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Publication numberUS3761975 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1973
Filing dateApr 12, 1972
Priority dateApr 12, 1972
Publication numberUS 3761975 A, US 3761975A, US-A-3761975, US3761975 A, US3761975A
InventorsB Personett
Original AssigneeB Personett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infant rest pad
US 3761975 A
Abstract
Generally rectangular sheets of plastic vinyl are heat-sealed together to form a pad with a resilient cushion defined by an inflatable chamber which extends around a central rest area. When inflated, the chamber forms a plurality of lobes with interposed air pockets around the periphery of the pad. The lobes extend toward the center of the rest area and act in effect as ramps which direct a rolling infant back toward the center of the rest area. The pockets provide air spaces to keep the infant from rolling tightly up against the wall of the chamber and possibly smothering.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Personett 1 Oct. 2, 1973 INFANT REST PAD [22] Filed: Apr. I2, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 243,163

Primary ExaminerBernard A. Gelak Assistant Examiner-Glenn O. Finch Attorney-Wolfe, Hubbard, Leydig, Voit & Osann, Ltd.

[ ABSTRACT Generally rectangular sheets of plastic vinyl are heatsealed together to form a pad with a resilient cushion defined by an inflatable chamber which extends around a central rest area. When inflated, the chamber forms a plurality of lobes with interposed air pockets around the periphery of the pad, The lobes extend toward the center of the rest area and act in effect as ramps which direct a rolling infant back toward the center of the rest area. The pockets provide air spaces to keep the infant from rolling tightly up against the wall of the chamber and possibly smothering.

5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures INFANT REST PAD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a device for preventing an infant from possibly rolling off of a bed or other elevated surface upon which he has been placed to rest or feed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The general aim of the present invention is to make it easier and safer for parents to care for a small infant when away from home through the provision of a novel portable device or rest pad upon which the infant may be laid and left alone to feed or nap without worry that he might roll over and smother himself or be injured by rolling over and off the elevated surface supporting the pad.

A further object of the present invention is to construct the pad with an inflatable chamber extending around the periphery of the pad at a height which virtually prevents the infant from possibly rolling off the pad.

More specifically, it is an object of the invention to construct the chamber to have a novel shape not only to keep the infant from possibly rolling up tightly against the walls and smothering but, also, to redirect the energy of the rolling infant so that the infant tends to roll back toward the center of the pad. In this regard, the invention resides in the unique arrangement of lobes and interposed pockets formed in the wall of the chamber along opposite sides of the rest area.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an infant rest pad embodying the novel features of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially along line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially along line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged elevational view taken substantially along line 4-4 of FIG. 1'.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As shown in the drawings for purposes of illustration, the present invention is embodied in an infant rest pad suitable for use on the top of a bed (not shown) or other elevated surface to keep an infant within a walled-in rest area 11 on the pad so that the infant is prevented from rolling off the bed and possibly being injured. In accordance with the primary aspect of the present invention, a resilient cushion l2 integrally formed around the periphery of the pad includes unique wall portions 14 disposed along opposite sides of the rest area both for preventing the infant from rolling off the pad and keeping the infant from possibly smothering against the wall. For these purposes, the cushion is defined by an inflatable chamber 13 having wall portions which are constructed with a plurality of lobes l5 and interposed pockets 15a. When the chamber is inflated, the lobes keep the infant away from the wall by redirecting the infant to roll back toward the center of the pad and the pockets provide air spaces between the lobes to keep the infant from burying his head in the cushion and possibly smothering.

In the present instance, the pad 10 comprises a plurality of generally rectangular vinyl plastic sheets 16, 17 and 18 overlying each other as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The bottom sheet 16 is somewhat thicker than the two upper sheets 17 and 18 and includes a cloth backing 19 embedded in the underside thereof to protect the pad against punctures and to keep the pad from sliding across the elevated surface during use. Alternatively, the underside of the bottom sheet may be embossed to facilitate washing the pad. The two upper sheets 17 and 18 are thinner than the bottom sheet and form a double-ply top which has been found to be particularly effective in stopping air leaks through the pinsized holes (not shown) normally found in thin plastic sheets.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the top two sheets 17 and 18 and the bottom sheet 16 are heat-sealed together along two spaced peripheral seams 20 and 21. The outer seam 21 defines the circumference of the pad 10 as having two parallel sides 22 and two parallel ends 23 connecting the sides with each other to form the generally rectangular pad. The inner seam follows an irregular, curving but generally rectangular path around the periphery of the rest area 11 to define the rest area as having generally straight and parallel opposite ends 25 which also are parallel with the ends 23 of the pad. The opposing sides 26 of the rest area are scallop-shaped curved segments of the inner seam 20 which alternately open toward and away from the center of the rest area upon progressing between the two ends 25.

The space between the inner and outer seams 20 and 21 defines the chamber 13 as including an upper wall 27 (see FIG. 2) formed bya portion of the double-ply top and a lower wall 29' formed by a portion of the bottom sheet 16, the two walls 27 and 29 being connected to each other along the inner and outer seams. In the exemplary embodiment, the inflated chamber approaches four inches in height along the sides 26 of the rest area in order to keep very young infants confined to the rest area 11. It will be appreciated, however, that under differing circumstances it may be preferable for the chamber to be ofa greater or lesser height than the 4 inches.

