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Publication numberUS3762712 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1973
Filing dateOct 14, 1971
Priority dateOct 14, 1971
Publication numberUS 3762712 A, US 3762712A, US-A-3762712, US3762712 A, US3762712A
InventorsR Beachley
Original AssigneeR Beachley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Racing game apparatus
US 3762712 A
Abstract
A game which may be played by normally two or more children or adults typically including the use of a playing board having a center thereon with the spinner centrally mounted within a circle having a plurality of rays extending from the center of the circle in which each ray represents a different horse and each ray is further subdivided into the categories of win, place and show, whereby by the spinning of the spinner, an arrow on the spinner comes to rest pointing at one of win, place, or show, of one of the horses signifying the winning of that race characterized by the spinning of the spinner, the amount wagered prior to the spinning of the spinner being marked by a player on a marking card selecting at least one horse for at least one and preferably a series of consecutive races, and concurrently in the marking including the amount bet on the first race and whether or not the proceeds of any winning race are to be wagered against a second or other subsequent occurring racing of the horse also concurrently marked during the initial marking of the card by the player, the amount payable on any particular horse for any one of win, place, or show being determined by a keeper of the wagers who after all wagers are in draws a separate card for each potential winning position - i.e., win, place, or show, on which a wager has been tendered for each horse on which a wager has been tendered, subsequent to the marking and prior to the spinning of the spinner the keeper authenticating a wager by certifying a card prepared by a player and returning a certified carbon copy thereof to the player, and thereafter either the keeper or any one or more of the players spinning the spinner, each spin representing a separate race, prior to the initial spinning the keeper of the wagers for each horse wagered drawing a separate "pay" card for that horse from a deck of "pay" cards, each "pay" card indicating the multiple of the amount wagered that will be paid as winnings for that particular horse's position if such a position is a winner.
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United States Patent 1191 Beachley Oct. 2, 1973 RACING GAME APPARATUS Robert W. Beachley, PO. Box 11281, Charlotte, NC. 28209 Filed: Oct. 14, 1971 Appl. No.: 189,119

Inventor:

US. Cl 273/130 H, 273/141 R, 273/148 R Int. Cl. A63f 5/00 Field of Search 273/86, 134, 135,

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/1929 Rottenburg 273/134 DB 2,400,261 5/1946 Plebanek 273/141 R 2,473,675 1 6/1949 Boreszewski 273/141 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 505,365 5/1939 Great Britain 273/134 CH 601,945 5/1948 Great Britain 273/134 CH Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Attorney-William T. Hough et a1.

[57] ABSTRACT whereby by the spinning of the spinner, an arrow on the spinner comes to rest pointing at one of win, place, or show, of one of the horses signifying the winning of that race characterized by the spinning of the spinner, the amount wagered prior to the spinning of the spinner being marked by a player on a marking card selecting at least one horse for at least one and preferably a series of consecutive races, and concurrently in the marking including the amount bet on the first race and whether or not the proceeds of any winning race are to be wagered against a second or other subsequent occurring racing of the horse also concurrently marked during the initial marking of the card by the player, the amount payable on any particular horse for any one of win, place, or show being determined by a keeper of the wagers who after all wagers are in draws a separate card for each potential winning position i.e., win, place, or show, on which a wager has been tendered for each horse on which a wager has been tendered, subsequent to the marking and prior to the spinning of the spinner the keeper authenticating; a wager by certifying a card prepared by a player and returning a certified carbon copy thereof to the player, and thereafter either the keeper or any one or more of the players spinning the spinner, each spin representing a separate race, prior to the initial spinning the keeper of the wagers for each horse wagered drawing a separate pay card for that horse from a deck ofpay cards, each pay card indicating the multiple of the amount wagered that will be paid as winnings for that particular horses position if such a position is a winner.

