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Publication numberUS3757103 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1973
Filing dateMay 17, 1971
Priority dateMay 17, 1971
Also published asCA949526A1
Publication numberUS 3757103 A, US 3757103A, US-A-3757103, US3757103 A, US3757103A
InventorsH Walter
Original AssigneeClairol Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Make up mirror
US 3757103 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ 1 Sept. 4, 1973 1 MAKE-UP MIRROR [75] Inventor: Henry J. Walter, Wilton, Conn.

[73] Assignee: Clairol Incorporated, New York,

[22] Filed: May 17, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 144,041

[52] U5. Cl 240/4.2, 240/6.45, 240/92, 313/ 109 [51] Int. Cl. F2lv 33/00 [58] Field of Search 240/l.1, 4.1, 4.2, 240/6, 6.45, 92; 313/109 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,761,959 9/1956 Kunins..... 240/3.l

2,301,419 11/1942 Lew 240/1 2,875,321 2/1959 Doliva 240/4 3,577,169 5/1971 Ban-y 313/109 1,138,552 5/1915 Goddard 240/4.2

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 36,245 1/1961 Japan 240/4.2 UX 1,021,351 3/1966 Great Britain.. 240/10.1 423,631 3/1967 Japan 240/4.2 UX

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Abstract, 774, 717 Electric Dressing Table, O.G. 11/27/51, Vol. 652, pg. 1182.

Primary Examiner-Robert P. Greiner Attorney-william F. Moss, Ill, David J. Mugford, Irving Holtzman, George A. Mentis, Ralph D. Gelling and Marvin B. Rosenberg [57] ABSTRACT An electric make-up mirror having light sources which provide substantially uniform energy output through most of the visible region, which when used in conjunction with light filters will simulate specific lighting conditions such as daylight, office light (fluorescent),

home light and evening light (incandescent). The light sources are comprised of special lamps which provide a unique degree of flexibility in that various lighting conditions may be simulated with a minimal loss of energy. The mirror is provided with two matching light sources, and two matching filter assemblies disposed on opposite sides of the mirror. The filter assemblies are adjusted by a single control mounted for the synchronous selection of a matching filter from each of the filter assemblies. The light filters of each filter assembly, when interposed between the light sources and the user, selectively vary the spectral energy distribution of the light transmitted from the light sources so as to simulate daylight, ordinary fluorescent light and incandescent light. The mirror allows the user to select the illumination approximating the type of light under which the user expects to be seen.

10 Claims, 28 Drawing Figures llll...

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SHEET 6 UF 6 INVENTOR JWZ BY aver 475-2 ATTORNEY MAKE-UP MIRROR This invention relates to a lighted make-up mirror. More particularly, the invention concerns a mirror which is provided with a light source with broad spectral output which has been developed specifically to simulate certain light conditions when used in conjunction with light filters.

Mirrors have generally been provided with a source of light for various reasons. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 1,493,709 relates to an improvement in portable mirrors designed especially for use in shaving. The light source is frictionally secured against accidental movement in any radial position of the mirror. The lighting element may therefore be moved to any position radially of the mirror to direct the light toward any particular point. U.S. Pat. No. 1,859,592 is drawn to a lighted mirror which has the lights arranged attached to the mirror, either at the top or at its sides so as to be visible only when needed. U.S. Pat. No. 3,268,715 describes an illuminated make-up mirror which is adjustable and will retain its position at any desired angle to the vertical. U.S. Pat. No. 2,313,838 is directed to an illuminated mirror for use in drawing rooms and compartments of railway sleeping cars. The mirror is provided with a set of prisms which are arranged to give adequate illumination and an attractive appearance. The surface of each prism is covered by a diffusing panel to prevent bright spots in the beam of the light emitted. Japanese Pat. No. 3633/67 is drawn to a compact pro vided with illuminating means. The device uses frosted glass light bulbs in order to soften the light and to reduce the dazzling effect of a bright light on the eyes of the user. The use of a light bulb on each side of the compact tends to reduce the formation of shadows due to uneven lighting. Japanese Pat. No. 245/61 is drawn to a mirror with an illuminating means adapted to eliminate shadows and to provide varying colors of light. The light sources are disclosed as fluorescent lamps for daylight and colored electric lamps for any particular desired light color. Japanese Pat. No. 3631/67 relates to a mirror device which is provided with a light source and colored reflectors. By changing the colored reflectors one may obtain a desired color of light. This device provides for light to be reflected by the colored reflectors to illuminate an object through a light transmitting opening to cast an image of the object on the mirror. Thus the device enables one to view ones own image without using direct light. British Pat. No. 860,921 is concerned with an ornamental mirror which is mounted to a shallow dish. It is a feature of the invention to provide colored light effects by the use ofcolored screens in conjunction with the light source. U.S. Pat. No. 1,138,552 is drawn to an illuminated mirror which will reflect the lighted object without the source of the light being visible and which will avoid glare. This patent discusses grading the light tones according to the character of the light source. The mirror is surrounded by a transparent or translucent light transmitting or diffusing surface in order to subdue the intensity of the light without depriving it of its illuminating qualities.

