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Publication numberUS3758115 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1973
Filing dateMar 23, 1972
Priority dateMar 23, 1972
Publication numberUS 3758115 A, US 3758115A, US-A-3758115, US3758115 A, US3758115A
InventorsHoglund E
Original AssigneeHoglund E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Putter
US 3758115 A
Abstract
A golf putter in which there is an enlarged somewhat elongate body and a transverse planar head connected by a narrow neck portion, the weight of the putter being balanced at least front and rear of the shaft connection and preferably laterally also, the shaft being connected substantially at the center of gravity of the putter.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Hoglund 1 1 Sept. 11, 1973 1 PUTTER 2,083,189 6/1937 Crooker 273 167 E Dl92,473 3/1962 Ray 273/167 D UX [76] lnvemor- 1020 Ave-1 0204,002 3/1966 Tanis C131... 273/80 0 ux Park Rldge, 60068 0213,507 3/1969 Koenig 273 167 G ux 1,654,916 l/1928 Boyce 273/164 [22] 1972 1,690,388 11/1923 Waldron. 273/167 0 [21] Appl. No.: 237,361 2,222,534 11/1940 Harris 273/168 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [52] .U.S. Cl. 273/164, 273/80 C, 273/167 A, 727,051 3/1955 Great Britain 273/80 C 273/167 F, 273/167 G 25,564 12/1905 Great Britain 273/164 [51] Int. Cl. A63b 53/04 836949 10/1938 France 273/l68 [58] Field of Search..; 273/77 R, 78, 80 C,

273/80.2-80.8, 163 R, 164, 167-175 Primary ExaminerRichard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Richard .l. Apley [56] References Cit d Attorney-1. Irving Silverman et a1.

I UNITED STATES PATENTS 57 ABSTRACT D185,522 6/1959 Whitney 273/164 UX 1 1,703,199 2/1929 273,164 X A golf putter 1n wh1ch there 1s an enlarged somewhat 1327,732 10/1897 'Ad 273/167 1) x elongate body and a transverse planar head connected 0196,736 10/1963 De Carlo.. 273/167 D UX by a narrow neck portion, the weight of the putter 20 67 Ma h m- 273/l64 UX being balanced at least front and rear of the shaft con- 581,331 4/1897 Brewster 273/169 nectlon and preferably laterally also the shaft being 115111479 10/1924 Kelly et 273/175 connected substantially at the center of gravity of the 3,343,839 9/1967 Borah 273/164 X utter 3,578,332 5/1971 Caldwell 273/78 X p 823,082 6 1906 Robertson 273/167 A 7 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEDSEP1 1 I915 3,758,115

CENTER OF GRAVITY PUTTER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The game of golf includes the art of putting on greens, this art being considered one of the most important aspects of the game. Considerable development in putter construction has occured, as a result of which there are many putters known in the prior art.

The best putting stroke is one which is accurate as to direction and of proper striking energy to move the ball to the hole. The designers of putters have always sought for a club whose construction will promote the needed accuracy and will assist the golfer in judging how hard to hit the ball, but the achievement of these ends has been less than universal. As a result, purchasers of putters are presented with a myriad of different constructions and designs which rarely live up to the promises made for them by the sellers.

As a result of considerable study, I have determined that the forces and effects which come into play in the use of a putter are complex and must be considered in building a putter. These forces and effects include, but are not limited to (a) balance of the club front to rear (considering the direction in which the ball is to be protransmission of energy to the ball when striking the same.

The best putting stroke will be one in which the movement of the club is smooth and along a natural swinging line, in which the ball is struck by the center of the club along the line of the clubs center of gravity, in which the maximum of kinetic energy is transmitted directly to the ball at a point or at most a very narrow area. Other factors are involved as will be mentioned, but these seem to be the most important, and I have provided a putter which takes these requirements into consideration in a novel and efficient manner.