2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures RACE O Pool- 8 I IDENTIFYING DATE O POOL# 2 O OUINELLA O EXACTA 0 REGULAR 0 WIN 0 PLACE 0 SHOW NAME ADDRESS TRACK ClTY 0:15 Otso SOCIAL SECURITY i STATE Zl F m w h sum 20F 2 Om 8 6 015 26 5% o 63m o MDVHJ.

o 35250 lit 25%@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ A P20 wziizmg #JOOQ INVENTQR,

ROBERT .W. BEACHLEY ,7 BYfl.

ATTORNEYS PAIENIEDBBT 2191a RACING GAME APPARATUS This invention relates to a game which may be played by either or both children and adults for fun and recreation, the game having simple rules but being sufficiently complicated and similar to actual racing events as to gain and maintain the interest of the players.

BACKGROUND There are a few games which are adaptable both to children and adults, normally the games which are understandable by and easily playable by young children being of too simple a nature to maintain the interest of an adult player. Similarly, those games designed for adults have rules that are entirely too complex to be properly followed by or to maintain the interest of children.

In games for either children or adults, the cost of the game often is prohibitive of its purchase, the cost being reflective of the involved structure or parts or both of the game necessary for the playing thereof.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Objects of this invention include the overcoming of problems of the type discussed above as well as other objects apparent from the preceding and following disclosure.

One or more objects of the invention are gained by the game as hereafter described.

It is to be understood that there may be many variations of the game as described herein, although for purposes of better maintaining the interest of the player, a preferred embodiment disclosed herein is believed to be superior. Accordingly, in such a preferred embodiment, there is a selection means such as a spinner having a pointer thereon mounted about centrally of a circle on a card, a board, or the like. The circle having the spinner centrally located therein is preferably divided into a number of radially extending rays extending from about the center of the circle, with each ray representative of a horse to be raced in a race, and with each ray preferably near the periphery of the circle being radially subdivided by subdivisions of each particular ray into each of win, place, and show. The separate categories of win, place, and show may each be of the same size or preferably the win category may be of a smaller dimension than the place category and the place category of a smaller dimension than the show category, thereby reducing the probability of a win as compared to a place and reducing the probability of a place as compared to a show for any particular horse. On the same card or on a separate card preferably there is a series of positions provided for by printing on the card allowing a designated space for each win, for each place, and for each show, of each horse, each designated space being sufficiently large to receive a pay card. There preferably also is a deck of cards designated as pay cards, with each pay card having thereon a number representative of the multiple of the amount wagered for a particular category (such as one of win, place, or show) for a particular horse. At the appropriate time in the procedure of the game, a separate pay" card is to be drawn from a shuffled deck of pay cards for each wagered category, after the wagers of all players are in. Each pay card after being drawn would be turned face up and placed in the position for the category of the particular horse for which that card was drawn by each player, prior to the running of the race --i.e., typically the spinning of the spinner is initiated. Typically to add to the fascination of the game, each player begins with an equal amount of play money. For adults, real money may be employed where permitted by local state law. Similarly, for adding suspense to the game, each player may have a plurality of disks, diskbuttons, or the like identifiable of that player from other players by a number, a color, a shape, or the like; upon placing a wager on a particular category (win, place, or show) for a particular horse, a particular player would place his identifying disk (for example) on the particular category of a particular horse on which he is currently making a wager, whereby other players may see the horse on which he is betting. In a variation, each disk may be representative of a certain value and in addition to being identified as that particular players disks may be representative of the amount wagered as dependent upon the number of disks that he places on that position. However in a preferred embodiment of the game, in order to make the game more basically similar to an actual racing situation at a race track, each player using a pen or pencil or the like marks a card which automatically produces a carbon thereof making his selections and wagers on the card prior to handing the card and the amount wagered at least on afirst race to the keeper of the funds and wagers. Upon receipt of a marked card from a player, the keeper of the wagers authenticates the card by placing an official certification on the card and on the copy and returning the copy to the particular player making that one or more wagers as set forth on the card and carbon copy thereof.

