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Publication numberUS3766588 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1973
Filing dateMay 20, 1971
Priority dateMay 20, 1971
Also published asCA944512A1
Publication numberUS 3766588 A, US 3766588A, US-A-3766588, US3766588 A, US3766588A
InventorsKopecky L
Original AssigneeKopecky L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for raising the nap of shag rugs
US 3766588 A
Abstract
A device for raising the nap of shag rugs includes a chasis mounted on wheels and having resilient grooming prongs projecting downwardly therefrom into the nap of the rug. As the chasis rolls over the rug on the wheels, the grooming prongs engage the nap and lift it, giving the rug a fluffed appearance. The wheels have closely spaced radial teeth and engage the rug backing only at the tips of the teeth. This enables the nap to extend between the teeth so that the wheels do not flatten the nap and leave tracks in the rug.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Kipecky 1 Oct. 23, 1973 DEVICE FOR RAISING THE NAP 0F SI-IAG RUGS [76] Inventor: Louis E. Kopecky, 4th & Downing StI{Ho1listr,"Mo. 65672 [22] Filed: May 20, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 145,330

[52] US. Cl. 15/142, 15/47, 56/400.14 [51] Int. Cl. A471 13/00 [58] Field of Search 15/40, 47, 142, 402,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,867,069 l/l959 Ellis 56/16.7 UX

2,953,210 9/1960 Bauserman 172/354 1,029,501 6/1912 Horlacher.... 15/402 X 2,510,188 6/1950 Morrison 56/400.l4 2,748,557 6/1956 Eadie 56/400. 1 6

3,538,533 11/1970 Woods 15/402 UX I FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 633,599 12/1949 Great Britain 172/356 323,865 1/1930 Great Britain 56/400.14

Primary ExaminerEdward L. Roberts Att0rneyGravely, Lieder and Woodruff [57] ABSTRACT A device for raising the nap of shag rugs includes a chasis mounted on wheels and having resilient grooming prongs projecting downwardly therefrom into the nap of the rug. As the chasis rolls over the rug on the wheels, the grooming prongs engage the nap and lift it,

' giving the rug a fluffed appearance. The wheels have closely spaced radial teeth and engage the rug backing only at the tips of the teeth. This enables the nap to extend between the teeth so that the wheels do not flatten the nap and leave tracks in the rug.

11 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a device for enhancing the appearance of rugs and, more particularly, to a device for raising the nap of shag rugs.

So-called shag rugs or carpets in recent years have experienced widespread popularity, particularly in the more informal rooms of homes. Thes rugs differe from conventional rugs and carpeting in that they have nap which is quite long, often extending from the rug backing 1% inches or more. After some use the extended nap tends to lie flatly against the rug backing, giving the shag rug an unattractive matted appearance. Furthermore, conventional vacuum cleaners tend to depress the nap of such rugs and likewise leave them rather unsightly.

Heretofore, rakes which resemble conventional garden rakes in appearance have been marketed for separating and fluffing the nap on shag rugs so as to restore such rugs to their original attractive appearance. These rakes, however, are difficult to manipulate since the correct amount of pressure must be applied to them. Moreover, if they are operated too vigorously they will tend to damage the rug. Furthermore, it is not possible to maintain any uniformity, whatever, in depth of action from prongs of the garden or lawn-type rakes.

It should also be noted that the housing of conventional carpet sweepers are built much too close to the ground and tend to flatten any fluffing the brushes of such sweepers may effect when used on shag rugs. Furthermore, the wheels of such carpet sweepersleave unsightly tracks in the nap.

In addition, some vacuum cleaners of current manufacture have adjustments for elevating the sweeper housing a substantial distance from the floor for enabling those vacuum cleaners to clean shag rugs with extended nap. However, even when a shag rug has been vacuumed with the vacuum cleaner housing in an elevated position, it is still necessary to fluff up the nap in order to restore the proper appearance to the shag rug.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 7 One of the principal objects of the present invention is to provide a device which will raise the nap of a shag rug and enhance its appearance. Another object is to provide a device of the type stated which is easy to manipulate and does not damage the rug. A further object is to provide a device of the type stated which does not leave wheel marks in the nap of the rug. An'additional object is to provide a means of maintaining uniformity of action and result. These and other objects and advantages will become apparent hereinafter.

