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Publication numberUS3762707 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1973
Filing dateMay 17, 1971
Priority dateMay 17, 1971
Publication numberUS 3762707 A, US 3762707A, US-A-3762707, US3762707 A, US3762707A
InventorsS Santorelli
Original AssigneeS Santorelli
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club with means within the shaft to rigidity the same upon impact
US 3762707 A
Abstract
A golf club comprising a hollow shaft with a grip at one end and a club head attached to the other end. The shaft is made of a material to impart a predetermined flexibility to the shaft. The shaft is partially filled from the attachment end up to a predetermined distance within the shaft with a normally flexible plastic material, preferably a polysiloxane composition, that does not alter the predetermined shaft flexibility under static conditions but has the characteristic of increased rigidity upon impact thereby imparting rigidity to the flexible shaft at the time of impact of the club head with a golf ball.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1 1 3,762,707

Santorelli 1 Oct. 2, 1973 1 1 GOLF CLUB WITH MEANS wrmm Tm: 1,904,750 4/1933 Reach 273/80 R SHAFT T0 RIGIDITY THE SAME UPON 2,078,728 W937 273/80 8 IMPACT 3,083,969 4/1963 273/80 R 3,265, 10] 8/1966 Spier 273/80 R [76; Inventor: Salvatore L. Santorelli, 160-14 Tenth -i Beechhul'sti l 1357 Primary ExaminerRichard C. Pinkham Assistanl ExaminerRichard 21 App]. 190.: 144,220 [57] ABSTRACT A golf club comprising a hollow shaft with a grip at one [22] 11.8. (.I. 273/80 B, 273/DlG. 29 end and 3 dub head attached to the other emLThe Cl A63!) 53/00 Shaft is made of a material to impart a predetermined L 1 d g 273/77 80 flexibility to the shaft. The shaft is partially filled from 73/80 sol-80's 260/37 SB the attachment end up to a predetermined distance 56 within the shaft with a normally flexible plastic matel Rderences cued rial, preferably a polysiloxane composition, that does I UNITED STATES PATENTS not alter the predetermined shaft flexibility under static 1,792,852 2/1931 Mattcrn 273/80.8 conditions but has the characteristic of increased rigid- 1,821,191 9/1931 Robinson. 273/808 ity upon impact thereby imparting rigidity to the flexi- 2.60 .20l 9/1952 Ma 273/910 29 ble shaft at the time of impact of the club head with a 2,066,962 1/1937 Cross 1 273/80 A golf balL 2,231,847 2/1941 Dickson et al.. 273/80 A 2,541,851 2/1951 Wright 260/37 SB 4 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures PATEN TED BET 2 I973 GOLF CLUB WITH MEANS WITHIN THE SHAFT TO RIGIDITY THE SAME UPON IMPACT The present invention relates to an improved golf shaft which is provided with a cavity therein. More particularly the cavity is partially filled with a material which is capable of rendering such shaft rigid and having a dampening effect on the golf shaft upon impact with the golf ball.

By way of background it is well known to manufacture golf shafts out of wood plastic, aluminum and certain light weight steel. The golf manufacturers have for years sought ways and means to manufacture golf shafts which have varying degrees of flexibility, weight and strength in order to better impart to a golf ball, on impact, greater distance and accuracy. Accuracy and distance are the principal criteria for which a golf club designs have been considered.

It is not unusual to see a golf shaft flex when arced back and swung with force. Flexure of the golf shaft depends upon the force of the swing and on the type of shaft used, namely a soft, medium or stiff flex shaft. A golfer with a very strong and powerful swing will use a stiff flex shaft to avoid having'too much flexure in the shaft when the club head makes contact with the ball, otherwise the ball will not have an accurate flight. In other words the golfer strives to have the shaft straight when the ball is struck. Furthermore, the ball should also be hit directly for accuracy and distance. If the ball is hit at the toe or heel of the club head, a certain amount of torque is imparted to such golf club causing inaccuracy to the trajectory of the ball.