Typically the card includes printed choices such as the number of the horse which is to be wagered on, also it being possible to indicate which race that horse is wagered on, there being possible also a second wager on the same or another horse for a subsequent race, and preferably there also being provision for additional markings of additional wagers on subsequent next occurring races on the same or different horses. Typical printed categories on the card include the listing of optional choices of each of pool number one, pool number two, optional choices of quinella, exacta, and regular, optional choices of win, place, and show, optional choices of two dollars, five dollars ten dollars, fifty dollars, or other amounts in substitution for those listed or in addition to those listed, and listing a category which the player identifies himself or herself as distinguished from other one or more players.

The process of playing the game includes dividing among the players equal numbers of chips, buttons or the like, with each player preferably having his chips or buttons separately identifiable from other players, similarly dividing play money, if any, equally among the players, the keeper of the wagers keeping a substantial number of chips, buttons, or thelike as well as retaining a substantial amount of the play money (for example), and the pay cards being thoroughly shuffled and placed conveniently for the keeper of the wagers to draw, and place on the board the appropriate number of cards at the proper time. Each player marks his particular wagering card and carbon. copy thereof selecting the horse for a first occurring race, the amount to be wagered thereon, whether or not for a particular pool or for regular, or the like, and other choices provided thereon as might be desirable typically of the type already discussed above and including in the marking the placing thereon of some identifying mark such as his name to distinguish his card and carbon copy thereof from other players. After each player marks his card, in some predetermined order, each player tenders his card and carbon copy thereof with the amount wagered in terms of chips or play money or actual money (where permitted by the local state law) to the keeper of the funds who places on the card and on the carbon thereof the keepers authentication certification mark and returns the certified copy to the particular player making the wager. After all wagers are in, the keeper thereafter draws a card for each wagered position (i.e., win and/or place and/or show) with a different card for each wagered position, and repeats the procedure for each horse on which a wager has been made by any one or more of the full number of players. At the time that the wager is tendered by a particular player, that player typically places at least one of the disks identifying himself on the position wagered for a particular horse, it being also possible depending on how that player marked his card to bet on more than one horse and more than one race at the same marking of the card. Minimally, depending upon how the card is marked, the winning proceeds, if any, of a race occurring first in a sequence may be automatically applied to a subsequent race occurring as marked on the card during the initial marking, and similarly for any other subsequent race the winning of an earlier race may be similarly applied; where the amount designated to be bet is an uneven amount when taken in multiples thereof, the balance above that amount remaining of the former winnings is credited by the keeper to that particular player to be returned to the player irrespective of the outcome of subsequent races. After the pay cards have been placed on the board by the keeper, the keeper thereafter causes the animate movement to be initiated; normally the animate movement comprises one or more players in any desired order of turns or the keeper himself with a flip of the finger or otherwise, causes the spinner to spin and thereafter allows it to stop spinning whereby the pointer points to a particular category of win, place, or show of a particular horse, that horse winning and the wagers being promptly paid off by the keeper for all players which bet solely on the first race. If none of the players bet solely on a first race but bet on multiple races and/or after the keeper of the wagers and funds has paid off, the keeper (typically) thereafter initiates the second race animate movement, as before and the above procedure is again followed in the paying off of winners, if any, who have not additionally bet on a subsequent race, and thereafter another race is run by the keeper initiating the animate movement. As many races will be run as are bet on by any one of the players.

THE FIGURES FIG. 1 illustrates an elevation plan view of a typical board having thereon a spinner and a chart in circular form listing any desired number of horses thereon, the illustrated embodiment listing 16 horses, with each horse being subdivided into three positions win, place, and show. The spinner has on one end thereof a pointer which after spinning would indicate the winning category.

Also FIG. 1 illustrates a typical chart providing positions for plan cards, one card for each category of each horse being wagered upon, the number of choices of cards insofar as available random choices of numbers being many in excess of the number of horses being run.

FIG. 2A illustrates a perspective view of a typical deck of pay cards from which one card will be withdrawn for each category wagered upon after all wagers are in.

