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Publication numberUS3763505 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1973
Filing dateFeb 17, 1972
Priority dateFeb 17, 1972
Publication numberUS 3763505 A, US 3763505A, US-A-3763505, US3763505 A, US3763505A
InventorsZimmerman J
Original AssigneeZimmerman J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toilet ventilation device
US 3763505 A
Abstract
In a toilet having a toilet bowl and a flush tank on the bowl in which an overflow pipe discharges overflow water into the toilet bowl and conducts obnoxious air and gases and odors from the toilet bowl into an air space above the water level in the tank, a ventilator casing which fits over the open top of the flush tank and bottom of the ventilator casing being substantially in the same proportions as the usual lid for the flush tank and it has an intake hole therethrough. A suitable blower or fan mounted on said bottom is located inside the casing. The walls of the casing are closed all around but are provided with charcoal filters for deodorizing and cleaning the air passing through the filters. The fan is driven by an electric motor from a suitable battery contained in the casing, and is controlled by a time switch so that the fan draws the air from the air space on the top of the tank and exhausts it through the filters. In a modified form a perforated hollow exhaust tube is placed either on the open top of the toilet bowl or on the toilet bowl cover with perforations in its inner periphery and is provided with a flexible connection into the casing of the ventilator capable of being set on the floor for directly drawing the air from the bowl and under the toilet seat into the casing and purifying it through the said filters. This separately located unit is also provided on one of its walls with compartments for magazines or the like.
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United States Patent 1 Zimmerman TOILET VENTILATION DEVICE [76] Inventor: Joseph P. Zimmerman, 3868 Shadowhill Dr., Santa Rosa, Calif.

22 Filed: Feb. 17,1972

21 Appl. No.: 227,499

[52] US. Cl 4/213, 4/72, 4/216 [51] Int. Cl A47k 3/22, E03d 9/04, E03d 13/00 [58] Field of Search 4/213-216, 72, 209, 100

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,366,979 2/1968 Johnston 4/213 2,388,990 1l/1945 Nelson et al.... 4/100 UX 2,100,962 11/1937 Juntunen 4/213 2,017,590 10/1935 Duffner 4/213 2,105,794 1/1938 Norris 4/213 2,778,033 1/1957 Majauskas 4/213 3,386,109 6/1968 Christian et a1. 4/213 3,495,282 2/1970 Taggart 4 213 3,585,651 6/1971 Cox 4/213 Primary Examiner-Henry K. Artis Attorney-George B. White [57] ABSTRACT In a toilet having a toilet bowl and a flush tank on the [451 Oct. 9, 1973 bowl in which an overflow pipe discharges overflow water into the toilet bowl and conducts obnoxious air and gases and odors from the toilet bowl into an air space above the water level in the tank, a ventilator casing which tits over the open top of the flush tank and bottom of the ventilator casing being substantially in the same proportions as the usual lid for the flush tank and it has an intake hole therethrough. A suitable blower or fan mounted on said bottom is located inside the casing. The walls of the easing are closed all around but are provided with charcoal filters for deodorizing and cleaning the air passing through the filters. The fan is driven by an electric motor from a suitable battery contained in the casing, and is controlled by a time switch so that the fan draws the air from the air space on the top of the tank and exhausts it through the filters. In a modified form a perforated hollow exhaust tube is placed either on the open top of the toilet bowl or on the toilet bowl cover with perforations in its inner periphery and is provided with a flexible connection into the casing of the ventilator capable of being set on the floor for directly drawing the air from the bowl and under the toilet seat into the casing and purifying it through the said filters. This separately located unit is also provided on one of its walls with compartments for magazines or the like.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTED [ET 9 75 sum 1 or 2 1 TOILET VENTILATION DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The previous devices for ventilating toilets required connections to vent pipes on the outside and therefore structural changes in the building, such as in US. Pat. No. 3,495,282 granted to Taggart on Feb. 17, 1970 or US. Pat. No. 2,371,923 granted to Sanford on Mar. 20, 1945.

