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Publication numberUS3759260 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1973
Filing dateSep 20, 1971
Priority dateSep 20, 1971
Also published asCA1007127A1, DE2236455A1, DE2236455C2
Publication numberUS 3759260 A, US 3759260A, US-A-3759260, US3759260 A, US3759260A
InventorsEtes D, Nolan J
Original AssigneeHollister Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Post surgical drainage collection pouch
US 3759260 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

waited States Patent 1 Nolan et al.

[ 1 Sept. 18, 1973 [75] Inventors: John L. Nolan, Glenview; Donald E.

Etes, CrXiStaTIQ aReIboth of 1117 [73] Assignee: Hollister Incorporated, Chicago, Ill.

[22] Filed: Sept. 20, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 181,961

[52] US. Cl. 128/283 [51] Int. Cl. A61f 5/44 [58] Field of Search 128/275, 283

[56] References Cited IJNITED STATES PATENTS 2,327,514 8/1943 Fenwick 128/283 3,312,221 4/1967 Overment... 128/275 3,439,677 4/1969 Bonfils 128/283 3,575,170 4/1971 Clark 128/275 3,601,119 8/1971 Engelsher 128/275 3,618,606 11/1971 Brown et a1. 128/283 2,741,247 4/1956 Marsan 128/283 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 631,987 12/1961 Canada 128/283 Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum AttorneyI-Iofgren, Wegner, Allen, Stellman & McCord [57] ABSTRACT A collection pouch for receiving drainage from an abdominal opening following surgery comprising a flexible fluid-tight bag having a lateral opening adapted to register with the abdominal opening, means for sealing the bag to the abdomen around the registered openings in the abdomen and the bag, and means for venting the bag under controlled circumstances to exhaust gases which may have unpleasant odors. In one form of the invention, a vent aperture is provided in the bag for exhausting gases, together with releasable means adhesively secured to the bag to close the vent aperture in a manner which permits removal of the releasable means to vent the bag in privacy and replacement of the releasable means to again close the vent aperture. In another form, a vent aperture is provided in the bag for exhausting gases, and a filter is secured to the bag adjacent the vent aperture for deodorizing the gases exhausted through the aperture.

15 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures POST-SURGICAL DRAINAGE COLLECTION POUCH BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a stoma bag, a term sometimes used to refer to a post-surgical collection pouch for receiving drainage from an abdominal opening following surgery. Certain abdominal surgery, such as a colostomy, cecostomy or ileostomy results in an opening in the abdominal wall, sometimes referred to as a stoma, which permits drainage from the interior of the abdominal cavity. The patient is unable to control the drainage and therefore drainage appliances, such as a pouch or bag, are used to collect the drainage.

In the past, it has been conventional to utilize collection pouches together with means for sealing the pouch to the abdomen around the abdominal opening in order to prevent undesirable leakage of the drainage and in order to prevent as much as possible any contact of the drainage with the external skin of the abdomen which might result in irritation. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,302,647 relates to a drainage collection pouch to 'gether with means for sealing the pouch to the abdomen. One of the problems encountered with use of drainage collection pouches of the type described arises due to accumulation of gases in the pouch in addition to liquid drainage. The gases tend to inflate the bag before it is significantly filled with liquid or solid drainage. As a result, there may be an undesirable bulge or the buildup of pressure may retard adequate drainage. Accordingly, it is desirable to provide means for venting the collection pouch.

In view of objectionable odors which some of the gases may have, it is not practical to provide a constantly open vent which would exhaust objectionable odors leading to embarrassment of the patient, though constantly open vents may be suitable in other circum stances. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,575,170 relates to a beside drainage collection bag with a vent adapted to exhaust gases without discharging liquids. In an individual abdominal pouch, venting sould be controlled.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a pouch for collecting drainage from an abdominal opening together with means for venting the pouch under controlled circumstances allowing exhaust of gases with objectionable odors without undue embarrassment to the patient.

Preferably, the pouch comprises a fluid-tight bag of flexible lightweight plastic material containing a lateral opening adapted to register with the abdominal open ing, together with a flange extending outwardly from the opening in the bag for use in sealing the bag to the abdomen. In one form of the invention, a vent aperture is provided in the plastic bag for exhausting gases from the bag, together with releasable means adapted to be manipulated in a manner to vent the bag and then reseal the bag at the convenience of the patient.

In the preferred construction of the bag as described in the preceding paragraph, the vent aperture is provided beneath the flange adjacent the bag opening, and provision is made for adhesively securing the flange to the bag in an area around the vent aperture, in a manner permitting venting and resealing.

In another form of the invention, a vent aperture is provided in the plastic bag for exhausting gases from the bag, together with a filter secured to the bag adjacent the vent aperture for deodorizing the gases exhausted through the aperture, without the need for means to close the aperture.