FIG. 28 illustrates three typical cards drawn from the deck illustrated in FIG. 2A, the figure 28 cards each being face up in a manner that they would be placed on the particular category illustrated in FIG. 1. Although the numbers 5, 9 and one-half are represented as illustrative of the cards, as shown in FIG. 28, any desired numbers or repeats of numbers may be used on one or more of the pay cards, there normally being solely one number to a card, as indicated above, the number being representative of the multiples of the wagered amount which will be paid in winnings. For example, if 10 dollars were bet, and for the category such as place bet upon the card one-half were placed on that category by the keeper and the card withdrawn, if that particular category should win, the player would win 5 dollars plus the return of his original wager, i.e., he would get back 15 dollars.

FIG. 3 is an elevation plan view of a typical card, the dotted lines on the left hand end thereof indicating that there is a carbon attached behind the original front part such that the marking of the front card also marks the carbon.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION It should be noted that when the keeper is drawing the pay card for the various positions wagered upon, although there may be variations of rules, preferably the rules shall state that the keeper shall place the first card drawn on the lowest number, i.e., one, of the horses wagered if someone wagered upon the number one also; and within that category, the first card drawn from the deck would be placed on the win position if someone has wagered upon that position, and if not upon the place position if a player has wagered upon the place position, and if not then upon the show position. The second card goes on the place position if a player has wagered on that position, and if not the next card goes upon the show position. Similarly the next card drawn goes for the win position of the two horse if that position has been wagered upon, and if not upon the place position of number two if that position has been wagered upon, and the like. In particular reference to the various figures in greater detail, together with the procedure for playing the game, typically a player takes a card such as illustrated in FIG. 3 and marks within the category for the first race the horse that he is betting upon; since there are two positions for each of one through nine and zero, a person betting on horse number one for the first race would fill in the zero on the left column and the one on the right column thereby representative of the number one horse, whereas for a second race he might wish to select horse 24 which would be the two circle in .the left hand column of race number two and the four circle in the right hand column of number 2 which would be thereby marked. Similarly markings may be made for other races ranging all the way up to 10 consecutive races if desired by the particular player. It should be noted that with the card of FIG. 3, for any particular race there may be horses ranging up to the number 99, and accordingly, in alternatives of the race horse numbers illustrated in FIG. l i.e., one through 16, it is possible that on a larger chart or on a variation thereof that the horses may be similarly numbered from one through 99, although not specifically illustrated in the FIG. 1 embodiment. As a part of the marking of the card the player also would mark whether or not he wished to go for pool one and if so fill that in, or alternatively pool two, and whether or not for quintella, exacta, or regular, and whether or not for win, place, or show for the horses marked. Note that although this card does not illustrate the following, it is also possible that there be provided on the card a separate marking category of win, place, or show for each race ranging from one up to 10, for example. Also marked at the same time would be the amount bet on the initial race, merely filling in the circle adjacent the amount to be wagered; similarly, it is possible that such a card could provide for different wagered amounts for different races. Also the card includes a space for use by the keeper for the stamping of identifying, i.e., certification information authenticating the card by a certified stamp or the like. Also as a part of the marking, the card may include a provision such as the name of the player, social security number, address, city, state, or the like as well as any additional desirable information. After each player has filled out his card, the particular player in order of his turn tenders his card to the keeper together with the amount of money or chips or the like wagered on the first and/or subsequent races. The keeper authenticates the original and the carbon and returns the carbon to the player. It should be noted that by the use of cards such as that illustrated in FIG. 3 on a large scale playing of the game of this invention, it is possible to employ computers or IBM machines or the like since all information is clearly indicated on the card-and if players range into large numbers the winning card may be automatically selected by a machine capable of spinning and returning to the keeper the winning card.