The putter of the invention is intended primarily to be used in the more conventional method of putting, where the golfer stands laterally of the line of movement of the ball and swings the club towards the hole either from his right or left side, as opposed to the mallet method of putting in which the golfer straddles the line of movement of the ball and uses his putter like a croquet mallet. The principles of the invention may be applied to the'mallet type of putter, but the greater advantages of the invention occur when used in the more difficult to construct putter, in which the shaft is connected on an angle with respect to the normal upright disposition of the putter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The putter of the invention is constructed as a generally T-shaped member having a head and a body, the head being generally rectangular in configuration with the longer sides arranged horizontally and the shorter side vertically, the body being generally elongate in the front to rear direction of the putter movement and havin g the shaft connected thereto. The body and head are connected by a narrow neck. The center line of the shaft passes through the center of gravity of the entire T-shaped member, giving front to rear and lateral balance, promoting natural pendulum-like swinging. The ball is struck by the center of the face of the head, eliminating likelihood of deflection. The narrow neck concentrates the application of force at the center point of maintained by symmetry of configuration and mass on opposite sides of center.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a golf putter constructed in accordance with the invention, the shaft being shown fragmentarily;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the golf putter taken generally along the line 2-2 of FIG. I. and in the indicated direction;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the golf putter;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3 and in the indicated direction and FIG. 5 is a front-on elevational view of the putter.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. 1 there is illustrated a top plan view of a putter 10 constructed in accordance with the invention, this being the view that the player will see as he looks down upon the green in prepartion for striking the ball 12' toward the hole on his left. (It will be assumed hereinafter that the putter 10 is intended for use by a righthanded golfer. In the case of a left-handed golfer, the shaft will be on the opposite side of center.)

The putter 10 comprise a T-shaped member 12 normally cast or otherwise formed out of a suitable material, preferably metalsuch as brass, steel or aluminum to give the member 12 concentrated weight secured to a shaft 14. The shaft 14 is of conventional construction and may be hollow steel or aluminum or even wood or plastic. The T-shaped member 12 comprises a front head 16, a rear body 18 and a connecting neck portion 20, all preferably being formed integrally. The configuration of the T-shaped member is symmetrical on opposite sides of a vertical plane 21 passing through the center of the member 12 from front to rear.

The head 16 has a rectangular striking face 22 which is planar, the plane of the face being normal to the intended line of movement of the ball 12' in alignment with plane 21. The bottomedge of the head is somewhat arcuate providing a crown 24 formed on its lower side which continues as shown along substantially the entire front to rear length of the T-shaped member 12. This compensates to some extent for the heights of different players by enabling the angle which the member 12 makes with the ground to vary slightly without causing drag or other interference when the putter is used by different players.

The body 18 as shown is generally of elongate configuration witha bulbous or thickened portion 26 at the front endwhere the shaft 14 is mounted, to give good weight distribution for the purpose to be explained. Other designs may not have as marked an increase in 'size, but in any event there must be sufficient stock at this point to enable the drilling of the socket 28 to receive the bottom end of the shaft 14 as shown in FIG.

2. The entering end of shaft 14 is frictionally held in end 30 of the putter body 18 tapers to a point which is an aid in aiming the putter member 12 during use.

The neck portion 20 is a connecting structure between the head 16 and the elongate body 18 whose lateral thickness is as narrow as practical commensurate with the strength of the putter member 12. Typically, the horizontal length of the striking surface 22 of one putter was 3 inches, the neck portion 20 of this putter being somewhat less than one quarter inch laterally. The height of the neck portion 20 was substantially the same as the vertical height of the head 16, but this dimension is not as critical as the lateral dimension, as will be explained.

In order to assit in the use of the putter 10, that is to help the golfer swing it in the direction the ball 12 is to travel, besides the elongate construction of the body 18 there is an indicia to indicate the said direction. In the structure illustrated, this is a groove 32 formed in the top of the T-shaped member 12 normal to the face 22, extending from the said face rearwardly to the juncture of the shaft 14 with the top of the body 12. This groove 32 may be filled with contrasting color paint or otherwise visually emphasized. Any kind of indicia applied will be of assistance.

The shaft 14 is mounted to the member 12 in such a manner that its center line 34 passes through the center of gravity 36 thereof. Thus the mass of the member 12 is balanced with respect to the shaft to give substantially perfect pendulum swinging. This is indicated in the front to rear direction of FIG. 1 by the notation m; and m, which signifies front mass and rear mass. According to the invention, the shaft 14 is mounted to make these two masses equal. The lateral mass is also balanced on both sides of the plane 21 by virtue of the location and the connection of the shaft 14 with the member 12. Note that the socket 28 continues down to the bottom of the body 26. An effort is made to choose the depth of the socket 28 so that the amount of material drilled out on both sides of the plane 21 is equal in weight and likewise the shaft end is inserted in the socket at such depth that the weight disposed on opposite sides of the plane 21 is equal.

