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Publication numberUS3763609 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1973
Filing dateAug 3, 1972
Priority dateAug 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3763609 A, US 3763609A, US-A-3763609, US3763609 A, US3763609A
InventorsJ Probst
Original AssigneePal Dev Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shingle roofing construction
US 3763609 A
Abstract
A sheet of roofing paper includes two sets of visually distinct parallel guide lines which extend longitudinally of the paper. The guide lines of the first set are uniformly spaced apart and the width of the paper is not a multiple of the spacing between the first guide lines so that each end guide line in the set is spaced from the respective side edge of the paper a distance less than the spacing between the guide lines. The second set of guide lines includes a pair of guide lines each of which is located between the end guide line of the first set and the next adjacent guide line of that set. The guide lines of the first set serve as guides for laying rows of shingles and the guide lines of the second set serve as guides for applying subsequent sheets of roofing paper in lapping relation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Patet [191 Probst S HINGLE ROOFING CONSTRUCTION 17.5. IFJYSPFPELJQP" Flutes! fler leeeawia [73] Assignee: P.A.L. Development Corp.,

' Butler, Wis.

[22] Filed: Aug. 3, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 277,648

[52] US. Cl. 52/105, 52/554 [51] Int. Cl E04dl 5/02 [58] Field of Search 52/416, 418, 553,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,541,745 11/1970 Probst 52/105 Primary ExaminerJohn E. Murtagh Attorney-Andrus, Sceales, Starke & Sawall Oct.9,l973

[5 7] ABSTRACT A sheet of roofing paper includes two sets of visually distinct parallel guide lines which extend longitudinally of the paper. The guide lines of the first set are uniformly spaced apart and the width of the paper is not a multiple of the spacing between the first guide lines so that each end guide line in the set is spaced from the respective side edge of the paper a distance less than the spacing between the guide lines. The second set of guide lines includes a pair of guide lines each of which is located between the end guide line of the first set and the next adjacent guide line of that set. The guide lines of the first set serve as guides for laying rows of shingles and the guide lines of the sec ond set serve as guides for applying subsequent sheets of roofing paper in lapping relation.

11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures SHINGILE ROOFING CONSTRUCTKON BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Conventional asphalt or asbestos shingle roofs are normally constructed by initially applying felt roofing paper to the roof deck and then nailing rows or courses of shingles over the paper in overlapping relation. The standard asphalt or asbestos shingle is approximately 36 inches long and 12 inches wide and each course of shingles overlaps the upper portion of the adjacent lower course by approximately half the width of the shingles. The roofer normally gauges the overlap by eye and without any auxilliary guide mechanism. With short runs an experienced roofer can apply the rows of shingles in a relatively straight path, but when a long run is required, as in an apart-ment or commercial building, even an experienced roofer has considerable difficulty in maintaining the rows or courses of shingles in a straight path, with the result that the rows are frequently wavy and may vary as much as 4 to 5 inches throughout the length of the roof. This problem is further complicated when large obstructions, such as dormers, vents, skylights and the like, interrupt the courses of shingles. With an obstruction, such as a dormer, the shingles are applied independently on either side of the dormer and at the top of the dormer the courses are often out of alignment.

In the past, attempts have been made to insure precise alignment of rows of shingles by using 'auxilliary guide devices which are attached to the roof, or by laying out the position of each row of shingles and snapping chalk lines along the roof. While these methods aid in maintaining alignment of the rows of shingles, the time required for setting up these alignment systems often overbalances the benefits to be achieved, so that the roofers generally rely on their own visual ability to maintain alignment of the rows of shingles.

