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Publication numberUS3762109 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1973
Filing dateJan 20, 1972
Priority dateJan 20, 1972
Publication numberUS 3762109 A, US 3762109A, US-A-3762109, US3762109 A, US3762109A
InventorsCohen A
Original AssigneeCohen A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bus shelters
US 3762109 A
Abstract
A bus shelter in the form of an open three-sided transparent structure having a translucent roof thereon. The walls of the structure are spaced from the ground to provide an open bottom area through which the wind may sweep dirt and debris from the floor of the shelter, so that maintenance thereof is not required.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Paten 1 1 Cohen 1 Oct. 2, 1973 1541 nus sum n cks l)l98,565 '7/1964 COUPCI' 52 79 x 1,756,849 4 1930 B '131' d 52 8 X [76] Inventor: Arthur Merrill Cohen, Rego Park, 2676554 41954 u x X NY 2,871,521 2 1959 Messmore 52/73 3,199,256 8/1965 Considder 52/95 [221 1972 3,269,743 8/1966 Barreco 285/D1G. 16 [2]] Appl. No.: 219,421

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Rem"! Applicafio" Dam 247,072 6/1963 Australia 52/270 [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 16,000, March 3,

1970 abandoncd' Primary ExaminerPrice C. Faw, .lr. 52 us. on 52/11, 52/79, 52/95, Amms 52/270 [51] 1nt.Cl E04h 1/12 57 ABSTRACT 58 F 1d is h ..52 11,73,74, 95, 8 :2; 36 27 97 700 2 275 79 28 A bus shelter 1n the form of an open three-sided transb parent structure having a translucent roof thereon. The walls of the structure are spaced from the ground to R f n Cit d provide an open bottom area through WhlCh the wind NITEDe g f PIZTENTS may sweep dirt and debris from the floor of the shelter,

U so that maintenance thereof is not required. Dl97,005 12/1963 Beekenkamp et a1. 52/79 X I 3,514,909 6/1970 Nevarez... 52/200 X 29 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures I; 1 i fi J, 7 1 s J J JL-'=-\ A A Patented Get. 2, 1973 3,762,109

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 zlu E77 n;

Patented Oct. 2, 1973 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 6

FIG. 7

BUS SI-IELTERS This application is a continuation-in-part of my prior copending application, Ser. No. 16,000, filed Mar. 3, 1970, and now abandoned.

The present invention relates to a waiting station construction, and is particularly suitable for use as, although not limited to, a shelter for mass transit commuters.

Waiting stations, or shelters for use by mass transit commuters have proven to be of considerable value, especially where commuters must wait for long time periods for buses or trains in inclement weather. Unfortunately, most of the waiting stations which are presently in use have a rather unattractive appearance, and tend to collect quantities of dirt and debris therein, thus requiring considerable expense for periodic cleaning and maintenance of the station interiors. Since the interiors of such existing waiting stations tend to be dark and are not readily visible from the surrounding terrain, these stations have become a common scene for violent crimes, perpetrated upon the persons of mass transit commuters.

In addition, the shield interiors and conventional construction of existing waiting stations have made them'popular targets for vandalism, thus further increasing the costs of maintaining and repairing such stations. A further disadvantage of existing waiting stations is the variation in construction from one unit to another, so that substantial redesign is required even when similar waiting stations of different sizes are to be provided.