A number of patents have been issued relating to apparatus concerned with lighting fixtures designed to simulate daylight. It has long been recognized that in many instances it is desirable to provide light closely approximating daylight. For example, U.S. Pat. No.

3,188,218 is concerned with photosensitive films used in daylight color photography. The patent discloses a light filter capable of modifying the color characteristics of artificial light from a high temperature incandescent lamp so as to produce a resultant illumination having color characteristics approximately equivalent to daylight.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,201,576 is concerned with producing daylight artificially by using several light sources. The patent discusses the application by artists and color technicians in the printing and textile fields of north sky daylight. Each of the fluorescent light sources used has a spectral energy distribution curve which is selected in relation to the respective curves of the other sources employed so as to provide the optimum balance of wavelengths and intensities comparable with those of the selected natural overcast north light conditions.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,355,982 is drawn to an apparatus for subjecting colored samples to simulated daylight and artificial light for obtaining visual color comparisons.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,093,319 is concerned with lighting devices, for use by technicians, testing laboratories, and artists, which reproduce natural light from artificial light.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,966,059 relates to a device for producing artificial daylight emanating from incandescent filaments. A filter is disclosed comprising a translucent glass plate having one surface entirely composed of light and dark zones so that the light after passing through the filter is almost entirely free from color.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,364,707 is concerned with providing the equivalent of daylight illumination. The lamp utilizes a series of four or more lamps and a disc having color segments.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,413,940 relates to fluorescent glasses which emit long wave ultraviolet radiation in response to excitation by short wave ultraviolet radiation. The fluorescent light source embodies a filter glass which passes long wave ultraviolet and visible radiation.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,725,461 relates to a lamp for approximating natural daylight. The lamp is provided with different colored lamps and a diffuser plate. The diffuser insures that no color in the lighting unit can be seen by the eye except in the final mixture and also provides low brightness and large area source.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,112,886 relates to the control of color' illumination produced by conventional light sources. The illumination is controlled through the use of a coated reflector. I

U.S. Pat. No. 3,136,890 is drawn to a lamp that transmits ultraviolet rays which have been filtered so as to remove visible light.

All of the above discussed prior art is concerned with light sources to produce a single specific effect. The present invention is drawn to a light source that has spectral qualifies which permit, with the use of light filters, an efficient way to simulate various lighting conditions.

There are, at present, commercially available lighted make-up mirrors which provide the user with a choice of types of light so that the type of light under which the user expects to be seen, may be selected. This is accomplished by the use of a plurality of light filters in conjunction with a light source, the light source and filter being such that the user may select a predetermined type of light such as daylight, evening light or indoor artificial light, by the use of a single control.

