Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3756578 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1973
Filing dateJan 27, 1972
Priority dateJan 27, 1972
Publication numberUS 3756578 A, US 3756578A, US-A-3756578, US3756578 A, US3756578A
InventorsMc Gurk
Original AssigneeMc Gurk
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid treatment and distribution system
US 3756578 A
Abstract
A fluid aeration-agitation system featuring a pumping system and a pressure manifold operatively mounted upon a float which is either stationary or mounted for rotation, the manifold being operatively connected to a plurality of pipes each leading to a hollow discharge directing subsurface convection current or to a discharge head being hemispherical in configuration.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 McGurk [451 Sept. 4, 1973 1 FLUID TREATMENT AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM [75] lnventor: William L. McGurk, Muskogee,

Okla.

[73] Assignee: Therator Pumper, Inc., Muskogee,

Okla.

[22] Filed: Jan. 27, 1972 I21] Appl. N0.: 221,320

[52] U.S. Cl 261/91, 261/120, 210/242 [51] Int. Cl B011 3/04 [58] Field of Search 210/242; 261/91,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,416,729 Ravitts et a1 261/91 8/1970 Culwell .i 261/91 2/1972 Albritton 261/91 Primary ExaminerTim R. Miles Assistant Examiner-Steven H. Markowitz Attorney-Staas, Halsey & Gable [57] ABSTRACT A fluid aeration-agitation system featuring a pumping system and a pressure manifold operatively mounted upon a float which is either stationary or mounted for rotation, the manifold being operatively connected to a plurality of pipes each leading to a hollow discharge directing subsurface convection current or to a discharge head being hemispherical in configuration.

7 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEHSU 4 am y sum 2 0F 3 FIG. 2

' PATENTEUSEP 4m SHEET 3 BF FIG. 3

FLUID TREATMENT AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a fluid treatment and distribution system, particularly applicable for the treatment of liquids such as sewage and industrial waste requiring the transfer of oxygen from the atmosphere into the liquid mass of sewage, or subsurface agitation.

Aeration of fluids occurs at peak efficiency when thorough mixing and circulation of the parent fluid body results in the solids contained therein being held in suspension. Previous aeration devices have included propeller-mixer equipment, paddle wheel arrangements and fountain systems. It is usually impossible to accurately rate the efficiencies of such prior art systems. In addition, such known devices usually provide insufficient rates of oxygen transfer per unit volume of fluid moved and thus insufficient fluid aeration. Hence, the therator apparatus may be used as a subsurface agitator and a liquid aerator at the same time. The conventional propeller-mixer equipment has the added disadvantage of causing bottom erosion.

The present invention is designed to overcome these disadvantages while providing flexibility of application as explained in detail hereinafter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is used to circulate fluid in a manner which establishes a convection pattern within a fluid body so as to cause continual fluid turnover from the lower depths to the surface while simultaneously aerating the fluid by transferring oxygen from the atmosphere thereto. With the present invention, the solids are maintained in suspension and exposed to sufficient dissolved oxygen to enhance bacterial attack and decomposition. Quantites of the liquid mass are exposed to impounded or atmospheric oxygen or other soluable gases. Also, predictable and controllable silting patterns for heavier solids are achieved. The foregoing is accomplished with the present invention which is characterized by its simplicity in construction and flexibility of use.

The fluid treatment and distribution system of the present invention is secured to a buoyant float permitting use in different environments such as tanks, ponds, vats and lakes. The aeration-agitation apparatus may be mounted to rotate at different speeds on the surface of the liquid mass. An important feature of the present.

invention is the shape of the discharge heads which are hollow and hemispherical in configuration. In this manner, the path of the fluid into the atmosphere and its return to the liquid mass is selected to maximize the kinetic energy of the fluid.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view partially in section desystem illustrating in particular hollow, hemispherical configuration thereof;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the pressure manifold and discharge pipes used in conjunction with a first embodiment intake element; and

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment intake element.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The aeration-agitation system of the present invention is designated generally by the reference numeral 10 in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 and comprises a motor and pump assembly 12 to which is attached a pressure manifold 14. Such centrifugal pump and manifold construction is well known in the art and needs no further description. The pump and motor assembly 12 is rigidly secured to the upper surface of a buoyant float 16, while the pressure manifold 14 may be secured to the bottom or the top surface of float 16, depending on the pump configuration.