As herein described, there is provided a waiting station having an open, light transmissive wall structure which is secured to and spaced above a horizontal surface. A roof dome covers the waiting station and is supported by the wall structure. A portion of the shelter between the wall structure and horizontal surface is open to the elements, so that the floor of the shelter may be swept by the wind.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view ofa bus shelter according to a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the fascia used in the shelter of FIG. 1, said view being taken along the cutting plane 2-2 shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of an alternative embodiment of the fascia which may be utilized in the construction of the shelter shown in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4 & 5 are cross-sectional views of window frames which may be utilized in the construction of the shelter shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the uprights and windows employed in the construction of a corner of the shelter shown in FIG. 1, taken along the cutting plane 6-6 shown therein;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the lower support structure of the shelter shown in FIG. 1, taken along the cutting plane 7-7 shown therein;

FIG. 8 is across-sectional view of still another embodiment of the fascia employed in construction of the shelter shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 9 is a front elevation-section view of an alternative embodiment of the shelter shown in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 10, ll & 12 are side elevation views of still other embodiments of the shelter shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 13 is a top plan view of another embodiemnt of the invention with the roof and roof frame removed.

The shelter 1 shown in FIG. 1 comprises a threesided open, light transmissive wall structure having a major wall portion 2 opposite the opening and two oppositely disposed and wall portions 3 and 4 extending from opposite ends of the major wall portion 2. The walls 2, 3 and 4 are supported by a support structure comprising a lower beam 5 which is in turn supported by a plurality of legs 6, the bottoms of the legs 6 being secured to a horizontal surface (not shown) by U brakcets or other suitable means. The lower beam 5 and the supporting legs 6 maintain'the shelter walls, 2, 3 and 4, spaced above the horizontal surface to which the shelter is mounted, so that the interior floor area of the shelter 1 may be swept clean of dirt and debris by the wind and washed by the rain.

In order to leave the floor of the shelter 1 sufficiently exposed to the elements, and to provide adequate wind sweeping of the shelter floor without introducing excessive drafts within the shelter strucutre, the open area between the lower edges of the walls 2 to 4 and the horizontal surface to which the shelter is secured, i.e., the distance A, is preferably in the range of 4 to 12-inches.

Wall portions 2, 3 and 4 comprise a number of hollow metallic uprights 7 of rectangular cross section, to which window frame channels are secured.

A plurality of light transmissive plastic panels 8 is situated within the structure defined by the uprights 7, each plastic panel being retained in position by a respective window frame channel secured to the'adjacent uprights.

Preferably, the uprights 7 should be constructed of a corrosion resistant, light weight metal requiring little or no periodic maintenance. I have found that anodized aluminum is an excellent material for this purpose.

The windows 8 are preferably constructed of a transparent plastic such as polyethylene, polypropylene,

polycarbonate, polybutyrate or acrylic. The plastic employed in construction of the windows 8 should preferably be abrasion resistant, resilient, and hydrophobic to minimize water marks. While a transparent plastic is preferred for construction of the windows 8, translucent plastic material may alternatively be employed.

By the term transparent as herein employed is meant a material which transmits light with sufficient clarity so that objects may be easily viewed and identified through the material.

By the term translucent as herein employed is meant a material which transmits light, but which diffuses the transmitted light so that objects viewed through the material cannot be clearly identified, but appear merely as light and dark shapes.

By the term light transmissive as herein employed is meant a material which is either transparent or trans lucent.

The anodized aluminum uprights 7 of the major portion 2 of the wall structure ofthe shelter 1 rest upon and are supported by the lower beam 5, which also is preferably formed of anodized aluminum having a hollow rectangular cross-section.

Each of the uprights 7 of the major wall portion 2 is secured to the lower beam 5 by a U-shaped channel situated at the junction of the upright and the lower beam,in the manner indicated in FIG. 7.

As shown in FIG. 7, a U-shaped channel 9 having a length in the direction perpendicular to the drawing equal to the internal depth of the upright 7 within which the channel 9 is situated, is secured to the lower beam 5 by a blind rivet 10. The sides ofthe channel 9 are secured to the adjacent portions of the upright 7 by blind rivets 11 and 12, which are countersunk so that the outer surfaces thereof are flush with the adjacent outer walls of the upright 7.

ln assembling the uprights 7 to the lower beam 5, each U-shapcd channel 9 is first secured to the lower beam 5 by a corresponding blind rivet 10, which is inserted from the open end of the channel 9. Thereafter each upright 7 is slid into place over a corresponding U-shaped channel 9, and secured to the channel by blind rivets 11 and 12. If desired, epoxy resin glue may be put in the shallow recesses 13 of the U-shaped channel 9 before the corresponding upright 7 is slid into place and subsequently cured so that additional bonding strength is provided between the channel 9 and the upright 7.

