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Publication numberUS3766662 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1973
Filing dateJan 24, 1972
Priority dateJan 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3766662 A, US 3766662A, US-A-3766662, US3766662 A, US3766662A
InventorsR Moyer
Original AssigneeR Moyer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for drying fabrics
US 3766662 A
Abstract
Fabrics to be dried and set are passed through a super steam atmosphere in a distribution chamber. The steam is driven through the fabric by fans, is returned to a collecting chamber, passed between heating coils to bring it back to the desired temperature and then returned to the distribution or drying chamber in an enclosed circulatory system. Supplementary fans draw off some of the steam from the distribution chamber and direct it into a preheating chamber through which the fabric passes on its way to the main drying chamber. Because the fabric itself yields up moisture, condensers are connected to the distribution chamber to remove excess moisture from the apparatus. Additional steam may be supplied to the collecting chamber from an outside source.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Moyer [451 Oct. 23, 1973 APPARATUS FOR DRYING FABRICS [76] Inventor: Richard E. Moyer, 2815 Baird Rd.,

Fairport, N.Y. 14450 22 Filed: Jan.24, 1972 211 App]. No.: 219,972

Primary ExaminerWilliam F. ODea Assistant Examiner-Paul Devinsky Attorney-B. Edward Shlesinger et al.

[57] ABSTRACT Fabrics to be dried and set are passed through a super steam atmosphere in a distribution chamber. The steam is driven through the fabric by fans, is returned to a collecting chamber, passed between heating coils to bring it back to the desired temperature and then returned to the distribution or drying chamber in an enclosed circulatory system. Supplementary fans draw off some of the steam from the distribution chamber and direct it into a preheating chamber through which the fabric passes on its way to the main drying chamber. Because the fabric itself yields up moisture, condensers are connected to the distribution chamber to remove excess moisture from the apparatus. Additional steam may be supplied to the collecting chamher from an outside source.

6 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures Patented Oct. 23, 1973 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Patented 0a. 23, 1973 7 Shoots-Sheet 2 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Get. 23, 1973 Patented Oct. 23, 1973 7 Shoots-Sheet 5 Patented Oct. 23, 1973 7 Shoots-Sheet 6 l l I APPARATUSFOR DRYING FABRICS The present invention relates to the drying of fabrics, and more particularly to apparatus for drying synthetic fabrics, such as rayon nylon, orlon, etc. after they have been dyed, and to apparatus for'developing and setting colors in printed fabrics. v

which will steam-dry fabrics in a fraction of the time previously required.

The ordinary method of drying fabrics after dyeingis I to pass a current of heated air over the fabric. This method in itself is inefficient and slow. Moreover, unless care is exercised inmaintaining the temperature of the drying air below a predetermined upper limit, which in some cases is ingthe neighborhood of 250F, the color, elasticity and strength of the fabric are affected. This process, furthermore, requires a drying chamber that is many feet long. Moreover, with this process it is difficult to prevent shrinkage of the material, and a great deal of heat is wasted in the heated air which has to be exhausted from the drying chamber in order to carry away the moisture absorbed from the fabric being dried.

For these reasons; machines have been built which use superheated steam to dry dyed fabrics. The synthetic material, which is to be dried, ismounted upon a tenter-frame and passed through a sealedchamber which is filled with superheated steam; and the steam is driven or forced through the fabric. The superheated steam not only provides a drying atmosphere but excludes atmospheric oxygen, which prevents oxidizing of the fabric. The steam is forced through the fabric by circulating fans. Rapid drying is achieved because the velocity of the steam passing throughthe minute interstices of the fabric is great. Furthermore, the heat treating steam can be confined so that the drier can do in a few feet what previously required a great many feet. Because the steam fills the drying chamber and keeps out atmosphere, a temperature much higher than could ordinarily be tolerated can be used so that drying can be effected in a few seconds instead of the many minutes heretofore required. Furthermore, using steam, the drying is accomplished without any change in color of the material and without'loss of elasticity or decrease in'strength, and while preventing any undesirable future shrinkage. Still further, in the case of vat dyes particularly, the colors can be set in the fabrics simultaneously withthe drying. The steam goes through the fabric instead of just over the surface of the fabric, achieving more intimate contact with every fiber and every filament of the fabric. The steam swells the fibers and opens them up so that they take in the dye.