The pressure manifold 14 is preferably a hollowwalled toroidal vessel provided with a plurality of equally spaced ports 18 along the outer periphery thereof. The pressure manifold 14 is provided with an intake element 20 which may be provided with access through 360 as illustrated in FIG. 6 or with a directional opening as illustrated generally in FIG. 5.

A draught tube 22 is positioned below the intake element 20, the length thereof depending upon the depth of fluid in which the aeration-agitation system is operating.

Attached to ports 18 are a plurality of pipes 24 extending either outwardly or outwardly and then upwardly; outwardly for setting up a convection current in a body of water and outwardly and then upwardly if the discharge is to be used for oxygen transfer. Each of the pipes 24 terminates in a discharge head 26 described in detail hereinafter.

As will now be apparent, the motor and pump assembly l2 draws fluid into the intake element 20 and through the draught tube 22. From there, the fluid passes into the manifold 14 and exits through the pipes 24.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the fluid is ejected under pressure through the end of each pipe 24' striking the inner surface of the discharge head 26 which is constructed of a rigid, wear-resistant material. Thereafter, the fluid passes downwardly returning to the parent body of fluid. Each of the discharge heads 26 is hollow and hemispherical in configuration, the interior surface thereof being smooth so as to minimize losses in fluid energy.

As will be further apparent from FIG. 4, a high velocity curtain of water having an outer radius r and an inner radius r, is formed at each discharge head 26 as the fluid is being directed back towards the parent body. This so-called high-velocity curtain results in a relatively high proportion of the discharging fluid being exposed to the atmosphere. The high-velocity curtain of water increases the interfacial exposure to atmospheric oxygen, entrapping greater amounts of air, frequently in the form of bubbles. Optimum oxygen transfer per unit volume of water moved is achieved.

The downwardly passing fluid returns to the parent body at an angle of with respect to the fluid ejected toward the inner surface of the discharge head 26. As will be apparent, then, the pressure generated in the present invention is significantly greater than that present where the jet strikes a flat plate positioned perpendicular to the direction of motion.

Furthermore, the actual rating of the present design is more practical than in prior fountain type aerators, submerged propellers or paddle wheel arrangements since the fluid-gas continuity is more predictable at the interface adapting more readily to well known gas absorption formulae.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, the aerationagitation system is securely tethered by lines 28 which are secured at one end to the float l6 and at the other end to the walls 30 of the vat. In this manner, uniform convection patterns are created.

Alternatively, as illustrated in FIG. 2, the aerationagitation system 10 is mounted for rotation about pole 32. Appropriate electrical power means are mounted within the casing 34 for rotating arms 36 to which the aeration-agitation system 10 is attached.

I claim:

1. A treatment and distribution system for a body of fluid, comprising:

a pump;

a manifold assembly operatively connected to said pump including a fluid intake and provided with at least one opening;

a buoyant float together with means mounting said pump and manifold thereto;

at least one fluid outlet conduit operatively connected to said opening, the outlet of said conduit extending out of the body of fluid; and

discharge head means hemispherical in configuration and operatively connected to said conduit in a manner such that fluid ejected from said conduit strikes the inner concave surface thereof and is returned in the opposite direction along a curtain into the body of fluid.

2. A fluid treatment and distribution system as in claim 1, including a plurality of openings in said manifold, a conduit connected to each of said openings and a discharge head connected to each of said conduits.

3. A fluid treatment and distribution system as in claim 1, including means mounting said pump, manifold, float, conduit and discharge head for rotation within the body of fluid.