In the preferred construction of the invention as described in the preceding paragraph, the filter comprises a disc of matted fibers and activated granular carbon having one surface overlying the vent aperture and an area surrounding the aperture, and an impervious cover over the opposed surface of the disc, leaving the periphery of the disc pervious, so that gases to be exhausted pass radially through the disc between the periphery of the disc and the vent aperture.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a fragmentary view of the abdominal section of a human torso showing a post-surgical drainage pouch positioned for use;

FIG. 2 is an outside elevational view of a drainage collection pouch embodying one form of the present invention utilizing a deodorizing filter with a vent aperture;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged transverse sectional view of the bag illustrated in FIG. 2, taken at about the line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and showing the manner in which the bag would be applied to an abdominal area;

FIG. 4 shows the components of the filter of FIGS. 2 and 3 in plan view;

FIG. 5 shows the filter components in elevational view;

FIG. 6 is an elevational view of a bag embodying another form of the invention, utilizing a selectively openable vent;

FIG. 7 is a transverse sectional view of the bag shown in FIG. 6, taken at about the line 7-7;

FIG. 8 is an elevational view of another bag showing a selectively openable vent; and

FIG. 9 is a transverse sectional view of the bag shown in FIG. 8, taken at about the line 9-9.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to the drawings in more detail, FIG. 1 illustrates a portion of a human torso 10 together with a drainage collection pouch ll of the character under consideration herein. In some pouches, particularly those of smaller dimensions, provision is made for sealing the pouch to the abdomen not only to prevent leakage of drainage fluid but also for purposes of supporting the pouch, and such a pouch is contemplated in the illustration of FIG. 1 which does not include a belt or other means additional to the pouch for supporting the pouch. The pouch in FIGS. 2-5 and the pouch in FIGS. 6 and 7 are both of a type like that shown in FIG. I utilizing adhesive attachment to the body for support without the aid of external devices. Other pouches may include provision for attaching a belt or the like adapted to surround the patients waist and aid in supporting the pouch. In the illustration of FIGS. 8 and 9, the pouch embodies means for utilizing external support. 1

Referring now to the illustration of FIGS. 2-5, the invention is embodied in a pouch 12 comprising a pair of generally rectangular panels of generally similar configuration, including an outer panel 13 and an inner panel 14 adapted to be disposed adjacent the patients body. The panels are of relatively lightweight flexible plastic material which is usually transparent. The outer perimeters of the overlying panels are secured together as by heat-sealing indicated at 16 in order to form a fluid tight bag which is adapted to be manufactured and stored in substantially flat form, but distended in use on admission of drainage fluid.

The panel 14 includes a generally circular opening 13 adapted to be placed in register with the abdominal opening for admitting drainage to the collection bag. In order to seal the bag to the abdomen to prevent leakage, the panel 14 includes an outwardly extending flange 19 around the opening 18. The flange 19 has a suitable adhesive coating on the exposed surface adapted to releasably adhere the flange to the abdomen in a manner to prevent leakage of fluid and in a manner to support the pouch. The adhesive preparation on the flange 19 may be similar to that described in the aforementioned U.S. Pat. No. 3,302,647 adapted to minimize irritation to the skin of the patient. Preferably, the adhesive coating is covered with a conventional releasable sheet adapted to protect the adhesive until the pouch is ready for use. As illustrated, the flange 19 is generally square in configuration and the panels 13 and 14 are generally rectangular in configuration, but it should be understood that other shapes may be utilized if desired.

In order to provide for exhaust of gases from the interior of the drainage collection pouch, the outer panel wall 1.3 is provided with a vent aperture as at 21 in association with a filter 22 secured to the inner surface of the panel 13. As best seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, the filter 22 includes a circular filter disc 24 comprised of matted fibers and granular activated carbon in a commercially available form which may include thin pervious paper sheets on opposite surfaces for containing the carbon granules against loss during handling. The activated carbon functions to deodorize the gases passing from the interior of the bag through the vent aperture 21. In order to ensure that the gases pass through as much activated carbon as possible, the opposite surfaces of the disc 24 are substantially sealed, except at the aperture 21, while the periphery of the disc 2d is pervious to the gas. In this manner, the gas enters the disc at the periphery and travels radially to the center of the disc for exhaust through the aperture 21.

In order to provide the desired effect, the surface of the disc 24 exposed to the interior of the pouch is covered by an impervious plastic cover sheet 26 somewhat larger than the disc and suitably secured to the disc if desired to facilitate handling. The opposite surface of the disc 24 is covered by a pervious plastic sheet as at 28 which will allow passage of gases. The disc 28 is also larger than the carbon disc 24, so that the periphery of the disc 28 may be secured to the periphery of the disc 26 as by heat-sealing in a manner to capture the carbon disc 24 between the two discs 26 and 28. The perforate cover sheet 28 becomes somewhat cup-shaped and spans the periphery of the carbon disc 24 so that gases in the collection pouch may enter the periphery of the carbon disc 24 through the pervious sheet 23, pass radially through the disc 24 and exit through the vent aperture 21. The assembled filter 22 may be attached to the inner surface of the wall panel 13 as by heat-sealing. If desired, the cover sheet 28 may be originally impervious and perforated at the periphery of the carbon disc during the step of securing disc 28 to disc 26.