The player, after receiving back his carbon places one of his identifying disks on the board around the spinner opposite the category bet on for the particular horse. After all players have bet, the keeper for each position wagered upon draws a separate card and places the card opposite that position in the position or space provided for such as illustrated in FIG. 1, or alternatively in an alternative position such as might in a different embodiment be provided for around the spinner of FIG. 1, possibly (for example) right on top of the category identified on the spinner chart itself-- thereby eliminating the need for an additional chart for the placing thereon of the pay" cards. i

It is to be understood that instead of having the spinner mechanism as illustrated in FIG. 1, there may be provided anysuitable or desirable alternative a'rrangement, such as a deck of cards with a separate card for each position category of win, place, and show for each horse, whereby if 16 positions were tobe considered, then there would be 48 cards, with three cards for each horse, for example. In an alternative embodiment, balls of some type or disks or buttons or the like may be shaken up within a container and the release of a ball represents the running of the race, the released ball representing the winner of that particular race.

Similarly, instead of the deck of pay cards as illustrated in FIGS. 2A and 28, there optionally may be provided other means of determining the amount which will be paid a winner for a particular category of win for a particular winning horse; for example, as in present race track systems, by conventional or other desirable methods and/or machines, typically including calculators and/or computers, the amount to be paid a particular winner for any one or more of a particular category may be computed based upon the number of wagers having been made by the total number of players and dependent upon the horses upon which the wagers have been made, and the like. It might be noted that the game of this invention provides a system and means whereby legal pari-mutuel betting can be conveniently extended to allow a purchaser-player to buy a ticket on more than one event at a time with the parimutuel system handling the wagers as a parlay pool. The utility of the invention is not limited to horse races or games related to horse races but may be similarly applied to any other event or occurrence whether a race or not, but particularly to dog races, where normally from eight to 10 races are run one after the other. 7

As compared to the game of this invention, in present systems of selling tickets at pari-mutuel events, the buyer of the ticket announces his choice by voice and the ticket seller such as the keeper of the wagers punches a corresponding key after which the ticket is dispensed to the buyer with the number of his selection, the race, the date and other identifying data which is intended to make the ticket difficult to counterfeit and avoid the pari-mutuel making mistakes in paying the winners. In the present pari-mutuel events normally used at race tracks and the like, the present tickets are limited to one selection per race per ticket usually, the exceptions being the daily double tickets where two selections are given by voice to the: ticket seller, one for each race comprising the daily double; quinella tickets where two entries are given for the same race and the selections must be run first and. second either entry being first; and exacta (or sometimes called perfecta) tickets where two selectionsare given for the same race and the selections must finish in the exact order named. Where more than two horses are named, more than one ticket is needed. In contrast thereto, the cards such as that illustrated in FIG. 3 and modified variations thereof within the scope of the game of this invention may choose more than one horse for the same race and/or for different races and the order of the winning of the horse may be easily indicated by an appropriate marking system in the order of that illustrated, for example, in the game of the present invention, on a parimutuel basis, the buyer premarks. the blank ticket with his selections and hands it to the ticket seller (keeper of the wagers) with his wagers. The ticket is in duplicate (similar to blanks used by credit card systems and gasoline station credit card charge tickets), and the ticket seller then stamps the ticket on both original and the duplicate with a serial number, the date, and place and other identifying information being advisable. Thereafter the ticket seller returns the duplicate to the ticket buyer for his receipt, the original ticket marked by the ticket buyer then being entered into the parimutuel system. This method of handling the tickets avoids errors and the ticket seller misunderstanding the voice or in pressing the wrong keys and also speeds up the process of ticket selling since no time is lost while the buyer inspects his ticket to be sure that he was understood. Also, it will prevent paying off on a counterfeit ticket since payoff is based on the original ticket marked by the buyer before the event.

As indicated above, with the game of this invention, using premarked tickets, the buyer is not limited to one or two numbered selections per ticket. Several possible uses of the premarked ticket are listed below as illustrations of the possibilities but are not intended to limit other possible applications:

1. The player marks a selection for each event on the program, the money to go into three equal pools: win, place, and show. Printed rules for a division of the pool would predetermine the division of money among winners. The rules could vary from place to place where the game is used, and would be preset by those in charge of the game events.

2. The player could mark two (or more) selections for each event on the program, with the pools handled as in example 1 above.