The mirror of the present invention is an improvement over the above-described mirrors in that the invention is concerned not only with a choice of the type of light under which the user may expect to be seen, but it is also concerned with an improved light source which was developed especially for use with lighted mirrors to efficiently simulate the desired lighting conditions. The light source used in this invention is a special fluorescent lamp which gives a reasonably flat response throughout the visible spectrum, and provides unique flexibility in that more than one lighting condition such as daylight, fluorescent light, or incandescent, may be simulated by the use of light filters with a minimal loss of energy. The new lamp has a spectral energy distribution curve which is not normally provided in other commercially available lamps.

The mirror contemplated by the present invention may either be of the plug-in type using current from existing wall outlets or it may be powered by batteries.

The above mentioned improvements as well as other advantages of the lighted make-up mirror of this invention will become more readily apparent to those skilled in the art by reference tothe accompanying drawings and description:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of the make-up mirror;

FIG. 2 is a plan view in section taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an end view in section taken along line 3-3 of FIG. I;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing a light filter assembly;

FIGS. 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f; FIGS. 6a, 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, 6f; and FIGS. 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d, 7e, 7f show the spectral energy distribution curves of some standard fluorescent lamps;

FIG. 8 is a curve of the spectral output of an ordinary incandescent lamp;

FIG. 9 is a curve of the spectral output of ordinary daylight; I

FIG. 10 is a curve of the spectral energy distribution of the new lamp of the present invention; and

FIGS. 11, 12, and 113 are curves showing the spectral energy distribution when the lamp of the present invention is provided with light filters.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, the mirror assembly as shown in FIG. 1 includes a mirror 2 mounted on a frame 1. Mounted onto the frame and arranged on both sides of the mirror are lenses 5, which direct the light emitted from the new light bulb 6 used in the invention, located behind the lenses 5. A filter adjustment control 3 is mounted onto the front panel of the frame 1a, the front panel having a rectangular slot 3a in which the control 3 is positioned to move horizontally as the control is moved from one setting to another. An ordinary electric light switch 4, mounted on the panel 1a, is used to turn the light on or off.

In FIG. 2 the filter adjustment control 3 is shown connected to a rack 3b which extends to both sides of the mirror assembly so that the filter 7 may be set for both sides with the same control 3.

In FIG. 3 the fluorescent light bulb 6 is shown in the socket 8 held by a bracket 13 connected to a pad 12 and mounted onto the frame 1 by screws 10. The filter 7 is positioned between the light bulb 6 and the lenses 5. The filter control is shown at 3 4 &

FIG. 4 shows a composite filter 7 for one embodiment of the invention as shown in FIG. 1. The filter control rack 3b is shown engaged with the pinion 9 which extends around a pin 9a. The pin and pinion are connected to the filter 7 by a bracket 9b. The filter is shown to have three sides 7a, 7b and 70. Each of the sides being difi'erent from the other and being adapted to transmit light of predetermined wavelengths and energy distribution.

In operation, referring to FIG. 1, the electric light switch 4 is turned on so that the light is emitted through the lenses 5. The filter adjustment control 3 is set to allign one of the three sides of the filter 7 with the light bulb 6. By selecting one section of the composite filter the user obtains a predetermined type of light which approximates natural or artificial light.

The use of filters in connection with light and color transmission has long been recognized. Today filters are used widely in photography and are available commercially in many forms. One form may be prepared,

for example, by mixing a dye in gelatin and applying the mixture in the form of a coating onto glass. upon drying the filter is separated from the glass. Filters are generally supplied in the form of a lacquered gelatin film or as a gelatin film cemented between plates of glass. Other forms include tinted glass or plastic.

Examples of filters which may be used in the device of the present invention are Kodak Wratten filters CC--025M, CC-l0C, CC-lOY, CC-20Y, CC-SR, CCIOR and CC40R. These commercially available filters are used singly and in combination and are used either in the form of a lacquered gelatin film, the gelatin having been mixed with the appropriate dyes, or as a gelatin film cemented between pieces of glass.

If one views an object under a light which does not contain all of the colors of natural daylight or does not contain each of the colors in high enough intensity, the object which he sees will not look the same under this artificial light, insofar as color is concerned, as it does under natural light or ordinary daylight.