For many years, it has been known that charcoal has the capacity to remove odors from air. More recently, activated carbon has been developed with increased porosity, improving the capability to absorb materials from gases and liquids of various compositions. Activation involves selective treatment with chemicals to enlarge the pores in the carbonized material to provide high absorbtive capacity. Activated carbons are commercially available in various physical forms, such as powdered or granular. The disc 24 preferably comprises granular carbons, which are over approximately mesh in particle size, enmeshed in matted fibers forming a felt-like material which is commercially available.

Referring now to the embodiment of FIGS. 6 and '7, a drainage collection pouch 30 is made from a pair of plastic panels of generally rectangular configuration designated 31 and 32 with peripheries secured together as by heat-sealing indicated at 34 in a manner to provide a fluid-tight bag for drainage collection. The panel 32 adapted to be disposed next to the patient is formed with a centrally disposed circular aperture as at 35, and adjacent the aperture 35 there is an outwardly extending flange 36 surrounding the aperture and containing an adhesive coating on the exposed surface adapted to be releasably secured to the abdomen of the patient for sealing the bag against leakage and for supporting the bag.

In order to vent the bag 30, an aperture is provided in the panel 32 as at 38, disposed beneath a portion of the flange 36 extending outwardly from the opening 35. Provision is made for releasably sealing the vent aperture 38 by means of a coating of adhesive material as at 39 in an area surrounding the aperture 38 on the outer surface of the panel 32 or on the corresponding surface of the flange 36, so that the flange 36 may be secured to the panel 32 in normal use to prevent exhaust of gases. However, the adhesive provided at 39 will permit the patient in appropriate privacy to separate the flange 36 and the panel 32 adjacent the aperture 38, so that the aperture is opened to permit exhaust of accumulated gases at a time and place which the patient considers suitable After venting the pouch, the aperture may be rescaled by pressing the panel 32 and the flange 36 together to adhesively'attach the two. If desired, the vent aperture may be located elsewhere and a separate sealing flap or tab provided for releasable sealing.

The pouch 40 shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 is of the gem eral type described in the aforementioned U.S. Pat. No. 3,302,647. It includes plastic panels 41 and 42 of generally rectangular configuration secured together at the periphery by means of heat-sealing as at 43. The inner panel 42 is formed with a centrally disposed opening 44 and around the opening 44 there is an outwardly extending flange as at 46 formed of heavier material than the material of the panels 411 and 42. Around the opening 4 the flange is thickened as at 47 to provide an annular lip adapted for cooperation with an annular sealing gasket or sealing pad 48. The inner surface of the gasket 48 contains an adhesive coating as described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,302,647 to facilitate releasable attachment to the patients abdomen, while the annular projecting lip 47 fits into the opening in the gasket. In use, the gasket $3 with tacky coating provides sealing engagement with the patients abdomen, and the pouch is removably mounted on the gasket and held by a belt or the like having buttons engageable in apertures 50 in tabs 51 projecting from flange $15, as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 3,302,647.

In order to vent the pouch 40, the panel 42 contains an aperture as at 52 underlying the flange 46. Either the outer surface of the panel 42 in the area surrounding the aperture 52 or the corresponding surface of the tab 50 is coated with a suitable adhesive as at 49 which provides for releasably securing the panel and the flange together in a manner to normally close the vent aperture 52 so that gases are sealed in the pouch. When it is desired to exhaust the gases, panel 42 may be peeled from the tab 50 so that the aperture is opened and the gases are free to exhaust. After venting the pouch, the aperture may be again closed by sealing the panel 42 to the tab 50.

We claim:

1. A collection pouch for receiving drainage from an abdominal opening following surgery, comprising,

a. a fluid-tight bag having a lateral opening adapted to register with the abdominal opening,

b. a flange extending outwardly from the bag opening for use in sealing the bag to the abdomen,

c. a vent aperture in the bag beneath the outwardly extending flange for exhausting gases from the bag, and

d. adhesive means releasably securing the flange to the bag in an area around the vent aperture and closing the vent aperture and manually operable to vent the bag and re-close the bag as desired by the patient.

2. A collection pouch as defined in claim I, wherein the flange extending outwardly from the bag opening contains adhesive on the outer surface for adherence to the abdomen to hold the bag in place.

3. A collection pouch as defined in claim 1, wherein the flange around the bag opening is adapted to receive a sealing gasket containing adhesive on the outer surface for adherence to the abdomen to seal the bag to the abdomen.