With steam-type driers as previously constructed, however, the steam, after passage through the fabric, was exhausted to atmosphere. While its temperature was, of course, considerably reduced, as compared with its drying temperature, unless it-is exhausted outdoors, it will heat up the drying room and increase very considerably the humidity therein. When exhausted outdoors, however, there is great waste of heat; and the whole operation is costly.

The primary purpose of the present invention is to provide improved apparatus for steam drying fabrics. To this end, a further purpose of the invention is to provide apparatus in which the steam may be recirculated after use and brought up repeatedly to drying temperature.

Another object of the invention is to provide apparatus for steam drying fabrics which will effect steam drying at a faster speed than was heretofore possible, and

Another object of the invention is to provide a steam drier which is more efficient than such driers have previously been, particularly in the use of steam.

Still anotherobject of the invention is to provide apparatus of the character described which definitely would prevent oxidizing of any fabric.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the recital of the appended claims particularly when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic perspective view illustrating the operation of a preferred form of drier built according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal'sectional view through the machine, in effect a side elevation with the side plates of one side of the machine removed;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of the machine, with some parts only removed;

FIG. 4 is a transverse section through the machine in a plane just forward of the heating section;

- FIG. 5 is a plan view on a somewhat enlarged scale of the machine, parts being broken away;

FIG. 6 is an end view on the same scale as FIG. 5, looking at the end of the apparatus through which the fabric exits;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view with parts broken away showing the relation of the tenter frame, and the fabric carried thereby to the distribution chamber; and

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view on an enlarged scale on the line 8-8 of FIG. 4.

Referring now to the drawings by numerals of reference, 20 (FIG. 2) denotes the hollow frame of the machine. Mounted in the lower portion or base section of the frame is a collecting chamber 22'which extends substantially across the whole width of the machine, and which has two large openings 24 and 25 in its forward face (FIG. 1) that are connected in sealed relation to heating chambers 26 and 27, respectively. In each of these heating chambers there is mounted a tubular heating coil 28, or 29, respectively (F IG. 4). The coils 28, 29 are of special design so that they may be used with a liquid'phase heating system (hot oil). The oil used has practically no pressure at 600F. Therefore the coils are only subjected to the pump pressure required to maintain .the oil circulation. If steam coils were to be used to obtain a temperature of 600F, a pressure in excess of 1,500 p.s.i. would be required.

The heating chambers 26 and 27 are connected sealingly by transition ducts 32 (FIG. 2) to a distribution chamber 34 which extends across the full width of the machine. These heating chambers heat the steam used in the apparatus to the desired drying temperature. A water manifold 30 (FIG. 2) may be mounted in the transition duct, if desired, to supply additional moisture to the atmosphere in the machine for insuring production of the desired superheated steam.

Across the top of the distribution chamber there extends a perforated plate 36, which is slotted as indicated at 38 in FIGS. 7 and 8.

Mounted above the plate 36 and spaced therefrom in parallelism thereto by spacers 40 (FIG. 8), which are fastened by bolts 42 to the distribution chamber, is a perforated plate 44, which is provided with a multiplicity of small holes 46 (FIGS. 7 and 8 Mounted to extend longitudinally through the machine adjacent opposite sides thereof are two parallel rails 48 (FIGS. 2 and 4), which carry a conventional tenter frame conveyor comprising two parallel endless chains 50 whose links are provided with tenter pins or hooks 52 (FIGS. 4 and 8). The fabric F, which is to be dried, is fastened to the hooks of the tenter frame so that it may be stretched to the desired degree by the tenter frame. The fabric and the tenter frame links enter the machine through a slot 54 (FIG. 2) in one end of the machine, and leave through the slot 58 (FIG. 6) in the other end 56 (FIG. 6) of the machine. The tenter slots may be sealed around the tenter frame in any suitable manner, as by inflated flexible tubes, such as shown at 60, 61, 62 and 63 in the Peck US. Pat. No. 2,773,312, so that outside air cannot enter the drier through these slots.