A device for lifting the trap of shag rugs includes base means, wheels supporting the base .means in an elevated position and prongs carried by the base means for engaging the rug nap and lifting it as the device is moved over the rug. The invention also consists in the parts and in the arrangements and combinations of parts hereinafter described and claimed.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings which form part of the specification and wherein like numerals refer to like parts wherever they occur! F IG. 1 is a perspective view of a rake device embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a bottom plan view of the rake device; and FIGS. 3 and 4 are sectional views taken along lines 3-3 and 44 of FIG. 2.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the drawings, 2 designates a rake device for raising the nap of shag rugs to enhance their appearance, and that device basically includes a chasis or base member 4, three wheels 6 journaled on the chasis 4, a housing 8 covering the chasis 4, and a handle 10 connected to the chasis 4 and projecting through the housing 8.

The chasis 4 is preferably injection molded from a somewhat flexible plastic, such as polystyrene, and includes a generally flat rake plate 20 having substantially parallel front and rear edges. The side edges of rake plate 20 are generally parallel near the front of the plate 20 and are furthermore substantially squared off with respect to the front edge, but about midway between the front and rear edges of those side edges turn inwardly and converge toward the rear edge (FIG. 2). Set slightly inwardly from the parallel portions of the two side edges, that is the portion extending rearwardly from the front edge, are a pair of elongated cutouts 22, the longitudinal axes of which extend generally parallel to the adjacent side edges and generally perpendicular to the front and rear edges. Similarly, near the rear edge of the rake plate 20 is another elongated cutout 24, the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the longitudinal axes of the cutouts 22. The cutout 24, how ever, is centered with respect to the side edges of the rake plate 20 and is set rearwardly from the cutouts 22.

Each cutout 22 and 24 is flanked by a pair of journal lugs 26 which projected downwardly from and are molded integral with the rake plate 20. The lugs 26 of each pair are provided with three sets of aligned holes 28 (FIG. 4) which are located at different distances from the plate 20. One set of holes 28 in each lug 26 is offset from the other two sets so as to not significantly weaken the lugs 26. Moreover, corresponding sets of holes 28 in the three pairs of lugs 26 are spaced the same distance from the rake plate 20. Each pair of lugs 26 supports a shoulder bolt 30 (FIG. 3) which traverses the space between the lugs 26 and forms a journal for one of the wheels 6; In particular, each bolt 30 extends through one set of aligned holes 28 in each pair of lugs 26 and is retained in place by a lock nut 32 threaded onto its end. The shoulder near the end of the shoulder bolt 30 bears against the lug 26 against which the lock nut 32 is tightened so the lock nut 32 does not tend to draw the lugs 26 together. Of course, the shoulder bolts 30 extend through corresponding sets of aligned holes 28 in the three pairs of lugs 26 so that the shoulder bolts 30 are allspaced the same distance from the rake plate 20.

Thus, the wheels 6 are captured between the lugs 26 and for the most part are disposed below the rate plate 20, but the upper sections of the wheels 6 project through the elongated cutouts 22 and 24. Consequently, the three wheels 6 support the chasis 4 in an elevated position above the supporting surface on which they themselves rest, and the height at which the chasis 4 is disposed is dependent on the set of holes 28 through which each shoulder bolt 30 extends.

In addition to the lugs 26, the rake plate 20 has grooming tines or prongs 34 formed integral with it and these prongs 34 project downwardly below the lower ends of the lugs 26. The prongs 34 possess their greatest diameter adjacent to the rake plate 20 and taper inwardly therefrom. All of the prongs 34 are the same length and all terminate at rounded or blunted ends 36. The prongs 34 are arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows (FIG. 2) with the prongs 34 of adjacent transverse rows being staggered. Connecting the prongs of each longitudinal row are longitudinal reinforcing ribs 38 and similarly connecting the prongs 34 of the transverse rows which are centered on the cutouts 22 and 24 are transverse reinforcing ribs 40.

