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Publication numberUS3758985 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1973
Filing dateJul 17, 1972
Priority dateJul 17, 1972
Publication numberUS 3758985 A, US 3758985A, US-A-3758985, US3758985 A, US3758985A
InventorsHeisler A
Original AssigneeStidham M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Discus toy
US 3758985 A
Abstract
The disclosure is of a discus toy comprising a hollow disc on the sides of which are carried inflatable members, preferably of hemispherical configuration. Openings in the sides bring the interior of the disc into communication with the interiors of the inflatable members. Air scoops are provided on the periphery of the disc so that when the disc is thrown and spun, the inflatable members will expand into a sphere.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Heisler 1 1 Sept. 18, 1973 [5 DISCUS TOY 303,885 8/1884 Ridge 273/l05.5

I t I f l [75] nven or Alan W Hers er, San Ra ae Calif Primary Examiner Louis G. Mancene [73] Assignee: Melyjn R. Stidham, San Rafael, Assistant Examiner-J. Q. Lever Calif.; a part interest Attorney-Melvin R. Stidham 22 Filed: Jul 17 1972 l 1 y 57 ABSTRACT [21] Appl 272358 The disclosure is of a discus toy comprising a hollow disc on the sides of which are carried inflatable mem- [52] U.S. Cl. 46/74 D, 273/1055 bers, preferably of hemispherical configuration. Open- [51] Int. Cl A63h 27/00 ings in the sides bring the interior of the disc into com- [58] Field of Search 46/74 D; 273/1055 munication with the interiors of the inflatable members. Air scoops are provided on the periphery of the [56] References Cited disc so that when the disc is thrown and spun, the inflat- UNITED STATES PATENTS able members will expand into a sphere.

3,113,396 12/1963 Collins 46/74 D 3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures DISCUS TOY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In recent years a number of throwing toys in the general configuration of saucers have enjoyed considerable popularity in the market. Such toys are thrown and spun about their axes and may be caused to sail for considerable distances and even to perform various maneuvers. However, the maneuvers that can be imparted to such toys are restricted because of its fixed configuration.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide a discus toy which exhibits varying aerodynamic characteristics.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a discus toy which changes progressively in configuration during flight.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a discus toy which is transformed from a disc to a sphere during flight.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the description to follow when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In carrying out this invention, I provide a hollow disc which is of nearly circular configuration, though having diametrically opposite radial protrusions. An opening in each protrusion conditions it to function as an air scoop when the discus is caused to spin in the direction in which the opening faces. A pair of hemispherical inflatable members are carried on the sides of the disc in sealed relationship thereto and openings in the sides of the disc bring the interior of the disc into communication with the inflatable members. When the discus toy is thrown with a spin imparted thereto, air is drawn into the interior through the air scoops to inflate the members. This converts the toy from a disc to a sphere with an orbital ring, changing its aerodynamic characteristics.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is an elevational view of the discus toy as normally configurated;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of the discus toy in its distended configuration; and a FIG. 3 is a plan view of the discus toy.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Now referring to the drawing with greater particularlity the aerodynamic discus toy of this invention comprises a nearly circular hollow disc 12 having a pair of generally convex outer sides 14 and 16. The sides of the disc may be bonded together around their peripheries or otherwise formed as an integral member. Preferably the disc 12 is formed in two or more arcuate sections which are offset from each other so as to form a pair of diametrically opposite radial protrusions and 22. The protrusions have intake'openings 24 therein, facing in the same circumferential direction so as to function as air scoops into which air is drawn when a spin in such circumferential direction is imparted to the disc 12.

Central openings 26 and 28 are formed in the sides 14 and 16 so that the rigid portion 12 of the discus toy is actually in the form of a ring. In sealed relationship with each side l4, 16, as by forming it integral therewith or bonding it thereto, is an inflatable member 30, 32, each preferably in the form ofa hemisphere. Each member may be scored with a plurality of circular weakening lines 34 parallel to the sides 14 and 16 whereby the inflatable members 30 and 32 are normally collapsed to form a relatively flat disc as shown in FIG. 1. However, they may be distended into spherical configuration when expanded in the nature of a bellows by inflation.