The distribution chamber extends from top to bottom of the machine and includes an upper section 60 (FIG. 2). This section communicates through openings 62 with a plenum 64, which is mounted in the frame of the machine above the heating chambers 26 and 27 and the transition ducts 32. A plurality of filters 66 (FIGS. 2 and 4) of conventional construction are mounted in front of the openings 62 so that steam passing through these openings is filtered before it enters the plenum 64.

Mounted outside of the plenum 64 adjacent opposite ends thereof are two fans 70 and 71 (FIG. These are driven by electric motors 72 and 73, respectively. They communicate through short ducts 74 and 75, respectively, and ports 76 (FIG. 2) with opposite ends of the plenum 64.

Elongate ducts 78 and 79 (FIG. 5) lead from the exhaust sides of the fans 70 and 71, respectively, into opposite ends of a duct 80 (FIG. 2).

The main circulating system of the machine comprises, however, two much larger fans 82 and 83 (FIG. 1) which are connected on their suction sides through ducts 84 and 85, (FIG. 5), respectively, with the rear side of the plenum 64 (FIG. 2). These fans are connected on their pressure sides by ducts 86 and 87, (FIGS. 1 and 5) with opposite ends of the collecting chamber 22 (FIG. 2) so that two completely enclosed circulating systems are provided in the machine.

The fans 82 and 83 are driven by pulleys 90 and 91, respectively, (FIG. 5) and shafts 92 and 93 respectively. The pulleys may be driven through belts (not shown) from motors (not shown) mounted in the machine, or from any other suitable source of power.

The ducts 78 and 79 are disposed laterally outside the opposite sides of the tenter frame, and so are the ducts 86 and 87 so that the tenter frame passes between them; and they do not interfere with the tenter frame.

Steam is supplied to the machine from any suitable source through a pipe 95 (FIG. 2) and the manifold 96, which opens into the collecting chamber 22.

In operation, the fans 82 and 83 force this steam from the collecting chamber 22 past the heating coils 28 and 29 in the heating chambers 26 and 27 and through the transition ducts 32 into the lower section of the distribution chamber 34. Thence the superheated steam passes through the slots 38 in the plate 36 and the holes 46 in the plate 44 and through the interstices of the fabric F, which is being transported over the distribution chamber by the tenter frame. The superheated steam passing through the interstices of the fabric dries and sets the same, and is drawn by the fans 82 and 83 through the filters 66 and the plenum 64 and delivered by these fans through ducts 86 and 87, respectively (FIG. 5), back into the collecting chamber 22. Thence the steam passes once more into the heating chambers to be reheated to the desired temperature before it again passes into the distribution chamber and the fabl'lC.

Simultaneously, the fans and 71 will draw off some of the steam, and drive it through the ducts 78 and 79 into opposite ends of the duct 80. This manifold is provided with ajet port or slot 98 (FIG. 2) which extends across the major part of the width of the machine and shoots the steam fromthe duct against the fabric being carried by the tenter frame through the machine. This blast serves to preheat the fabric before it reaches the distribution chamber. This steam circulates in the preheating space or chamber 97 above the col lecting chamber 22, the heating chambers and the transition duct 32, in the manner indicated by the arrows 99 in FIG. 2, and passes through the opening 101 in the partition 104 of the machine into the upper section 60 of the distribution chamber. Thus, the fabric is preheated, expediting the drying operation. The radiation from the collecting chamber 22, the heating chambers 26 and 27 and from the transition duct 32, as well as the steam from the jet slot 98, furnish the heat for preheating the fabric.

