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Publication numberUS3766728 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1973
Filing dateMar 25, 1971
Priority dateMar 25, 1971
Publication numberUS 3766728 A, US 3766728A, US-A-3766728, US3766728 A, US3766728A
InventorsNagy A
Original AssigneeNagy A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electromechanical system
US 3766728 A
Abstract
A horological instrument comprising at least two time drums, means rotatably supporting said drums, motor means associated with said drums so that each is rotatably driven and so that one drum controls the rotation of the other drum, said other drum having means associated therewith which divides each revolution thereof into segments of rotation and revolving one segment of rotation for each revolution of said one drum, means constituting an alarm system for said instrument including electrical alarm means for giving off an alarm, a rotatably supported alarm drum corresponding to each time drum, normally open electrical switch means including a moveable contact arm thereof carried on each alarm drum, each alarm drum manually rotatable to a pre-set alarm position corresponding to an advance rotational position of the respective time drum, a laterally projecting trip arm associated with each time drum, each alarm drum disposed adjacent its corresponding trip arm so that the respective contact arm thereon is actuated by the trip arm once upon each revolution of the time drum to close the respective electrical switch means, the alarm means being energized upon simultaneous closing of all said electrical switch means.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[5 1 ELECTROMECHANICALSYSTEM Arthur A. Nagy, 26109 Cubberness, St. Clair Shores, Mich. 48079 221 Filed: Mar.25, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 127,952

[76] Inventor:

3,353,347 11/1967 Gates et a1... 58/4 R X 3,603,073 9/1971 Terada..... 58/125 C 2,595,467 5/1952 Kellner 58/4 A 2,170,408 8/1939 Hillcourt... 58/6 3,274,717 9/1966 Herr 40/111 3,456,123 7/1969 Phil 200/38 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 605,115 9/1960 Canada 58/4 A 1,473,620 3/1967 France 58/6 Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson Assistant ExaminerEdith Simmons Jackmon AttorneyWilliam L. Fisher [57] ABSTRACT A horological instrument comprising at least two time drums, means rotatably supporting said drums, motor means associated with said drums so that each is rotatably driven and so that one drum controls the rotation of the other drum, said other drum having means associated therewith which divides each revolution thereof into segments of rotation and revolving one segment of rotation for each revolution of said one drum, means constituting an alarm system for said instrument including electrical alarm means for giving off an alarm, a rotatably supported alarm drum corresponding to each time drum, normally open electrical switch means including a moveable contact arm thereof carried on each alarm drum, each alarm drum manually rotatable to a pre-set alarm position corresponding to 7 an advance rotational position of the respective time drum, a laterally projecting trip-arm associated with each time drum, each alarm drum disposed adjacent its corresponding trip arm so that the respective contact arm thereon is actuated by the trip arm once upon each revolution of the time drum to close the respective electrical switch means, the alarm means being energized upon simultaneous closing of all said electrical switch means.

12 Claims, 59 Drawing Figures AP 7 5 MM PMENEDMNMK v 3.756.728

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' SHEET 5 []F 7 [SECONL FIG, 37

CLOCK WVENTQR ARTHUR A. NAGY HIS ATTORNEY mm, as m SHEET 8 BF 7 MW HIS ATTORN EY BY ARTHUR A mam Way 3%.

1 ELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEM My invention relates to electromechanical systems particularly for horological purposes.

The principal object of my invention is the provision of improvements in electromechanical systems which have useful properties particularly in horology.

The foregoing object of my invention and the advantages thereof will become apparent during the course of the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary front elevational view of a horological instrument embodying my invention;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are, respectively, fragmentary vertical sectional and top plan views of a front portion of said embodiment;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are, respectively, fragmentary vertical sectional views of a modification of friction bearing means used in said embodiment;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevational views of a modified form of ratchet pawl for the day gear used in said embodiment;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary front elevational view partly in schematic form of a portion of said instrument with parts removed;

FIGS. 8-12 and 17-19 are, respectively, fragmentary views with parts in section illustrating the operation of electrical contacts and trip levers therefor associated with sequentially rotating drums used in said embodiment;

FIGS. 13-15 and 16 are, respectively, side elevational and fragmentary top plan views of said drums and ratchet gears and pawls therefor used in said embodiment;

FIGS. 20-25 are elevational views of laid-out cylindrical surfaces of said drums illustrating spaced apart means thereon;

FIGS. 26 and 32 are, rspectively, front and end elevational views of said embodiment with parts cut-away;

FIG. 27 is an elevational view of a laid-out cylindrical surface'of a 48-month locator drum used in said embodiment; I

FIGS. 28-30 are fragmentary side elevational views with, parts in section of said locator drum and the ratchel pawl and locator bar associated therewith;

FIG. 31 is a fragmentary elevational view showing the blank tooth area on said day gear;

FIG. 33 is a fragmentary top plan view of a portion of said embodiment illustrating the operation of said day and locator drums and locator bar associated therewith;

FIG 34 is an electrical schematic view illustrating the operation of contact pins when in contact with contact bars on said drums; i

FIGS. 35 and 36 are, respectively, front and end elevational views with parts in section of electric motor means used in said embodiment; and

FIG. 37 is a schematic diagram with parts in section illustrating the relation between means and auxiliary power sources for use with said embodiment.

Referring to FIGS. 1-37 of'the drawings in greater detail 1, 2, 3, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 48, 5A, 5B, 6, 103 and 178 designate drums which are made of non conductive material, such as hard plastic, and are pressed firmly onto friction bearings, such as friction bearings 319. Drum 4F is an exception as it has no friction bear- 2 ing and is made fast to and rotates constantly with the shaft 301.

Each said drum, with the exception of drum 4F, has a ratchet gear attached thereto. Said drums rotate sequentially one gear tooth at a time. Said drums except drums 4A, 6, 103 and 178 have trip levers l79-l90 (FIG. 7).

Said drums except drums 103 and 178 are provided with spaced apart means which, in the instance, comprise metal bars, such as copper or similar conductive material which are circumferentially and axially spaced apart on the outside cylindrical surface of said drums. Said bars serve as contact areas for contact pins such as 290, 291 (FIG. 2) and are made in varying circumferential lengths and, in the instance, are imbedded into said drums so that they form a smooth surface with the external cylindrical surfaces thereof. The arrangement of said bars, which are designated 7-102, respectively, on said drum is shown in FIGS. 2-25.

When any given contact bar has rotated to its uppermost position on its respective said drum said contact bar is considered to be in the contact area of said contact pins 290, 291 provided the same are axially pre-set for the given contact bar. All said drums rotate in a prearranged sequence and said contact pins which have been previously set for an alarm time will not contact with said bars to complete the circuit to the alarm until said contact bars have rotated to their respective positions of contact with all contact pins, in which event said alarm will sound.

' Said external cylindrical surfaces of said drums also serve as locations providing time indicia for direct reading of time information as shown in FIGS. 1 and 26. Said numbers, letters, (Jan. through Dec.) and A.M./P.M. should be smooth and level with said surface of said drum and said contact bars. Said numbers, letters and A.M./P.M. designate the actual time and correspond to the alarm setting only at the time of alarm. Said numbers, letters and A.M./P.M. represent on each drum the contact bar which at that instant is in the contact area of said drum, i.e. the uppermost position of said bar on said drum (not necessarily in in contact with said pins). Said bar cloes not contact the pins when the latter are set for another number or time.

The following listed drums are provided with the numbers or letters as set forth below:

l. Lettered month drum; Jan. Dec.

2. Day drum 01-31 3. Hour drum; 12 midnight is considered as commencement of A.M.; '12 noon 'is'considered as commencement of RM.

12 to 11 (11 oclock plus minutes and seconds or from 12 midnight until the 11th hour, 59 minutes and 59 seconds AM.) 1

12 to 11 (ll oclock plus minutes and seconds or from 12 noon until the 11th hour, 59 minutes and 59 seconds P.M.) 4A-Year drum 0 to 9 (1st digit in 4 digit number) 413- Year drum 0 to 9 (2nd digit in 4' digit number) 4C- Year drum 0 to 9 (3rd digit in .4 digit number) 4D- vear drum to9 (4th digit in 4 digit number) 4E- Minute drum Oto' 9 (2nd digit in 2 digit number) 4F- Second drum 0 to 9 (2nd digit in 2 digit number) 5A- Minute drum 0 to 5 (1st digit in 2 digit number) SB-Second drum to (1st digit in 2 digit number) 6- A.M./P.M. drum.

bar represents.

