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Publication numberUS3760546 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 25, 1973
Filing dateAug 24, 1971
Priority dateAug 24, 1971
Publication numberUS 3760546 A, US 3760546A, US-A-3760546, US3760546 A, US3760546A
InventorsJ Baccus, M Gurman, G Martin
Original AssigneeHoliday Recreation Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular roof construction
US 3760546 A
Abstract
Prefabricated roof modules and associated prefabricated joining and trim members are described for completing on-the-job roofing from the joists out in a single carpentry operation. The modules each comprise a sheet-metal upper layer, a foamed synthetic plastic interior insulation layer, and a plywood sheathing lower layer. The sheet-metal upper layer is embossed or pressed-formed to simulate any desired roof deck construction, and is coated with a protective layer of vinyl resin of any desired color. The various module joining and trim members are provided with resilient wedge portions adapted to be compressed between the abutting edges of adjacent modules; and coated, power driven nails are used to secure the joining and trim members, together with their modular roof units, directly to the roof joists of a building under construction. The side-to-side length of the roof modules is a multiple of the conventional spacing between roofing joists or trusses in ordinary building construction, so that module junctures will overlie central portions of the trusses for nailing.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Martin et a1.

[ Sept. 25, 1973 1 1 MODULAR ROOF CONSTRUCTION [75] Inventors: Gerald Martin, Miami Beach; James [73] Assignee: Holiday Recreation Products, Inc.,

North Miami, Fla.

22 Filed: Aug. 24, 1971 [211 Appl.No.: 174,477

[52] US. Cl 52/555, 52/94, 52/309, 52/314, 52/468, 52/515, 52/622 [51] Int. Cl. E04d 1/28, E04d 1/36, E04d 3/18 [58] Field of Search 52/94, 309, 314, 52/467, 468, 470, 478, 465, 622, 555, 316,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,133,854 10/1938 Fischer 52/316 1,322,888 11/1919 Fischer 52/468 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 421,856 l/191l France 52/467 Primary Examiner-Frank L. Abbott Assistant Examiner.1ohn R. Masterman Att0rneyErnest H. Schmidt [5 7] ABSTRACT Prefabricated roof modules and associated prefabricated joining and trim members are described for completing on-the-job roofing from the joists out in a single carpentry operation. The modules each comprise a sheet-metal upper layer, a foamed synthetic plastic interior insulation layer, and a plywood sheathing lower layer. The sheet-metal upper layer is embossed or pressed-formed to simulate any desired roof deck construction, and is coated with a protective layer of vinyl resin of any desired color. The various module joining and trim members are provided with resilient wedge portions adapted to be compressed between the abutting edges of adjacent modules; and coated, power driven nails are used to secure the joining and trim members, together with their modular roof units, directly to the roof joists of a building under construction. The side-to-side length of the roof modules is a multiple of the conventional spacing between roofing joists or trusses in ordinary building construction, so that module junctures will overlie central portions of the trusses for nailing.

8 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures PATENTED 3.780.546

SHEHIUFQ Q. H SMOM ,QTTOR/VEX MODULAR ROOF CONSTRUCTION This invention relates to roof construction and is directed particularly to a modular roof construction comprising a plurality of roofing modules and module joining and trim members all adapted to be readily prefabricated at the factory and comprising sheathing, fireproofing, insulation, outer covering and weatherproofing to enable roof construction from the rafters or trusses out in a single operation.

Heretofore it has been common practice in roof construction to apply the sheathing, insulation, waterproofing and deck or outer covering in a series of individual layers ordinarily applied by different workmen having different skills. Thus, carpenters installed the sheathing, insulation installers the insulation, and roofers the weatherproofing material and outer decking. This method of construction is not only costly in the labor involved, but is also uneconomic in the use of materials because of uncontrollable wastage at the job site in the various cut-to-fit'operations.

It is, accordingly, the principal object of this invention to provide a modular roof construction wherein the modular roof components can be factory prefabricated and shipped to the job site for erection directly upon the trusses or rafters of a building under construction to complete the roofing in a single constructional operation involving only carpentry skills, and thereby not only effecting substantial savings in labor costs, but also enabling completion of the roof in a substantially shorter period of time than required in ordinary on-thejob roof construction methods.

A more particular object of this invention is to provide a modular roof construction of the character described wherein the roof modules comprises an outer or deck layer of formed sheet metal the outside of which is press-shaped or embossed to simulate any desired conventional roof construction and the underside of which is provided with either an integral layer of composite roofing insulation and sheathing or successive layers of insulation and sheathing.

Another object of the invention is to provide a modular roof member of the above nature which can readily be press-formed and assembled in layers of the individual components in mass production by the use of power press techniques for economy and simplicity of manufacture.

