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Publication numberUS3764132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1973
Filing dateMay 18, 1972
Priority dateMay 18, 1972
Publication numberUS 3764132 A, US 3764132A, US-A-3764132, US3764132 A, US3764132A
InventorsD Hepburn
Original AssigneeAdrian Poppel M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Friction type exercising apparatus
US 3764132 A
Abstract
A frictional exercising device having a tubular casing non-rotatably mounted in the housing and two brake shoe pairs in the housing embracing a tubular brake shaft on projecting ends of which pulleys having cables wound thereon are mounted. The pulleys, through a ratchet engagement, can drive the brake shaft in one direction and freewheel in an opposite direction. The brake shaft rotatably extends through a pair of annular pressure plates slidable with respect to a surrounding casing. A rod extends through a brake shaft and connects at one end to a rope guard secured to one of the pressure plates and slidably extends through a rope guard secured to the opposite pressure plate. The opposite end of the rod is threaded to receive an adjusting nut which can be moved inwards against the pressure plate to move the pressure plates together and into engagement with wedges which slide in peripheral slots on the brake shoes between the brake shoes and the casing wall so as to move the brake shoes into braking engagement with the brake shaft and effect frictional braking of the brake shaft when the cables are operated. The pulleys a freewheeling when they are counter-rotated by rewind springs to rewind the cables.
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United States Patent [191 Hepburn Oct. 9, 1973 FRICTION TYPE EXERCISING APPARATUS [75] Inventor: Douglas Ivan Hepburn, Vancouver.

B. C Canada 41:73 1 Assignee: Michael Adrian Poppel,Gibsons,

B. O, Canada [22] Filed: May 18, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 254,735

[52] US. Cl. 272/79 R, 272/83 A, 2'72/DlG. 3,

Primary Examiner -Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-William R. Browne Attorney-Brian J. Wood [57] ABSTRACT A frictional exercising device having a tubular casing non-rotatably mounted in the housing and two brake shoe pairs in the housing embracing a tubular brake shaft on projecting ends of which pulleys having cables wound thereon are mounted. The pulleys, through a ratchet engagement, can drive the brake shaft in one direction and freewheel in an opposite direction. The brake shaft rotatably extends through a pair of annular pressure plates slidable with respect to a surrounding casing. A rod extends through a brake shaft and connects at one end to a rope guard secured to one of the pressure plates and slidably extends through a rope guard secured to the opposite pressure plate. The opposite end of the rod is threaded to receive an adjusting nut which can be moved inwards against the pressure plate to move the pressure plates together and into engagement with wedges which slide in peripheral slots on the brake shoes between the brake shoes and the casing wall so as to move the brake. shoes into braking engagement with the brake shaft and effect frictional braking of the brake shaft when the cables are operated. The pulleys a freewheeling when they are counter-rotated by rewind springs to rewind the cables.

8 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENIEU 91975 3,764.132

SHEET 10F 2 FRICTION TYPE EXERCISING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to exercising devices and in particular to portable exercising devices which, when used, simulate exercises obtainable with the use of dumbbells, barbells and the like.

2. Prior Art There are many and varied types of exercising devices, for example dumbbells', barbells, and springloaded or weight-loaded devices operated by ropes and cables. These last mentioned devices are suitable for use in gymnasia and other like occasions, however, due to their bulk and weight they are cumbersome and difficult to move from place to place. These factors and others tend to preclude their use where an individual, desiring to take exercise, does a considerable amount of travelling.

Portable exercises of prior design have also not proven entirely satisfactory as they usually require provision for attachment to floors, walls, or ceilings.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a portable exercising device which does not require attachment to floors, walls, etc., which is relatively light yet which is durable enough to withstand heavy usage by muscular individuals.

The present exercising device includes a cylindrical casing non-rotatably mounted in a housing upon which an individual taking exercise can stand, a cylindrical brake shaft extending axially through the brake drum, brake shoes in the casing embracing the brake shaft, axially movable wedges between the brake shoes and the casing, pulleys rotatably mounted on and having a ratchet engagement with extending ends of the brake shaft, cables wound on pulleys adapted when pulled to rotate the pulleys and brake shaft in the same direction, pressure plates on opposite ends of the casing adapted to be moved into engagement with the wedges for moving the brake shoe against the brake shaft, and rewind springs connected to the pulleys normally loaded to counter-rotate the pulleys so as to rewind the cables.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exercising device in accordance with the invention,

FIG. 2 is a view of an underside of the exercising device with a base plate removed and showing braking mechanism,

FIG. 3 is a central sectional view of the braking mechanism,

FIG. 4 on sheet 1 of the drawings, is a sectional view .on 44 of FIG. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION FIGS. 1 and 2 The exercising device, generally 10, has a substantially rectangular housing [2 closed by a base plate 13. Cables, severally 14, having handles 15 extend through slots 16 in the housing 12 and are wound on helically grooved pulleys 17' and 18, see FIG. 2 of braking mechanism, generally 19, the braking mechanism being so arranged so as to frictionally resist rotation of the pulleys when an individual taking exercise and standing, sitting or kneeling on the housing applies tension to the cables. The braking mechanism is also so constructed so that when the individual releases the handles the pulleys automatically rotate in an opposite direction to rewind the cables thereon.

FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 The braking mechanism 19 has a cylindrical casing 20 which is seated between partition walls 21 of the housing 12, see FIG. 2 and which has a central hole 22 into which a lug 22.1 extending from the base plate fits so as to prevent axial and rotative motion of the casing.

Annular pressure plates 23 and 24, FIG. 3, which have a slidable fit in the casing rotatably support a tubular brake shaft 25 axially of the casing. The pulleys l7 and 18 are mounted for rotation on extending end portions 26 and 27 of the brake shaft. Opposite ends of the brake shaft bear against cover plates 28 and 29 secured by screws 29.1 to the pulleys.

The pulleys have inwardly opening radial sockets for slidably receiving radially movable pawls 30.] each of which is spring-urged inward against the brake shaft and which is engagable with any one of a group of circumferentially aligned spaced slots 33 in the brake shaft, the pawls being adapted so that when the cables 14 are tensionedto rotate the pulleys l7 and 18 the pawls engage a slot to lock the pulleys and brake shaft for mutual rotation in one direction and when the pulleys are rotated in an opposite direction automatically withdraw from the slots to enable the pulleys to freewheel on the brake shaft.

The braking mechanism includes rope guards 37 and 38 which take the form of rectangular frames, having side pieces 39 and end pieces 40 and which are integral of the pressure plates 23, and which enclose the pulleys l7 and 18. The side pieces of the rope guards ensure proper winding of the cables on the pulleys so that the cables follow the grooves therein. The end pieces 40 of the rope guards are spaced outwards of outer end faces of the pulleys and seat in notches 42 formed in end walls 12.1 and 12.2 of the upper housing portion 12, see FIG. 2, so as to prevent rotation of the pressure plates.

A rod 43 extends axially through the brake shaft and pulleys, one end 44 of the rod being non-rotatably secured to the end piece or end bar 40 ofthe rope guard 38 by a pin 45. An opposite end 46 of the rod extends through the end piece 40 of the rope guard 37 and is threaded to receive a tension adjusting nut 47.

Helical tension springs 48 and 49 mounted on the rod 43 have inner ends 50 and 51, respectively, secured against rotation on a threaded sleeve 52 pinned to the rod 43 and are fixed at their outer ends to pins 53 and 54. The springs are normally tensioned sufficient to maintain the cover plates 28 and 29 of the pulleys against the ends of the brake shaft. The springs are oppositely wound and are normally loaded so as to tend to rotate the pulleys in the freewheeling direction.

Braking of the shaft is effected by two brake shoe pairs 55 and 56 mounted on the brake shaft inside the casing, the brake shoe pairs being spaced apart by cylindrical spacer 57 mounted on the brake shaft. Each of the brake shoe pairs, see FIGS. 3 and 4 has a pair of semi-cylindrical brake shoes 61 and 62 embracing the shaft which are provided with suitable brake lining 63, for example leather or known fibrous material, for frictionally engaging the brake shaft.

Each of the brake shoes has a sloped-bottomed, outwardly opening peripheral groove 64 adapted slidably to receive a wedge 65, the wedges having butt ends 66 projecting outwards of outer end faces of the shoes.

It is seen, that braking pressure can be applied to the brake shaft by appropriately tightening the nut 47 against the end piece 40 of the rope guard 37 thus moving both rope guards inwards along the rod and moving the pressure plates 23 and 24 against the butt ends of the wedges. The wedges which frictionally engage the casing move the brake shoes radially inwards into frictional engagement with the brake shaft. Frictional engagement of the wedges with the walls of the casing and the pressure plates prevents rotation of the brake shoe pairs. Alternately, grooves 67 are formed in the casing wall to slidably receive the wedges to prevent rotation of the brake shoes. Braking pressure of the brake shoes on the brake shaft, it is seen, is a function of the tension applied to the rod 43 by the adjusting nut 47.

OPERATION In using the exercising device a person taking exercise suitably adjusts the braking pressure of the brake shoes against the brake shaft, as above described, then sits, stands, or kneels on the housing, then takes hold of the handles and applies tension to the cables so as to rotate the pulleys and the brake shaft against friction developed by pressure of the brake shoes against the brake shaft. The pulleys, as they rotate, also wind their respective springs so that when the handles are released the springs automatically counter-rotate the pulleys so as to rewind the cables.

It is seen further, that the cables can be operated simultaneously or alternately. When one pulley is rotated by applying tension to its cable so as to rotate the brake shaft the other pulley simply freewheels on the brake shaft so that the cable does not unwind therefrom.