7-Contact bar which is 0 (1st digit in 2 digit number) 8-Contact bar which is l 9-Contact bar which is l IO-Contact bar which is 2 11-Contact bar which is 3 12-Contact bar which is 4 13Contact bar which is 5 14-Contact bar which is 6 l5-Contact bar which is 7 16-Contact bar which is 8 17-Contact bar which is 9 l8Contact bar which is I9-Contact bar which is l 20-Contact bar which is 2 21 -Contact bar which is 0 22C0ntact bar which is l 23-Contact bar which is 2 24-Contact bar which is 3 25-Contact bar which is l 26-Contact bar which is 2 27-Contact barwhich is 3 28-Contact bar which is 4 29Contact bar which is 5 (151 digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (lst digit in 2 digit number) (1st digit in 2 digit number) (1st digit in'2 digit number) (1st digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) Contact bar which is 6 (2nd digit in 2 digit number) 31- Contact bar which is 7 BIZ-Contact bar which is 8 33-Contact bar which is 9 34-Contact bar which is 0 35-Contact bar which is l 36-Contact bar which is 2 37-Contact bar which is 3 38-Contact bar which is 4 9 Contact bar which is 5 to-Contact bar which is 6 41-Contact bar which is 7 42-Contact bar which is 8 43-Contact bar which is 9 44Contact bar which is 0 45C0ntact bar which is l 46-Contact bar which'is 2 47-Contact bar which is 3 48-Contact bar which is 4 49-Contact bar which is 5 50-Contact bar which is 6 5l-Contact bar which is 7 52-Contact bar which is 8 53Contact bar which is 9 54- Contact bar which is 0 'S5Contact bar which is l 56-Contact bar which is l 57-Contact bar which is O 58-Contact bar which is 1 59- Contact bar which is O 60-Contact bar which is 1 (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit-number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (1st digit in 2 digit number) (lst digit in 2 digit number) (lst digit in 2 digit number) (1st digitin 2 digit number) (1st digit in -2 digit number) O1-Contact bar which is 2 in A.M.

62-Contact bar which is 2 in A.M.

6--Contact bar which is 2 in A.M. 64- Contact bar which is 3 in A.M. 65-Contact bar which is 4 in A.M. 66-Contact bar which is 5 in A.M. 67-C0ntact bar which is 6 in A.M. 68- Contact bar which is 7 in A.M. 69- Contact bar which is 8 in A.M.

71-Contact bar which is 0 in A.M. 72-Contact bar which is l in A.M. 73-Contact bar which is 2 in P.M. 74-Contact bar which is l in P.M. 75Contact bar which is 2 in P.M. 76-Contact bar which is 3 in P.M. 77-Contact bar which is 4 in P.M. 78-Contact bar which is 5 in P.M. 79-Contact bar which is 6 in P.M. 80-Contact bar which is 7 in P.M. 81- Contact bar which is 8 in P.M. til-Contact bar which is 9 in P.M. 83-Contact bar which is O in P.M. 84-Contact bar which is 0 in P.M. 85Contact bar which is 0.

86-Contact bar which is l.

87-C0ntact bar which is 2.

flit-Contact bar which is 3.

89-Contact bar which is 4.

(2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) 70-C0ntact bar which is 9 in A.M.

(2nd digitiin 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) -(2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) (2nd digit in 2 digit number) 90- Contact bar which is 5. 91-Contact bar which is 6. 92-Contact bar which is 7. 93-Contact bar which is 8. 94-Contact bar which is 9. 95-Contact bar which is O. 96-Contact bar which is l. 97-Contact bar which is 2. 98-Contact bar which is 3. 99-Contact bar which is 4. 100-Contact bar which is 5. fill-Contact bar which is A.M. 102Contact bar which is P.M.

Assuming the alarm has been set and that except for one contact bar, all contact pins are in contact with their respective contact bars which have rotated in normal sequence into their respective contact areas when the last contact bar rotates to a position of contact with its respective contact pins, a circuit is closed (as shown in FIG. 34 in which the bridging of the contact pins by their respective contact bars is represented by switches 275-289) and the pre-set number or A.M./P.M. is made active and said alarm will trigger. Rotation of a particular drum shows what actual number or A.M./P.M. comes up in the visual reading area at the front of the instrument on each one tooth revolution of the respective drum. For visual or actual time reading on the face of the instrument the month drum is printed with the month in letters instead of numbers of the month to provide direct time reading, e.g. December is substituted for 12 on drum 1. Drum 103 has no contact bars and registers number 12 at this time. Also every time a new day registers on drum 2, a new week day (Sun. through Sat.) registers on drum 178 which also has no contact bars.

The following illustrates which numbers are registered on the face of the instrument for direct reading of time for the listed contacts bars.

Month-drum 1 shown in FIG. 20 registers as follows:

Contact bars 7 and 9 are 01 month or Jan.

Contact-bars 7 and 10 are 02 month or Feb.

Contact bars 7 and 11' are 03 month or Mar.

Contact bars 7 and 12 are 04-month or April Contact bars 7 and 13 are 05 month or May Contact bars 7 and 14 are 06 month or June Contact bars 7 and 15 are 07 month or July Contact bars 7 and 16 are 08 month or. Aug. I

Contact bars 7 and 17 are 09 month or Sept.

Contact bars 8 and 18 are 10 month or Oct.

- Contact bars 8 and 19 are ll month or Nov.

Contact bars 8 and 20 are 12 month-or Dec Day drum 2 shown in FIG. 21 registers as follows:

Contact bars 21 and 25 are 0] day of month Contact bars 21 and 26 are 02 day of month Contact bars 21 and 27 are 03 day of month Contact bars 21 and 28 are 04 day of month Contact bars 21 and 29 areOSday' of month Contact bar 21 and 30 are 06 day, of month 7 Contact bars 21 and 31 are 07 day of month Contact bars 21 and 32 are 08 day of month Contact bars 21 and 33 are 09 day of month Contact bars 22 and 34 are 10 day of month Contact bars 22 and 35 are ll day of month Contact bars 22 and 36 are 1.2 day of month Contact bars 22 and 37 are '13 day of month Contact bars 22 and 38 are .14 day of month Contact bars 22 and 39 are 15 day-of month Contact bars 22 and 40 are 16 day of month Contact bars 22 and 41 are l7'day of month Contact bars 22 and 42 are 18 day of month Contact bars 22 and 43 are 19 day of month Contact bars 23 and 44 are day of month Contact bars 23 and 45 are 21 day of month Contact bars 23 and 46 are 22 day of month Contact bars 23 and 47 are 23 day of month Contact bars 23 and 48 are 24 day of month Contact bars 23 and 49 are 25 day of month Contact bars 23 and 50 are 26 day of month Contact bars 23 and 51 are 27 day of month Contact bars 23 and 52 are 28 day of month Contact bars 23 and 53 are 29 day of month Contact bars 24 and 54 are 30 day of month Contact bars 24 and 55 are 31 day of month Hour drum 3 shown in FIG. 22 registers as follows:

Contact bars 56 and 61 are 12 midnight (considered here as A.M.)

Contact bars 57 and 62 are 01 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 63 are 02 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 64 are 03 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 65 are 04 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 66 are 05 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 67 are 06 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 68 are 07 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 69 are 08 hour A.M.

Contact bars 57 and 70 are 09 hour A.M.

Contact bars 58 and 71 are 10 hour A.M.

Contact bars 58 and 72 are 11 hour A.M.

Contact bars 58 and 73 are 12 noon (considered here as P.M.)

Contact bars 59 and 74 are 01 hour P.M.

Contact bars 59 and 75 are 02 hour P.M.

Contact bars 59 and 76 are 03 hour P.M.-

Contact bars 59 and- 77 are 04 hour P.M.