Thus the uprights 7 are secured to the lower beam 5 by structural fastening means which is extremely difficult to dismantle without the use of power tools, thereby minimizing the opportunity for dismantling of, or major structural damage to, the wall structure by vandals. Since the walls 2, 3 and 4 of the shelter 1 are light transmissive (except, of course, for the relatively small area defined by the opaque uprights 7), persons and activities within the shelter 1 are exposed to public view, thus minimizing the exposure of persons situated within the shelter to violent crimes. The light transmissive structure of the wall portions 2 to 4 permits rapid police surveillance of the interior of the shelter from virtually any direction.

A unitary (one piece) light transmissive roof dome 14 is supported by the wall structure of the shelter 1.

The light transmissive roof dome 14, which is preferably translucent, or transparent, comprises a relatively raised central portion and a relatively depressed peripheral portion to which a fascia 15 is secured in a manner to be hereafter described.

The fascia 15 is in turn supported by an upper beam 16 which also serves as a header for the upper ends of the uprights 7.

Preferably, the upper beam 16 is constructed of anodized aluminum having a hollow rectangular cross section, the upper ends of the uprights 7 being secured to the upper beam 16 by an internal U-channel construction similar to that employed for securing the lower ends of the uprights 7 to the lower beam 5.

The legs 6 are integral with the corresponding uprights 7 of which they form a part, the lower beam 5 being secured to each of these uprights by an internal U-channel construction of the type shown in FIG. 7.

As indicated in FIG. 7, an upright 7 having a lower portion comprising a leg 6 is secured to a U-shaped channel 17 by a blind rivet 18. The sides of the U- shaped channel 17 are secured to the upper and lower surfaces of the lower beam 5 by blind rivets l8 and 19 respectively, these rivets being countersunk to be flush with the adjacent upper and lower exposed surfaces of the lower beam 5.

The upright 7, having a leg 6 comprising the lower portion thereof, is secured to the lower beam 5 by first riveting the U-shaped channel 17 (this channel having a length in the direction perpendicular to the paper as indicated in FIG. 7 equal to the corresponding internal dimension of the lower beam 5) to the upright 7 by means of the blind rivet 18 which is inserted from the open end of the channel. The lower beam 5 is then slid over the sides of the channel 17, and riveted thereto by means of the countersunk blind rivets 18 and 19. If desired, this joint may be further strengthened by disposing uncured or partially cured epoxy resin glue within the shallow recesses 20 of the U-shaped channel 17 before the lower beam 5 is slid into place, and thereafter allowing the glue to cure.

The translucent roof dome 14 of the shelter 1 admits sunlight to illuminate the shelter during the day, and moonlight and light from the street lamps to illuminate the shelter at night, thus further contributing to the exposure of the interior of the shelter to public view at all times and further minimizing the possibility of violent crime and vandalism within the shelter walls.

The roof dome 14 and fascia 15 overhang the open front of the shelter 1, so as to protect the occupants of the shelter from rain and snow. Rain falling on the raised central portion of the roof dome 14 flows down to the relatively depressed periphery thereof.

As will be more particularly described hereafter, the fascia 15 cooperates with the peripheral portion of the roof dome 14 to form a drainage gutter. The fascia 15 is provided with weep holes adjacent to and outside the walls, 2, 3 and 4 through which water flowing in the gutter formed by the fascia l5 and peripheral portion of the roof dome 14 may escape. No weep holes are provided in the overhanging portion of the roof and fascia 15, thus protecting the occupants of the shelter from water dripping from the roof of the shelter being blown into their faces by the wind.