I claim:

1. A friction type exercising device including:

a. a housing,

b. a tubular casing non-rotatably mounted in the housing,

c. a pair of annular pressure plates slidably mounted in the housing for movement along the longitudinal axis of the housing,

d. means secured to the pressure plates and co-acting with the housing for maintaining the pressure plates non-rotative relative to the housing,

e. a tubular brake shaft extending along the axis of the housing and supported for rotation in the annular pressure plates, I

f. brake means mounted in the housing between the pressure plates for radial movement into braking engagement with the brake shaft, said brake means comprising brake shoes, said brake shoes having peripheral longitudinally extending slots,

g. wedges positioned within the slots and said wedges extending between the brake shoes and the casing, the wedges having butt ends extending outwards of outer faces of the brake shoes,

h. means for effecting slidable non-rotatable engagement of the wedges and the casing,

i. adjustable means for causing pressure plates to move against the wedges and force the shoes into frictional engagement with the brake shaft,

j. pulleys rotatably mounted on opposite ends of the brake shaft,

k. cables wound on the pulleys and positioned so that when pulled they rotate the pulleys in one direction,

. ratchet means for connecting the pulleys and brake shaft for mutual rotation in said one direction and for permitting freewheeling counter-rotation of the pulleys in an opposite direction,

m. rewind springs means connected to the pulleys for rewinding the cables on they pulleys by causing the pulleys to counter rotate.

2. An exercising device as claimed in claim 1 in which the means for effecting non-rotational engagement of the pressure plates with the housing includes a rope guard having side and end bars embracing each pulley and non-rotatably connected to the pressure plates, the end bars having a slidable non-rotatable engagement with the housing.

3. A friction type exercising device as claimed in claim 2 in which the adjustable means for moving the pressure plates includes a rod extending axially through the brake shaft, the rod being secured at one end to an end bar of the rope guards and slidably extending at an opposite end through the end bar of the other of the rope guards and a nut threaded on the said opposite end of the rod engagable with the last mentioned end bar.

4. A friction type exercising device as claimed in claim 3 in which the rewind spring means includes a pair of helical springs mounted on the rod, each spring being secured non-rotatably at an inner end to the rod and being secured at an outer end to a pulley.

5. A friction device as claimed in claim 1 in which the ratchet means includes a pawl mounted for radial movement on each pulley and being spring urged against the brake shaft, the brake shaft having a circumferential row of slots for effecting ratchet engagement with the pawl.

6. A friction exercising device as claimed in claim 4 including an externally threaded sleeve non-rotatably secured to the rod adjacent the middle length of the ladder, the sleeve being adapted to threadedly receive the helical springs.

7. A friction device as claimed in claim 4 in which the pulleys have annular end plates engagable with the ends of the brake shaft, the springs being tensioned so as to maintain said end plates against the brake shaft.

8. A friction device as claimed in claim 1 in which the means for effecting non-rotatable movement of the wedges with respect to the housing includes longitudinal slots in the housing adapted slidably to receive the wedges.

3 i k i l

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3596907 *Jan 12, 1967Aug 3, 1971Scient Exercising Equipment LtFriction exercising apparatus
US3610617 *Jul 19, 1968Oct 5, 1971Apollo Distributors LtdExercising device
US3690654 *Apr 21, 1971Sep 12, 1972Doublas I HepburnPull type frictional resistance exercising device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4235439 *May 21, 1979Nov 25, 1980Super Stretch Co., Ltd.Friction type exercising device
US4360693 *Apr 7, 1981Nov 23, 1982Scientific Pharmaceuticals, Inc.1,4-Bis[(3'-methacroyl-2'-hydroxypropoxy)methyl]cyclohexane derivatives thereof
US4645204 *Feb 6, 1985Feb 24, 1987Isaac BergerCompact portable exercising apparatus
US4944511 *Jan 23, 1989Jul 31, 1990Paul S. FrancisAdjustable resilient reel exerciser
US5147264 *Jun 27, 1989Sep 15, 1992Braathen Thor FResistance reel for an exerciser
US6030321 *Mar 27, 1995Feb 29, 2000Fuentes; Joe A.Kicking exerciser for martial arts
US6123649 *May 26, 1999Sep 26, 2000Lee; R. ClaytonResistance apparatus for connection to a human body
US6315701Nov 20, 1998Nov 13, 2001Tessema Dosho ShifferawPortable exercise machine
US6440044Aug 1, 2000Aug 27, 2002Spiraflex, Inc.Resistance mechanism with series connected resistance packs
US7364538 *Jul 13, 2006Apr 29, 2008Aucamp Fredrick PMobile exercise equipment
US7775936Jan 20, 2005Aug 17, 2010Wilkinson William TTotal body exercise machine
US7909745 *Feb 12, 2009Mar 22, 2011Brookstone Purchasing, Inc.Adjustable resistance exercise device
US7942793 *Oct 26, 2009May 17, 2011Brookstone Purchasing, Inc.Adjustable resistance exercise device
US8088050Apr 6, 2009Jan 3, 2012Aucamp Frederick PPortable exercise equipment
EP0565021A1 *Apr 5, 1993Oct 13, 1993Heinz Kettler Metallwarenfabrik GmbH & CoBrake device for training apparatus
WO1990000077A1 *Jun 27, 1989Jan 11, 1990Braathen Thor FA resistance reel for an exerciser
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/123, 482/116, 482/127
International ClassificationA63B21/015, A63B21/00, A63B23/035
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/015, A63B23/03533, A63B21/153, A63B21/00069, A63B21/1484
European ClassificationA63B23/035C4, A63B21/15F4, A63B21/015