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Publication numberUS3756520 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1973
Filing dateNov 9, 1970
Priority dateFeb 25, 1970
Publication numberUS 3756520 A, US 3756520A, US-A-3756520, US3756520 A, US3756520A
InventorsM Hughes
Original AssigneeCommercial Holdings Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glass pulverizer
US 3756520 A
Abstract
A glass pulverization apparatus including a cylindrical pulverization chamber having a pair of case hardened steel impeller blades located therein for pulverizing glass articles or the like. The peripheral speed and the unit torque of the impeller blades along with a gap maintained between the end of the respective impeller blades and the surface of the cylindrical pulverization chamber ensures rapid pulverization of glass articles or the like. An escape aperture, which is offset from a vertical line normal to the horizontal axis of the drive shaft that rotates the impeller blades, provides for a secondary means of determining the end size of the pulverized glass. A receiving chute is positioned at a 45 DEG angle to the cylindrical pulverization chamber to facilitate the rapid pulverization of the glass articles or the like.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Hughes Sept. 4, 1973 [54] GLASS PULVERIZER 3,035,621 /1962 Burchamm, 241/186 R 2,852,202 9/1958 Ditting et al.. 241/100 X [751 lnvemorg fggl g i l f 3,655,138 4 1972 Luscombe 241 99 a r l e, on y o H b k, ampshlre Put r00 England Primary Examiner-Robert L. Spru|ll [73] Assigneez Commercial Holdings (U.S.) AttorneyFranklin D. Jankosky Limited, Carmel, Calif.

[22] Filed: Nov. 9, 1970 [57] ABSTRACT 1 1 pp 87,777 A glass pulverization apparatus including a cylindrical pulverization chamber having a pair of case hardened For n A P D ta steel impeller blades located therein for pulverizing 1 F b 25 pglca Flor. y a 8 954 glass articles or the like. The peripheral speed and the e teat mam unit torque of the impeller blades along with a gap maintained between the end of the respective impeller 241/99 z blades and the surface of the cylindrical pulverization I00 R chamber ensures rapid pulverization of glass articles or 7 22 278 the like. An escape aperture, which is offset from a vertical line normal to the horizontal axis of the drive shaft that rotates the impeller blades, provides for a second- [56] References cued ary means of determining the end size of the pulverized UNITED STATES PATENTS glass. A receiving chute is positioned at a 45 angle to 2,308,578 1/ 1943 White et a1. 241/100 X the cylindrical pulverization chamber to facilitate the 'lg l l rapid pulverization of the glass articles or the like.

a 2,392,958 1/1946 Tice 241/188 R 2 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures PATENTEDSEP 4191s 3. 756, 520

M/CH/J EL EDW/N HUGHES INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY GLASS PULVERIZER FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the destruction of glass articles or the like, and more particularly to the rapid pulverization of glass articles or the like to safe, compact, easy to handle bulk form.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART Glass bottle-breaking machines have been in use for a number of years. There have been simple machines that employ a pair of rotor blades to randomly strike the bottle to pieces, and there have been added features on similar type machines, such as, means for initiating the rotation of the rotor blades upon the insertion of the bottle into the input of a feed hopper. There have also been machines that utilize a complex arrangement of crushing rollers in combination with an anvil and a rotating cutter to crush glass bottles. In addition, rotating drums having extended teeth-like members have been employed to crush glass bottles. However, all of these machines were relatively slow and produced an end product of glass chips which was bulky, harmful, and not suitable for most recycling applications.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a glass pulverization apparatus to rapidly pulverize a large quantity of glass articles or the like in a relatively short period of time.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a glass pulverization apparatus for pulverizing glass articles or the like into a safe, compact, easy to handle bulk form.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a glass pulverization apparatus for pulverizing glass articles or the like into a powder-like form.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a glass pulverization apparatus which pulverizes glass articles or the like to a useable size for recycling tiles, roadways, etc.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the objects set forth above, this invention provides a glass pulverization apparatus which includes a cylindrical pulverization chamber having a pair of case-hardened steel impeller blades located therein for pulverizing glass articles or the like. The peripheral speed and the unit torque of the impeller blades along with a gap maintained between the end of the respective impeller blades and the surface of the cylindrical pulverization chamber ensures rapid pulverization of glass articles or the like. An escape aperture, which is offset from a vertical line normal to the horizontalaxis of the drive shaft that rotates the impeller blades, provides for a'secondary means of determining the end size of the pulverized glass. A receiving chute is positioned at a 45 angle to the cylindrical pulverization chamber to facilitate the rapid pulverization of the glass articles or the like.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Additional objects, advantages and characteristic features of the present invention will become readily apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiments of the invention when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a glass pulverization apparatus in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the glass pulverization apparatus with portions thereof exposed to illustrate various components therein in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 33 of FIG. 2 illustrating the various components associated with the cylindrical pulverization chamber of the glass pulverization apparatus in accordance with the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a perspective view of a glass pulverization apparatus 10 mounted on a stand 11 in accordance with the present invention. While the mounting means, namely, the stand '11, which has three legs 12 and accompanying casters I3, is illustrated to provide portability for the glass pulverization apparatus 10, the glass pulverization apparatus 10 may be mounted within a built-in arrangement. The glass pulverization apparatus 10 generally includes a pulverization housing 14, a receiving chute 15, a motor 16 and a receptacle bag 17. As illustrated, a bottle 18 may be inserted into the glass pulverization receptacle 10 via a spring-loaded door 19, having door members 19a and 19b that are biased by spring members 190, on the upper end of the receiving chute 15. Further illustrated are a power source connection means 20 and an on/off switch 21.