In other prior devices structural changes had to be made either on the tank or on the toilet bowl or both as in US. Pat. No. 2,985,890 to Baither, granted on May 30, 1961. In an attempt to eliminate such structural changes to an outside vent or to the bowl, filtering unit was utilized in US. Pat. No. 3,087,168 of Huso, granted on Apr; 30, 1963, which alteration was necessary at the top of the flush tank in order to conduct air into a small filtering unit hung along one side of the flush tank.

An object of applicants herein invention is to provide a filtering unit which requires no structural alteration of the building, nor alteration of the toilet bowl, nor alteration of the tank, but which can be easily placed either on top of the flush tank in place of the usual lid, or it may be placed on the floor or some other support near the toilet bowl and by an intake placed on the top of the toilet bowl or secured to the underface of the toilet bowl cover, obnoxious odors in the air can be filtered out efficiently.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a partly sectional perspective view showing a toilet bowl and flush tank with the ventilating unit on the top of the tank.

FIG. 2 is a perspective detail view of the ventilator on a somewhat enlarged scale.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a modified application of the ventilator.

FIG. 4 is a fragmental view showing the intake conduit mounted on the underface of the toilet seat cover.

FIG. 5 is a sectional top view of the ventilator with wiring diagram.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The usual toilet bowl 1 has thereon a lid 2 which is provided with suitable hinges 3. A flush tank 4 is mounted in operative relation to the toilet bowl 1. In this illustration the flush tank 4 rests upon a bracket extension 6 of the toilet bowl 1. Inside of the flush tank 4 are the usual flush valves, the herein pertinent part of which is an overflow pipe 7 which is communicated through the usual conduits 8 and 9 to the usual spaces or perforations around the rim of the toilet bowl 1 so that obnoxious odors and air, after or before flushing the toilet, escapefrom the toilet bowl through the overflow conduit 7 the upper end 11 of which is above the water level in'the tank 4.

In the top of the tank and above the water level 12 is an air space 13 in which air is trapped under the usual lid on the top of the flush tank- 4.

The ventilator device includes a casing 14 which has a front wall 16, a rear wall 17, end walls 18, and a top 19. A bottom wall 21 is spaced above the lower edge 22 of the casing so that a flange 23 is formed all around below the bottom wall 21 which'fits on the top of the flush tank 4. It is preferable that the bottom wall 21 be made of slightly compressible material or provided with a suitable gasket around its edges to rest upon the upper edges of the flush tank 4.

A fan 26 is mounted on the bottom wall 21 so that the intake 27 thereof is aligned with or extends through a suitable intake aperture 28. The fan 26 is driven by an electric motor 29 which in turn is connected to a suitable battery 31. The electric circuit, as shown in FIG. 5, is controlled by an automatic time switch 32 of the usual type whereby a person can turn on the time switch 32 to the selected period of ventilation, and after the predetermined period the switch automatically breaks the circuit. In the alternative the power source 31 may be a suitable cord connection which may be plugged in in the house circuit.

As shown particularly in the sectional view in FIG. 5, the sides and ends of the casing are normally open and are formed by suitable charcoal filter sheets 33 which are covered with a suitable grid formed in the respective walls or ends. While in this illustration such charcoal filter sheets are shown on one side and the ends, it is understood that the same type of filter sheets may be utilized on all the sides of the casing 14.

In the form shown in FIG. 3, the flush tank may be remote or so located as to render the use of a casing on the top of the flush tank inconvenient, therefore the modified ventilator casing is provided with suitable legs 37 and the intake 38 is through one end of the ventilator casing 36. The intake of the fan 26 is suitably connected to the intake 38. In other respects this floor filter operates in the same manner as the filter at the top of the tank.

In the form shown in FIG. 3 a suitable manifold 39 in the form ofa ring is provided on the rim of the toilet seat 1. Vent holes 41 on the inside periphery of the manifold 39 provide intakes when the toilet seat 42 and the lid 2 cover the toilet bowl. An exhaust spout 43 of the manifold 39 is connected by flexible conduit 44 to the intake 38 of the ventilator.

