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Publication numberUS3762115 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1973
Filing dateApr 26, 1971
Priority dateApr 26, 1971
Also published asCA993679A, CA993679A1
Publication numberUS 3762115 A, US 3762115A, US-A-3762115, US3762115 A, US3762115A
InventorsCompton L, Mc Caul J
Original AssigneeSchokbeton Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multilevel concrete building of precast modular units
US 3762115 A
Abstract
A plural story building comprised of a number of basic precast concrete components, said components being held to a minimum and being so constructed to allow factory assembly of the components to such an extent that plumbing, electrical wiring, heating and ventilating, closets, bathroom fixtures, lighting fixtures, door frames, window frames, etc., are installed prior to shipment to the erection site thereby reducing field erection time. The basic components consist mainly of a corridor box forming the inside corridor's load bearing walls and ceiling and also resisting horizontal forces, a column component forming the outside walls, a slab component forming the floor for one level and the ceiling of the level below, and wherein the slab component is supported by and attached to a shelf in both the corridor box and the combination column, beam, panel component.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 MULTILEVEL CONCRETE BUILDING OF PRECAST MODULAR UNITS [75] Inventors: James F. McCaul, III, Birmingham,

, Ala.; Lloyd A. Compton, Denver,

Colo.

[731 Assignee: Schokbeton Products Corp.,

Birmingham, Ala.

[22] Filed: Apr. 26, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 137,582

52 us. C1 52/236, 52/295, 52/79,

52/262, 52/263, 52/251 [51] Int. Cl E04h 1/00 [58] Field of Search 52/79, 234, 236, I 52/289, 295

[56] v References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,886,962 11/1932 Roche 52/79 3,514,910 6/1970 Comm 52/79 2,064,789 12/1936 Faber 52/236 3,643,814 2/1972 Martin 52/236 3,566,558 3/1971 Fisher 52/236 3,642,339 2/1972 vRuderfer... 52/236 3,568,380 3/1971 Stucky 52/79 3,510,997 5/ 1970 Ratych 52/79 2,043,697 6/1936 Deichmann'. 52/236 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 7/1969 Great Britain 52/79 639,437 5/1962 ltaly 52/79 431,023 8/1967 Switzerland 52/79 6,709,528 1/1968 Netherlands 52/79 Primary Examiner-Frank L. Abbott Assistant ExaminerLeslie A. Braun Attorney-James W. Grace 57 ABSTRACT A plural story building comprised of a number of basic precast concrete components, said components being held to a minimum and being so constructed to allow factory assembly of the components to such an extent that plumbing, electrical wiring, heating and ventilating, closets, bathroom fixtures, lighting fixtures, door frames, window frames, etc., are installed prior to ship ment to the erection site thereby reducing field erection time. The basic components consistmainly of a corridor box forming the inside corridors load bearing walls and ceiling and also resisting horizontal forces, a column component forming the outside walls, a slab component forming the floor'for one level and the ceiling of the level below, and wherein the slab component is supported by and attached to a shelf in both the corridor box and the combination column, beam, panel component.

4 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures Austria 52/79 PATENTED 2 m3 SHEEI 3 [IF 6 PATENTED BET 2|973 SHEET '5 BF 6 MULTILEVEL CONCRETE BUILDING OF PRECAST MODULAR UNITS DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART It has always been desirable to provide a multi-story building that can be erected and occupied in a short period of time. Plural story buildings have long been comprised of many parts varying in complexity of function and difficulty of erection. For example, U. S. Pat. No. 1,886,962 shows six to eight individual units that must be held in alignment simultaneously in order to insert one bolt through a hole common to each of them. However, our invention provides an improved building design of precast structure composed of fewer parts than usual and allows factory assembly of items usually installed after the structure is erected.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is the primary object of this invention to provide a multi-story precast concrete building composed of factory prepared components containing the fixtures and utility items needed by its future inhabitants. It is a further object of this invention to combine the need for structural strength and'the need for ducts, wire ways, pipe chases, etc.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide precast components that will align and attach in such a manner as to maintain the desired dimensional integrity of the building without the usual steps of aligning.

columns vertically and horizontally prior to making the final connections. Thus, the columns are self aligning both horizontally and vertically by nature of their unique construction.