To prevent billowing of the fabric as it moves through the distribution chamber, Teflon covered restraining rollers 105 (FIG. 2) are mounted just above the tenter frame. These extend from one side of the machine to the other as shown in FIG. 4.

To accommodate widthwise adjustment of the tenter frame, curtains and 111 (FIG. 4) are each secured, respectively, at one end to one of the tenter chain supporting rails 114, and at their opposite ends to the sides 112 and 113 of the distribution chamber. These curtains may be made of fiberglas impregnated with Teflon (tetrafluoroethylene). The curtains pass over rollers 116 and 117, respectively; and weights 118 and 119, respectively, are suspended in the bights of these curtains to hold them taut.

To remove Water from the drier, two condensing units are connected adjacent opposite sides of the distributing chamber, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 6 near the exit slot 58 (FIG. 6). Each condensing unit comprises a pipe 120, which extends outside the apparatus and is connected to a standpipe 121 that extends downwardly outside of but alongside the adjacent side of the frame and terminates atits lower end in a trap-shaped tube 122 of smaller diameter. The tubes 122 discharge into drainpipes 124. There is a spray nozzle 126 mounted in each pipe and cold water is constantly delivered to the nozzles 126 through pipes 128 controlled by valve cocks 130. The cold water helps condense the steam; and the condensing steam will pull a vacuum on the distribution chamber, pulling other steam into the condenser. An air vent is provided in each pipe 122.

Access to the machine may be had through a door 132 (FIGS. 2 and 3) hingedly mounted at one side of the machine by hinges 134 and held closed by pins 136 and hasps 138.

One outstanding feature of this machine is that moisture within the atmosphere will be generated in the machine as steam, once steam is introduced into the machine. Steam is being generated all the while in the machine from the moisture contained within the fabric and driven off by the steam. If the fabric were stopped while in the apparatus, there would be steam immediately. The drying steam has uniform velocity across the width of the fabric due to the delivery of the steam from two fans 82, 83.

One outstanding advantage of this machine is the very considerable reduction in size as compared with prior drying units. For instance, a unit built according to the present invention need only be 6 feet in length against forty to sixty feet in a conventional air drying unit.

The non-oxygen atmosphere of the machine prevents color change if the machine is stopped. In conventional machines, if the machine is stopped the fabric will be oxidized because the atmosphere is an oxygen atmosphere.

While the invention has been described in connection with a specific embodiment thereof, it will be understood that it is capable of further modification, and this application is intended to cover any embodiments of the invention coming within the disclosure, and the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. Apparatus for drying fabric comprising a frame having a base section and an upper section,

a collecting chamber in said base section,

a heating chamber in said base section aligned with said collecting chamber and communicating therewith,

a distribution chamber in said base section aligned with said heating and collecting chambers,

said heating chamber being disposed intermediate said collecting and distribution chambers,

a tenter frame for holding the fabric along its opposite lateral edges and for conveying the fabric through the machine,

means for supplying steam to said heating chamber,

means in said heating chamber to heat steam supplied thereto, g

a duct connecting said heating chamber with said distribution chamber to supply steam to said distribution chamberbelow fabric traveling therethrough,

a fan connected at its suction side to said distribution chamber above the fabric, to drive steam through the interstices of the fabric, and connected on its pressure side to said collecting chamber to return steam to said collecting chamber in a closed circulatory path,

means for driving said fan,

a preheating chamber disposed above said collecting chamber and upstream of said distribution chamber, and

means for conveying some steam from said distribution chamber into said preheating chamber below fabric passing therethrough, and

a duct connecting said preheating chamber with said distribution chamber.

2. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the means for conveying steam into said preheating chamber includes a second fan, smaller than the first-named fan and connected on its suction side with a plenum and connected on its pressure side with said preheating chamber, said plenum communicating with said distribution chamber.

3. Apparatus as claimed in claim 2, wherein said second fan is connected on its pressure side with a duct,

and the last-named duct has a jet slot therein communicating with said preheating chamber to supply steam under pressure to said preheating chamber.

4. Apparatus for drying fabric comprising a frame having a base section and an upper section,

a collecting chamber in said base section,

a heating chamber in said base section aligned with said collecting chamber and communicating therewith,

a distribution chamber in said base section aligned with said heating and collecting chambers,

said heating chamber being disposed intermediate said collecting and distribution chambers,

a tenter frame for holding the fabric along its opposite lateral edges and for conveying the fabric through the machine,

means for supplying steam to said heating chamber,

means in said heating chamber to heat steam supplied thereto,

a duct connecting said heating chamber with said distribution chamber to supply steam to said distribution chamber below fabric traveling therethrough,

a fan connected at its suction side to said distribution chamber above the fabric, to drive steam through the interstices of the fabric, and connected on its pressure side to said collecting chamber to return steam to said collecting chamber in a closed circulatory path,

means for driving said fan, and

a condenser connected to said distribution chamber adjacent the exit end thereof to condense excess moisture driven out of the fabric in the drying thereof.

5. Apparatus for drying fabric comprising a frame having a base section and an upper section,

a collecting chamber in said base section,

a heating chamber in said base section aligned with said collecting chamber and communicating therewith,

a distribution chamber in said base section aligned with said heating and collecting chambers,

saidheating chamber being disposed intermediate said collecting and distribution chambers,

a tenter frame for holding the fabric along its opposite lateral edges and ,for conveying the fabric through the machine,

means for supplying steam to said heating chamber,

means in said heating chamber to heat steam supplied thereto,

a duct connecting said heating chamber with said distribution chamber to supply steam to said distribution chamber below fabric traveling therethrough,

a fan connected at its suction side to said distribution chamber above the fabric, to drive steam through the interstices of the fabric, and connected on it's pressure side to said collecting chamber to return steam to said collecting chamber in a closed circulator path,

means for driving said fan,

a duct connected to said distribution chamber adjacent the exit end thereof to carry off excess moisture driven out of the fabric in the drying thereof, and means for spraying cold water into the lastnamed duct to condense the moisture.

6. Apparatus for drying fabric comprising a distribution chamber,

fabric as it passes through said distribution and preheating chambers and for separating this steam into two parts and for recirculating the major part of this steam to said distribution chamber and the minor part to said preheating chamber and for heating the recirculated steam prior to its recirculation into the distribution chamber.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2732631 *Sep 20, 1954Jan 31, 1956 Convfcyuk ukyu
US3015893 *Mar 14, 1960Jan 9, 1962John MccrearyFluid flow control device for tenter machines utilizing super-heated steam
US3314159 *May 18, 1964Apr 18, 1967Universal Oil Prod CoFume treating system for a drying oven
US3327367 *Dec 15, 1964Jun 27, 1967Artos Meier Windhorst KgApparatus for thermic treatment of textile materials
US3371428 *Aug 23, 1965Mar 5, 1968Proctor & Schwartz IncFabric drier
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3931684 *Oct 7, 1974Jan 13, 1976J. J. Baker Company LimitedVapor chamber for drying
US4011663 *Aug 6, 1975Mar 15, 1977Synchro Systems, Inc.Apparatus for drying fabrics
US5228211 *Nov 9, 1988Jul 20, 1993Stubbing Thomas JMethod and apparatus for energy efficient drying
WO2000068486A1 *May 9, 2000Nov 16, 2000Hegnauer FrankTextile dying method for the treatment of textile webs with overheated steam
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/646, 34/219, 34/212
International ClassificationF26B13/02, D06C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06C7/00, D06C2700/09
European ClassificationD06C7/00