Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3766922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1973
Filing dateAug 2, 1971
Priority dateAug 28, 1970
Publication numberUS 3766922 A, US 3766922A, US-A-3766922, US3766922 A, US3766922A
InventorsE Krusko
Original AssigneeScott Paper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Throw-away boy and girl diapers
US 3766922 A
Abstract
Throw-away diapers having elongate, absorbent pads, or sections of cellulosic fibers disposed within covering envelopes having a fluid pervious and fluid containing facing cover layer, and a backing cover layer. The absorbent pads have predetermined regions of differing fiber weight through the thickness per unit surface area thereof wherein the greatest weight of fibers through the thickness per unit surface area is included in a predetermined region where it is most needed to retain body fluids. An embossed pattern in the facing layer and underlying absorbent pad defines valleys and ridges in all of the predetermined regions, and the density of the absorbent pad in the valleys is greater than the density of the absorbent pad in the ridges. Absorbent pads in throw-away diapers for use by girl babies comprise an elongate, fluff batt of cellulosic fibers in which an elongate, middle one-third thereof constitutes the predetermined region having the greatest weight of fibers through the thickness per unit surface area. Absorbent pads in throw-away diapers for use by boy babies comprise a main fluff batt and a secondary fluff batt. The elongate, forward one-third of the main fluff batt constitutes the predetermined region having the greatest weight of fibers through the thickness per unit surface area thereof. The secondary fluff batt is disposed forwardly of the main fluff batt and is folded over the main fluff batt during use of the diaper. The elongate, absorbent pads utilized in the throw-away diapers of this invention also constitute a part of the present invention.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Krusko Oct. 23, 1973 THROW-AWAY BOY AND GIRL DIAPERS [75] Inventor: Evelyn H. Krusko, Philadelphia, Pa.

[73I Assigns-e: Scott Paper Company, Delaware,

[22] Filed: Aug. 2, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 168,159

[52] U.S. Cl. 128/284 [51] Int. Cl. A611 13/16 [58] Field of Search 128/284, 286, 287, 128/288, 290, 296

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,788,003 4/1957 Morin 128/284 2,890,700 6/1959 Lonberg-Holm 128/284 3,063,452 11/1962 Del Guercio 128/284 3,180,335 4/1965 Duncan et al. 128/287 3,211,147 10/1965 Pherson et al... 128/284 3,386,442 6/1968 Sabee 128/287 3,402,715 9/1968 Liloia et a1 128/287 3,498,296 3/1970 Gallagher 128/284 3,592,194 7/1971 Duncan 128/287 3,612,055 10/1971 Mesek et a1. 128/287 Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum Attorney-Martin L. Faigus et al.

[57] ABSTRACT Throw-away diapers having elongate, absorbent pads,

or sections of cellulosic fibers disposed within covering envelopes having a fluid pervious and fluid containing facing cover layer, and a backing cover layer. The absorbent pads have predetermined regions of differing fiber weight through the thickness per unit surface area thereof wherein the greatest weight of fibers through the thickness per unit surface area is included in a predetermined region where it is most needed to retain body fluids. An embossed pattern in the facing layer and underlying absorbent pad defines valleys and ridges in all of the predetermined regions, and the density of the absorbent pad in the valleys is greater than the density of the absorbent pad in the ridges. Absorbent pads in throw-away diapers for use by girl babies comprise an elongate, fluff batt of cellulosic fibers in which an elongate, middle one-third thereof constitutes the predetermined region having the greatest weight of fibers through the thickness per unit surface area. Absorbent pads in throw-away diapers for use by boy babies comprise a main fluff batt and a secondary fluff batt. The elongate, forward onethird of the main fluff batt constitutes the predetermined region having the greatest weight of fibers through the thickness per unit surface area thereof. The secondary fluff batt is disposed forwardly of the main fluff batt and is folded over the main fluff batt during use of the diaper. The elongate, absorbent pads utilized in the throw-away diapers of this invention also constitute a part of the present invention.

39 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PAIENIEBnm 23 an SHEET 10$ 4 INVENTOR.

Y Evelyn H.Krusko B ATTORNEY.

mtmmnmzam 3.766322 SHEEF 2 OF 4 INVENTOR- Evely BY w ATTORN EY.

PATENIEU 0U 23 I973 SHEET 3 OF 4 INVENTOR. Evelyn Hiigsko BY ATTORNEY.