The putter l departs in construction radically from L-shaped putters and thus eliminates lateral deflection of the putter blade at impact which is a fault with L- shaped putters. In addition, the construction with the neck portion 20 gives an unusual advantage to the putter of the invention. The swinging of the putter provides a moving mass, giving kinetic energy which is to be transmitted to the ball 12. Most of the weight of the putter is in the body 18 and the energy produced is all concentrated in alignment with the neck portion 20, thereby producing the greatest concentration of impact energy at the center of the face 22, either at a point or at most a very small area. A ball struck here will receive the energy at the most efficient location, and even if slightly off center the ball will get the advantage of a concentrated application of force. Thus, it takes less effort to propel the ball and the club therefore has great sensitivity and accuracy. The stroke is a natural pendulum type of stroke with no tendency to twist or shock when the ball is struck.

As stated, the crown 24 is carried fully back toward the rear of the member 12, but in addition, it is preferred to are the bottom of the club convexly downwardly from the front to rear as best shown at 38 in FIG. 3 to prevent interference or dragging. Actually the club is swung in an are when used and this should be considered in constructing the sole of the putter member 12.

Considerable variation in the design of the putter can be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What it is desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A golf putter comprising a substantially T-shaped member having a top surface and a sole surface and having a shaft connected thereto, said T-shaped member comprising A. a head portion having a rectangular striking face defined between head side surfaces, a head top surface and a head sole surface, said head top and sole surfaces being longer than said head side surfaces and extending generally horizontally and the striking face defining a plane normal to the direction in which the putter is to strike a golf ball in propelling same forward,

B. an elongated body portion having a forward end and a rearward end and arranged at a right angle to the head portion and extending rearwardly relative to the center of said head portion, said elongate body portion being symmetrical about its center axis, said center axis passing substantially through the center of said head portion,

C. a neck portion having a lateral thickness between said top and sole surfaces which is substantially less than the thickness of at least said forward end of the body portion and connecting the body portion to the rear of the head portion, said neck portion being arranged at a right angle to the head portion and being symmetrically formed and coaxial with said body portion center axis,

D. said shaft being connected to the forward end of the body portion and rearwardly of the neck portion, said body portion being sufficiently laterally thickened at said forward end thereof to accommodate said shaft, the center line of said shaft being aligned substantially with at least the front to rear center of gravity of the T-shaped member whereby the swinging of the club is closely a balanced pendulum type of swinging, and

E. said body portion having an acutely angled shaft socket relative to a vertical plane passing through said center axis and terminating within said body portion adjacent said sole surface and having equal volumes on opposite lateral sides of said vertical plane, and the bottom end of said shaft is engaged in said socket with portions of equal weight disposed on opposite sides of said plane.

2. The putter as claimed in claim 1 in which the said center line passes through substantially the complete center of gravity of the said T-shaped member.

3. The putter as claimed in claim 1 in which there are indicia means on said topsurface of said T-shaped member along the geometric center thereof to assist in aiming the putter during use.

4. The putter as claimed in claim 1 in which the shaft is arranged at a lateral angle to the T-shaped member and said sole surface of said member being generally laterally convex to enable putting stances at slightly different angles without interference.

5. The putter as claimed in claim 1 in which said sole surface of said member is arcuate convexly between said striking face of said head portion and said rearward end of said body portion.

6. A golf putter comprising a substantially T-shaped member having a top surface and a sole surface and having a shaft connected thereto on an angle with the vertical, said T-shaped member comprising A. a head portion having a rectangular striking face defined between head side surfaces, and horizontally extending head top and sole surfaces of said head portion, said head top and sole surfaces being longer than said head side surfaces, said head sole surface between said head side surfaces being slightly convex, the striking face defining a plane normal to the direction in which the putter is swung to strike a golf ball in propelling same forward,

B. an elongate body portion having a forward end and a rearward end arranged at a right angle to the head portion and extending rearwardly relative to the center of the said head portion, said elongate body portion being symmetrical about its center axis, said center axis passing substantially through the center of said head portion,