3. The player could mark selections (one or more as the rules allow) for certain specified events (also as scheduled by the officials) and such a ticket could go into quinella or exacta pool (as predetermined by the officials).

4. This type of ticket could be used with the present mutuel pools where the player wished to wager on certain horses in certain races and have the wager go into the regular mutuel pools rather than into a special pool as is intended with the previous examples. For this use, the ticket would have a space marked regular" and spaces for the amount of the wager, such as 2 dollars, 5 dollars, dollars, etc; and the choice of win, place, or show would be also available for marking. The player would indicate the various post positions of his selections in the races he has selected, the amount of his wager and check the space marked regular." For example, he thinks number two in the second, number seven in the fourth, number three in the sixth, and number nine in the seventh will all run second or better; he therefore marks his selections (and no others) and checks the regular space, the place" space and the 2 dollar space and pays 2 dollars for his ticket. If number two places in the second race and pays $4.00 each two 2-dollar tickets are put on number seven in the fourth, and he has 80-cents change credited to his account. If number seven in the fourth wins and pays $9.80 to place, he has nine 2 dollar tickets on the third in the sixth and a $1.60 plus 80-cents totalling 2 dollars 40 cents change. If number three places in the sixth and pays $5.70, he has 25 2 dollar tickets on number nine in the seventh, and 1 dollar 30 cents plus 2 dollars 40 cents totalling 3 dollars 70 cents credit to his account. Depending on the results of the seventh race the player may win a considerable amount or his change will give him a slight profit in any event added to his enjoyment of the racing program. It is suggested that the change -i.e., the credit be accumulated in view of the fact that the present mutuel booths such as where programs are sold are not set up to handle wagers except in multiples of 2 dollars and 5 dollars.

The possible variations to which a multi-selection ticket can be put seem endless and can be adapted as need may appear to the official scheduling of events to which the game may be applied.

On a large scale basis, the ticket and carbon thereof attached, can be sold at track booths, but additionally may be sold at any place, including the coin operated dispensing machines, the important matter being that the player has the ticket in his possession for a time so that he can mark it and hand it to the official seller, this eliminating time consuming marking at a window as well as eliminating the present necessity of the person expressing verbally all the various information to the ticket seller. All the ticket seller or the keeper of the wagers has to do is accept the ticket and the amount wagered, authenticate the ticket by certifying the original and the copy and returning the copy to the player. The original ticket prepared by the player and retained by the keeper after certification is placed thereon, is grouped with all others intended for the same pool assuming that the particular ticket in question is intended for a pool involving more than one race. The tickets are examined after each race, i.e., after the first race and the winners are kept for examination after each race involved in the pool. Losers are retained for a check and verification before the payoff of the pool. After verification of winners, the winning serial numbers are listed and duplicates presented for payment are checked to insure that they are actually duplicates of the originals.

The ticket original and duplicate employable either with the game on a small scale or with the game on a commercial scale may be of the card stock typically of approximately 0.005 inches thick, or may be determined by practical use. The ticket preferably has a space for the player to write in the name of the track, and where the ticket is intended for use at only one track, the track name or other desired information may be printed on the ticket. However this invention may find use in legal betting establishments such as now exist in the states of New York, Nevada, and other typical states in which games of chance for money are authorized by state law. There is a blank for the player to write in his social security number preferably, the social security number of the player collecting more than a set figure preferably being required to be given to the cashier before collecting in order to satisfy federal law. Spaces may be provided on the ticket for the player to enter his name and address, as typically shown in FIG. 3. If a player failed to collect his winnings at the track, the cashier or keeper of the wagers could mail a check to that winner.

The game covers the distribution and/or scale of tickets, unmarked and undated so that any ticket could be used on any date (until the officials running the game decide to change the style of the ticket). The sorting of tickets to select those tickets that are winners may be done by hand, but where many tickets are involved could be done by a scanning selector such as are now commercially available, for example. The scanning selector takes a large group of tickets and sorts them into two piles typically one pile with those which have the filled-in oval spaces and the other pile those which do not have the filled-in oval spaces thus separating winners from losers.