Finally, the rake plate 20 has a pair of tabs 42 projecting upwardly therefrom and formed integral therewith at the forward end of the rear cutout 24, and positioned between these tabs 42 is the lower end of the handle 10. The handle is retained on the tabs 42 by a pin 44.

Referring again to the three wheels 6, they are preferably molded from a high impact polystyrene or some other suitable plastic. Each wheel 6 includes (FIGS. 3 and 4) a hub section 50 through which one of the shoulder bolts 30 extends. The hub section 50 constitutes the widest portion of the wheel 6, and its width is slightly less than the spacing between the lugs 26 of a pair so that the wheel 6 does not shift laterally to any appreciable degree. The hub 50 is molded integral with a narrow web 52 to which a plurality of radially projecting teeth 54 are connected. Each tooth is generally rectangular in cross-section (FIG. 2) and possesses its greatest cross-sectional area at its juncture with the web 52. From the web 52, each tooth tapers downwardly and terminates at a transversely extending edge 56. Each wheel is about 3% inches in diameter and the spacing between the edges 56 of adjacent radial teeth 54 is about inch. The teeth 54 around the periphery of each wheel 6 prevents the wheels 6 from flattening the nap and leaving track marks in the shag rug.

The housing 8 is thermoformed from high impact polystyrene and completely covers the upper surface of the rake plate 20. The housing 4 is provided with skirt portion 60 which extends completely around the peripheral edge of the rake plate and obscures most of the grooming prongs 34. On its inwardly presented surface the skirt portion 60 has a ledge 62 which rests on and is fused to the upper surface of the rake plate 20, thus joining the chasis 4 to the housing 8. The top wall of the housing 8 has an aperture 64 configured to receive tabs 42 to which the handle 10 is attached.

OPERATION In use the rake device 2 is moved backwardly and forwardly across a shag rug much in the same manner that a carpet sweeper is moved over a conventional rug or carpet. The wheels 6, of course, roll over the shag rug and support the rake plate 20 such that the blunted ends 36 of the grooming prongs 34 are approximately V4 and A inches from the rug backing, the height being dependent on the particular set of holes 28 in which the shoulder bolts 30 are installed. As the rake device 2 moves over the shag rug, the grooming prongs 34 engage the individual pieces of nap, raising them and imparting a generally fluffed appearance to the rug. The radial teeth 54 on the wheels 6 provide relatively large spaces around the wheels into which the fluffed nap extends, and consequently the wheels 6 do not flatted the nap and leave track marks on the rug. The resilient plastic from which the chasis 4 is molded enables the grooming prongs 34 to yield upon encountering snags in the nap, and this avoids damage to both the rake device 2 and the shag rug.

This invention is intended to cover all changes and modifications of the example of the invention herein chosen for purposes of the disclosure which do not constitute departures from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A device for raising the nap of rugs, said device comprising: a base; at least three wheels mounted on the base for rotation about axes extending transversely of the base, the wheels projecting downwardly from the base for engaging the rug so as to support the base in an elevated position above the rug and to enable the base to move easily over the rug in a direction perpendicular to the axes of rotation, the wheels being arranged such that the base is supported in a stable condition thereon and with no two wheels being aligned in a direction perpendicular to the axes of rotation, each wheel having radially projecting teeth arranged thereon such that the wheels bear against the rug only at the ends of the teeth and the rug nap extends between the teeth, whereby the wheels do not flatten the nap and leave wheel tracks as the device rolls over the rug; and prongs attached to and extended downwardly from the base to lift the nap as the device moves over the rug, the downward projection of the prongs terminating above the lowermost portions of the wheels.

2. A device according to claim 1 and further characterized by adjusting means for varying the height at which the base is supported above the rug.

3. A device according to claim 1 wherein the base includes a plate-like member provided with cutouts into which the upper portions of the wheels extend and lugs extended downwardly from the plate-like member adjacent to the sides of cutouts; and wherein the lugs carry axles on which the wheels are mounted.

4. A device according to claim 3 wherein the position at which the lugs carry the axles may be adjusted vertically to vary the height at which the base is supported above the rug.

5. A device according to claim 3 wherein two lugs project downwardly from the plate-like member at each cutout; and wherein the axles span the lugs and the wheels are mounted on the axles between the two lugs at each cutout.

