellulose acetate fiber tobacco smoke filter which comprises impregnating a cellulose acetate filament tow with an aqueous emulsion of a lubricant containing 5 to 35 parts by weight of a polyalkylene glycol fatty acid saccharose ether ester having the formula:

wherein one of R R R R R R R and R represents a polyalkylene glycol ether residue, at least one other of them represents an acyl group having two to 19 carbon atoms and all the remainder represent a hydrogen atom, and five to 65 parts by weight of a polyglycerine fatty acid ester in which the polyglycerine residue has a degree of polymerization of two to three and the fatty acid residue has 12 to 22 carbon atoms, crimping said impregnated filament tow and forming said crimped filament tow into tobacco smoke filter rods.

10. A process as claimed in claim 9, wherein said an edible mineral oil.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3443566 *Jul 29, 1965May 13, 1969KurarayonCigarette filters employing sugar esters
US3477445 *Oct 12, 1965Nov 11, 1969Celanese CorpNon-woven cigarette filter rod
US3620227 *Oct 13, 1969Nov 16, 1971Mitsubishi Acetate Co LtdTobacco smoke filter
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Organic Chemistry (Text) by Fieser and Fieser Third Edition pub. by The Reinhold Publishing Corp. New York 1956, pages 412,413 and 414 cited.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4171705 *Dec 17, 1976Oct 23, 1979Hoechst AktiengesellschaftCigarette filter
US6163895 *Aug 25, 1999Dec 26, 2000Davenport; Clyde F.Plunger apparatus
US6584979 *Apr 20, 2001Jul 1, 2003Philip Morris IncorporatedHigh efficiency cigarette filters having shaped microcavity fibers impregnated with adsorbent or absorbent materials
US6907885Feb 11, 2003Jun 21, 2005Philip Morris Usa Inc.High efficiency cigarette filters having shaped micro cavity fibers impregnated with adsorbent or absorbent materials
US7153447 *Jul 22, 2002Dec 26, 2006Emini ShefqetEmulsion for use as a lubricant in the production of threads, containing mineral oil and emulsifiers selected from sorbitan esters, polyglyerol esters, polyricinoleate
US8464728 *Sep 29, 2010Jun 18, 2013Innovia Films LimitedBiodegradable composites
EP1766115A2 *Apr 26, 2005Mar 28, 2007Celanese Acetate, LLCCellulose acetate tow and method of making same
EP1789615A2 *Apr 26, 2005May 30, 2007Celanese Acetate LLCCellulose acetate tow and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/343
International ClassificationA24D3/00, A24D3/14
Cooperative ClassificationA24D3/14
European ClassificationA24D3/14