In operation, the discus 10 may be grasped by placing the thumb on top and one or more fingers on the bottom of the disc and hurling the disc in sidearm fashion with a sharp snap of the wrist causing the disc to spin about its axis. With the disc spinning in a counterclockwise direction as shown in FIG. 3 air will enter the scoops at a rapid rate and because the inflatable members 30 and 32 are in communication with the disc ring 12 they are inflated and distended into a spherical configuration, creating a ball with an orbital ring around it, Hence, the aerodynamic characteristics of the discus toy are altered in flight. If the discus toy is then thrown with the ball distended and with the air scoops reversed, i.e. spun in the clockwise direction in FIG. 3, the air scoops will act as aspirators to deflate the ball.

While this invention has been described in conjunction with a preferred embodiment thereof, it is obvious that modifications and changes therein may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A discus toy comprising:

a hollow disc having a pair of spaced, nearly circular dished sides, adapted to be propelled and spun about the axis of said sides,

an opening in the central portion of one of said sides,

a normally collapsed inflatable member secured to and carried on said one side in sealed relationship thereto and around said opening, and

at least one air scoop on the periphery of said disc opening into the interior thereof so that air flowing tangential to said disc enters the interior thereof.

2. The discus toy defined by claim 1 wherein said inflatable member comprises:

a generally hemispherical hollow member having a plurality of parallel circular fold lines forming a bellows member.

3. The discus toy defined by claim 1 wherein:

there is an opening in the central portion of the other one of said sides, and including:

a second normally collapsed inflatable member carried on said other side in sealed relationship thereto and around said second opening.

t i i t

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US303885 *Feb 23, 1884Aug 19, 1884 Flying target
US3113396 *Mar 27, 1961Dec 10, 1963Ross W CampbellFloating saucer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3880427 *Jul 6, 1973Apr 29, 1975Vernon R BinghamProjectile and correspondingly shaped target including a projectile stop
US3930650 *Dec 23, 1974Jan 6, 1976Molded Foam Industries, Inc.Throwing device
US3959917 *Aug 20, 1975Jun 1, 1976Lawrence Peska Associates, Inc.Flying toy
US4117626 *Nov 8, 1976Oct 3, 1978Kifferstein Harry PSound-emitting toy flying saucer
US4143483 *Jun 9, 1977Mar 13, 1979Kifferstein Harry PSound-emitting toy flying saucer
US4568297 *Oct 27, 1983Feb 4, 1986Champion Discs, IncorporatedFlying disc
US4580990 *Jul 16, 1984Apr 8, 1986J. J. Avery, Inc.Pneumatic aerial amusement device
US4752267 *May 29, 1987Jun 21, 1988Robert LaymanDouble flying disc
US4955841 *Nov 3, 1989Sep 11, 1990Anthony PastranoDisc-shaped throwing toy
US5045011 *Jun 1, 1990Sep 3, 1991Lovik Craig JFlying balloon toy
US5287561 *Jan 22, 1993Feb 22, 1994Donald SpectorConvertible fabric hat and package therefor
US5531624 *Mar 2, 1994Jul 2, 1996Innova Champion Discs, Inc.For catching and/or throwing
US5797815 *Feb 6, 1997Aug 25, 1998Goldman Toy Group, Inc.Pop-open throwing toy with controllable opening delay and method of operating same
US5984753 *Dec 22, 1998Nov 16, 1999Perez; Charles G.Aerodynamic toy
US6805077Feb 25, 2003Oct 19, 2004Tucker Toys Inc.Collapsible dog toy
US6905387 *Sep 26, 2003Jun 14, 2005Donald M. BensonFlyable ball
US8197363 *Sep 20, 2010Jun 12, 2012Davignon Robert WTraining baseball and method of using the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/46, 473/588, 273/362
International ClassificationA63H33/00, A63H33/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/18
European ClassificationA63H33/18