6. A device according to claim 1 and further characterized by a handle connected to the base and extending upwardly therefrom to enable the user to roll the base over the rug on the wheels which support it.

7. A device for raising the nap of rugs, said device comprising: a base; at least three wheels mounted on the base for rotation about axes extending transversely of the base, the wheels projecting downwardly from the base for engaging the rug so as to support the base in an elevated position above the rug and to enable the base to move easily over the rug in a direction perpendicular to the axes of rotation, the wheels being arranged such that the base is supported in a stable condition thereon, each wheel having radially projecting teeth arranged thereon in a single circumferential row such that the wheels bear against the rug only at the ends of the teeth and the rug nap extends between the teeth, whereby the wheels do not flatten the nap and leave wheel tracks as the device rolls over the rug; and prongs attached to and extended downwardly from the base to lift the nap as the device moves over the rug, the prongs being arranged one ahead of the other as well as to the sides of one another, at least one prong being located in the path of each wheel, the downward projection of the prongs terminating above the lowermost portions of the wheels.

8. A device according to claim 7 wherein three wheels are provided and the axes of two wheels are coaxial while the axis of the third wheel is offset from the common axis of the other two wheels, the third wheel being located midway between the other two wheels in relation to the direction of advance.

9. A device according to claim 8 and further characterized by means for varying the height at which the base is supported above the rug.

10. A device according to claim and further characterized by a handle connected to the base and extending upwardly therefrom to enable the user to roll the base over the rug on the wheels which support it.

11. A device for raising the nap of rugs, said device comprising a base having a downwardly presented surface; wheels mounted on the base and projecting downwardly therefrom for engaging the rug and supporting the base in an elevated position above the rug to enable the base to move easily over the rug, each wheel having radially projecting teeth arranged thereon in a single circumferential row such that the wheels bear against the rug only at the ends of the teeth and the rug nap extends between the teeth, whereby the wheels do not flatten the nap and leave wheel tracks as the device moves over the rug; adjusting means for changing the distance between the wheel axes and the downwardly presented surface of the base so as to vary the height at which the base is supported above the rug, and prongs attached to the base and extending downwardly from the downwardly presented surface thereof to lift the rug nap as the device moves over the rug, at least some of the prongs being in the space between the wheels and further being arranged one ahead of the other as well as to the sides of one another with respect to the direction of movement, the downward projection of the prongs being fixed relative the base and terminating above the lowermost portions of the wheels irrespective of the position at which the adjusting means positions the wheels relative to the base.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1029501 *Sep 18, 1911Jun 11, 1912George H HorlacherNozzle.
US2510188 *Nov 29, 1948Jun 6, 1950Morrison David RLawn rake
US2748557 *Nov 24, 1954Jun 5, 1956Eadie Andrew HLawn conditioner rake
US2867069 *Jun 28, 1957Jan 6, 1959Ellis Benjamin FPower mower with endless belt cutting means
US2953210 *Dec 9, 1957Sep 20, 1960Bauserman Clyde ASoil tillage implement
US3538533 *Jun 16, 1969Nov 10, 1970Woods John ANap raising device
GB323865A * Title not available
GB633599A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3852844 *Jan 8, 1973Dec 10, 1974H HukubaCarpet fluffing device
US3878582 *Feb 11, 1974Apr 22, 1975Fukuba Future ResearchCarpet fluffing and dust-suction device
US4042995 *May 24, 1976Aug 23, 1977Hyman VaronTool for removing animal hair from carpeting
US4087879 *Jan 10, 1975May 9, 1978Forrest SpenceShag rug brushing and object retrieving device
US4156298 *Mar 10, 1978May 29, 1979Forrest SpenceShag rug fluffing and object retrieving device
US5794297 *Mar 29, 1995Aug 18, 1998Hoky Contico, L.L.C.Cleaning members for cleaning areas near walls used in floor cleaner
US6671921 *May 9, 2000Jan 6, 2004Bradley L. HickmanMagicarpet broom
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/142, 15/47, 56/400.14
International ClassificationD06G1/00, A47L13/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06G1/00, A47L13/00
European ClassificationD06G1/00, A47L13/00