Accordingly, it is the main object of the present invention to avoid the defects of the prior art.

A further objective is to provide the golf shaft with sufficient structure to allow a strong hitter to use a more flexible shaft and still maintain accuracy and distance.

Still another object of the present invention is to greatly minimize the torque imparted to the golf club when the ball is hit on the toe or heel of the club head.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent with respect to the specification, claims and drawings.

The golf shaft 2 can be made of metal or plastic providing the shaft has a suitable cavity 6 throughout its length which will accept a suitable material 7. The material 7 used to partially fill the cavity 6 may be a polysiloxane composition. The materials 7 preferably used as mentioned above, are the putty-like elastic plastic polysiloxane compositions prepared according to US. Pat. Nos. 2,541,851 and 3,350,344. These putty-like elastic plastics have the property which on impact causes them to harden and become rigid, and thereafter returning to their putty-like state.

In the Drawings:

FIG. la is a perspective view with partial crosssection of a golf shaft showing the present invention.

FIG. lb illustrates the golf shaft of FIG. 1a during backswing before impact with the ball.

FIG. la shows the inventive golf club 1 including a shaft 2 having a club head 3 affixed at one end. The shaft is usually gripped at the upper portion with both hands 4 and swung in an arcing manner to impart a force to a golf ball 5 in order to drive it toward a given hole. FIG. lb illustrates the flexure of the shaft 2 upon the backward stroke just prior to impact of the driving vided a filling material 7 in such shaft 2 exhibiting cer tain properties to be described hereinafter. It has been found that in some instances up to, for example, about one-half of the shaft length 2 can be filled with such material and yet not depart from the spirit and scope of the invention. An essential characteristic of the filling material 7 be that it not in any manner add or detract from the flexibility of the shaft 2. The material 7 is a putty-like elastic plastic, such as, a polysiloxane composition. The material 7 added into the cavity 6 must have the property of causing the shaft 3 to become rigid immediately at the moment of impact between the driving portion 3 with the ball 5. In other words, the hollow shaft per se is made of a material to impart to it a predetermined flexibility, commonly classified as soft, medium, or stiff. The shaft is then partially filled from the attachment end up to a predetermined distance with a normally flexible plastic material, preferably a polysiloxane composition, that does not alter the predetermined shaft flexibility under static conditions but has the characteristic of increased rigidity upon impact thereby imparting rigidity to the flexible shaft, no matter what its original stiffness classification may be, at the time of impact of the head with a golf ball.

By way of example two golf CilllbS obtained from the same manufacturer were employed to test the difference obtained when one club was treated according to the present invention and the other remained untreated. A polysiloxane composition as described above was inserted into the shaft 2 of one of the clubs, tamped down so that it filled the cavity 6 to a height of about 8 inches, measured from the point of attachment of the shaft 2 to the club head 3. Both shafts 2 measured out to the same flexibility under non-impactconditions.

The above two golf clubs were tested by professionals and it was found that it was not possible to control the ball when using the untreated club. However, on using the treated club it was discovered that no problem resulted in controlling the ball even with a medium flex shaft. It was also ascertained that a treated, less expensive club had the same accuracy and distance obtained with a costlier club. The treated club has a firmness and soliditarity on impact with the ball, according to the professional golfers who conducted the test.

Several other golf shafts were treated filling the shaft cavity up to one half the height of the shaft measured from the point of attachment of the shaft to the club head. The same beneficial effects were noted.

While the invention will find special utility in connection with specially manufactured golf shafts, it is not to be considered so limited, but the inventive idea is shown by way of example as to the scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

l. A golf club comprising a hollow shaft with a grip at one end and a club head attached to the other end, said shaft being made of a material to impart a predetermined flexibility to said shaft, said shaft being partially filled from the attachment end up to a predetermined distance within the shaft wiith a normally flexible 3. A golf club according to claim 1 wherein said plastic material is a polysiloxane composition.