The manner in which each of the windows 8 is secured to the adjacent uprights 7 and the adjacent portions of the lower beam 5 and upper beam 16 is illustrated in FIG. 6.

As shown in FIG. 6, each of the plastic windows 8 is secured to the adjacent uprights 7 by window brackets 21. The preferred shape of each of the window brackets 21, which are preferably formed of anodized aluminum, is shown in FIG. 4, with an alternative window frame shape being shown in FIG. 5.

In the window bracket structure shown in FIG. 5, parallel ribs 22a and 230 are provided to retain the plastic window in position, the window being installed to occupy the entire depth of the U-shaped recess between the ribs 22a and 23a. On the other hand, the arrangement shown in FIG. 4 provides parallel ribs 22 and 23, each of which has a small inwardly facing projection (24 and 25) thereon. The projections 24 and 25 limit the depth to which the plastic window extends into the recess formed by the parallel ribs 22 and 23, the remaining space between the projections 24 and 25 and the bottom of the recess formed by the ribs 22 and 23 being utilized for accepting a corner key to align and connect the adjacent portions of the ribs 22 and 23 at the corners of the window frame.

As shown in FIG. 6, each window frame 21 is secured to a corresponding upright 7 by a plurality of vertically spaced blind rivets 26. A projecting lip 27 on the forward edge of each window frame provides additional structural rigidity and proper spacing between the ribs of the window frame and the outer surfaces of the corresponding uprights.

A rubber or neoprene Weatherstrip 27 provides a resilient seal between the edge of each window 8 and the adjacent portions of the recess between the ribs 22 and 23 of the corresponding window frame 21.

A corner key 28 projects from the corner edge of the recess between the ribs 22 and 23 of each window frame 21 and an aligned recess in the adjacent upper or lower window frame section.

Corner keys 28 thus insure coplanar alignment between the'four window frame sections 21 surrounding and securing each of the windows 8.

Thus it is seen that the wall structure of the shelter 1 is of a basically modular design, any desired shelter size being obtainable merely by varying the number of uprights 7, the width of the windows 8, or both.

As shown in FIG. 2, the fascia comprises a vertical outer face 29 having an upper edge 30 and a lower edge 31, with a horizontal leg 32 extending inward from the outer face 29 intermediate the upper and lower edges 30 and 31 respectively. The peripheral portion of the light transmissive roof dome 14 is secured to the end of the horizontal leg 32 remote from the outer face 29 of the fascia 15 by means of a roof support bracket 33 and a series of rivets 34.

Depending downwardly from the horizontal leg 32 of the fascia 15 and spaced parallel to the outer face 29 thereof is a spacer flange 35. The surface of the spacer flange 35 remote from the outer face 29 of the fascia 15, and the lower portion of the roof support bracket 33 are secured to the upper beam 16 by a suitable bonding agent such as epoxy resin glue. Alternatively, the spacer flange 35 may be riveted to the adjacent portion of the upper beam 16.

By use of the aforementioned construction arrangement, a precise, self-aligned spacing is achieved between the upper beam 16 and the lower portion 36 of the outer face 29 of the fascia 15, thus insuring a precisely determined overhang of the lower fascia portion 36 beyond the adjacent window 8.

Preferably, the entire fascia 15, including the outer face 29, the horizontal leg 32 and the downwardly depending spacer flange 35 is formed of an extruded, unitary (one piece) construction to provide increased structural rigidity and reduced manufacturing cost. Preferably, the fascia 15 is formed of anodized aluminum.