In the form shown in FIG. 3 the back wall of the ventilator casing 36 is formed with suitable perpendicular shelves or compartments 46 in the fshion of a magazine rack.

In the form shown in FIG. 4 the manifold 49 is shown attached to the underface of the toilet seat 42 so that it may be lifted therewith.

THe aforesaid device is very convenient and it can be installed without any tools or without any structural alteration either of the walls of the house or of the parts of the toilet or the flush tank, and the device operates automatically for a preset period, and it fully eliminates all obnoxious odors and discharges the purified air in the room where the toilet is located, keeping thatroom odorless.

I claim:

1. A ventilator device for a toilet bowl and a flush tank having a vent from the bowl to the top of the tank, comprising a closed housing having a bottom, a top, and side walls,

said bottom being impervious to air and being spaced above the edges of the sides and ends of the housing, thereby to form a flange around the housing substantially fitting over the top of said flush tank and being adapted to seal the top edges of said flush tank,

certain of the side walls surrounding said housing having filter openings therethrough,

2. The invention specified in claim I, said forced air circulating means being clcctrically operated, and a time switch on one of said walls adapted to close the electric circuit for operating said forced air circulating means for a preset period.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2017590 *Nov 2, 1933Oct 15, 1935Duffner Carl AAir purifier
US2100962 *Sep 9, 1936Nov 30, 1937Gust JuntunenVentilating apparatus for toilets
US2105794 *Feb 8, 1937Jan 18, 1938Norris Charles CCombination closet tank cover and ventilator
US2388990 *Jul 25, 1942Nov 13, 1945Sloan Valve CoElectrically operated flush valve
US2778033 *Jul 11, 1955Jan 22, 1957Majauskas Charles JVentilator for water closets
US3366979 *May 6, 1965Feb 6, 1968Melvin I. JohnstonDeodorizing apparatus
US3386109 *Mar 2, 1966Jun 4, 1968Jack L. YoungbloodToilet deodorizing device
US3495282 *Nov 16, 1967Feb 17, 1970Taggart Allaird BToilet bowl and exhaust device
US3585651 *Aug 27, 1969Jun 22, 1971Cox Corp TheOdor remover for toilets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3887948 *Oct 5, 1973Jun 10, 1975Stamper Robin HarryConditioning device for deodorising and/or odourising air
US3939506 *Aug 13, 1974Feb 24, 1976Pearson Raymond HOdor control ventilator
US3942200 *Jan 13, 1975Mar 9, 1976Pearson Raymond HOdor control ventilator
US4031574 *Jun 17, 1976Jun 28, 1977Werner Frank DTimed ventilator for toilets
US4099047 *Nov 19, 1976Jul 4, 1978Kirkland Jr James RCommode ventilation system
US4153956 *Dec 15, 1977May 15, 1979Fischer Raymond C JrToilet deodorizer device
US4166298 *Jan 16, 1978Sep 4, 1979Pearson Raymond HDeodorizer for toilets
US4251888 *Apr 20, 1979Feb 24, 1981Turner William FVentilating toilet seat
US4301555 *May 27, 1980Nov 24, 1981Poister Clarence EReplaceable filter for deodorizing the air from a toilet bowl
US4318192 *Oct 31, 1979Mar 9, 1982Williams Jack DVentilated toilet
US4344194 *Dec 12, 1980Aug 17, 1982Pearson Raymond HToilet seat and lid unit with concealed air deodorizer
US4402091 *Jul 9, 1982Sep 6, 1983Ellis William DToilet evacuation device