4. A golf club according to claim 1 wherein said plastic material is a polysiloxane composition and said predetermined distance is from about eight inches to about one half the length of said shaft.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1792852 *Dec 7, 1926Feb 17, 1931Crawford Mcgregor & Canby CoGolf club
US1821191 *Apr 22, 1926Sep 1, 1931Robinson Roy HGolf club
US1904750 *Nov 20, 1930Apr 18, 1933Spalding & Bros AgTwo-piece metal shaft for golf clubs
US2066962 *Apr 16, 1934Jan 5, 1937Lloyd CrossShaft for golf clubs or the like
US2078728 *Nov 30, 1936Apr 27, 1937Lard Allan ERebound check for golf club shafts
US2231847 *May 31, 1938Feb 11, 1941Spalding A G & Bros IncGolf club
US2541851 *Dec 23, 1944Feb 13, 1951Gen ElectricProcess for making puttylike elastic plastic, siloxane derivative composition containing zinc hydroxide
US2609201 *Jun 26, 1947Sep 2, 1952Us Rubber CoSilicone elastomer golf ball core
US3083969 *Mar 27, 1961Apr 2, 1963Axaline Golf CompanyLong-handled, swingable driving instrument
US3265401 *Jan 29, 1964Aug 9, 1966Martin Spier IReinforcement for a pole
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4105205 *Sep 22, 1976Aug 8, 1978Sudbury Engineering CorporationRacket
US4197827 *Nov 11, 1977Apr 15, 1980Smith Tommy LCoacting wheel ball projecting device
US4220336 *Feb 27, 1978Sep 2, 1980Kochevar Rudolph JExtrudable weight capsule
US4496153 *Jan 10, 1984Jan 29, 1985Kochevar Rudolph JMethod of weighting an article
US4953861 *Feb 26, 1988Sep 4, 1990Kabushiki Kaisha SigelBall hitting sports tool
US5088734 *Jan 9, 1991Feb 18, 1992Glava Gary LAttenuating handle for recreational and work implements
US5314180 *Dec 16, 1992May 24, 1994Toray Industries, Inc.Sports instrument and impact-absorbing element to be attached to sports equipment
US5409220 *May 6, 1994Apr 25, 1995Lombardo; John B.Putter with advantageously angled and constructed shaft
US5421574 *Nov 8, 1993Jun 6, 1995Toray Industries, Inc.Sports instrument and impact-absorbing element to be attached to sports instrument
US5478075 *Jun 27, 1994Dec 26, 1995Saia; Carman R.Golf club stabilizer
US5485948 *Jul 26, 1993Jan 23, 1996Mccrink; Edward J.Shaft and method of making same
US5575722 *Sep 6, 1995Nov 19, 1996Vertebrex Golf L.L.C.Golf club stabilizer and method of stabilizing a golf club
US5607364 *Dec 21, 1994Mar 4, 1997Black & Decker Inc.Polymer damped tubular shafts
US5655975 *Nov 2, 1995Aug 12, 1997Roush Anatrol, Inc.Golf club having vibration damping device and method for making same
US5766090 *Jan 28, 1994Jun 16, 1998Orlowski; Michael E.Vibration dampening material for putter shafts
US5904628 *Jun 12, 1997May 18, 1999Hillerich & Bradsby Co.Golf club
US5964673 *Jan 27, 1997Oct 12, 1999Hellerich & Brasby Co.Hollow metal bat with stiffened transition zone and method of making same
US20040009824 *Jul 11, 2002Jan 15, 2004Ching-Song ShawGolf club with weight device
US20040082402 *Nov 21, 2003Apr 29, 2004Akira UnosawaShaft for golf club
WO1998056470A1Jun 9, 1998Dec 17, 1998Hillerich & Bradsby Co.Golf club
WO1999002223A1 *Jul 9, 1998Jan 21, 1999Lyle SmithPlug for stressing golf club shaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/318, 273/DIG.290
International ClassificationA63B53/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S273/29, A63B53/00
European ClassificationA63B53/00