Contact bars 59 and 78 are 05 hour P.M.

Contact bars 59 and 79 are 06 hour P.M.

Contact bars 59 and 80 are 07 hour P.M.

Contact bars 59 and 81 are 08 hour P.M.

. Contact bars 59 and 82 are 09 hour- P.M. Contact. bars 60 and 83 are 10 hour P.M. Contact bars 60 and 84 are 1 1 hour P.M.

Year drums 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 2nd digit minute drum 4E and 2nd digit second drum 4F each register as fol-' lows: I

Contact bar 85 is 0 Contact bar 86 is l Contact bar 87 is 2 Contact bar 88 is 3 Contact bar'89 is 4 Contact bar 90 is 5 Contact bar 91 is 6 Contact bar 92 is 7 Contact bar'93 is 8 Contact bar 94 is 9 First digit minute drum 5A and first digit second drum 58 each register as follows:

Contact bar 95 is 0 Contact bar 96 is l Contact bar 97 is 2 Contact bar 98 is 3 Contact bar 99 is 4 Contact bar 100 is .5

A.M./P.M. drum 6 registers as follows:

Contact bar 101 is A.M.

Contact bar 102 is P.M.

The description of my invention will be more clear if the different parts of my instrument are described in conjunction with the respective reference numerals assigned thereto which are listed in numerical order hereinafter.

103-Numbered month drum and 48 month locator drum The drum 103 is a round notched drum with a 48- tooth gear 152 attached. The drum 103 is pressed firmly onto a friction bearing, such as the friction bearing 319. The drum 103 has 48 notches or location areas on the outer cylindrical surface at one side thereof; each location area represents one month in 48 months or 4 years which includes Leap Year which is the reason for the 48-month span. Said drum 103 could be made with only 12 locating areas but would require time correction on Feb. 29 of each Leap Year. 48 month drum 103 eliminates this time correction.

Said location areas which are designated 104-151 are of a depth related to the months represented thereby. Such depth is the distance axially inwardly from right to left as viewed from the front of the drum 1'03.

Each month location area has a depth directly related to the 4 different gear teeth areas on the day gear 158, viz. gear teeth areas 158A, 158B, 158C and 158D. For example, 105 represents the month of Feb. in Leap Year. When the locating end of the locating bar 304 10- cates itself in the groove 105 a ratchet pawl 171 automatically locates itself in area 158B which is the section of the gear which has 29 teeth representing 29 days in the month. f

Upon changeover from Feb. to Mar. the locator bar 304 locates on the area 106 (representing Mar. with 31 days) of the drum 103. Thus the pawl 171 will be shifted to the location area 158D on the day gear 158 which has 31 teeth or locations. Thus the correct number of days is selected for every month whether the year is Leap Year or not.

Also on the face of the drum 103 and visible from the front of the instrument are numbers representing each month-'l-12 which are located 4 times to encircle the drum once. The number showing through the aperature in front of the instrument (FIG.. 26) represents the number of the present month in actual time, e.g. if number 12 shows the present month is Dec. I

The left side of the drum 103 as viewed from the front of theinstrument has an arrow 317 painted or engraved thereon which is visible through the plexiglass left side 316 of the instrument.

The following are the 48 location areas of the drum 103 and the month represented by each such area. Also shown is the gear tooth area of the day gear 158 in which the locating bar 304 automatically locates the pawl 1'71.

l04--Location area of drum 103 which is Jan; 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days)" 105-Location area of drum 103 which is Feb. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158B (29 days) 106-Location area of drum 103 which is Mar. Locates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days l07-Location area of drum 103 which is Apr. lo-

cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) 108Location area of drum 103 which is May 10- cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 109Location area of drum 103 which is June 10- cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) ll -Location area of drum 103 which is July cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 111'Location area of drum 103 which is Aug.

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 1l2-Location area of drum 103 which is Sept.

cates pawl 17] in area 158C (30 days) 113Location area of drum 103 which is Oct. lo-

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 114Location area of drum 103 which is Nov.

cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) ll -Location area of drum 103 which is Dec.

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 116Location area of drum 103 which is Jan. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 117-Location area of drum 103 which is Feb. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158A (28 days) 'll8Location area of drum 103 which is Mar. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 119Location area of drum 103 which is Apr. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158C 30 days) 120Location area of drum .103 which is May cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 1-21Location area of drum 103 which is June cates pawl.171 in area 158C (30 days) 122--Location area of drum 103 which is July 10- cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) l23-Location area of drum 103 which is Aug. cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) I l24--Location area of drum 103 which is Sept. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158C (3.0 days) 125Location area of drum 103 which is Oct.

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 126- -Location area of drum 103 which is Nov. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) 141-Location ara of drum 103 which is Feb. locates pawl 171 in area 158A (28 days) l42--Loca tiori area of drum 103 which is Mar. lo-

cates pawl 17] in area 158D (31 days) 143-Location area of drum 103 which is Apr. Io-

cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) l44- Location area of drum 103 which is May locates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 145-Location area of drum 103 which is June locates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) 146 Location area of drum 103 which is July 10- cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 147 Location area of drum 103 which is Aug.

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 148Location area of drum 103'which is Sept. lo-

cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) 149-I .ocation area of drum 103 which is Oct.

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) ISO-Location area of drum 103 which is Nov. lo-

cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) 151Location area of drum 103 which is Dec.

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) Each of the following ratchet gears 152-164 has a certain number of equally spaced teeth. The number of teeth represents the number of increments each drum rotates during one complete revolution of the shaft 301, e.g. drum 1 represents 12 months in a year so the gear 157 has 12 teeth and the drum 1 rotates 1/12 revolution .each month. if the contact bars 7 and 17 are located in the contact area ofthecontact pins the direct time reading on the front face of the drum 1 will read Sept. When the drum rotates one ratchet tooth, contact bars 8 and.18 will thus be rotated into the contact area of the contact pins and then the direct time reading will change from Sept. to Oct.

127Location area of drum 'l03 which is Dec. lo-

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) 128-Location'area of drum 103 which is Jan. 10-

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) l29Location area of drumf'103, which is Feb. lo-

cates pawl 171 in area 158A (28 days) 130 -'Location area of drum- 103which is Mar. 10- cates pawl 171 in area 158D(3l days) l3l--'-Loca'tion area of drum 103 which is Apr. cates pawl 171 in area'l58C (30 days) 132-Lo'cation area of drum 103 which-is May cates pawl 171' in area v158D (3l 'days) l33- Location area of drum 103 which is June cates pawl 171 in area 158C (30 days) f 134'Location area of drum 103 which is July cates pawl 17l.'in'area 158D (3-1 days) 135- 'Location'a'rea of drum 103 which is Aug.

cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) l36-Location area of drum '103 which vis Sept. cates pawl 171 inarea 158C (30'days') cates pawl 171 in area 158D (31 days) The ratchet gears on all the other drums work to control the rotation thereof in this same way.

152 48 Month Ratchet Gear Said gear 152;.which has 48 teeth (for LeapYea'r) regulates the rotation of thelocator drum 103 and rotates one gear tooth each time said drum 2 comp'letes one revolution, i.e..one gear'tooth every month. Said-gear 152 completes one revolution every four years. v I t 153 Thousands-Year Ratchet Gear Saidgear 153 which regulatesthe rotation of the drum 4A has 10 teeth and rotates 1- gear tooth every 1000 years'and completes one revolution .every 10,000years. t v 154 Hundreds Year RatchetGear I I Said gear 154 which regulates the rotation of the drum'4B has 10 teeth and rotates 1 gear tooth every years and completes one revolution everylOOO years. g i I l5.5 Tens Year Ratchet-Gear Said gear 155 which regulates the rotation of the drum 4C has 10 teeth and rotates 1 gear tooth every 10 years and completes one revolution every 157 Month Ratchet Gear Said gear 157 which has 12 teeth regulates the rotation of the drum 1 and rotates 1 gear tooth each time said drum 2 completes one revolution. Said month ratchet gear 157 completes 1 revolution every year.