These objects and others are obtained by a plural story builing comprised of a number of basic precast concrete components, said components being held to a minimum and being so constructed to allow factory assembly of the components to such an extent that plumbing, electrical wiring, heating and ventilating, closets, bathroom fixtures, lighting fixtures, door frames, window frames, etc., are installed prior to shipment to the erection site thereby reducing field erection time. The basic components consist mainly of a corridor box forming the inside corridors load bearing walls and ceiling and also resisting horizontal forces, a column component forming the outside walls, a slab component forming the floor for one level and the ceiling of the level below, and wherein the slab component is supported by and attached to a shelf in both the corridor box and the column component.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view in partial cross section of a complete building according to the subject invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view in partial cross section of a corridor box and attached appurtenances.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view ofa corridor box connector.

FIG. 4 is a partial sectional elevation taken along line AA of FIG. 1 showing a corridor box connection.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a column component.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view in partial cross section of a slab section.

FIG. 7 is a partial elevation of a connection of a slab section to a corridor box and to a column component.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a pair of stair sections.

FIG. 9 is a vertical fragmentary sectional view taken along line 99 of FIG. 8 showing a typical connection of the stair box sections.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a bathroom'module.

FIG. 11 is a vertical transverse sectional view taken along lines ll-ll of FIG. 10 showing additional details of the bathroom module.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a kitchen unit.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, there is shown in FIG. 1 a completed building, indicated generally by numeral 1, resting on a foundation 2 of poured concrete or suitable alternative. Building 1 comprises three basic build ing components namely a corridor box 3, a column section 4, a slab section 5, the particular construction of which is described more fully below. The stub columns 6 are fixed to a base plate that allows precise alignment both vertically and horizontally while both stub column and base plate are attached to foundation 2. Corridor boxes 3 rest on and are attached to the foundation with anchor bolts allowing precise vertial and horizontal alignment. Column sections 4, uniformly rest on stub columns 6 so as to be at the same height relative to one another at each story level.

In FIG. 2, there is shown the detailed construction of corridor box 3 having open ends, ribbed walls and an open bottom. Box 3 comprises reinforcing cage 7, door opening 8, door frame 9, electrical box 10, opening for electrical box 1 1, water heater l2, piping l3, and nailer strip 14. The ribbed walls comprise vertical sidewalls 3a depending downwardly from the top wall 3b and having integral vertical ribs 3c extending outwardly in a generally normal direction therefrom, each of said ribs 3c forming a two-tiered step means at its upper junction with said vertical depending sidewalls 3a. The two-tiered step means comprises lower and upper seats 3d and 3e respectively. Lower seat 3d is inset from the outer face 3f of the rib 30 to an upstanding wall 3g of said rib and the upper seat 3e is inset from the top edge 3h of the wall 3g along the horizontal plane of the top of the rib 3:: to a second upstanding wall formed by the outer wall 3] of the depending vertical sidewall 3a. The particular construction of the reinforcing cage 7, is not part of our invention. Its construction, amount and size of reinforcing, etc., will depend on the loading conditions experienced but should be obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art. Other appurtenances may be similarly provided. Similarly the particular location of door openings, etc., may be changed to suit the conditions. A plurality of connectors 15 are embedded in the corridor boxes at the lower most edges of the wall sections thereof. Details of such a connector are shown in FIG. 3. A portion 16 of each connector 15 protrudes beyond the present structure of the box, but into the enclosure of access opeing 17 in order to receive a corresponding archor bolt 18 embedded in and protruding beyond the upper most surface of an adjoining corridor box. A connection of each vertically adjacent stacked pairs of corridor boxes is made as shown in FIG. 4. The number of connectors 15 and 18 provided for each box is a matter of design choice and is not a part of this invention. The column section as shown in FIG. 5, provides two columns 19 and 20, with a beam 21 spanning between and cantilever beams 22 and 23 extending outwardly halfway to the next column. Also provided by this section are architectural panels 24 forming the outside wall while in specific locations leaving openings for windows if desired. The placement or selection of panels versus windows, as well as the type of panel, can be varied at will in accordance with the intent of the architect. To allow connection of the columns of one story to those of the next and to maintain horizontal and vertical alignment there is provided in the top of each column a connector 25, and in the bottom of each column a recess 26, shown in dotted line to receive the connector. A preferred connector is shown and described in copenidng application Ser. No. 137,680, now U. S. Pat. No. 3,702,523, issued Nov. 14, 1972 and assigned to the same assignee as the subject invention. However, alternative means of connection could be provided such as shown in U. S. Pat. No. 3,110,982. This would, however, present alignment problems which are overcome by the preferred means of connection.