Referring now to FIG. 2, there is shown a side elevational view of the glass pulverization apparatus 10 with portions thereof exposed to illustrate various components therein. The pulverization housing 14 may be of cast metal, such as aluminum, and includes a main portion 14a and a front panel 14b. The front panel 14b may be secured to the main portion 14a by means of conventional locking means, such as a pair of hand wheels 22 that are respectively illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. When the front panel 14b is secured to the main portion 14a, there is formed a cylindrical pulverization chamber 23. Located within the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23 is pulverization means 24 which is mounted to a drive shaft 28, by conventional means, such as, a keyway lock mounting means 270. The pulverization means 24 includes an impeller blade mounting 27 and a pair of impeller blades 25 and 26, as illustrated in FIG. 3. The pulverization means 24 are constructed of case-hardened steel including not more than a maximum of 1 percent of Tantalite (Ta O to provide the necessary strength and durability to accomplish the effective rapid pulverization of the glass for the life-time of the impeller blades 25 and 26. While the pulverization means 24 are shown as a unit construction, the pair of impeller blades 25 and 26 and the impeller blade mounting 27 may be separate components.

An escape aperture 29 allows the glass pulverized by the glass pulverization apparatus 10 to drop into the receptacle bag 17. The receptacle bag 17 may be retained on the glass pulverization apparatus 10 by means of conventional retention means 30, such as, the snapclamp arrangement illustrated. While the receptacle bag 17 is illustrated as a means to retain the pulverized glass 31, it should be understood that either in a portable or in a built-in glass pulverization apparatus 10, it would still be within the scope of the present invention to utilize a drawer receptacle unti to collect and retain the pulverized glass. While the size of the aperture 29 plays a part in determining the size of the pulverized glass 31, the illustrated gap A maintained between the ends of the respective impeller blades 25 and 26 and the chamber pulverization surface 33 along with the peripheral speed and unit torque of the pulverization means 24 principally determines the size of the pulverized glass 31.

Referring now to FIG. 3, there is shown a sectional view taken along the line 33 of FIG. 2 to illustrate the various components associated with the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23. The drive shaft 28 is centrally mounted with respect to the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23 on bearings, not shown, and extends through the main portion 14a of the pulverization housing 14 to the motor 16. The keyway lock mounting means 27a retains the pulverization means 24 on the drive shaft 28. The escape aperture 29 is located to the left of the vertical line normal to the axis of the drive shaft 28, defined as C/L. It has been found by experimentation that such location of the escape aperture 29, in the working prototype which has impeller blades 25 and 26 rotating in the clockwise direction, prevents clogging of the glass pulverization apparatus 10.

Referring now to both FIGS. 2 and 3, the size of the various components of a working prototype of the glass pulverization apparatus will now be discussed. The motor 16 is a 230/250 volt, )6 horse power, 1425 revolutions per minute, SO-cycle, single phase, totally enclosed, squirrel cage, capacitor start induction run type flange-mounted motor. It should be understood that an equivalent U.S. or other foreign country motor that will produce the same torque and revolutions per minute may be utilized to rotate the pulverization means 24. The diameter of the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23 is 10 inches and the pair of impeller blades 25 and 26 provide a 9% inch diameter swing within the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23. The ends of the impeller blades 25 and 26 have a V4 inch 45 chamfer to provide the gap A of /4 inch, as illustrated.

