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Publication numberUS3763515 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1973
Filing dateMar 22, 1972
Priority dateMar 22, 1972
Publication numberUS 3763515 A, US 3763515A, US-A-3763515, US3763515 A, US3763515A
InventorsVoss T
Original AssigneeVoss T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf tool
US 3763515 A
Abstract
A golf tool is integrally constructed of a single piece of metal and includes a body having a fork connected thereto, and a plurality of cleaning elements carried by the body and projecting therefrom and each being adapted to be received in a groove on the striking face of an associated golf club, the cleaning elements being equidistantly spaced apart in a predetermined direction along the body with the distance between adjacent elements as measured in the predetermined direction being substantially equal to the distance between adjacent grooves on the associated golf club for accomodating simultaneous cleaning of a plurality of the golf club grooves.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Voss [ GOLF TOOL [76] Inventor: Thomas E. Voss, 614 South St..

Dundee. 111. 60118 [22] Filed: Mar. 22, 1972 [2]] Appl. No.: 237,069

[52] US. Cl. 15/105, 15/236 R [51] Int. Cl. A63b 57/00 [58] Field of Search 15/105, 236 R, 237; 30/172; 7/17 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,507,632 9/1924 Taylor 15/236 R 3,050,760 8/1962 Darnell 15/237 3,178,747 4/1965 Peterson 15/236 R Primary Examiner-Leon G. Machlin Attorney-Curtis F. Prangley et al.

[5 7] ABSTRACT A golf tool is integrally constructed of a single piece of metal and includes a body having a fork connected thereto, and a plurality of cleaning elements carried by the body and projecting therefrom and each being adapted to be received in a groove on the striking face of an associated golf club, the cleaning elements being equidistantly spaced apart in a predetermined direction along the body with the distance between adjacent elements as measured in the predetermined direction being substantially equal to the distance between adjacent grooves on the associated golf club for accomodating simultaneous cleaning of a plurality of the golf club grooves.

1 Claim, 4 Drawing Figures GOLF TOOL The present invention relates to a novel device for cleaning the striking face of the golf club. More particularly, the invention relates to a golf tool for cleaning the grooves on the striking face of the golf club.

It is a general object of the present invention to provide a simply and economically constructed golf tool which can be used both to clean the grooves on the striking face of a golf club and for lifting and leveling small divots and the like on the putting green of a golf course.

It is an important object of the present invention to provide a golf tool for cleaning the grooves on the striking face of a golf club, the tool comprising an elongated body adapted to be grasped by a user, and a plurality of cleaning elements carried by the body and projecting therefrom, each of the cleaning elements being shaped and dimensioned to be received in a groove of an associated golf club, the cleaning elements being equidistantly spaced apart in a predetermined direction along the body with the distance between adjacent elements as measured in the predetermined direction being substantially equal to the distance between adjacent grooves on the associated golf club, whereby a plurality of the grooves in the golf club head equal in number to the cleaning elements may be simultaneously cleaned by the placement of the cleaning elements respectively in the grooves and movement of the cleaning elements longitudinally of the grooves. I

In connection with the foregoing object, it is still another object of the present invention to provide a golf tool of the type set forth which is additionally provided with a fork member adapted for repairing and replacing divots on the golf course putting green.

Further features of the invention pertain to the particular arrangement of the parts of the golf tool whereby the above-outlined and additional operating features thereof 'are attained.

The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation together with further objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following specification taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a golf tool constructed in accordance with and embodying the features of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a reduced scale view of the golf tool of FIG.

1, shown held by a user in a use position adjacent to the head of a golf club for cleaning the grooves on the striking face thereof;

FIG. 3 is a view in vertical section taken along line 33 in FIG. 2 through the golf club head, and illustrating the golf tooldisposed perpendicular to the striking face of the golf club with the cleaning members in position for insertion into the golf club grooves; and

FIG. 4 is afront elevational view of the golf tool of the present invention being held by a user in position for employing the fork of the tool.

Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawings, there is illustrated a golf tool, generally designated by the numeral l0, constructed in accordance with and embodying the features of the oresent invention. The golf tool is constructed of a flat plate-like piece of metal and includes a generally rectangular body 11, a fork and a neck 12 interconnecting the body 11 and the fork 15. The tool 10 is preferably integrally constructed of a single piece of suitable material, such as metal, the tool 10 including a flat planar front surface 13 and a flat planar rear surface 14 disposed substantially parallel to the front surface 13 and spaced a predetermined distance therefrom. Extending about the periphery of the tool 10 and interconnecting the front and rear surfaces 13 and 14 is a continuous peripheral side surface 16.

The neck 12 has a width substantially less than that of the body 11, the opposite side edges of the neck 12 defining concave recesses in the sides of the tool 10. The fork 15 includes three substantially equidistantly spaced-apart tines 17, each preferably having a length slightly less than that of the body 11. It will be noted that the peripheral side surface 16 is convoluted in the region of the tines 17 to define the side surfaces thereof. Centrally disposed in the body 11 adjacent to the upper end thereof, as shown in FIG, I, is a circular opening 19 extending therethrough for accommodating a key chain or the like to attach the golf tool 10 to a key ring, key case or similar device so that the tool 10 may be conveniently stored for ready use in the pocket of a user or hung from the user's golf bag or belt or the like.

Integral with the body I 1 along one side edge thereof is a plurality of equidistantly spaced-apart cleaning elements 20 aligned longitudinally of the tool 10. Each of the cleaning elements 20 is integral with the peripheral side surface 16 and projects laterally therefrom a pre determined distance substantially equal to the depth of the grooves in the striking face of an associated golf club. Preferably, each of the cleaning members 20 is generally triangular in transverse cross-section and extends along the peripheral side surface 16 from the front surface 13 to the rear surface 14 substantially perpendicular thereto, the spacing between adjacent ones of the cleaning members 20 being substantially equal to the spacing between the adjacent grooves on the striking face of a golf club head.

Referring now also to FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings, there is illustrated a golf club generally designated by the numeral 25, which includes a shaft 22 and a head 23, the head 23 being provided with a substantially flat planar striking face 24 having a plurality of elongated, substantially parallel, spaced-apart grooves 26 therein in a wellknown manner. Each of the grooves 26 is relatively shallow and is generally V-shaped in transverse cross-section, as may best be seen in FIG. 3.

When it is desired to clean the grooves 26 so as to remove dirt and other foreign matter therefrom, the golf tool 10 is held in the hand of a user as illustrated'in FIG. 2, with the cleaning elements 20 respectively positioned adjacent to corresponding ones of the grooves 26 in the club face 24. The cleaning members 20 are then inserted in the grooves 26 and moved longitudinally therealong' in a scraping motion to clean the grooves 26. While in FIG. 2 the tool 10 is illustrated disposed at an acute angle to the club face 24 in order to more clearly illustrate the position of the cleaning elements 20 with respect to the grooves 26, it will, of course, be appreciated that, in actual use, the tool 10 will be held more nearly perpendicular to the club face 24, as indicated in FIG. 3, in order to insure that the cleaning elements 20 will be fully inserted in the grooves 26. Since most golf irons have I0 or 11 grooves on the striking face thereof, it will be appreciated that the provision of a plurality of the cleaning elements 20 will permit simultaneous cleaning of a plurality of grooves 26, thereby accommodating cleaning of all grooves 26 in a minimum amount of time and with a minimum number of passes of the tool 10.

Referring now to FIG, 4 of the drawings, the golf tool 11 is illustrated as held by a user in position for utilizing the fork 15 to lift and level a divot 28 or the like on the putting green 27 of a golf course. It will readily be appreciated that the fork 15 can also be utilized to repair spike marks, remove loose debris and the like on the green and may, if desired, also be utilized to clean golf balls and to clean the cleats of golf shoes.

In a constructional model of the golf tool 10, the tool was integrally constructed of a single piece of stainless steel approximately one-sixteenth inch thick, the overall length of the tool 10 being approximately 2% and the opening 19 having a diameter of approximately five thirty-seconds inch. It will, of course, be appreciated that the golf tool 10 may be provided in other sizes and shapes and may be constructed of other suitable materials. Further, while in the preferred embodiment of the invention, five of the cleaning elements 20 are provided, it will be appreciated that any desired number may be used. It will also be appreciated that the front and rear surfaces 13 and 14 of the tool 10 may, if desired, be suitably engraved with the owners initials or other indicia. While the golf tool 10 is designed primarily for use in cleaning the grooves on the striking face of a golf iron, since it is the irons which are most likely to collect dirt and mud in use, it will, of course, be appreciated that the tool 10 may also be used to clean the striking faces of other golf clubs.