C. a neck portion having a lateral thickness between said top and sole surfaces which is substantially less than the thickness of at least said forward end of the body portion and connecting the body portion to the rear of the head portion, said neck portion being arranged at a right angle to the head portion and being symmetrically formed and coaxial with said body portion center axis,

D. an acutely angled socket formed relative to a vertical plane passing through said center axis and terminating within said body portion adjacent said sole surface and being located said forward end of said body portion rearwardly of said neck portion and said shaft being engaged in said socket, said body portion being sufficiently laterally thickened at said forward end thereof to accommodate said shaft, the center line of the shaft being substantially aligned with the center of gravity of the T-shaped member whereby to provide mass balance front and rear of the shaft as well as laterally thereof for pendulum swinging of said putter,

E. indicia means on said top surface of said T-shaped member arranged on a line extending from the cen' ter of said striking face to said shaft to assist in aiming said putter during use thereof,

D. said angled shaft socket having equal volumes on opposite lateral sides of said vertical plane, and the bottom end of said shaft is engaged in said socket with portions of equal weight disposed on opposite sides of said plane.

7. The putter as claimed in claim 6 in which said sole surface of said member is slightly convex between said striking face of said head portion and said rearward end of said body portion.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4121833 *Mar 31, 1977Oct 24, 1978Prueter John LGolf club putter
US4138117 *Sep 15, 1976Feb 6, 1979Dalton John AGolf club head
US4140318 *Apr 20, 1977Feb 20, 1979Izett George MPutter-type golf club
US4141556 *Feb 16, 1977Feb 27, 1979Paulin Leo JGolf putter
US4163554 *Sep 19, 1977Aug 7, 1979Bernhardt Floyd VGolf putter
US4194739 *Aug 8, 1978Mar 25, 1980Thompson Woodrow FAdjustable golf putter
US4253667 *Apr 13, 1979Mar 3, 1981Clark Jack LGolf ball putter
US4265451 *May 3, 1979May 5, 1981Bernhardt Floyd VGolf putter
US4324404 *May 19, 1980Apr 13, 1982Walter Dian, Inc.Golf putter
US4754976 *Oct 15, 1985Jul 5, 1988Pelz David TPutter
US4756535 *Apr 17, 1987Jul 12, 1988Bradley Michael RGolf putter
US5046740 *Jun 26, 1989Sep 10, 1991Eath Roger A DGolf putter
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US5344141 *Apr 8, 1993Sep 6, 1994Smith James DPutter
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US5494282 *Mar 23, 1995Feb 27, 1996Pranio Thomas CGolf club putter with YIPS prevention and accurate line of sight
US5544879 *Jun 9, 1995Aug 13, 1996Collins; Clark E.Putter golf club
US5716290 *Aug 22, 1996Feb 10, 1998Hustler Golf Co.Balanced putter with top spin facility
US5785608 *Oct 24, 1996Jul 28, 1998Collins; Clark E.Putter golf club with rearwardly positioned shaft
US5795239 *Mar 17, 1997Aug 18, 1998Lin; Chun ShinGolf putter
US6045453 *Sep 1, 1998Apr 4, 2000Jenkins; Robert E.Golf clubhead for putting or chipping the golfball
US6406380Mar 2, 1999Jun 18, 2002Robert E. JacksonGolf putter clubhead
US6929564Jan 8, 2003Aug 16, 2005Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head
US7066831Apr 28, 2004Jun 27, 2006Jackson Robert EGolf putter
US7347793May 23, 2005Mar 25, 2008Davis Larry AWeight-balanced golf putter head
US7407446Sep 1, 2006Aug 5, 2008Bengtson Andrew WPutter with aligned front and back weights and a forwardly angled shaft
US8777775 *Mar 21, 2012Jul 15, 2014Lyle D. JohnsonWhole mallet putter head
US20050282656 *May 23, 2005Dec 22, 2005Davis Larry AWeight-balanced golf putter head
US20120108355 *May 3, 2012Guerriero Charles PFun golf club assembly
US20120214609 *Aug 23, 2012Lyle Dean JohnsonWhole mallet putter head
WO1993024187A1 *May 17, 1993Dec 9, 1993Probe Custom Golf Co IncGolf club putter
WO2004062746A1 *Dec 15, 2003Jul 29, 2004Taylor Made Golf CoGolf putter head
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/255
International ClassificationA63B53/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/007
European ClassificationA63B53/00P