158 Day Ratchet Gear Said gear 158 is divided into 6 different sections which are listed as follows: 158A- The area of said ratchet gear 158 which is for a 28 day month. 158B The area of said ratchet gear 158 which is for a 29 day'month. 158C- The area of said ratchet gear 158 which is fo a 30 day month. 158D- The area of said ratchet gear 158 which is for a 31 day month. 158E- The area of said ratchet gear 158 which is the travel'area for the bottom finger of the pawl 171. 158F- The area of said ratchet gear 158 which is the travel area for the top finger of the pawl 171 at the month location changes when month locator bar 304 is carried to the extreme left of the travel area and rests on top of the month locator drum 103. Said gear 158 which has a variable number (from 28 to 31) of effective teeth regulates the rotation of the month drum 2 and rotates one gear tooth each time said drum 3 completes one revolution, i.e. one gear tooth every day.

159-- I-Iour Ratchet Gear Said gear 159 has 24 teeth (12 for A.M.; 12 for P.M.;) and rotates 1 gear tooth per hour and completes 1 revolution per day. 160- Tens Minute Ratchet Gear Said gear 160 has 6 teeth and rotates 1 gear tooth every ten minutesand completes l revolution per hour. 161- Units Minute Ratchet Gear Said gear 161 has teeth and rotates 1 gear tooth every minute and completes l revolution every 10 minutes. 162- Tens Second Ratchet Gear Said gear 162 has 6 teeth and rotates 1 gear tooth every 10 seconds and completes 1 revolution every minute. l63-- A.M. and RM. Ratchet Gear Said gear 163 has 2 teeth and rotates 1 gear tooth at noon and one gear tooth at midnight and completes 1 revolution every day.

6 Week D y Rat et ear V a Said gear 164 has 7 teeth and rotates 1 gear tooth per day and completes 1 revolution every week. 165- Ratchet pawl for the 48'month ratchet gear 152 166- Ratchet pawl for the year gear 153 167- Ratchet pawl for the year gear 154 168- Ratchet pawl for the year gear 155 169- Ratchet pawl for the year gear 156 170- Ratchet pawl for the month gear 157 171- Ratchet pawl for the day gear 158 171 AB Alternate ratchet pawl for the day gear 158 171A-- Bottom finger of the pawl 171 which bottom finger 171A is angled so that it always travels in section 15815 of the gear 158.

171B Bottom finger of the alternate pawl 171AB (FIG. 6) which bottom finger 1718 has two smaller fingers to straddle the gap in gear 158.

172- Ratchet pawl for the hour gear 159 173- Ratchet pawl for the minute gear 160 174- Ratchet pawl for the minute gear 161 175- Ratchet pawl for the second gear 162 176 Ratchet 'pawl for the A.M./P.M. gear 163 177- Ratchet pawl for the week day gear 164 Said ratchet pawls 165-177 are used to hold their respective drums stationary until it is time for said drums to rotate. At said time the respective ratchet pawl disengages from its respective gear to allow said drum one gear tooth rotation. Said ratchet pawls are also released to effect time correction. Upon cnergization of the respective electromagnets the ratchet pawls are disengaged from the respective gears to permit the respective drums to rotate one gear tooth rotation. Upon deenergization of said electro-magnet said pawls are returned to engagement with their respective gears by their respective return springs. Each pawl is provided with a magnetic attraction plate to insure stronger magnetic attraction for its electromagnet and a bottom finger to prevent more than one gear tooth rotation at each segment of revolution.

FIG. 13 shows the upper finger of the pawl 175 engaged with a tooth on gear 162 while the bottom finger is clear of said gear 162. At this point upon energization of the elctromagnet 214 the upper finger of the pawl 175 is disengaged from the gear 162 so that the latter rotates one gear tooth rotation whereupon a tooth thereon is stopped by the bottom finger of the pawl 175 which bottom finger engages with the gear 162 simultaneously with disengagement of said upper finger. FIG. 14 shows the upper finger of said pawl 175 completely disengaged from said tooth on said gear 162 while said bottom finger is fully engaged with a tooth onsaid gear 162.

Said pawl 175 re-engages with the next subsequent tooth on gear 162 in the reverse sequence illustrated by considering first FIG. 14 and then FIG. 13.

. Upon lifting of the 48 month ratchet pawl to dis-- engage it from the gear 152 at the month end change said ratchet pawl 165-also lifts up the bar 304.

All of said pawls pivot on'the ratchet shaft 302 and except for the axially shiftable pawl 171 are disposed with clearance between the ratchet pawl holders 309A and 3098 as illustrated in FIG. 33. Said holders 309A and 309B are fixed to said ratchet shaft 302 by set screws and the holders 309A are grooved to anchor and tain the ratchet pawl return springs 331.

Said ratchet pawl 171 pivots in annular slot on a slidin g ratc het holder 308 (FIG. 33) which slides on the "shaft'302 and allows said ratchet pawl 171 to be located in different gear areas on the gear 158. The bottom finger 171A of said pawl 171 is angled and axially offset in respect to the uppr finger so that regardless of to which area the top part of the pawl 171 is shifted the bottom part of the pawl 171 will always locate in the area 15812. If the bottom finger of the pawl 171 was located in the areas 158A, 1588 or 158C, the gear 158 would rotate more than one gear tooth rotation at atime at about mid-month. The return spring 307 for the 1 l pawl 171 is fixed to the shaft 302 via a holder therefor which is fast to said shaft 302.

178- The L'ettered Week-Day Drum Said drum 178 which is lettered Sunday through Saturday shows a different day of the week for each gear tooth rotation. When the hour drum 3 completes one revolution the trip lever 184 thereon 1 closes the contact points 197 and the electromagnet 2l6is energized and disengages the pawl 177 from the gear drum 164 allowing said drum 178 to rotate one gear tooth or one week day. 179-190 Trip Levers Said trip levers 179-190 are made fast to their respective drums and when said drums complete one revolution'the respective trip levers cause the corresponding contact points to close which energizes the respective electromagnets which in turn lift the respective pawl and allow the respective drums to rotate one gear tooth, e.g., the trip levers 185 and 186 on the hour drum 3 alternately every 12 hours kick over the A.M. and drum 6.

I91-203- Contact Points Said contact points 191-203 which are carried on Said time correction push button switches 217-229 are independent of the alarm system and used in time correction to adjust the drums to correspond with the present or absolute time, e.g. after the clock has stopped (because of a power failure or for any other reason) one of the buttons 217-229 rnust be pressed and released for each number to be changed. Pressing of a button cuts off power to all said electromagnets 204-216 except the corresponding electromagnet of each said switch holder 230-244 fits into a helical groove on the cam roller 300. Turning of said cam roller 300 moves the respective switch holder to the desired pre-set alarm position. Rotation of the respective drum to a position where its contact pins rest on the property contact bar energizes the alarm circuit provided all of the other pairs of contact pins 290-291 are bridged by the proper contact bar. The connection between the contact pins 290-291 and the proper contact bar is maintained by the flat downwardly pressing springs 298 and 299, respectively; which, while pressing down upon the contact pins 290-291, slide on and maintain contact with the contact plates 259-274 when the switch holders 230-244are moved to pre-set the alarm. I

259-274 Contact Plates Said contact plates 259-274 which are attached to a contact plate holder 295 which is made of nonconductive material and insulated from each other are arranged in two transversely spaced rows and are longitudinally spaced apart in each row to accommodate the movement of the switch holders 230-244 and connect the contact pin switches 275-289 in series circuit with the alarm circuit as shown in FIG. 34.

275-289- Contact Pin Switches Said contact pin switches 275-289 represent the pairs of contact pins 290-291 and the 7-102 various ones of which bridge said pairs of contact switches to give the alarm, such as shown in FIG. 2 for the contact bar 95 which bridges its corresponding contact pins 290-291.