While there has been described what is at present considered to be the preferred embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that various modifications may be made therein, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such modifications that fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A combination pocket golf tool for cleaning the grooves of the striking face ofa golf club and for repairing divots and spike marks and the like, said tool comprising a flat body adapted to be grasped by a user, a plurality of cleaning elements carried by said body and projecting therefrom in a first direction, each of said cleaning elements being shaped and dimensioned to be received in a groove of an associated golf club face for effecting cleaning thereof, said cleaning elements being equidistantly spaced apart in a second predetermined direction along said body substantially normal to said first predetermined direction with the distance between adjacent elements as measured in said second predetermined direction being substantially equal to the distance between adjacent grooves on the associated golf club face, and a flat fork-like member including a plurality of spaced-apart tines integral and substantially coplanar with said body for repairing divots and spike marks and the like, each of said tines extending from said body generally in said second predetermined direction and terminating in a blunt rounded end.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1507632 *Oct 26, 1922Sep 9, 1924Taylor Israel RGolf-club tool
US3050760 *Mar 16, 1961Aug 28, 1962Darnell Beryl ECleaner
US3178747 *Nov 3, 1961Apr 20, 1965New ProductsCulinary scraper
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4086678 *Oct 12, 1976May 2, 1978Torr Calvin DGolf club tool
US4114878 *Jul 5, 1977Sep 19, 1978Robert Louis HammondAnchored golf tee
US4475912 *Oct 26, 1981Oct 9, 1984Coates Fredrica VAdjustable diapers with fastening means
US4535987 *Aug 22, 1984Aug 20, 1985Dikoff Joseph KGolf tool
US4908899 *Feb 21, 1989Mar 20, 1990Donald KillenGolf club cleaning tool
US5007129 *Jun 12, 1989Apr 16, 1991Hainey Melvin FGolfer's cleaning tool
US5022650 *Apr 23, 1990Jun 11, 1991Kt Products, Inc.Golf tool
US5121519 *Apr 24, 1991Jun 16, 1992Howard HaugomGolf club groove cleaner and turf repair tool
US5126276 *Oct 19, 1987Jun 30, 1992Falk FishMethod for the determination and measurements of more than one unknown material in a single surface of a multianalytic assay
US5143371 *Feb 6, 1992Sep 1, 1992Strahan Ronald LGolfer's aid
US5269513 *Jul 31, 1992Dec 14, 1993Gervais Debra CCompact golfing tool
US5562553 *Jan 16, 1996Oct 8, 1996Robert L. DigernessMulti-purpose golfer's tool
US5596812 *Sep 1, 1995Jan 28, 1997Karsten Manufacturing CorporationGroove depth gauge for golf club heads
US5694660 *Sep 16, 1996Dec 9, 1997Rachwalski; Joseph E.Tool for cleaning cleated shoes
US5733208 *Jan 4, 1996Mar 31, 1998Fazekas; Craig A.Multi-purpose golf tool and method
US5860430 *Sep 30, 1997Jan 19, 1999Thorsheim; Kevin L.Combination comb and ice scraper
US6004229 *Oct 29, 1997Dec 21, 1999Fazekas; Craig A.Multi-purpose golf tool and method
US6112364 *Oct 19, 1999Sep 5, 2000Myers; Joseph P.Golf club cleaning tool
US6733402 *Sep 5, 2002May 11, 2004Everett B. ChristensenGolf ball mark repair tool containing a scoring pencil
US7303484 *Mar 30, 2006Dec 4, 2007Brett BieskeGolf-putter grip with removable ball mark repair tool
US8365344 *Nov 28, 2011Feb 5, 2013Kenneth NeuGroove cleaning tool
US20110214242 *Mar 7, 2011Sep 8, 2011Mark BrownGolf club groove cleaning and deburring tool
WO1996022131A1 *Jan 16, 1996Jul 25, 1996Mitch International Ltd A SGolf tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/105, D21/793, 172/378, D28/31, D08/6, 15/236.8, 473/408
International ClassificationA63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0068
European ClassificationA63B57/00G