US4494255 *Nov 29, 1983Jan 22, 1985Drummond Charles EVentilated toilet device
US4583250 *Sep 4, 1985Apr 22, 1986Valarao Bonifacio CDevice for the removal of foul air from toilet bowls
US4590629 *Jul 27, 1984May 27, 1986Lusk Leonard AToilet ventilating device
US4876748 *Mar 3, 1988Oct 31, 1989Chun Duk KToilet odor filter assembly
US5029346 *May 15, 1990Jul 9, 1991Fernald Sr Robert CToilet bowl vent system
US5231705 *Mar 24, 1992Aug 3, 1993Peter RagusaMethod and apparatus for eliminating toilet odors
US5325544 *Nov 27, 1992Jul 5, 1994Busch Michael SToilet flush tank and bowl air deodorizing apparatus
US5351344 *Aug 20, 1992Oct 4, 1994Phillips Rhudy FFluid evacuation system
US5369810 *Dec 2, 1992Dec 6, 1994Warren; H. RayMalodorous air entrapment apparatus
US5369813 *Dec 10, 1993Dec 6, 1994Goddard; Lewis W.Self-contained toilet venting system
US5519899 *Sep 26, 1994May 28, 1996Taylor; Raymond J.Toilet odor venting apparatus with improved retrofit capability
US5590423 *Dec 13, 1995Jan 7, 1997Boykin; Dwight L.Commode odor extractor
US5727262 *Jul 29, 1994Mar 17, 1998Littlejohn; George C.Bathroom ventilator
US5819324 *Jun 24, 1997Oct 13, 1998Bianco; Ronnie D.Toilet ventilating device
US6167576Dec 9, 1999Jan 2, 2001Jimmie L. SollamiVentilated toilet seat
US6298500Nov 15, 2000Oct 9, 2001Jimmie L. SollamiVentilated toilet seat
US6360377Jun 8, 2001Mar 26, 2002Jimmie L. SollamiFiltration housing unit for use with a ventilated toilet seat
US6370702 *Sep 26, 2000Apr 16, 2002Harold E. Iddings, Sr.Toilet enclosure with ventilation system
US6694534 *Aug 26, 2002Feb 24, 2004Earlyn W. StoneToilet ventilation system
US6804837Sep 9, 2003Oct 19, 2004Guess Sr Robert LOdor transporter system for a toilet bowl
US6944888Aug 6, 2004Sep 20, 2005Canales Jr AmadorSystem for venting noxious fumes from a toilet
US7275271Oct 7, 2004Oct 2, 2007Smith Robert IToilet evacuation system
US20050015869 *May 7, 2004Jan 27, 2005Rudolf BoecklerOdor extracting water tank cover assembly and toilet comprising same
US20060195975 *Mar 3, 2005Sep 7, 2006David KirbyFiltered exhaust system for commode
US20060248634 *May 9, 2005Nov 9, 2006Sollami Jimmie LVentilated toilet seat
US20070240250 *Apr 18, 2006Oct 18, 2007Lee FoersterToilet odor removal system, assembly containing the same, and methods for odor removal
US20080086799 *Oct 12, 2006Apr 17, 2008Granush BakhchadzyanUltra fresh way toilet
US20080086800 *Oct 12, 2006Apr 17, 2008Entrekin Donald RVented toilet seat
US20090056007 *Aug 27, 2007Mar 5, 2009Pham Hoang VVentilation system for a toilet
US20090126089 *Oct 31, 2008May 21, 2009Lyle SmithToilet ventilation system
US20110138525 *Jun 25, 2009Jun 16, 2011Washroom-Wizard LtdLavatory Systems
US20120255110 *Oct 11, 2012Chi KaoVentilation system for toilet bowl
CN103362194A *Apr 10, 2013Oct 23, 2013印度卫生洁具与工业有限公司Air freshener in water storage device
WO1996025134A1 *Feb 15, 1996Aug 22, 1996Renzo VidaliSystem and means for removing odour from bedpans
WO2013036106A3 *Jul 23, 2012Nov 21, 2013Q-Holding B.V.A toilet seat comprising a ventilator and a filter element, an element to be coupled to a seating element of a toilet seat, and a toilet comprising said toilet seat
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/213, 4/352, 4/216
International ClassificationE03D9/04, E03D9/052
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/052
European ClassificationE03D9/052