As seen in FIG. 2, the portion of the outer face 29 of the fascia 15 extending between the upper edge 30 thereof and the horizontal leg 32 cooperates with the horizontal leg 32 and the adjacent inclined peripheral portion of the roof dome 14 to form a drainage gutter. Any drainage accumulating in this gutter can escape through a plurality of weep holes 37 in the horizontal leg 32 of the fascia 15. Preferably each weep hole 37 is situated closely adjacent to the outer face 29 of the fascia 15, so that any liquid escaping through the weep hole 37 will run down the inner surface of the lower portion 36 of the outer face 29 of the fascia 15, and fall to the ground from the lower edge 31 of the outer face 29, the lower edge 31 preferably being angled slightly with respect to the major portion of the outer face 29 to provide a rain drip surface. v

FIG. 3 shows an alternative fascia structure which is similar to that of FIG. 2, except that the horizontal leg 32 of FIG. 2 is replaced by a stepped horizontal leg 32a. The structure shown in FIG. 3, as a result of this structural change, provides an improved seal with less tendency for water seepage from the roof of the shelter into the interior thereof.

Portions of the fascia structure 15a shown in FIG. 3 which correspond to portions of the fascia 15 of FIG. 2 are provided with the same reference numerals, to which the designation a has been added.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the upper window frame section 21a which secures the upper edge of a corresponding window 8, is secpred to the bottom surface of the upper beam 16 by a suitable bonding agent such as epoxy resin glue. Alternatively, the window frame 21a may be secured to the upper beam 16 by blind rivets.

The fascia 15b shown in FIG. 8 represents another, more sophisticated fascia construction. Portions of the structure shown in FIG. 8 which correspond to those of FIG. 2 are indicated by the same reference numerals, followed by the letter b.

As indicated in FIG. 8, the horizontal leg 32b of the fascia 15b is of stepped construction, and the roof supporting bracket 33b is flat. A rubber or neoprene roof seal 38 provides a watertight, resilient seal between the periphery of the roof dome l4 and the adjacent portions of the horizontal fascia leg 32b and roof support bracket 33b.

A series of threaded bolts 39 secures together the upper beam 16, the roof support bracket 33b and the periphery of the roof dome 14.

The outer face 29b of the fascia 15b is provided with upper and lower corner key support flanges 40 and 41 respectively. An additional corner key support flange 42 extends from the horizontal leg 32b.

Corner key members 43 and 44, of generally L- shaped configuration, are disposed adjacent the inner surface of the outer face 29b of the fascia 15b, and retained in proper vertical position by the corner key support flanges 40, 41 and 42.

The corner key members 43 and 44 are secured to the outer face 29b of the fascia 15b by threaded bolts 45 and 46 respectively. The corner key members 43 and 44 serve to provide proper vertical alignment and interconnection between adjacent fascia sections at the corners thereof.

Preferably, the upper beam 16 is secured to the adjacent portions of the spacer flange 35b and the horizontal fascia leg 32b by a suitable bonding agent such as epoxy resin glue.

By securing auxiliary members to, the interior side surfaces of the shelter uprights, various useful accessories may be installed in the shelter.

For example, FIG. 9 shows the shelter of FIG. 1 with a telephone 46 installed therein and secured to one of the uprights 7, a radiant heater element 47 installed within the shelter and secured to the inner surface of upper beam 16, a light fixture 48 similarly secured within the shelter, and a bench 49 secured to the uprights 7 by means of L brackets or othersuitable fastening members.

FIG. 10 shows a police telephone 50, a fire alarm box 51, and a mail box 52, all secured within the shelter 1 between adjacent uprights 7 thereof;

FIG. 11 shows a similar arrangement in which a bus transit map 53 is installed between and secured to adjcent uprights 7, while FIG. 12 shows a vending machine 54 and trash receptacle 55 similarly installed and secured.

Referring now to FIG. 13, there is shown another embodiment of the invention wherein there is provided a front wall portion disposed in spaced relationship with respect to wall portions 2, 3 and 4. The wall portion 60 is constructed and secured to the fascia in a manner similar to the wall portions 2, 3 and 4. The wall 60 is positioned substantially parallel to the wall portion 2 and is positioned outwardly from the free ends of end wall portions 3 and 4 so as to provide angular spaced apart openings 61 and 62 for the shelter 1. However, the wall 60 may also be positioned in a plane which is coextensive with the free ends of wall portions 3 and 4.