Color is influenced by the nature of the source of light, the observer, and the nature of the object being viewed. The term is used in the general sense for any quality of light distinguishable by the visual sense, but specifically it applies to the property of things seen as red, yellow, blue, etc. as distinguished from black, gray or white. Since colored objects reflect light of their own color and absorb other hues one could recognize color or define it from spectral reflectance or transmittance curves. One may say that an object is colored" due to the way it reflects or transmits the various wavelengths of light within the visible spectrum. By using the device of the present invention the apparent color of the light or its spectral energy distribution is changed and the color rendering properties of the light source in which the user expects to be seen after the cosmetics have been applied, is approximated.

Light other than natural light or ordinary daylight which we term artificial light generally will have a spectral energy distribution which is different from that of natural light. Stated another way, artificial light does not contain all of the colors of the spectrum nor does it contain colors in equal amounts. Various types of light bulbs are commercially available ranging from the ordinary incandescent bulbs to the newer daylight" fluorescent bulbs. The so-called daylight" fluorescent bulbs are designed to approximate natural light.

To change the spectral energy distribution of the light source used in the above mentioned mirrors which provide a choice of light, light filters are used which modify the light source by having a different absorption and transmission rate for different frequencies. The resulting light is changed in color but its total energy output is lower than the unmodified source. The limitation of light modification and the resultant filtered light is an inherent characteristic of the initial light source.

The mirror of the present invention is an improvement over other illuminated mirrors in that it provides a specialized type of lighting for use in applying cosmetics to the face which heretofore has not been avail able. The mirror of this invention is provided with a new cool-white type fluorescent lamp and a plurality of light filters which, when interposed between the transmitted light and the user, selectively vary the spectral energy distribution of the light transmitted from the lamp to provide simulated daylight, ordinary fluorescent light, (home or office light) or incandescent light (evening light) which approximates the type of light under which the user expects to be seen.

To produce the spectral quality of daylight and obtain the proper color balance according to FIG. 9 one would have to reduce the intensity of the light source in the wavelength range above 400-500 nm. to such an extent that the obtained energy output would be insuf' ficient and unusable. FIGS. 6a, 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, 6f show the spectral energy distribution curve of daylight superimposed over existing fluorescent lamps, the shaded area being the energy the filter would have to absorb in order to attempt to simulate daylight. It is apparent that the resulting energy output would be extremely low. On the other hand, if one wanted to modify the light of any of the existing fluorescent light sources to obtain the spectral quality of an incandescent tungsten source, according to FIG. 8 one would have to absorb all the energy of the short wavelength and would not have enough long wavelength in the lamp to produce properly this light. In FIGS. 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d, 7e, 7f, the shaded area shows the energy the filter would have to absorb in order to attempt to simulate incandescent light. Not only would the energy output be low, but the simulated light would not have the spectral characteristics of tungsten light, since the existing fluorescent sources do not contain sufficient energy in the long wavelength (red) spectral region.

Therefore, to obtain a fluorescent light source that can be modified by light filters to closely resemble existing lighting conditions and to simulate the spectral quality of that light from daylight to evening, a special fluorescent lamp was developed. The lamp used in the present invention has a substantially flat response and therefore will produce acceptable renderings to simulate the desired lighting condition with the least loss of energy, when used in conjunction with light filters.

FIG. 10 is a plot of the spectral energy distribution of the new fluorescent lamp which has been developed to achieve the purposes described herein.

FIG. 11 is a plot of the spectral energy distribution of the light transmitted from the new lamp. of the present invention unfiltered (N), filtered to simulate home light (I-I) (incandescent) and filtered to simulate evening light (E) (incandescent). The curve (I) represents the spectral energy distribution of ordinary incandescent light.

FIG. 12 is a plot of the spectral energy distribution of the light transmitted from the new lamp of the present invention unfiltered (N), and filtered to simulate daylight (D-l The curve (D) represents the spectral energy distribution of ordinary daylight.

FIG. 13 is a plot of the spectral energy distribution of a typical fluorescent cool-white lamp (CW), the new lamp of the present invention unfiltered (N) and filtered to simulate office light (fluorescent) (O).