290291 Contact Pins Said contact pins 290-291 which are made of metal such as steel are arranged in pairs and slide freely in the holes in the respective switch holders 230-244 and are pressed lightly down on the respective drums by the flat spring connectors 298-299, respectively. When the contact pins 290-291 locate on top of the proper contact bar, a current passes from one pin to the other provided all of the other pins 290-291 are in contact with which is energized by actuation of said button, e.g. if

the button 217 is pressed and released, the drum 1 03 rotates one gear tooth rotation or one month. This method .of time correction 'in which power is cut off to all the electromagnets except that for the drum being adjusted prevents the next adjacent drum from being rotated during rotation of thedrum being adjustedtherein for slidably carrying contact pins 290-291. The

front portion of each said switch holder 230-244 carries a spring pointer 297 which indicates one of the indicium of the respective group of spaced apart indicia carried on the frame 296 corresponding to the pre-set alarm position for the respective drum. The rear part is triggered'When the contact pins 290-291 locate on the respective drum in areas where there are no contact bars a current does not pass from one pin to the other because the body of the drum is made of nonconductive material. 7

'292-293- Support Rods g Said rods 292-293 are transversely spaced apart and .slidably support said switch holders 230-244 for movementbetween their various alarm settings.

295- Contact Plate Holder Said contact plate holder 295 which'is supported on the 'frame of the instrument by .well known means is made of non-conductive material and has contact plates 259-274 affixed to the underside thereof.

' 296 Frame Plate Said frame plate 296 is provided with spaced apart I Said spring pointers 297 point to the indicia on the alarm plate 296 and locate in the corresponding notches on the locator plate 296 to lock the respective contact pins 290-291 in their respective pre-set alarm settings.

298-299- Spring Connectors Said spring connectors 298 and 299 press the contact pins 290 and 291 downwardly upon the drums and also maintain electrical contact, respectively, with the front and rear rows of contact bars 259-274 during movement of the switch holders 230-244.

300- Cam Rollers Said cam rollers 300 are rotatably carried on the shaft 303 and are manually rotated via a knurled ring 326 fast thereto. Said cam rollers 300 have helical grooves which receive rear portions of the switch holders 230-244 for sliding the latter axially on their shafts 292-293 and are provided with indicia in the form of numbers or letters and facilitate pre-setting the alarm for people who may have difficulty reading the lined scale on the frame plate 296.

301- Power Shaft Said power shaft 301 is itself driven by electric motor means at a constant speed of 6 rpm and is the power source for all of the moving parts of the instrument including the drums. The drum 4F and the kick back cam 313 are fast to and rotate with the shaft 301. The other drums rotate sequentially from rotation of the drum 4F.

302- Ratchet Pawl Rod Said ratchet pawl rod 302 supports the ratchet pawls 165-177 for limited pivotal movement. The ratchet pawl 171 pivots on the holder 308.

303 Cam Roller Rod Said roller rod 303 rotatably carries and supports said cam rollers 300.

304- 48 Month Locator Bar Said 48 month locator bar 304 interconnects the ratchet pawl 171 for the day drum gear 158 and the 48 month locator drum 103, the position of which locator bar 304 in respect to the drum 103 determines the location of the pawl 171 in respect to the gear 158. Said locator bar 304 carries a finger 304A'which engages a ratchet pawl holder 308 and an arm 30413 which engages the locating area on the drum 103.

305 Locator-Bar Spring Said locator bar spring 305 has one end fast to a ratchet pawl holder 309B and the other end over an arm of the locator bar 304 and keeps the locator bar 304 pressed down against the locating area: on the drum 103 and against the top of the drum 103 at the time of disengagement at the month change. Said spring 305 also yieldably maintains the locator bar 304 pressed axially against the-locating area on the drum 103 to keep the pawl 171 in the proper position on the gear 158.

306 Ratchet Pawl Return Spring Said ratchet pawl return spring 306 has one end fast to a ratchet pawl holder 309A and the other end bent over the upper arm of the ratchet pawl 165 so as to yieldably maintain the latter in engagement with the ratchet gear 152 for the 48 month locator drum 103.

307- Ratchet Pawl Return Spring Said ratchet pawl return spring 307 has one end fast to a ratchet pawl holder which in turn is fast to the shaft 302 and the other end bent over the upper arm of the ratchet pawl 171 so as to yieldably maintain the latter in engagement with the ratchet gear 158 for the day drum 2.

308- Ratchet Pawl Holder Said ratchet pawl holder 308 which is slidably supported on the shaft 302 pivotally supports the ratchet pawl 171. The location of the pawl holder 308 is determined by the location of the locator bar 304 which carries a finger 304A which operates in an annular groove on the holder 308.

309A309B Ratchet Paw] Holders Said ratchet pawl holders 309A and 3098 are held axially spaced apart and fast to the shaft 302 by set screws. Each pawl is rotatably mounted on the rod 302 and disposed between said ratchet pawl holders 309A and 309B. The holder 309A is grooved to retain the ratchet return spring 306.

310 Attraction Plate Said attraction plates 310 are each formed as a lateral projection on the upper arm of the respective ratchet pawl except the pawl 171 to provide a larger attraction mass for the respective electromagnet.

311 Attraction Plate Said attraction plate 311 which is constructed the same as the attraction plates 310 is formed on the pawl 171.

171A- Lower Arm of the Day Pawl 171 Said lower arm 171A is angled in respect to the upper arm so that it will always be located on the area 158E on the gear 158 regardless of the position to which the upper arm is shifted so that the day drum will not rotate more than one gear tooth at a time.

313 Month Locator Kick Back Cam Said kick back cam 313 constantly rotates with the shaft 301 to which it is made fast. At each month end change said cam 313 pushes upon the locator bar 304 so that the arm 304B thereon can drop into the proper locating groove on the drum 103. During the remainder of each month the cam 313 rotates over the locating end of said locating bar 304 without touching the same until the next month end change. Said cam 313 is located about three-fourths of a revolution behind drum 4F'so as not to extend over the end 3048 of said locating bar 304 when the latter is raised at the month end change.

314 Frame Part v Said frame part 314 is located at the lower front end of the instrument and serves to mount the time correction switches 217-229.

316- Frame Plate I Said frame plate 316 which is located on the left end of the instrument is made of see-through material, such as clear plexiglass, so that the left side of the drum 103 can be viewed from the outside of said instrument. Said frame plate 316 serves as a mount for a pivot-support for a push lever 334. The drum 103 has an arrow 317 painted or engraved on the left end thereof which is visible through said frame plate 316. Said'drum 103 can be pre-set to the proper year and month by pressing and releasing the switch 217 once for each month desired to be changed. Said left side 316 is provided with indicia thereon divided into four quadrants each with each of the 12 months and with every 4th year as shown in FIG. 32. The drum 103 is factory pre-set on the shaft 301 so that if the arrow 317 points to the present month which is in the quadrant containing the present year the drum 103 will'be correctly adjusted for leap year correction. If said arrow 317 points to the present month but is located in the wrong quadrant for the present year then an incorrect number of days will register on the gear 158 for the month of Feb. in Leap Year (28 days instead of 29) and one of the other three years will register a 29 day Feb. instead of a 28 day. When the arrow is set to point to the present month and in the quadrant which contains the present year it need never be re-set. Said instrument will always indicate the correct year, month, day, hour, second, A.M. or P.M. automatically without re-setting regardless of which year or which leap year comes around.

317 Arrow Said arrow 317 is carried on the left end of the drum 103.

318-- Electric Motor Means Said electric motor means operates at a constant speed under load and has its drive shaft coupled to the power shaft 301 for rotatably driving the same.

319- Friction Bearings Said friction bearings 319 maintain a constant rotative force on their respective drums. Except for the drum 4F said friction bearings 319 are disposed in the hubs of the other drums and are packed with a heavy lubricant 321 so as to offer resistance in the turning of the outer race of said bearing 319. When the outer race of said bearing 319 which is fast to its respective drum is held stationary, such as when the respective ratchet is engaged to the gear, the inner race turns with the shaft 301 while the projections 302 function like paddles in passing through the heavy lubricant. Upon the release of the respective gear by the respective ratchet, the respective drum instantly rotates and turns against the slight pressure of the respective contact pins 290-29l and against the slight resistance offered by the respective contact point trip levers when the latter close the respective contact points upon completion of the revolution of said drum;

320-- Projections on Bearing Races Said projections 320 are provided on the friction bearings'319. to operate in-heavy lubricant so as to pro- 323 Switch Support Said switch support 323 is fastened by well known means to opposite ends of the instrument and serves as a mount for the contacts 191-203.