In such working prototype, the pulverized glass collected is in a substantially powder-like form. While the working prototype of the glass pulverization apparatus 10 pulverizes glass articles to a substantially powderlike form, it should be understood that various modifications to the gap A, or the peripheral speed and unit torque of the pulverization means 24, to provide pulverized glass of a different size is within the contemplation and scope of the present invention.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the receiving chute 15 is shown mounted at a 45 angle with respect to the vertical orientation of the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23. It has been found that optimum rapid pulverization of bottles may be obtained if such bottles enter the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23 at such 45 angle. On the other hand, if the receiving chute 15 is mounted at an angle substantially over 45 with respect to the vertical orientation of the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23, the impeller blades 25 and 26 hit the side of the bottles, and the pulverization process takes longer; and if the receiving chute 15 is mounted at an angle substantially less than 45 with respect to the vertical orientation of the cylindrical pulverization chamber 23, the bottles do not have enough impetus and again, the pulverization process takes longer. The receiving chute 15 not only provides safety means in the spring-loaded door 19, but further provides a secondary protective device, namely, a stranded rubber curtain 32 which further prevents any glass particles from being blasted back out of the feed end of the receiving chute 15.

Thus, although the present invention has been shown and described with reference to particular embodiments, for example, impeller blades having a /1 inch 45 chamfer nevertheless, various changes and modifications obvious to a person skilled in the art to which the invention pertains, for example, impeller blades having a curved end, are deemed to lie within the spirit, scope and contemplation of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for pulverizing glass-like articles comprising:

motor means including a drive shaft for providing rotatioal motion;

a cylindrical chamber having an escape aperture, said cylindrical chamber having an inner cylindrical surface;

pulverization means located within said cylindrical means located within said cylindrical chamber, said pulverization means including at least two impeller blades, located in parallel planes to each other and disc-like mounting means, said impeller blades being mounted to said disc-like mounting means, said disc-like mounting means being mounted to said drive shaft of said motor means, said distal end of each said impeller blade having a A inch, 45 chamfer to provide a V4 inch gap between said respective chamfered distal ends of said impeller blades and said inner cylindrical surface of said cylindrical chamber;

receiving chute means having an input end and an output end said receiving chute means mounted to said cylindrical chamber for providing gravity feed of said glass-like articles to said cylindrical chamber; and

receptacle means located below said cylindrical chamber in proximity of said escape aperture for receiving said pulverized glass-like articles.

2. Apparatus for pulverizing glass-like articles as recited in claim 1 wherein said drive shaft of said motor means rotates at a desired speed to provide sufficient unit torque to said impeller blades whereby said glasslike articles are pulverized to a powder-like form.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2308578 *Mar 2, 1940Jan 19, 1943Weber Bros Metal WorksHammer mill
US2392958 *Jul 19, 1943Jan 15, 1946Tice Reuben SMill
US2620988 *Jan 10, 1950Dec 9, 1952Tellier Edgar HFluorescent lamp bulb breaking device
US2628036 *Dec 22, 1950Feb 10, 1953Hall Jesse BDeactivating lamp disposal plant
US2852202 *Nov 12, 1954Sep 16, 1958DittingCoffee grinder
US3035621 *Oct 5, 1959May 22, 1962Miller Mfg CompanyRotary feed mills
US3655138 *Aug 8, 1969Apr 11, 1972Luscombe Gene AMachine for comminuting glassware and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3873047 *Mar 22, 1973Mar 25, 1975Louis W JohnsonImpact crusher
US3913849 *Jan 17, 1974Oct 21, 1975Atanasoff Irving MFluorescent tube digester
US3926379 *Oct 4, 1973Dec 16, 1975Dryden CorpSyringe disintegrator
US3958765 *May 12, 1975May 25, 1976Musselman James ASyringe and needle grinder
US3987972 *Nov 21, 1975Oct 26, 1976Gladwin Floyd RClosure plate for bottle crusher
US4143823 *Sep 6, 1977Mar 13, 1979Judson Jr CarlHammermills
US4273297 *Jul 24, 1979Jun 16, 1981Rinfret John H TApparatus for crushing frangible articles
US4771952 *Jan 20, 1983Sep 20, 1988Speier Philip NArticle-breaking apparatus
US4884386 *Nov 22, 1988Dec 5, 1989Govoni, SpaSystem for recovering, selecting and recycling rejected plastic containers
US4905916 *Feb 27, 1989Mar 6, 1990National Syringe Disposal, Inc.Syringe disposal apparatus and method
US5186403 *Jul 30, 1992Feb 16, 1993Jones Calvin BPortable glass crushing apparatus
US5242126 *Nov 27, 1991Sep 7, 1993Bomze Howard JBottle crusher
US20090029841 *Mar 8, 2007Jan 29, 2009Oliver MonaghanGlassware Breaking Apparatus
USRE29798 *Mar 16, 1977Oct 10, 1978El-Jay, Inc.Impact crusher
WO2007104926A2 *Mar 8, 2007Sep 20, 2007Oliver MonaghanGlassware breaking apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/99, 241/100, 241/188.1
International ClassificationB02C13/06
Cooperative ClassificationB02C13/06, B02C19/0087
European ClassificationB02C19/00W8G, B02C13/06