To inflate the chamber 13, a valve 30 secured to the uppermost sheet 18 extends through the double-ply top wall 27 and into the chamber to permit air to be blown into the chamber. Preferably, the valve is normally oneway acting to prevent air from leaking out of the chamber back through the stem of the valve. In the present instance, the stem of the valve must be pinched together in order to deflate the chamber. Thus, through the use of this valve, the chamber is kept from accidentally deflating.

When the chamber 13 is inflated, the lobes 15 are formed in the upper wall 27 of the chamber along the opposing sides 26 of the rest area 11 as a result of the outwardly opening curved segments of the inner seam 20. Similarly, the inwardly opening curved segments of the inner seam form the pockets 15a between the lobes. As shown in FIG. 2, the upper surfaces of the lobes slant downwardly from the top of the chamber, upon progressing toward the inner seam to form in effect small resilient ramps which tend to redirect an infant rolling upon them back toward the center of the rest area. The pockets 15a provide air spaces between the lobes so that an infant is kept from rolling up tightly against the cushion l2 and possibly smothering himself.

In another aspect, the present invention enables the infant to feed from a bottle 31 without the bottle having to be held manually while he nurses. For this purpose, a bottle holder 33 located on top of the cushion 12 includes a recess 34 formed in the top wall 27 to support the bottle above the rest area 11. A strap 35 spanning the recess holds the bottle therein so that the infant can feed himself.

Herein, two of the bottle holders 33 are formed integrally with the pad 10, the holders being located on opposite sides of the rest area 1 1 (see H6. 1) so the infant may lay on either side when nursing. More particularly, the recesses extend across the top of the chamber generally at right angles with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cushion 12 along each side 26 of the rest area. The straps 35 are heat-sealed to the uppermost plastic sheet 18 along opposite sides of the recesses as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4 for holding bottles within the recesses.

While one of the main advantages of the present invention resides in the use of the pad to keep the infant from rolling off an elevated surface when he is resting or feeding, other additional advantages of the pad are readily apparent. For instance, since the pad is made of plastic and is impermeable, it makes an excellent covering upon which diapers may be changed without worry of possibly causing damage to the surface supporting the pad. Moreover, when the pad is not in use, it may be deflated and folded into a small, easily portable package. Thus, it will be appreciated that the present invention as embodied in the unique pad 10 makes it much easier, safer and more convenient to care for an infant not only when away from home but also in the home itself.

I claim as my invention:

1. An impermeable pad for an infant including a central rest area, a resilient cushion extending circumferentially around the rest area and adapted to be inflated to prevent the infant from rolling off the pad, said cushion including a plurality of lobes with outer wall sur faces slanting downwardly and inwardly toward the middle of the rest area from along opposite sides thereof to help direct the infant to roll toward the middle of the rest area and away from the walls of the cushion, and said lobes defining pockets between adjacent lobes to provide air spaces so that the infant is kept from rolling against the walls of the chamber and possibly smothering.

2. A pad as defined by claim 1 further including a holder mounted on top of the cushion to support a bottle above the rest area for self'feeding by the infant.

3. A pad as defined by claim 2 including a recess extending laterally across the top of the cushion to support the bottle.

4. A pad as defined by claim 3 wherein said holder includes a strap spanning the recess and heat-sealed to the pad on opposite sides of the recess to hold the bottle in the recess.

5. An impermeable pad for an infant including first and second sheets of plastic positioned one on top of the other, a generally rectangular rest area centrally formed on said sheets, inner and outer sealed seams spaced from each other and extending around the periphery of the two sheets to hold the sheets together and to define an inflatable chamber between said sheets and said seams, a resilient cushion defined by said inflated chamber and including curved upper and lower walls to prevent the infant from rolling off the pad, a plurality of lobes formed in said upper wall by said inner seam and slanting downwardly and inwardly toward the middle of the rest area from along the top of said cushion to help direct the infant to roll toward the middle of the rest area, and said lobes defining pockets between adjacent lobes to provide air spaces so that the infant is kept from possibly smothering by rolling against said cushion.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4104750 *Mar 4, 1977Aug 8, 1978Kelter S LouisInflatable infant crib and carrier
US4137584 *Oct 3, 1977Feb 6, 1979Sharber Norman GInsect and reptile barrier for outdoorsmen
US4442838 *Mar 25, 1982Apr 17, 1984Her Majesty The Queen In Right Of Canada, As Represented By The Minister Of National DefenceMalignant hyperthermia mattress
US4594743 *Jul 10, 1984Jun 17, 1986Siesta Corp.Air support bed
US4641386 *Jul 1, 1985Feb 10, 1987Agence Spatiale EuropeenneMethod of and device for restraining the sleeping body of an astronaut in conditions of weightlessness
US4825487 *Jun 11, 1987May 2, 1989Tertulin EberlApparatus for the positioning of people, especially new-born babies, in a lying position
US5120111 *Jun 13, 1991Jun 9, 1992Cook Christopher AInflatable seat
US5699569 *Oct 27, 1994Dec 23, 1997Schwarz-Zoehrer; SabineCombined bed and seat device for an infant
US5813066 *Jul 15, 1996Sep 29, 1998Gebhard; Albert W.Baby rest
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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/655, 5/732, 5/94, 5/699
International ClassificationA47C27/08, A47D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61J2009/0638, A61J9/06, A47D5/00, A47D15/003, A61J2009/0684
European ClassificationA47D5/00, A61J9/06, A47D15/00B2