324 Contact Support Said contact support 324 is fastened to the switch support 323 and formed of insulator material to hold the pairs of contacts 191-203 spaced apart.

325- Card Container Said card container 325 is provided at the rear of the instrument to hold appointment cards. Each date of which one desires to be reminded is written on an appointment card. What is to be remembered at a future time is also marked on each card. The cards are kept in the card container 325 in chronological order according to the dates to be remembered with the first reminder date filedin front. The alarm system of the instrument is set preferably for a time prior to the time or date to be remembered to give ample warning, e.g. if the present date is Dec. 15, 1970 and the date and time to be reminded ofis Mar. 2, 1971 at 3:30 PM. the card may be marked as follows: Dentist appointment; Dr. Smith; for Arthur; Mar. 2, 1971'; 330 RM. The alarm. may be set for 8:00 A.M. also to serve as a first reminder at which time the card would be replaced in the container and the alarm set for a second reminder, say at 2:30 P.M. or 3:00 P.M. When the alarm is given the font card is checked to ascertain as to what was to be remembered and the card for that particular appointment is then discarded. The alarm is then set for the time or date noted on the next subsequent card. While any number of cards can be filed in the container 325 the alarm is set only for the first card.

326 Knurled Ring Said knurled ring 326 is provided on each cam roller 300 to facilitate manually turning the same when setting the alarm.

328 Friction Bearing Said friction bearing 328 is a modified form of friction bearing in respect to the friction bearing 319 and includes an O-ring which fits snugly onthe shaft 301 vide a yieldable rotative driving force between the races thereof.

321-'H eavy Lubricant 7 Said lubricant 321 is carried between the races of the friction bearings to provide a yieldable rotative driving force therebetween. I Y

322' Notches v Said notches 322 are formed in the frame plate 296 along an edge thereof defining the top wall of an elon gated slot through which the spring pointers 297 are visible. Said notches 322 serve to locate andv hold in place said spring pointers 297. Each said notch is cen tered in respect to a line carriedon the frame plate 296. Said vertical lines are number or A.M./P.M. lines which indicate by the spring pointers 297 the locations of the respective contact pins and which contact bars on the drums will bridge the corresponding contact pins 290-291. Said notches 322 are a part of the alarm system of said instrument and function independently of the direct time reading system. The alarm settings which can be read off the plate 296 show the time the alarm is set to trigger whereas the time readings on the drums is the absolute or actual time and only at the instant of triggering of the alarm are the two readings identical.

and. on the inside diameter of the respective drum. Bushings are press fitted in the respective drum on each side of the O-ring.-Said O-ring produces a yieldable rotative-force on the respective drum as does the friction bearing 319. l

329-Friction Bearing t 3 Said friction bearing 329 is another modified formof friction bearing and includes a plug 329 whichis spring pressed against the shaft 301. Thespring pressure on the plug 329 may be adjusted by a set screw accessible from the outside cylindrical surface of the respective drum. I

330- Bearings Said bearings 330 are mounted in frame plates at op posite ends of the shaft 301 and rotatably support the same. I

33l Ratchet Pawl Return Spring Said ratchet pawl return spring 331 is associated with as an alternate thereof. Said push lever 334 is actuated upon energization of the electromagnet 335 at each month end change at the beginning of the upward movement of the locator bar 304 when it is lifted by the pawl 165. When the electromagnet 335 is energized the push lever 334 pivots on the pin 336 and the bar 304 is pushed to its extreme right position, as viewed in FIG. 33. When the drum 103 has completed its one gear tooth revolution at the month end change and the pawl 165 re-engages the gear 152 the electromagnet 335 is tie-energized allowing the bar 304 to locate in the proper locating area on the drum 103.

335 Electromagnet Said electromagnet 335 controls the actuation of the push lever 334 as explained.

336 Pivot Pin Said pivot pin 336 pivotally supports the push lever 334.

337- Electrical Line One end of each stator coil connects to an annular contact ring 339 mounted upon and insulated from the shaft 340.

338- Commutator Said commutator is stationary on the stationary shaft 304 and brushes rotate around commutator 338.

339- Annular Contact Ring Said annular contact ring 339 serves as a common connector means for said one ends of the stator coils and is connected to one of the power lines. Said contact ring 339 is insulated from the shaft 340 upon which it is mounted.

340- Stationary Shaft Said stationary shaft 340 is fixed to the frame 350. The stator cores and the commutator 338 are pressed to said shaft 340. The follower 349 rotates on the shaft 304.

34l Spring Connector Said spring connector 341 wipes against the rotating contact bar 342 and connects one of the power lines thereto.

342 Rotating Contact Bar Said contact bar'342 is insulated from the gear 343 on one face of which it is mounted but is electrically connected to the brushes 344.

343 Gear I I Said 'gear 343 is rotatably mounted upon said shaft 340 and is driven by a small motor 346.. Said gear 343 in turn carries the brushes 344 around the commutator 338. i

344- Commutator Brushes Each of said commutator brushes '344 covers a commutator segment corresponding to a magnetized area on the stator 35]. In the instance there are 6 brushes to correspond with 6 attraction plates 349A. The brushes 344 are radially slidable in respect to the shafts on which they are carried which shafts are fast to the inside face of the gear 343.

346 Small Constant Speed Motor Said motor 346 is mounted upon the frame 350 and drives the gear 343 and the brushes 344 carried thereby. Said motor 346 determines the rpm. and direction of the follower 349and its speed is independent of the load on the follower 349.

348- Constant Speed Motor Said constant speed motor 348 can be used in place of the conventional constand speed motor 318 and is described, infra, in connection with the operation of my invention.

349-- generally designates the follower which is rotatably mounted upon the shaft 340 but held axially fast thereto by Well known means and includes attraction plates 349A and follower end 349B.

349A Attraction Plates Circumferentially spaced apart attraction plates of the follower 349. Said plates 349A and the outer driving end 3498 as well as the inner end (which is partially extended inside of the stator) are integrally joined.

349B Follower End Said follower end 3498 is coupled to the power shaft 301 to rotatively drive the same.

350- Frame Said frame 350 serves as a stationary support for the shaft 340 which is fixedly secured in the frame 350 and as a mount for the samll constant speed motor 346.

35l Stator Each section of said stator 351 comprises an iron core and a coil wound independently and connected to the commutator 338 and the bar 339. Said stator 351 provides a rotating magnetic field for the follower 349 to follow and thus produces a rotating magnetic field which is not affected by the world load on the follower 349. The magnetic field will maintain its contant speed of rotation around said armature 351 regardless of the world load on the follower 349.

352- Electrical Line The other end of each stator coil connects to the commutator 338 by an electrical line 352.

353- Moveable Contact Said moveable contact 353 is connected to one of the terminals of the auxiliary power source indicated, in the instance, as a battery. The other terminal of the auxiliary power source is connected to one of the electrical feed lines for the electrical motor 318 (or 348). An electromagnet 355 is wired in series with one of the main electrical feed lines for the motor 3l8(or 348) and maintains open the switch constituting the contacts 353 and 354 to keep the auxiliary power source out of circuit. When the regular power which energizes the electromagnet 355 is turned on said-contact points 353 and 354 are separated and my instrument derives its electrical power from the regular power source. Upon cutting off of theregular powersource the electromagnet 355 is de-energized so that itreleases said point 353 which instantly makes contact withlthe stationary point 354 thus connecting the auxiliary or battery power! 354'- Stationary Contact Said stationary contact 354 is connected tothe other of the electrical feed lines for the electrical motor 318 355 Electromagnet Saidelectromagnet 355 is wired in series with one of the main electrical feed lines for the motor 318 (or 348) and operates upon the moveable contact 353 to hold it open in respect to the stationary contact 354.

356- Brush Hold Down Springs The brush hold down springs 356 yieldably maintain the respective brushes 344 against the commutator 338.