In FIG. 6, there is shown a slab section with reinforcing cage 27 and a prestressing strand 28. The amount, size and location of reinforcing rods and/or prestressing strands is a matter of design choice and is not a part of this invention. Ceiling board may be attached to ribs 29 at the bottom of the slab section in a conventional manner; however, in the preferred embodiment an embedded nailer strip is used, details of which are shown and described fully in copening application Ser. No. 138,268, filed Apr. 28, I971 assigned to common assignee. The slab sections 5 are attached on one end to the column sections by means of a connector 30 as shown in FIG. 7 and to the corridor box by means of a connector 31 also shown in FIG. 7. The number and size of connectors 30 and 31 are a matter of design choice, however, in the preferred embodiment each slab section is connected utilizing two connectors 30, one at each outer rib, attached to the column section by means of embedded anchor bolts 32 and to the slab section by means of through bolts 33 extending through cored holes provided in the slab section and also two connectors 31, one at each outer rib, attached to the corridor box by means of through bolts 34 and to the slab section by means of through bolts 35; all through bolts 34 and 35 extending through cored holes provided in the corridor box and the slab section. Referring again to FIG. 1, there are provided stair boxes 36 and 37, each having stairs and landings. FIG. 8 shows a pair of stair boxes in more detail. The stair boxes ar joined by bolting together two embedded connectors 38 as shown in FIG. 9. FIG. shows a prefabricated bathroom in the shape of a rectangular parallelepiped. FIG. 11 shows the inside of the bath unit with lavatory 39, commode 40, exhaust vent 41, and glass shower door 42 all in one piece and needing only to be connected to the building's service lines. In FIG. 12 there is provided a prefabricated kitchen with sink 43, garbage disposal 44, hot water heater 45, range 46, refrigerator 47, range hood 48, cabinets 49, lights 50, fuse box 51, and junction boxes 52 all in either one or two pieces, complete with all service lines and needing only to be connected to the building's service lines.

Building end walls are comprised of precast, insulated architectural panels bolted to structural members in a manner well known to those skilled in the art and do not form a part of this invention.

All precast components described above may be cast in accordance with conventional methods as well known to those skilled in the art. Steel forms are preferably employed in our invention because of their long life characteristics and the need for many such components in any one building. Dimensional integrity is also an important factor. Any prefabricated reinforcing cages and prestressing strands needed are placed prior to casting all in accordance with the strength needed and in such a manner as is also well known to those skilled in the art.

METHOD OF INSTALLATION Referring again to the drawings and more specifically FIG. 1, there will be provided in the foundations anchor bolts to which the stub columns 6 are fixed and precisely aligned. Anchor bolts are also provided in the foundation for the corridor boxes 3, stair boxes 36 and 37, and the elevator boxes 53. These components are precisely aligned and fixed to the foundations. In the preferred embodiment the utility lines servicing the building emerge from the foundations and attach to lines 13 that have been provided as part of the corridor boxes. Now the column sections 4, for the first story can be set atop the stub columns. These sections 4 are self-aligning due to recess 26 in the bottom of the column mating with the connector 25 provided in the top of the stub column 6 and in the top of the column sections 4. The slab sections can now be set on the seat 54 provided in the column section 4 and the seat 32 provided in the corridor boxes. Connectors 30 and 31 shown in FIG. 7, are provided to attach the slab sections to the corridor boxes and column sections. Similar connections are made to a seat 56 provided in the elevator boxes 53 or a seat 57 provided in the stair boxes. End walls attach to the end corridor boxes or stair boxes and to the column sections. Bathroom sections FIG. 10 are set in their required location, plumbing and electical connections made and doors hung. Kitchen units FIG. 12 are set in their desired location and plumbing and electrical connections are made. Additional stories are added similarly until the desired number are in place. The top slab section now becomes the roof and is covered with a moisture proof membrane, insulation and a built-up roofing surface. The elevators are installed in the elevator shafts. A precast elevator penthouse is provided to house the elevator hoisting equipment and electrical switch gear. This allows all equipment to be installed in the penthouse at ground level prior to its being set in place atop the elevator shaft needing only to have the hoisting cables connected and electrical connections completed. Prefabricated-prefinished partition walls are set in place throughout the building, windows are installed, doors hung and carpets installed, and other finish work completed, all of which forms no part of the subject invention.