What is claimed is:

l. A waiting station comprising an open, light transmissive wall structure having a major wall portion opposite the opening and two oppositely disposed end wall portions extending from opposite ends of said major wall portion, each wall portion having an upper and a lower edge, a light transmissive roof dome supported by said wall structure, a support structure having a plurality of legs for securing said wall structure to a horizontal surface with the lower edges of said wall portions spaced above said surface, a fascia secured to said roof dome and the upper edges of said wall portions and having a vertical outer face, and a part of said outer face overhanging said wall portions.

2. A waiting station according to claim 6, wherein said outer face has an upper and a lower edge, said fascia further having a horizontal leg extending inward from said outer face intermediate the upper and lower edges thereof.

3. A waiting station according to claim 2, further including means for securing the end of said horizontal leg remote from said outer face to the periphery of said roof dome.

4. A waiting station according to claim 3, further including means for securing the upper edges of said wall portions to said horizontal leg.

5. A waiting station according to claim 4, further including spacing means integral with said fascia for insuring that said fascia is secured to the upper edges of said wall portions in such a manner that said upper wall portion edges are spaced from the outer face of said fascia by a predetermineddistance. I

6. A waiting station according to claim 5, wherein said roof dome has a relatively raised center portion and a relatively'depressed peripheral portion secured to the end of the horizontal leg of said fascia remote from the outer face thereof, the part of said outer face between said horizontal leg and the upper edge thereof cooperating with said horizontal leg and the adjacent peripheral portion of said roof dome to form a drainage gutter.

7. A waiting station according to claim 6, further including a plurality of weep holes through said horizontal leg to permit escape of drainage from said gutter.

8. A waiting station according to claim 7, wherein said weep holes are closely adjacent the inner surface of the outer face of said fascia, so that any liquid escaping from said gutter through said weep holes runs down said inner surface.

9. A waiting station according to claim 8, wherein the lower edge of the outer face of said fascia is oriented at an angle to said face to provide a drip surface for any liquid running down said inner surface.

10. A waiting station according to claim 8, wherein said wall structure is transparent.

11. A waiting station according to claim 10, wherein said roof dome is translucent.

12. A waiting station according to claim 11, wherein the spacing between the lower edges of said wall portions and said horizontal surface is in the range of four to twelve inches.

13. A waiting station comprising an open, light transmissive wall structure having a major wall portion opposite the opening and two oppositely disposed end wall portions extending from opposite ends of said major wall portion, each wall portion having an upper and a lower edge, a light transmissive roof dome supported by said wall structure, a support structure having a plurality of legs for securing said wall structure to a horizontal surface with the lower edges of said wall portions spaced above said surface, a light transmissive wall structure disposed in spaced relationship to said major wall portion and said end wall portions, and said last mentioned wall structure providing a pair of spaced apart openings for ingress and egress from said waiting station.

14. A waiting station according to claim 13, wherein said last mentioned wall structure is disposed in a plane parallel to the plane determined by the free ends of said end wall portions.

15. A waiting station according to claim 14, wherein said last mentioned wall structure is substantially parallel with said major wall portion.

16. A waiting station comprising an open, three-sided transparent wall structure, means for securing said structure to and spacing said structure above a horizontal surface, the portion of said station between said wall structure and said horizontal surface being open to the elements, a unitary translucent roof dome supported by said wall structure, a light transmissive wall member disposed in spaced relationship with respect to said three-sided wall structure, means for securing said wall member with respect to said roof dome and said horizontal surface, and said wall member in conjunction with said three-sided wall structure defining a pair of spaced apart openings for ingress and egress from said waiting station.