4. A collection pouch as defined in claim 1, wherein the flange around the bag opening has means providing for connection of a belt adapted to surround the patient and hold the bag in place.

5. A collection pouch for receiving drainage from an abdominal opening following surgery, comprising,

a. a fluid-tight bag of flexible plastic material having an opening in one side adapted to register with the abdominal opening,

b. a flange extending outwardly from the bag opening for use in sealing the bag to the abdomen,

c. a vent aperture in the bag under the flange for exhausting gases from the bag, and

d. adhesive means releasably sealing the flange to the bag in an area around the vent aperture permitting manual separation of the flange and bag to vent the bag and rescaling to close the vent.

6. A collection pouch as defined in claim 5, wherein the bag is constructed of two similarly shaped panels of material secured to each other at the perimeters thereof.

7. A collection pouch as defined in claim 5, wherein the flange around the bag opening is of material similar 6 to the material ofthe bag and has adhesive on the outer surface for adherence to the abdomen to hold the bag in place.

8. A collection pouch as defined in claim 5, wherein the flange around the bag opening is of stiffer material than the material of the bag for receiving a sealing gasket containing adhesive on the outer surface for adherence to the abdomen, and has means providing for connection of a belt.

9. A collection pouch for receiving drainage from an abdominal opening following surgery, comprising,

a. a fluid-tight bag having a lateral opening adapted to register with the abdominal opening,

b. means on the bag extending outwardly from the bag opening for use in supporting the bag in fluidtight relation on the abdomen of a patient,

0. a vent aperture in the bag for exhausting gases from the bag, and

d. a filter secured to the wall of the bag adjacent the vent aperture for deodorizing gases exhausted through the aperture comprising a disc of matted fibers and granular carbon having one surface overlying the vent aperture and an area surrounding the vent aperture, and an impervious cover on the opposed surface of the disc preventing passage of gas through that portion of the opposed surface directly opposite the vent aperture and permitting passage of gas through the disc radially outwardly relative to the vent aperture, so that gases exhausted pass radially through a course, which is longer than the thickness of the disc.

10. A collection pouch as defined in claim 9, including a flange extending outwardly from the bag opening and containing adhesive on the outer surface for adherence to the abdomen.

1]. A collection pouch for receiving drainage from an abdominal opening following surgery, comprising,

a. a fluid-tight bag having a lateral opening adapted to register with the abdominal opening,

b. a flange extending outwardly from the bag opening for use in sealing the bag to the abdomen,

c. a vent aperture in the bag for exhausting gases from the bag, and

d. a filter secured to the wall of the bag adjacent the vent aperture for deodorizing gases exhausted through the aperture comprising a disc of matted fibers and granular carbon having one surface overlying the vent aperture and an area surround.- ing the aperture, and an impervious cover over the opposed surface of the disc, leaving the periphery of the disc pervious, so that gases to be exhausted pass radially through the disc between the periphery of the disc and the vent aperture.

12. A collection pouch for receiving drainage from an abdominal opening following surgery, comprising,

a. a fluid-tight bag of flexible plastic material having an entrance opening in one side adapted to register with the abdominal opening,

b. a flange extending outwardly from the bag opening for sealing the bag to the abdomen,

c. a vent aperture in the bag for exhausting gases therefrom,

d. a filter disc of matted fibers and charcoal particles having an outer surface secured inside the bag over the vent aperture and an area surrounding the aperture, and

e. an impervious cover over the inner surface of the disc, leaving the periphery of the disc pervious.

13. A collection pouch as defined in claim 12, wherein the charcoal particles comprise activated granular carbon.

14. A collection pouch as defined in claim 12, wherein the impervious cover is larger than the disc, and including a impervious plastic sheet over the outer '7 surface of the disc and the periphery thereof, with the panels of material secured together at the perimeter penphery of the Sheet secured to the penphery of the thereof, one panel containing the entrance opening and the other panel containing the vent aperture.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3865109 *Mar 16, 1973Feb 11, 1975Elmore Austin EColostomy fecal pouch venting means
US3952727 *Dec 5, 1974Apr 27, 1976Hollister IncorporatedVent device for ostomy appliance
US4121589 *Jul 28, 1976Oct 24, 1978Mcdonnell Roy EdwardOstomy appliance
US4203445 *Dec 11, 1978May 20, 1980Hollister IncorporatedGas-venting filter assembly for collection device
US4232672 *Aug 2, 1978Nov 11, 1980Kingsdown Medical Consultants LimitedOstomy coupling including a venting valve
US4268286 *Jul 24, 1980May 19, 1981Kingsdown Medical Consultants LimitedAttachable filter and ostomy bag including same
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/333
International ClassificationA61M1/00, A61F5/441, A61M27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/441
European ClassificationA61F5/441