Still another object of the invention is to provide, in a modular roof construction, a method and means for joining the roof modules along their various edges, valleys, ridges and eaves, including the fascia board, to provide for water and weather-proof integrity of the completed roof under allclimate conditions for long periods of time.

Other objects, features, and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description when read with reference to the accompanying drawings. In the drawings, wherein like reference numerals denote corresponding parts throughout the several views:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view, as seen from above, ofa prefabricated roof module embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial, transverse cross-sectional view, taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 in the direction of the arrow;

FIG. 3 is an isometric view, as seen from above, of a joining strip for joining the sides of adjacent roof modules, whether in a common plane or where angles form a roof valley;

FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of the joining strip illustrated in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a partial side elevational view of the joining strip illustrated in FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is an end elevational view of a ridge and corner capping strip for the roof modules;

FIG. 7 is a partial side elevational view of the ridge and corner capping strip illustrated in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a front elevational view of the joining strip illustrated in FIG. 10;

FIG. 9 is a partial side elevational view of the joining strip illustrated in FIG. 10;

FIG. 10 is an isometric view, as seen from above, of a joining strip for joining adjacent roof modules along their upper and lower edges;

FIG. 11 is an isometric view of a fascia board assemy;

FIG. 12 is an end view of the fascia board illustrated in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is an isometric view of a side covering member for use with the roof modules;

FIG. 14 is an end elevational view of the side edge covering member shown in FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a front edge view illustrating the use of the side-to-side joining strip of FIG. 3 in the assembly of the prefabricated roof panels in a typical roofing installation;

FIG. 16 is a vertical cross-sectional view illustrating the use of the joining strip of FIG. 8 in the assembly of the prefabricated roof panels in a typical roofing installation; and

FIG. 17 is a transverse cross-sectional view illustrating the assembly of the lower edge of a roof module with a fascia strip member at the eaves of a typical roofing construction embodying the invention.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, reference numeral 10 designates, generally, a preferred form of a roofing module embodying the invention, the same being comprised, generally, of a formed sheet metal outer layer 11, a foamed synthetic plastic interior insulating layer 12 and a plywood sheathing bottom layer 13. The roofing module 10, which will preferably be 8 feet long and 4 feet wide, i.e., 4 feet from the lower to the upper edge, has its sheet metal outer layer 11 stamped to simulate any desired outer covering such as, for example, tile shingles as illustrated at 14. As such, the outer layer of sheet metal 1 l is formed with equidistantly-spaced, longitudinally-extending steps or riser portions 15 simulating the lower ends of courses of simulated tile 14, and a plurality of spaced depressions l6 simulating the spacing between tiles. Along the lower end of the sheet metal outer layer 11 the longitudinally extending step or riser l5 terminates in a short, outwardly projecting marginal lip portion 17 for the purpose hereinafter appearing. As a weatherproof outer coating the sheet metal outer layer 11 will be fluidize bed coated with a vinyl resin 18 having a minimum thickness of 0.01 inches. Such a protective coating has not only been found to be impervious to the elements, but also resistant to fading and substantially color fast. Fabrication of the roofing module 10 can be simply and economically effected by the use of a suitable forming and cutting die in a power or brake press of sufficient size. The individual layers of sheet metal 11, foamed synthetic plastic 12 and plywood sheathing 13 will be inserted together into the press die, with a suitable adhesive applied at the interior interfaces, so that the shaping and sizing of the roof module can be effected in a single stamping operation.

Means is provided for joining the sides of adjacent roof modules 10 upon roof assembly whether the juncture is to be in a common plane or along a valley in the finished roof. To this end, side-to-side and valley joining strips 19 are provided (see FIGS. 3, 4, and 5) comprising a formed sheet metal outer layer 20 having course-to-course steps 21, spaced and arranged as in the formed sheet metal outer layer of the roofing module l0 and further being formed with a central, longitudinal depression 22 simulating individual lateral spacing between tiles. The lowermost step 21 terminates in a short, outwardly-projecting lower lip 23. The sheet metal outer layer 20 of the joining strip 19 will also be provided with a protective outer coating of a vinyl resin, the same as that provided on the sheet metal outer ayer of the roofing module 11. The underside of the sheet metal outer layer 20 has cemented or otherwise secured to the underside thereof a wedge strip of foamed plastic 24, substantially T-shaped in transverse cross-section and having a downwardly-extending, resilient plug portion 25.

Means is also provided to seal and trim the ridges and corners of a modular roof assembly embodying the invention. To this end, as illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, a ridge and corner capping strip 26 is provided, said strip comprising a formed sheet metal outer layer 27 bent centrally along its length at an obtuse angle to provide sidewardly and downwardly outwardly projecting, opposed side portions 28, 28. The underside of the sheet metal outer layer 27 has cemented or otherwise secured thereagainst a wedge strip 29 of foamed plastic material, substantially T-shaped in transverse crosssection and integrally formed with a central, downwardly projecting resilient plug portion 30. The outer surface of the sheet metal outer layer 27 is also coated with a weather-proofing vinyl resin.