US. Pat. No. 3,541,745 of the same inventor, describes a roofing system for applying shingles which insures that the rows of shingles will be in precise alignment and follow a straight path along the entire length of the roof. According to the aforementioned patent, the roofing paper is formed with two sets of visually distinct guide lines which not only aid in alignment of the rows of shingles, but also aid in aligning the subsequently applied sheets of roofing paper in overlapping relation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is an improvement to the roofing system shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,541,745. According to the invention, the roofing paper, which is adapted to be applied to the roof deck, is provided with two sets of generally parallel, visually distinct lines which extend longitudinally of the paper. The guide lines of one set are uniformly spaced across the width of the paper and the width of the paper is not a multiple of the distance between the guide lines, so that the end guide lines of the first set are spaced from the respective side edges of the roofing paper a distance that is less than the spacing between the guide lines. The second set of guide lines includes a pair of guide lines, each of which is located between an end guide line of the first set and the next adjacent guide lines of that set.

The second guide lines, which are visually distinct from the first guide lines, serve as a guide for applying additional sheets of roofing paper to the roof deck in overlapping relation, while the first guide lines serve as guides for applying the rows or courses of shingles over the roofing paper.

The roofing system of the invention provides an accurate method of applying shingles which insures that the rows of shingles are in precise alignment and follow a straight path along the entire length of the roof.

The system of the invention is inexpensive for no auxilliary guides or markers are required. The guide lines are applied to the roofing paper in the factory so that the overall cost of the system is minimal.

As both the first and second sets of guide lines are symmetrical across the width of the paper, the paper can be unrolled from either side edge of the roof, and the resulting guide pattern will be identical.

The guide system of the invention can be utilized with 36 inch width roofing paper which is standard in the industry.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the course of the following description.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The drawings illustrate the best mode presently contemplated of carrying out the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the roofing system of the invention; and

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the rollof roofing paper having the two sets of guide lines.

As shown in the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates a roof I which is generally either a hip or gable roof and facia board 2 is applied to the ends of the rafters at the lower edge of the roof. A gutter 3 is located along the facia 2 and the flashing 4 of the gutter is nailed to the roof deck l.

A number of sheets of roofing paper 5 are applied to the roof deck 1 with each succeeding upper sheet 5 overlapping the upper edge portion of the next lower sheet. As shown in the drawings, the lower edge of the lowermost sheet of roof paper 5 extends slightly beyond the lower edge of the roof deck above the facia In accordance with the invention, a set of uniformly spaced guide lines 6 are applied to the paper 5 and extend longitudinally of the paper. The guide lines 6 are parallel to the edges 7 of the paper and the spacing between the guide lines 6 is not a multiple of the width of the paper 5, so that the distance between the end guide lines and 6h of the set and the respective side edges 7 is substantially less than the spacing between the guide lines 6. In practice, the distance between the guide lines 6 would be approximately 5 inches, while the spacing between the end guide lines 6a and 6h and the respective side edges 7 would be approximately one-half inch.

in addition to the guide lines 6 the paper is also provided with a second set of guide lines 8a and 8b. The guide lines 6 are disposed parallel to the side edges 7 and the guide lines 60 is located between the guide lines 6a and 61) while the guide line 8b is located between the guide lines 6g and 6h. In practice, the guide lines 8a and 6b would be spaced inwardly approximately onehalf inch from the guide lines 6a and 6h respectively.

The guide lines 6 and 6 are visually distinct, meaning that the guide lines 6 and 8 are of a different color, or one set of guide lines can be continuous, and the other interrupted in the form of dots, dashes, or the like, or

the guide lines 6 and 8 can be differentiated in any other manner so that the roofer can be readily distinguish between the two sets of guide lines 6 and 8. The term guide lines" as used in the claims is intended to mean either a continuous or interrupted visual marker.

ln laying the roof, the rooder initially unrolls the paper 5, from one side edge of the roof to the opposite side edge and cuts the felt at the opposite side edge. The paper is then nailed to the roof deck with the lower edge 7 of the paper in the proper alignment with the facia board 2. The remaining roll of felt paper is then reversed in position and unrolled from the opposite side edge back toward the original side edge of the roof. The felt paper is again cut at the original side edge of the roof and the cut second sheet of roof paper is then nailed to the roof with the lower edge 7 of the second sheet aligned with the line 8b of the first sheet, as shown in FIG. 1. This procedure is repeated until the entire roof is covered with the sheets of the roofing paper with each upper sheet overlapping the upper edge of the next lower sheet at the line 8b.