In operation of my invention, said instrument records the absolute or actual time as shown in F [(3. 26 in that the month is shown in numerical notation 12 the year 1970 the month is also shown as Dec.

the day 31 the hour 11 the minutes 59 the seconds 59 the correct one half of each day RM. and the week day Thu. In FIG. 26 it is noted that the alarm setting coincides with the actual time reading signifying that the alarm is energized at the particular instant flashing a signal light and/or sounding a buzzer.

The push button switches 217-229 are actuated to correct the actual time reading for any reason, e.g., after said instrument has stopped as during an electric power failure. Once set, said instrument requires no correction regardless of the number of days in the month or even on account of the occurrence of Leap Years.

The date and time are registered for visual reading of actual time on the faces of the drums 103, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 1, 2, 3, 5A, 4E, 5B, 4F, 6 and 178. Sequential rotation of said drums registers the changing of time in seconds, minutes, hours, months and years without requiring re-setting or correction for any reason including the passing of Leap Years.

Considering the visual or actual time reading the above-drums 103, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 1, 2, 3, 5A, 4E, 5B, 4F, 6 and 178 have gears 152-164, respectively, attached thereto and the following elements associated therewith respectively:

ratchets 165-177 electromagnets 204-216 contact points 191-203 contact trip levers 179-190 time correction switches 217-229 and identical friction bearings each of which in one form thereof is designated 319 The following is a decription of the sequential rotation of said drums in the order and manner in which they rotate to show the actual time reading. The second drum 4F rotates with the shaft 301 which is rotatably driven at a constant speed by the conventional constant speed motor 318 or by my electrical motor 348. Upon completion of each revolution (10. seconds) of the drum. 4F, the trip lever 190 closes the contacts 203 which energizes the electromagnet 214 thus releasing the pawl 175 which releases the gear 162 and permits the second drum SE to rotate l/6th of a revolution. On completion of'each revolution of the drum 5B (1 minute) the trip lever 189 closes the contacts 202 to energize the electromagnet 213 which raises the pawl 174' to release the gear 161 and the drum 4E rotates 1/ 10th of a revolution. Upon the completion of a revolution (ten minutes) of the drum 4E, the trip lever 188 closes the contacts 201 to energize the electromagnet 212 and raise the pawl 1 73 to release the gear 160 which permits the drum 5A to rotate l/6th of a revolution. Upon completion of a revolution of the drum 5A 1 hour) the trip lever 187 closes the contacts 200 to energize the electromagnet 211 which raises the pawl 172 to release the gear 159 which permits the hour drum 3 to rotate l/24th of a revolution. Upon one-hlaf of a revolution 12 hours) of the hour drum 3, the trip lever 186 closes the contacts 199 to energize the electromagnet 215 which raises the pawl 176 to release the gear 163 which permits the AM/PM drum 6 to rotate one-half of a revolution from A.M. to P.M. Upon completionof a revolution (24 hours) of the hour drum 3, the trip levers 184 and 185 close the contacts 197, 198 and 199, respectively. Closing of the contacts 199 energizes the electromagnet 215 and raises the pawl 176 to release the gear 163 which permits the AM/PM drum 6 to rotate a second one-half of a revolution from RM. to A.M. Closing of the contacts 197 energizes the electromagnet 216 which raises the pawl 177 to release the gear 164 and the week day drum rotates l/7th of a revolution or one week day. Closing of the contacts 198 energizes the magnet 210 which raises the pawl 171 to release the gear 158 which permits the day drum 2 to rotate 1 gear tooth or 1 day. Upon completion of a revolution (28, 29, 30 or 31 days) of the day drum 2, the trip lever 183 closes the contacts 195 and 196. Closing of the contacts 195 energizes the electromagnet 204 which raises the pawl 165 to release the gear 152 which permits the 48 month drum 103 to rotate 1/48th of a revolution or one month. Releasing of the gear 152 by the pawl 165 lifts the 48 month locator bar 304 to disengage said bar 304 from its location in drum 103. After the pawl 165 re-engages with the gear 152 the kick back cam pushes said locator bar 304 back and causes said bar to drop into a new month location on the drum 103. Location of said bar 304 determines the location of the pawl 171 on the gear 158. Closing of the contacts 196 energizes the electromagnet 209 which raises the pawl 170 to release the gear 157 which permits the 12 month drum 1 to rotate l/l2th of a revolution or one month. Upon completion of a revolution (one year) of the 12 month drum 1, the trip lever 182 closes the contacts 194 and energizes the electromagnet 208 which raises the pawl 169 to release the gear 156 which permits the units year drum 4D to rotate l/lOth of a revolution'or one year. Upon completion of a revolution (10 years) of the units year drum 4D, the trip lever 181 closes the contacts 193 and energizes the electromagnet 207 which raises the pawl 168 to release the gear 155 which permits the tens year drum 4C to rotate 1/l0th ofa revolution 01' 10 years. Upon completion of a revolution (100 years) of the tens year drum 4C, the trip lever 180 closes the contacts 192 and .energizes the'electromagnet 206 which raises the pawl 167 to release the gear'l54 which permits the hundreds year drum 413 to rotate l/lOth of a revolution or years. Upon completion ofa revolution-( 1000 years) of the hundreds year drum-4B, the trip lever 179 closes the contacts 191 and energizes the electromagnet 205 which raises the pawl 166 to release the gear -1 53 which permits the thousands year drum 4A to rotate l/ 10th of a revolution or 1000 years. The thousands year drum 4A can rotate one full revolution or 10,000 years. 1

My instrument is a combination clock and calendar having long-range alarm capabilities as compared to the alarm range of the standard alarm clock or timer. One use of said instrument is as a reminder mechanism in the way-similar .to the use of a standard alarm clock,

but this is where the similarity ends and the alarm range pointments to be remembered which r night otherwise be forgotten. Said instrument can be set to alarm at or shortly before said time. The alarm can be set as a reminder for birthdays, anniversaries, dates, doctor or dentist appointments, PTA meetings, drivers license renewal dates, teenage dates, club meetings or the like.

Considering now the alarm function of the instrument, the cards stating the necessary information regarding the date to be reminded of may be filed in the container portion 325 at the rear of said instrument in chronological order.

The reminding date on the first card only is set on the instrument by positioning the contact pin switches 230-244 to give an alarm. When the pre-set alarm time set on said instrument coincides with the absolute or actual time the alarm is triggered and the card is read and then discarded. The alarm is then set for the time noted on the next subsequent card.

My instrument can be operated by any constant speed motor geared down to produce a low constant speed output preferably 6 rpm, but to insure such constant speed output the constant speed motor 348 shown in FIGS. 35 and 36 is used to drive the shaft 301. In the use of said motor 348 the shaft 301 is made fast to the portion 3498 of the follower 349 which portion 349B rotates with said follower 349. The attraction plates 349A are made to chase respective magnetic fields which are caused to rotate around the stator 351 by current fed to the stator coils by the plurality of rotating brushes 344 which act upon the commutator 338 to simultaneously magnetize a plurality of individual areas of the stator 351 which areas rotate therearound as the brushes 344 rotate around the commutator 338.

FIGS. 38-40 and ,45 are, respectively, side elevational, fragmentary front elevational and top plan with parts in section, and front elevational views of a modified form of alarm system used in embodiments of my invention; Y

FIGS. 42-41 are, respectively, side elevational and fragmentary front elevational with parts in section views of a modified form of rotatable-support means for alarm drums used in embodiments of my invention.

FIGS. 43-44 and 46-47 are, respectively, fragmentary side elevational and top plan views of a modified form of ratchet gear movement controlling means;

FIG. 48 is a front elevational view with parts removed of a modified form of horological instrument embodying my invention;

FIGS. 49-52 and 53-56 and 59 are, respectively, end elevational and top plan and front elevational views of time drum moving means used in'said modified form of embodiment;

FIGS. 57 and 58 are side elevational views with parts cut-away and in section of a day drum moving means used in said modified form of embodiment.

Referring to FIGS. 38-47 of the drawings in greater detail, the same shows in FIGS. 38-40 and 45, amodified form of an alarm system; in FIGS. 41-42, a modified form of rotatable support means for alarm drums; andin FIGS. 43-44 and 46-47, a modified form of ratchet gear movement controlling means.