Means is also provided forjoining adjacent roof modules along their upper and lower edges in the assembly of a roof. To this end, as illustrated in FIGS. 8, 9, and 10, upper and lower edge joining strips 31 are provided, said strips being comprised of a formed and resin-coated sheet metal outer layer 32 having transverse depressions 33 simulating the side-to-side spacing between individual tiles. The underside of the sheet metal outer layer 32 has secured thereto, by cementing or the like, a wedge strip 34 of foamed plastic material, substantially T-shaped in transverse cross-section and providing a central, downwardly extending plug portion 35. The use of the above-described joining strips 19, 31 and the capping strip 26 in the on-the-job roofing installation is hereinbelow described.

The invention also comprises a fascia board assembly 36 (see FIGS. 11 and 12) comprising a fascia board 37 covered at one side and along the longitudinal edges with a bent sheet metal covering layer as indicated at 38 and 39, respectively, the outside of which is also coated with a protective layer of vinyl resin. Sheet metal end covers or caps 40 are provided for covering the ends of the fascia board assembly 36, said caps being applied on the job after the fascia board assembly has been cut to length in any particular roofing assembly.

along the other side with partial wedge-shaped steps 45 simulating overlapping tiles, and is further formed along the lower end with a downwardly stepped portion 46 terminating in an outwardly extending lip 47. The underside of the formed sheet metal outer layer 41 has cemented or otherwise secured against the underside thereof a wedge strip 48 of foamed plastic material substantially T-shaped in transverse cross-section and having a downwardly extending, resilient plug portion 49 arranged in substantially vertical alignment with the step 43.

In the use of the roofing modules 10 and their associated joining, capping and trim members in the assembly of a new roof, it is first to be noted that the size of the modules 10, being 8 feet from side to side, is such to reach center to center between truss members or rafters spaced 16 inches on centers, as in common in building construction, so that overlapping of the modules occurs along such building roof trusses or roof rafters, whereat they can be nailed in place as is hereinbelow described. It will further be understood that wherever necessary to cut a module to fit the roofing job under construction, this can readily be done with a saber saw.

As illustrated in FIG. 15, joining strips 19, described above with reference to FIGS. 3, 4, and 5, will be wedged between the opposed lower-to-upper edges of said modules, whereat they will conform with the stepped, simulated tile shape of said modules, as described above, and nailed in place, preferably by the use of two nails 50, 50 hammered through said joining strip at positions immediately outwardly of the lower ends of the course-to-course steps 21. Nails 50, 50, the heads of which are fluidize bed coated and the shanks of which are coated with a dry adhesive, will be hammered in by the use of a power tool, whereby they will be self-sealing with respect to the nail holes thus formed in the joined modules l0, 10 is passing through and into a roofjoist or truss .I. The force-nailing of the nails 50, 50 in place further serves to tightly compress or squeeze the horizontally extending portions of the wedge strip 24 against upper marginal surface portions of the roofing modules 10, 10 in their zone of juncture to seal against any possibility of water leakage. Although the joining strip 19 in FIG. 15 is illustrated as joining adjacent side-to-side roof modules in a common plane, it will be understood that such a strip could also be used where module edges meet in a valley, whereat the formed sheet metal outer layer 20 of such a joining strip can readily be bent along a central longitudinal axis to conform with the valley angle. The central longitudinal depression 22 in the joining strip 19 will simulate, in the finished roof, junctures between individual tiles.

FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 illustrate a joining strip for joining and sealing adjacent upper and lower roof modules 10, 10 in a typical modular roof construction. As illustrated in FIG. 16, ajoining strip 31, described above with reference to FIGS. 8, 9, and 10, will be wedged between and along the opposed upper and lower edges of said modules with the joint-simulating depressions 33 in alignment with the depressions 16 formed in said roof modules. A pair of coated nails 51, 51, similar to the nails 50 described above, will similarly be powerhammered through said joining strip and through the opposed marginal edge portions of said roof modules into each of the covered joists J of the roof under construction. The nails 51, 51, being thus applied in pairs at 16 inch intervals along the joining strip 31 squeeze the wedge strip 34 in place, as described above in connection with the use of the side-to-side valley joining strips 19, to insure weather-tight assembly.

The ridge end corner capping strip 29 illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7 will be used wherever the side to side edges of modules 10, 10 meet, such as along the ridge of the roof under constuction or along outside corners. Their use will be as described above in connection with the nailing in place of the joining strip 31 of FIGS. 8, 9, and 10, using nails hammered into the roof joists spaced along 16 inch centers. It will be understood that, here again, the downwardly projecting side portions 28, 28, upon installation, can be readily altered in their angular shape to conform with the particular angle along the meeting edges of the modules to be joined.