In FIGS. 8 through 13 the wavelength in nanometers is plotted against the radiant power in microwatts per 10 nanometers per lumen similarly as shown in FIGS. 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f; FIGS. 6a, 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, 6f; and FIGS. 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d, 7e, 7f.

It will be appreciated from the above discussion and reference to the Figures that the newly developed lamp used in the present invention has provided a substantial advancement in the art of illuminated make-up mirrors.

Standard fluorescent lamps are designed to give max imum lumen output and also to produce a certain type of light. A Cool-White lamp, for example, produces a white light without harshness. A Deluxe Cool-White lamp produces the same austere light with a little more yellow included for softness. Warm White and Deluxe Warm white lamps have more yellows than pinks and reds to produce a lightwith even more yellow.

The Commercial White lamp produces a very stark white light, and Daylight lamps produce bluish-white light. In the broad spectrum lamp of this invention no attempt has been made to give any of the above referred to types of characteristics nor has there been any attempt to give maximum lumens. Emphasis was placed on providing all of the colors of the spectrum from blue to red, so that by the selective modification with light filters, one can obtain any desired light simulation. As can be seen from the energy distribution curve of the new lamp, a white lamp without any specific character, as discussed above, and not available from existing lamps, is provided. It can be seen that the new lamp provides a substantially flat energy distribution curve and that the particular light emission properties afford a simple, versatile and effective method for simulating daylight, fluorescent light, and incandescent light by filtering with a minimal loss of light energy. It is this combination of advantages which is not found in any of the previous commercial lamps.

In TABLE A below data is given for the light transmittance curves for home light, evening light, office light and daylight as shown in FIGS. 11 and 13.

TABLE A Fil- Fil- Fil- Fil- Wave tered tered tered tered Unfilfor for for for in NM. tered Home Evening Ofiice Paylight light light light 300 50 The lamp of the present invention is rated at 6 watts and has an apparent color temperature of 6100K and can be made by mixing phosphors such as phosphates, silicates, tungstates or borates in accordance with standard fluorescent lamp technology known in the art. See, for example, the Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, Volume Vlll, lnterscience Encyclopedia, Inc., New York, 1952.

Having described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. An illuminating make-up mirror having a light source which provides substantially uniform energy output through most of the visible spectral region and means to simulate more than one difierent standard of illumination by selectively changing the color rendering properties of the light as transmitted from the source of illumination so as to select and provide the standard of illumination approximating the type of light under which the user expects to be seen, said light source having a substantially flat energy distribution curve in accordance with FIG. 10.

2. An illuminating make-up mirror having a light source which provides substantially uniform energy output through most of the visible spectral region and means to simulate daylight, ordinary fluorescent and incandescent light by selectively changing the color rendering properties of the light as transmitted from the source of illumination so as to select simulated daylight, ordinary fluorescent or incandescent light and provide illumination approximating the type of light under which the user expects to be seen, said light source having a substantially flat energy distribution curve in accordance with FIG. 10.

3. An illuminating make-up mirror which simulates more than one standard of illumination by selectively changing the color rendering properties of the transmitted light comprising a mirror, illuminating means disposed to illuminate the user, means for varying the spectral energy distribution of the light transmitted from said illuminating means, said varying means comprising a plurality of light filters, each of said filters simulating a different standard of illumination from at least one of the other filters when interposed between the illuminating means and the user, and means for coordinating said spectral energy distribution varying means with theilluminating means so as to select and provide the standard of illumination approximating the type of light under which the user expects to be seen, said illuminating means comprising a lamp having a spectral energy distribution curve according to FIG. 10.