The descriptions of said modifications are described in conjunction with the respective reference numeralsassigned thereto which are listed hereinafter.

.357 Circular Disks said circular disks 357 are formed of non-conductive material and rotate on said shaft 301 when individually actuated by ones finger tips applied to knurled edges 360 of said disk 357. The numbering on each such disk corresponds to its respective absolute time drum, e.g.,

said disk 357 corresponds to the numbering on second drum EBB and when disk 357 is set at the reading which is visible on the drum SBB when the alarm is energized is also 0.

357A Modified Forms of Circular Disks Said circular disks 357A are similar to said disks 357 and each is supported for rotation by three circumferentially spaced apart rollers 366, 366A and 3668 which are supported for rotation by stationary axles 365, 365A and 3658, respectively.

358, 359 and 358A, 359A Contact Rings Said contact rings 358, 359 and 358A, 359A are formed of conductive material and bonded to said circular disk 357 and 357A, respectively. Each said contact ring 359 and 359A carries a contact arm 3598 and 359C, respectively, which is moveable toward and away from said disks 358 and 358A, respectively, for closing and opening, respectively, an electrical circuit.

360 and 360A Knurled Edges Said knurled edges 360 and 360A are provided on opposite peripheral edges of said disks 357 and 357A, respectively, to facilitate their manual finger tip turning to any desired rotational position.

361, 362 Contact Fingers 'Said contact fingers 361, 362 are provided with inturned ends which are spring pressed against said contact rings 358 and 359, respectively, and serve as electrical conductors and also as brake means to prevent the respective disk 357 from rotating except when the latter is manually rotated.

363 Insulator Body Said insulator body 363 serves as a mount for said spring fingers 361 and 362 and insulates them from each other. Said insulator body 363 is made fast to a shaft 364. 364 Shaft Said shaft 364 serves as a mount for said insulator bodies 363.

365, 365A and 3658 Axle Shafts Said axle shafts 365,365A and 365B which are supported by suitable stationary structure are equally circumferentially spaced apart andserve as'mounts for rollers 366, 366A and 3668, respectively.

- 366, 366A and 3668 Rollers Said rollers 366, 366A and 366B rotate on saidaxle shafts 365, 365A and 365B, respectively, for rotatably supporting the respective disk 357A and are each provided with flanges on opposite ends thereof for holding said disk 357A.

367 Trip Arms Said trip arms 367 are made fast to the respective absolute time drums as shown for the drum SBB in FIGS. 39 and 45 and each projects laterally for actuating the respective arm 359B or 359C between open and close positions when said absolute time drum rotates to alarm position.

.368 Electromagnets Each said 'electromagnet 368 is energized at the proper time in the sequential rotation of the respective absolute time drums as shown in FIG. 7 and when energized pulls a stop plate 369 rearwardly to a non-stop position and at the same time via apivot lever 373 pushes a stop plate 370 to a stop position.

369, 370 Stop Plates Said stop plates 369, 370 are each bent at right angles and slotted for sliding movement and have normal stop and non-stop positions.

371 Stationary Plates Said stationary plates 371 are each provided with an aperture in the main body thereof through which a fastener 375 extends and with two spaced apart ears at its rear-end having concentric apertures therein.

372 Pivot Pins Said pivot pins 372 are disposed in said concentric apertures in said ears of said stationary plate 371.

373 Pivot Levers Said pivot levers 373 are each rotatably carried on the respective pivot pin and are disposed between said ears of said stationary plates 371 and has upper and lower arms operative against said stop plates 369 and 370, respectively.

374 Return Springs Said return springs 374 each has one end wrapped about a pin fast on a bracket 376 and its other end operative against the lower end of said stop plate 370 to push the same against the lower arm of said pivot lever 375 Fasteners Said fasteners 375 each extends through the apertures on said stop plates 369 and 370 and through said stationary plate 371 and is threadably engaged with said bracket 376.

376 Brackets Said brackets 376 are each supported by a shaft 377 extending therethrough and carries said stop plates 369 and 370 and said stationary plate 371 between spaced apart arms thereof. Said bracket 376 holds said return spring 374. v

377 Shaft Said shaft 377 is comparable to said ratchet pawl rod 302' and supports said bracket 376 which is made fast thereto by a set screw as shown.

In operation of said modified form of alarm system alarm drums each as constructed in accordance with the alarm drum 358 is made fast to the shaft 301 so that it ordinarily rotates therewith but the fingers 361 and 362 hold the same fast against rotation so that the alarm drum remains ina fixed position wherever set at the desired alarm setting. When the adjacent absolute time drum reaches a corresponding position of rotation to that at which the alarm drum is set said-trip arm 367 moves the contact member 359B to close position in respect to the contact plate 358 and closes the alarm circuit for the respective alarm drum. ln the case of the alarm drum 357A the same does not have to beheld against rotation since no rotary driving force is applied thereto as said drum 357A is rotatably supported by the circumferentially spaced apart rollers 366, 366A and 3668 as before described and remains in a fixed position until such time as said drum 357A is set to the desired alarm setting. The contact member 359C is closed in respect to'the contactplate 358A by the trip arm 367 v vthe turn spring 374 so as to maintain the respective ratchet gear stationary until the aforesaid steps are repeated upon energization of the electromagnet 368 a subsequent time.

Referring to FIGS. 48-58 of the drawings in greater detail, the same shows a modified form of a horological instrument embodying my invention which is described in conjunction with the respective reference numerals assigned thereto which are listed hereinafter.

301A Stationary Shaft Said stationary shaft 301A is made fast to said frame 316 and supports said absolute time and alarm drums and said 48 month locator drum 103A for rotation thereon. Said shaft 301A also supports pivot plates 393, 393A-l-l, 393J for partial rotation thereon.

318A Electric Motor Means Said electric motor means 318A which may be a conventional constant speed motor or the constant speed motor 348 operates at a constant speed under load and has its drive shaft coupled'to the gear 163A for rotatably driving the same at a constant speed.

367A 367H, 367J Trip Arms Said trip arms 367A-367H, 3671 are comparable to said trip arm 367.

378 Motor Shaft Said motor shaft 378 is driven by said electric motor means 318A and carries said gear 163B thereon.

379, 379A Second Drums Said second drums 379, 379A are, respectively,abso lute time and alarm drums and are numbered consecutively from 0 to 59. Each said absolute time drum except drum 379 is rotated on said shaft 301A one gear tooth segment of rotation at a time by its respective ratchet gear. Each said absolute time drum except drums 178A and 387 carry at least one trip lever fast thereon. l-lour drum 381 carries two such trip levers 184A and 185A. Each said alarm drum is manually r0- tatable on said shaft 301A to any 360 rotational position. i

380, 380A Minute Drums Said minute drums 380 and 380A are, respectively, absolute time and alarm drums and are numbered consecutively from 0 to 59 381, 381A Hour Drums Said drums 381 and 381A are, respectively,'absolute time and alarm drums and are numbered consecutively from 12 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from l2 pm. to ll p.m.'

382, 382A Day Drums I Said day drums 382 and 382A are, respectively, ab solute time and alarm drums and are numbered consecutively from 1m 31. g

178A Weekday Drum 1 Said weekday drum 178A is an absolute time drum and is suitably lettered to show the days of the week.

383, 383A Month Drums 1 Said month drums 383 and 383A are, respectively,

absolute time and alarm drums and aresuitably lettered v Said tens year drums 385 and 385A are, respectively',

absolute time and alarm drums andare numbered consecutively from 0 to 9.

386, 386A Hundreds Year Drums Said hundreds year drums 386 and 386A are, respectively, absolute time and alarm drums and are numbered consecutively from 0 to 9.

387, 387A Thousands Year Drums

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3962858 *Aug 29, 1973Jun 15, 1976Uranus Electronics Inc.Electronic watch
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Classifications
U.S. Classification368/39, 968/573, 968/574, 368/247
International ClassificationG04C17/00
Cooperative ClassificationG04C17/0083, G04C17/0075
European ClassificationG04C17/00T, G04C17/00T2