4. A fluid treatment and distribution system as in claim 1, including means mounting said pump, manifold, float, conduit and discharge head in stationary position with respect to the body of fluid.

5. A fluid treatment and distribution system as in claim 1, including interchangeable means for varying the depth below said fluid intake at which fluid is withdrawn.

6. A fluid treatment and distribution system as in claim 5, said means varying the depth including a draught tube.

7. A fluid treatment and distribution system as in claim 1, said manifold being toroidal in configuration. =r s

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3416729 *Aug 12, 1966Dec 17, 1968Richards Of Rockford IncLiquid aerator
US3524629 *Jul 29, 1968Aug 18, 1970Culwell Don AApparatus for and method of aerating liquids
US3640514 *Dec 3, 1970Feb 8, 1972Ashbrook CorpAeration
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3962093 *Mar 5, 1975Jun 8, 1976The Glacier Metal Company LimitedApparatus for removing contaminants from the surface of a fluid
US4059526 *Mar 24, 1976Nov 22, 1977Ballast Nedam Groep N.V.Device for collecting light-weight substances floating on a liquid surface
US4086306 *Feb 16, 1977Apr 25, 1978Kaneyasu YoshinagaCentrifugal pump
US4126552 *Sep 6, 1977Nov 21, 1978Ballast Nedam Groep N.V.Method for collecting light-weight substances floating on a liquid surface
US4229302 *Oct 20, 1978Oct 21, 1980Clevepak CorporationWaste treatment apparatus with floating platform
US4365938 *Jan 14, 1980Dec 28, 1982Warinner Archie FModular low head high volume water pump and aquaculture system
US4626358 *Oct 18, 1984Dec 2, 1986Fetsko Francis ELiquid sweeping assembly and method
US4680148 *May 30, 1985Jul 14, 1987Aeras Water Resources, Inc.Mobile pond aerating system
US4733972 *Jul 9, 1987Mar 29, 1988Aqua-Aerobic Systems, Inc.Floating mixer apparatus with foam dispersing spray
US4797063 *May 27, 1987Jan 10, 1989Chem-O Company, Inc.Floating suction apparatus
US5167878 *Aug 20, 1991Dec 1, 1992Aeras Water Systems, Inc.Submersible aeration device
US5213718 *Nov 4, 1991May 25, 1993Burgess Harry LAerator and conversion methods
US5275762 *May 25, 1993Jan 4, 1994Burgess Harry LAerator
US5971372 *Dec 4, 1997Oct 26, 1999Ash; GaryAerator transport system
US5996977 *Oct 5, 1998Dec 7, 1999Burgess; Harry L.Temperature adjusted water aerator and circulation system
US6050550 *Jul 9, 1998Apr 18, 2000Burgess; Harry L.Apparatus for aeration and bottom agitation for aqua-culture systems
US7331569 *Jul 25, 2005Feb 19, 2008Allied Precision Industries, Inc.Liquid aeration system and method
US7575226Jan 17, 2008Aug 18, 2009Allied Precision Industries, Inc.Liquid aeration system and method
DE2711805A1 *Mar 18, 1977Oct 20, 1977Kaneyasu YoshinagaZentrifugalpumpe zur sauerstoffbelueftung von zuchtteichwasser
EP0147108A2 *Dec 6, 1984Jul 3, 1985Long Enterprises, Inc.Improved sewage sludge treatment apparatus and process
EP0359965A1 *Aug 7, 1989Mar 28, 1990Ulrich SeidlitzApparatus for replenishing waters with oxygen
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/91, 210/242.2, 261/120
International ClassificationC02F3/14, C02F3/16, B01F3/04, B01F5/16, B01F13/00, C02F3/24, B01F7/00, B01F5/00, B01F7/16
Cooperative ClassificationB01F5/16, C02F3/24, C02F3/16, B01F13/0049, B01F2003/04865, B01F3/04773, C02F3/165, B01F7/16
European ClassificationC02F3/16B, C02F3/16, B01F3/04C6C2, C02F3/24