FIG. 17 illustrates how a fascia board 36 (see also FIGS. 11 and 12), applied along the lower ends or eaves of the roof joists J will be joined to the lower edge of roof modules 10, 10 of a roof under construction by the use of front-toback joining strips 31 according to FIGS. 8, 9, and 10. As illustrated in FIG. 17, such joining strips will be bent along their sides to conform with the angle of juncture and nailed into the fascia board assembly 36 along the upper edge thereof and into the joists J along 16 inch centers. Coated power-driven nails 52, 52 together with the compression of the wedge strip 34 at the junction insures watertight integrity of the assembled roof for a long period of time.

The side edges of a roof assembly comprising the roof modules of the invention can readily be trimmed by the use of side edge covering members 41 illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14. Here again, the wedge strip offoamed plastic material 48 together with the horizontallyextending portions of said wedge strip upon being compressed in place by the use of coated power driven nails extending through outer edge portions of said modules and through said side edge cover members into the outer joists, provides for watertight assembly while at the same time providing for a finished appearance along the side edges of the completed roof.

Preferably, the joining and capping strips 19, 26, 32, and 41 will be fabricated in 8 foot lengths for ease of storage and transportation and for convenience in use. A variety of widths of these strips could be provided, such as 4, 6 and 8 inch widths, to accommodate the various requirements of individual roof constructions. It is also to be noted that while I have illustrated and described herein the roofing modules 10 as being comprised of three layers, i.e., an outer formed sheet metal layer 11, a foamed synthetic plastic insulating layer 12, and a plywood sheathing layer 13; it is contemplated that by making the formed sheet metal outer layer 11 of increased gauge or thickness to provide the required structural rigidity, the plywood sheathing bottom layer 13 could be entirely eliminated. In such instances the foamed synthetic plastic insulating layer would be made substantially thicker to provide the additional insulation otherwise lost by the elimination of said plywood sheathing layer.

It is further to be understood that while I have described herein the interior insulating layer 12 as comprising a foamed synthetic plastic material, preferably styrofoam or urethane foam, this material could as well be any material having insulating and fire retarding properties, while at the same time being light enough in weight and economical enough in cost to satisfy requirements of practibility.

While we have illustrated and described herein only one form in which the invention can conveniently be embodied in practice, this embodiment is presented by way of example only and not in a limiting sense. The invention, in brief, comprises all the embodiments and modifications coming within the scope and spirit of the following claims.

What we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A roofing module, comprising, in combination, a rectangular, formed sheet metal outer layer and a comparatively thIck layer of insulating material attached to the underside of said outer layer, a layer of rigid roof Sheathing secured against the underside of said layer of insulating material, said outer layer being pressedformed (along) throughout its surface to simulate a plurality of roof shingles both side-by-side along a course of shingles and row-upon-row along successive courses of shingles and having the appearance of a conventional built-up roof construction, and means for joining a pair of such modules placed edge to edge in a roof assembly, said joining means comprising a elongated strip of sheet metal and a wedge strip of foamed plastic material of T-shaped cross-sectional configuration secured against the underside of said metal strip and defining a resilient plug portion extending outwardly of the underside of said metal strip.

2. A roofing module as described in claim 1 wherein the outer surface of the outer layer is fluidize bed coated with a synthetic resin.

3. A roofing module as defined in claim 2 wherein said layer of insulating material is of a foamed synthetic plastic material.

4. A roofing module as defined in claim 3 the length of which is a multiple of 16 inches.

5. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein said metal strip is pressed-formed along its surface to conform with the press forming of the sheet metal outer layer of said roofing modules.

6. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein said metal strip is bent centrally along its length at an obtuse angle for joining an adjacent pair of such modules along the ridge of a roof under construction.

7. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein said joining means further comprises a plurality of nails driven through marginal edge portions of said strip and said modules, said strip being disposed with its resilient plug portion fitted between opposing edge portions of said roofing modules, the shanks of said nails being coated with a dry adhesive.

8. The invention as defined in claim 1 and further comprising a fascia board assembly comprising an elongated wooden board and a layer of sheet metal covering the outside and the peripheral edges of said board, and a second joining means for joining the lower edge of the lowermost one of said modules in a roofing assembly along the upper edge of said fascia board memthe underside of said last mentioned metal strip and defining a resilient plug portion extending outwardly of the underside of said last mentioned metal strip.

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/555, 52/309.9, 52/468, 52/94, 52/748.1, 52/515, 52/314, 52/793.1
International ClassificationE04D3/35, E04D1/26, E04D3/00, E04D3/38, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D3/38, E04D1/365, E04D3/352, E04D1/265
European ClassificationE04D1/36S, E04D3/35A1, E04D3/38, E04D1/26A