While only a preferred embodiment has been illustrated, other embodiments will be apparent with units constructed and arranged differently yet within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A multistory building including a plurality of living compartments,

the improvement comprising corridor means, vertical column means and slab means, each of said vertical column means, slab means, and corridor means being of unitized reinforced precast concrete construction, said corridor means and said vertical column means being spaced parallel and opposite one another and said slab means extending between said corridor means and said vertical column means, said corridor means being of substantially inverted U-shape and including a top wall and two opposite and substantially parallel, vertical sidewalls depending downwardly therefrom, each of said sidewalls having a plurality of integral vertical ribs extending outwardly in a generally normal direction therefrom, each of said ribs forming a twotiered step means at their upper junction with said depending sidewalls, said two-tiered step means comprising upper and lower seats in which said lower seat is inset from the outer face of said rib to an upstanding wall of said rib and said upper seat is inset from the top edge of said upstanding wall of said rib along the horizontal plane of the top of said rib to a second upstanding wall formed by the outer wall of said depending side of said corridor means, mechanical fastener means at least partially embedded in said top wall and extending into said recesses for connection to complementary fastener means extending outwardly from a corridor means, supported on said upper seats; said slab means resting on said lower one ofsaid seats of said ribs, further mechanical fastening means connected to said slab means at each end thereof for permanently attaching said slab means to said vertical column means at one end thereof and to said corridor means at the other end thereof, whereby said slab means forms the ceiling of one of said plurality of living compartments and the floor of another of said plurality of living compartments of said multistory building, and said vertical column means forms one outside wall of said one of said plurality of living compartments and said corridor means forms the opposite wall of said one of said plurality of living compartments.

2. A multistory building as in claim 1 wherein said vertical column means comprises a plurality of column sections, each said column section being of integrally cast one piece construction comprising two substantially vertical columns, each said column being substantially parallel to and spaced a distance from one another, connection means at each end of said vertical columns, a beam extending between said vertical columns and intersecting therewith at substantially the respective midpoints thereof, and said beam including means for supporting and securing said slab means.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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US3835601 *Jan 10, 1973Sep 17, 1974Kelbish EModular construction system
US3902287 *May 18, 1973Sep 2, 1975Marcor Housing Systems IncDwelling construction system
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US8910434 *Nov 21, 2007Dec 16, 2014Metromont CorporationPre-cast monolithic concrete stair with dual edge beams, method and mold
US8919058Jun 22, 2010Dec 30, 2014Barnet L. LibermanModular building system for constructing multi-story buildings
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US9243398Nov 3, 2014Jan 26, 2016Barnet L. LibermanModular building system for constructing multi-story buildings
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US20120090254 *Sep 7, 2011Apr 19, 2012Mr. Venkata Rangarao VemuriMethod of forming flat strip stepped slab floor system of reinforced concrete
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US20150308141 *Apr 21, 2015Oct 29, 2015Mausoleum, S.A. De C.V.Modular system for niches or crypts for depositing ashes and/or dry remains
CN102146736A *Feb 21, 2011Aug 10, 2011张春平Anti-seismic environment-friendly rural house warm in winter and cool in summer
EP1063363A2 *Jun 14, 2000Dec 27, 2000Antonella BigiSystem of prefabricated tunnel and portal elements and accessories made of structural light concrete for the total erection of 1 to 8 storey buildings for any use
WO2010151539A1 *Jun 22, 2010Dec 29, 2010Barnet LibermanModular building system for constructing multi-story buildings
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/236.6, 52/79.13, 52/263, 52/295, 52/79.14, 52/236.9, 52/262, 52/251
International ClassificationE04H1/00, E04F11/02, E04B1/348
Cooperative ClassificationE04H1/005, E04B1/34823, E04F11/02
European ClassificationE04F11/02, E04B1/348C2, E04H1/00B