17. A waiting station comprising an open, three-sided transparent wall structure, means for securing said structure to and spacing said structure above a horizontal surface, the portion of said station between said wall structure and said horizontal surface being open to the elements, a unitary translucent roof dome supported by said wall structure, a fascia secured to said roof dome and the upper edges of said wall portions and having a vertical outer face including an upper and a lower edge, said fascia also having a horizontal leg extending inward from said outer face intermediate the upper and lower edges thereof, and a part of said outer face overhanging said wall portions.

18. A waiting station according to claim 17, further including means for securing the end of said horizontal leg remote from said outer face to the periphery of said roof dome.

19. A waiting station comprising an open, light transmissive wall structure having a major wall portion opposite the opening and two oppositely disposed end wall portions extending from opposite ends of said major wall portion, each wall portion having an upper and a lower edge, a roof dome above said wall structure, said dome having a relatively raised central portion and a relatively depressed peripheral portion, and a roof support structure for securing said roof dome to the upper edges of said wall portions, said support structure including a fascia comprising a vertical outer face having an upper and lower edge,

a horizontal leg extending inward from said outer face intermediate the upper and lower edges thereof, means for securing the end of said leg remote from said outer face to the peripheral portion of said roof dome, and V means for securing the upper edges of said wall portions to said horizontal leg so that part of said outer face overhangs said wall portions,

the part of said outer face between said horizontal leg and the upper edge thereof cooperating with said horizontal leg and the adjacent portion of said roof dome to form a drainage gutter.

20. A waiting station according to claim 19, further including a support structure for securing said wall structure a predetermined distance above a horizontal surface.

21. A waiting station according to claim 20, wherein said predetermined distance is in the range of four to twelve inches.

22. A waiting station according to claim 21, wherein said roof dome is unitary.

23. A waiting station according to claim 22, wherein said roof dome is light transmissive.

24. A waiting station according to claim 23, wherein said roof dome is translucent.

25. A waiting station according to claim 24, wherein said wall structure is transparent.

26. A waiting station according to claim 25, further including spacing means integral with said fascia for insuring that said fascia is secured to the upper edges of said wall portions in such a manner that said upper wall portion edges are spaced from the outer face of said fascia by a predetermined distance.

27. A waiting station according to claim 26, further including a plurality of weep holes through said horizontal leg to permit escape of drainage from said gutter.

28. A waiting station according to claim 27, wherein said weep holes are closely adjacent the inner surface of the outer face of said fascia, so that any liquid escaping from said gutter through said weep holes runs down said inner surface.

29. A waiting station according to claim 28, wherein the lower edge of the outer face of said fascia is oriented at an angle to said face to provide a drip surface for any liquid running down said inner surface.

UNITE STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PatentlNo. 3 762 ,109 Dated O eI 2 1973 Arthur Merrill Cohen Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In the drawings: Fig. 11: a lead line should beadded,

entending from reference numeral 53 and directed tothe bus transit map depicted in Fig. 11. I I Fig. 13: reference numerai 61 should be added, With'a lead line extending therefrom directed to the pas 1age+ wayopening betneenthe ends of Walls 3 and6Qn I Reference numeral x 6 2 should be added, with a lead line extending therefrom directed to the passageway opening between. the end of walls 4 and 60, Y I I I Claim 2, line Y 1, the numeral "6" should read 1 v Signed and. sealed this 17th day of September ,1974.

(SEAL) v Attest: v

McCOY M. GIBSON Y C. MARSHALL DANN v Attest'ing vOffiwer Commissioner oi Patents v I 'uscoMM-Dc some-P69 U. 5. GOVERNMENT PRII ITING OFFICE I IQD O35$-38l,

FORM 0-1050 (10-69)

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/11, 52/270, D25/16, 52/79.1, D25/56, 52/73, 52/95
International ClassificationE04H1/12
Cooperative ClassificationE04H1/1211
European ClassificationE04H1/12B1