4. An illuminating make-up mirror which simulates daylight, fluorescent and incandescent light standards of illumination by selectively changing the color rendering properties of the transmitted light, comprising a mirror, two matching light sources, each of said light sources providing substantially uniform energy output through most of the visible spectral region, means for varying the spectral energy distribution of the light transmitted from said light sources, said varying means comprising two matching sets of light filters, said sets of filters and light sources being disposed on opposite sides of the mirror, each of said sets of filters having a plurality of light filters, each of said filters simulating daylight, fluorescent light, or incandescent light when interposed between the light source and the user, and so simulating a standard of illumination different from at least one of the other filters in the same set, a connecting member for connecting said sets of filters, and a filter selection control attached to said connecting member for the synchronous selection of a filter providing the same standard of illumination from each set of filters, each of said light sources comprising a lamp which when activated emits a substantially flat response which permits the efficient simulation of different lighting conditions.

5. An illuminating make-up mirror according to claim 4 wherein the simulated standard of illumination is an incandescent standard according to curved H of FIG. 11. t

6. An illuminating make-up mirror according to claim 4 wherein the simulated standard of illumination is an incandescent standard according to curve E of FIG. 11.

7. An illuminating make-up mirror according to claim 4 wherein the simulated standard of illumination is a daylight standard according to curve D-l of FIG. 12.

8. An illuminating make-up mirror according to claim 4 wherein the simulated standard of illumination is a fluorescent standard according to curve 0 of FIG. 13.

9. An illuminating make-up mirror which simulates more than one type of illumination under which the user may expect to be seen by selectively changing the color rendering properties of the transmitted light comprising a mirror, illuminating means disposed on at least two opposing sides of said mirror to illuminate the user, filter means disposed on at least two opposing sides of the mirror and on the same sides as the illuminating means, said filters means comprising sets of a plurality of light filters which modify the spectral energy distribution of the light transmitted from the illuminating means, each of the filters simulating a different type of illumination from at leastone of the other filters when interposed between the illuminating means and the user, a connecting member for connecting said sets of filters and a filter selection control attached to said connecting member for the synchronous selection of a filter providing the same illumination from each set of filters, the illumination approximating the type of light under. which the user expects to be seen, each of said illuminating means comprising a lamp having a spectral energy distribution curve according to FIG. 10.

10. An illuminating make-up mirror which provides the user with a choice of daylight, fluorescent light, or incandescent light comprising a frame and a mirror mounted on said frame, fluorescent lamps mounted on at least two opposite sides of said frame for illuminating the face of the user, and means for varying the spectral energy distribution of said fluorescent lamps, said varying means being disposed with respect to said'fluorescent lamps so that, when interposed between the fluorescent lamps and the user, the user may select the type of light under which the user expects to be seen, said varying means comprising composite filter assemblies mounted on at least two opposite sides of the frame, each filterassembly comprising a plurality of light filters, each filter in combination with the fluorescent lamps simulating daylight, fluorescent light, or incandescent light, said mirror further comprising a connecting member for connecting said filter assemblies, and a filter selection control attached to said connecting member for the synchronous adjustment of the filter assemblies to select simulated daylight, fluorescent light, or incandescent light and provide illumination approximating the type of light under which the user expects to be seen, each of said fluorescent lamps having a spectral energy distribution curve according to FIG. 10.

1i 0 i i 1 mm No. 3,757,103 Dated September 7 Inventofls) enry J Walter It is certified that ertor appears, in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In Claim- 6, line 9, "An" should read an line 11, after the word "standard" insert the improvement consisting of saidstandard being Signedand sealed this 27th day of August 1974.

(SEAL) i Attest:

MCC YM. GIBSON, JR. c. MARSHALL DANN Attestl'ng Office 7 Commissioner of Patents USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 1 u.sv GOVERNMENT Pmurl w qFFlcs was o-ass-ssa.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent o, 3,757,103 Dat d September 4, 1973 Inventor(s) Henry alter It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

' In Column 4, on 15k; 22, change "upon" to read In Column 6, on line 37, change "white lamp" to read --white light--;

on line 55, change "Pay" to read --Day- In Claim 1, on line 7, before "An" insert the word --In--;

on line 7, change "An" to read --an--;

on line 15, after the word "seen,

insert --the improvement consisting of--.