As the guide lines 6 and 8 are symmetrical across the width of the roofing paper the roofer can unroll the felt from either side edge of the roof, as opposed to other types of roofing papers which have unsymmetrical guide lines across the width. With unsymmetrical guide lines, it is necessary to unroll the felt from only one side edge of the roof, so that the roofer, after applying one sheet of the roofing paper is required to carry the remaining roll of paper back to the original side edge of the roof to apply the next succeeding sheet of roofing paper. With roofs of substantial length, as in apartment or commercial buildings, this requires substantial time to continuously walk back and forth across the roof deck. However, with the roofing paper of the invention, the roofer need not unroll the paper from the same side edge of the roof, but and after applying one course or sheet of the roofing paper, he can merely reverse the roll and unroll it back toward the original side edge.

After the roofing paper has been nailed to the roof deck, a starter course of shingles 9 is applied with the upper edges of the starter course in alignment with the guide line 60. The shingles in the starter course are normally inverted so that slits face upwardly and the lower edge of the shingle is continuous. The first course of shingles 10 is then applied directly over the starter course with the upper edges of the first course also aligned with the guide line 60. Each succeeding course of shingles is then applied in overlapping relation to the previous courses with the upper edges of the shingles being aligned with each succeeding guide line 6d-6h, as illustrated in FIG. 1.

The roofing construction of the invention provides a precise method of aligning the rows or courses of shingles and insures that the rows will be laid in a straight path along the entire length of the roof without waves or ripples.

The roofing system can be utilized without the requirement for any additional equipment or labor costs, for the sets of guide lines are applied to the roofing paper in the factory and no additional time or labor is required in applying guides or laying out guide systems on the roof prior to laying of the roofing.

The roofing system has particular application to long roofs, such as in apartments or commercial buildings, and also to roofs having large obstructions such as dormers, vents, sky-lights and the like.

The guide line pattern of the invention can be applied to 36 inch roofing paper which is the standard of the industry. Furhermore, fewer guide lines are required with the roofing system of the invention than with prior types and this reduces the overall cost of the roofing paper.

Various modes of carrying out the invention are contemplated as being within the scope of the following claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter which is regarded as the invention.

1 claim:

1. A shingle roof construction material to be applied to a roof deck, comprising a sheet having a pair of opposed side edges, a first set of generally parallel uniformly spaced guide lines extending longitudinally of the sheet, the width of said sheet not being a multiple of the spacing between said first guide lines, whereby the distance from the end guide lines of the set to the adjacent side edges of the sheet is less than the spacing between the guide lines, and a pair of second guide lines extending longitudinally of the sheet, each second guide line being spaced inwardly of the end guide line of the first set, with the spacing between the second guide line and the end guide line of the first set being less than the spacing between said first guide lines, said second guide lines having different visual characteris tics from said first guide lines and thereby being visually distinct from said first guide lines.

2. The material of claim 1, wherein said first and second guide lines are disposed symmetrically of the longitudinal center of the sheet.

3. The material of claim 1, wherein the spacing between the end guide lines of the first set and the respective side edges is equal.

4. The material of claim 1, in which the distance between one of said second guide lines and the adjacent end guide line is substantially equal to the distance between the other second guide line and the adjacent end guide line.

5. The material of claim 1, wherein each second guide line is located closer to the respective end guide line of the first set than to the next adjacent first guide line of the first set.

6. The material of claim 5, wherein the distance between the end guide lines of the first set and the respective side edge is approximately equal to the distance between said end guide line and the respective second guide line.

7. The material of claim 1, wherein said visual distinction is a color distinction.

8. The material of claim 1 wherein one of the said sets of guide lines is continuous and the other set of guide lines is interrupted.