In a typical variation, each race could have three columns of numbers instead of two, i.e., instead of that shown in FIG. 3. Then the player could select not only the horse but the exact position the player thinks will be the finishing position.

In still another variation, the multi-selection ticket could be used for football or baseball pools at locations where such pools are legal under the local state laws. For such use, the teams involved would be printed on the ticket with an oval by each team name. The playerwagerer would then fill in the ovals beside the teams that he thinks will win. Such tickets would have to be preprinted with the teams listed and would show the date and dates of the games; otherwise the format would be somewhat similar to that illustrated in FIG. 3.

Accordingly the game of this invention may be played on any scale from that of a simple childrens game to that of an adult game for the home or may be extended to a large scale game such as conventional horse races, dog races, football games, baseball games, and the like, wherever it might be desired and to the extent permitted by local law.

It is within the scope of this invention to make such variations and modifications as would be obvious to a person of ordinary skill in this field.

I claim:

1. A game comprising in combination: a selection means providing a plurality of selectable items and a chance-selection device dependent upon variable animate movement; value-means providing for the selection and representation visually of any one of a plurality of numerical values; and printed forms providing a separate form for each player of the game, each form providing for a designation of at least one selection, said each form including identifiable printed matter of other categories for each of said items and of additional choices including each of pool number one, pool number two, quinella, exacta, regular, and different dollarvalue spaces, said other categories including win, place and show such that any one of said other categories may be clearly designated by a player as associated with any one of a plurality of repeatable movements of said chance-selection device animate movements, said printed form including a paper receivable of markings thereon and carbon-second copy paper means therebeneath such that the carbon copy is retainable by a player after the marking of the marking-receiving pa per, and said items each including arace horse to be raced and means for racing each horse, and in which said chance-selection device comprises a horse-racing facility.

2. A game comprising in combination: selection means providing a plurality of selectable items and a chance-selection device dependent upon variable animate movement; value-means providing for the selection and representation visually of any one of a plurality of numerical values; and printed forms providing a separate form for each player of the game, each form providing for a designation of at least one selection, said each form including identifiable printed matter of other categories for each of said items and of additional choices including each of pool number one, pool number two, quinella, exacta, regular, and different dollar value spaces, and other categories including win, place and show such that any one of said other categories may be clearly designated by a player as associated with any one of a plurality of repeatable movements of said chance-selection device animate movements, said game further including play-wagering money and a plu rality of different identifiable disk-buttons, there being a plurality of each separate button such that each player may have several of the same type button for separate wagers, each item being further identifiable as a plurality of other consecutive categories consisting of win, place, and show, said selection means including a playing board having printed thereon a circle with a center thereto, having a plurality of rays extending peripherally from about said center, each ray being associated with a separate one of said selectable items, each ray being further subdivided into said other categories, each of said selectable items being identified as a separate number from other ones of said plurality of said selectable items, said value-means including a deck of cards having a different number on different ones of the cards of differing numbers representative of the money-value multiple to be associated with a particular one of said other categories such that after a wager has been made by all players a separate card is drawable from said deck and placed on said playing board beside each said other category on which a wager has been made, with a different card placeable by each different category on which a wager has been made, said printed form including a paper receivable of markings thereon and carbon-second copy paper means therebeneath such that the carbon copy is retainable by a player after the marking of the marking-receiving paper.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1697023 *Apr 20, 1927Jan 1, 1929Leon M E RottenburgRace game
US2400261 *Dec 15, 1943May 14, 1946Plebanek Leonard ZRace horse game
US2473675 *May 30, 1945Jun 21, 1949Clarence F BoreszewskiRotating disk racing game
GB505365A * Title not available
GB601945A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5275400 *Jun 11, 1992Jan 4, 1994Gary WeingardtPari-mutuel electronic gaming
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US6837791 *Oct 13, 2000Jan 4, 2005Ods Properties, Inc.Interactive wagering system with totalisator selection
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/141.00R, 273/148.00R, 273/240, 273/274
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00082, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10