In Claim 2, on line 18, before "An" insert the word --In--;

on line 18, change "An" to read -an-:

I on line 27, after the word "seen," 7

F ORM PC1-1050 (IO-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 w u.s. eovznuuzm' rnmnus OFFICE 1 nu o-su-au,

Patent No. 757,103 Dated I September 4, 1973 In'ventor(s) Henry J. Walter Page 2 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

insert the improvement consisting of--.

In Claim 3, on line 30, before "An" insert the word --In-;

on line 30,,change "An"to read -an--;

on line 44, after the word "seen," 4

insert -the improvement consisting of--.

In Claim 4, on line 48, before "An" insert the word -In on line 48, change "An" to read --an--;

in column 8, on line 1, after the word 7 "filters, insert --the improvement consisting of--.

In Claim 5, on line 5, before "An" insert the word --Inon line 5, change "An" to read --an--;

on line 7, after the word "standard" insert the improvement consisting of said standard being--.

, In Claim 6, on line 9, before "An" insert the word --In--;

FORM po'wso (0459) uscoMM-oc 60376-P69 t U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE l9, 0-36-3SL UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent N Dated September 4,

Henry J. Walter Page 3 Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In Claim 7, on line 13, before "An"- insert the word --In--;

on line 13, change "An" to read --"a;;--;

on line 15, after the word "standard" insert the improvement consisting of said standard being--.

in Claim 8, on line 17, before "An" insert the word --In-;

on line 17, change "'An" to read -an-;

on line 19, after the word "standard" insert the improvement consisting of said standard being--.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 757 ,103 Dated September 4 1973 lnventofls) Henry J. Walter Page 4 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In Claim 9-, on line 21, before "An" insert the word --In-; I

on line 21, change "An" to read --an--;

on line 28, change "filters" to read --filter--:

on line 39, after the word "seen," insert --the improvement consisting of--.

In Claim 10, on line 43, before "An" insert the word --In'-; Q

on line 43, change "An" to read --an--;

on line 65, after the word "seen," insert --the improvement consisting of".

Signed and sealed this 8th day of January 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. RENE D. TEGTMEYER Attesting Officer Acting Commissioner of Patents USCOMM-DC 6O376-P69 u.s. GOVERNMENT PRINTING orrlc; nu o-su-au.

F ORM PO-1050 (10-69)

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5075823 *Nov 16, 1990Dec 24, 1991Video One Systems Ltd.Color correcting system for fluorescent lighting
US5392162 *Oct 31, 1991Feb 21, 1995Glucksman; Dov Z.Illuminated travel make-up mirror
US5418419 *Mar 22, 1994May 23, 1995Tailored Lighting Inc.Lamp for producing a daylight spectrum
US6019476 *Jan 14, 1997Feb 1, 2000Kirschner; Kevin A.Full spectrum filtering for fluorescent lighting
US6219159Mar 9, 1998Apr 17, 2001Hewlett Packard CompanySpectrally balanced scanner
US6604836Sep 27, 2001Aug 12, 2003Conair CorporationVariable lighted make-up mirror
US7083293 *Mar 12, 2004Aug 1, 2006Kalinski Arthur AMultiple color temperature video, task or reading light system
US7152991Feb 25, 2004Dec 26, 2006Wenger CorporationMake up station
US7559668 *Aug 8, 2005Jul 14, 2009Truman AubreyFloating mirror
US7805260Mar 12, 2008Sep 28, 2010Electric Mirror, LlcMirror assembly
US7853414Apr 16, 2009Dec 14, 2010Electric Mirror, LlcMounting structure for a mirror assembly
US8099247Nov 24, 2006Jan 17, 2012Electric Mirror, LlcBack lit mirror with media display device
EP0883889A1 *Feb 25, 1997Dec 16, 1998Tailored Lighting Inc.Novel daylight lamp
EP2298138A1 *Sep 13, 2010Mar 23, 2011Cantoni Trading srlMirror with a lighting system
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/2, D06/308, 362/129
International ClassificationF21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21Y2103/00, F21V33/00
European ClassificationF21V33/00