9. A roof construction, comprising a roof deck having a lower edge, a sheet of rooting material on said roof deck and having a pair of parallel side edges with the lower of said side edges disposed in general alignment with the lower edge of the roof deck, a first set of generally parallel uniformly spaced guide lines extending longitudinally of the sheet, the width of said sheet not being a multiple of the spacing between said first guide lines, whereby the distance from the end guide lines of the set to the adjacent side edges of the sheet is less than the spacing between the guide lines, and a pair of second guide lines extending longitudinally of the sheet, each second guide line being spaced inwardly of the end guide line of the first set, with the spacing between the second guide line and the end guide line of the first set being less than the spacing between said first guide lines, said second guide lines having different visual charactetistics from said first guide lines and thereby being visually distinct from said first guide lines, and a plurality of shingles applied over the roofing material on the roof deck in a series of partially overlapping rows, said shingles having a width slightly greater than twice the spacing between said first guide lines, the upper edges of the shingles of each row being aligned with one of the first guide lines.

10. The roof construction of claim 9, and including a second sheet of roofing material having said first and second guide lines thereon, the upper side edge of said second sheet disposed in overlapping alignment with the upper second guide line of the first sheet and the distance between the lowermost first guide line of said of the longitudinal center of the sheet.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3541745 *Jun 7, 1968Nov 24, 1970Pal Dev CorpRoofing construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4449336 *Jul 19, 1982May 22, 1984Kelly Thomas LFire barrier reservoir
US4858402 *Dec 9, 1985Aug 22, 1989Helmar PutzBuilding board, particularly gypsum plasterboard
US5404651 *Jul 12, 1993Apr 11, 1995Brodrick; John H.Clapboard installation layout guide and method
US5542226 *Oct 13, 1994Aug 6, 1996Markovich; Joseph G.For use in retaining shingles on a roof
US6199338 *Aug 10, 1999Mar 13, 2001Elk Corporation Of DallasUniversal starter shingle
US6349506Jun 17, 1999Feb 26, 2002Artistic View, Inc.Shingle with integral gutter screen
US6880299 *Aug 20, 2002Apr 19, 2005Thomas E. MartinConstruction material with multiple stud position indicia
US6964141 *Dec 26, 2000Nov 15, 2005Structural Quality Assurance Inc.Building reinforcing method, material, and structure
US6990779 *Aug 2, 2002Jan 31, 2006Elk Premium Building Products, Inc.Roofing system and roofing shingles
US7934345Nov 10, 2005May 3, 2011Marsh Roger FSystems for building construction by attaching blocks with bolts and vertically spaced flat bars
US8099918Apr 18, 2008Jan 24, 2012Marsh Roger FSpecial and improved configurations for unitized post tension block systems for masonry structures
US8522510 *Sep 18, 2003Sep 3, 2013Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LlcLaminated starter shingle for a roof covering
US8567601Jul 27, 2011Oct 29, 2013Tamko Building Products, Inc.Roofing product
US8595993Feb 7, 2011Dec 3, 2013Huber Engineered Woods LlcBoards comprising an array of marks to facilitate attachment
US8850763 *Oct 25, 2007Oct 7, 2014Roger F. MarshSuper unitized post tension block system for high high strength masonry structuresówith SuperStrongBloks
US8893447Dec 5, 2013Nov 25, 2014J Kevin HarrisUse devices for mechanically secured block assembly systems
US20120117908 *Oct 20, 2011May 17, 2012Travis TurekRoofing product
US20140260078 *Mar 12, 2014Sep 18, 2014Building Materials Investment CorporationLight weight shingle
EP1518973A2 *Sep 24, 2004Mar 30, 2005Fabrene Inc.Roofing underlayment
WO1996030609A1 *Mar 27, 1996Oct 3, 1996Ronald C HungarterRoofing tape
WO2008057778A2 *Oct 25, 2007May 15, 2008Marsh Patricia MPost tension block system with superstrongbloks
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/105, 52/554
International ClassificationE04D15/00, E04D15/02, E04D1/00, E04D12/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D12/002, E04D15/025
European ClassificationE04D15/02T, E04D1/26, E04D12/00B