PAIENIEflnmza ma $766322 SHEET a 0F 4 INVENTOR.

Evelyn H. Krusko ATTORNEY.

THROW-AWAY BOY AND GIRL DIAPERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to throw-away diapers, and more particularly to separate throw-away diapers constructed for use by boy babies and girl babies, respectively.

2. Description of the Prior Art A demand exists for throw-away diapers which are inexpensive, non-bulky, and capable of absorbing and retaining urine and fecal matter at least as effectively as cloth diapers when such throw-away diapers are utilized by either boy or girl babies. It is known in the prior art, as exemplified in Canadian Pat. No. 820,551, to provide throw-away diapers with profiled, absorbent fluff batts of cellulosic fibers as one component thereof; i.e. fluff batts having regions of differing fiber weight per unit surface area through the thickness thereof to position the greatest weight of fibers were it is most needed to store urine. These throw-away diapers are not believed to represent the preferred forms for obtaining the above demand. Even in such throwaway diapers the urine tends to strike completely through the thickness of said fluff batt in the region in which it is initially impinged before a sufficient volume of said urine can be directed into other areas of said fluff batt for containment in said other areas to prevent excessive leakage.

Furthermore, the fluff batts disclosed in the abovereferred-to Canadian Patent extend for the entire transverse extent of the throw-away diapers. The use of fluff batts which extends for the entire transverse extent of the throw-away diapers results in the application of excessive stresses to said diapers when they are in use. These excessive stresses occur because the fluff batt is extremely bulky in the crotch and thigh-encircling regions, and the confining nature of the crotch and thighencircling regions imposes excessive stresses on said fluff batt. The excessive stresses imposed upon the throw-away diapers cause the fluff batts to lose their structural integrity and break up into separated clumps to thereby adversely affect the fluid absorbing capability of said fluff batts.

It has been suggested in the prior art to emboss fluff batts having a substantially uniform fiber weight distribution over its entire extent, i.e. unprofiled. It has never been suggested in the prior art to emboss profiled fluff batts since it has been thought that the inclusion of an embossed pattern in the region of greatest fiber weight in profiled fluff batts would seriously detract from the fluid storing capabilities of said fluff batts in said region. Therefore, it was thought that embossing would directly defeat the purpose for non-uniformly distributing the weight of fibers in a fluff batt; namely, to provide a fiber region having a greater fluid storing capability than other regions of said fluff batt.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Although it is known in the prior art that urine emitted by a boy baby is directed to a different area of a diaper than urine emitted by a girl baby, it remained for applicant to invent unique, separate, throw-away diapers for use by boy and girl babies, respectively, wherein an acceptable volume of urine is retained, or stored within said diapers without excessive leakage therefrom. Applicants invention is in unique structures of absorbent pads, or sections of cellulosic fibers to accommodate the specific urinating characteristics of boy and girl babies, and to the throw-away diapers utilized in said absorbent pads.

Each throw-away diaper of this invention includes an absorbent pad defined by a profiled, embossed fluff batt of cellulosic fibers. The term profiled," as used throughout the specification and claims of this application in describing the structure of a fluff batt, refers to a varying weight distribution of fibers throughout said fluff batt such that the fluff batt has regions of differing fiber weight per unit surface area throughout the thickness thereof to position the greatest weight of fibers in a predetermined region of the fluff batt wherein it is most needed to store urine. Reference to weight of fibers or to fiber weight throughout this application, including the claims, refers to the weight of fibers per unit surface area through the thickness of the region referred to, unless clearly indicated to the contrary.

Each throw-away diaper of this invention includes a covering envelope which has a fluid pervious and containing facing cover layer, and a backing cover layer. A profiled fluff batt is disposed within said covering layer, and an embossed pattern is impressed into the facing layer and the underlying profiled fluff batt to define the profiled, embossed fluff batts of this invention. The embossed pattern impressed into the profiled fluff batt defines ridges and valleys in both the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight and in the other regions of said fluff batt; the desity of the fluff batt in the valleys being greater than the density of the fluff batt in the ridges.

In the most preferred embodiments of this invention the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight has a less percentage of its surface area defined by compressed valleys than the other predetermined regions of said fluff batt. The compressed valleys in the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight are preferably in the form of uniformly spaced, substantially circular, compressed islands. These compressed islands prevent an excessive volume of urine from striking through the thickness of the fluff batt by acting as a fluid wick for the urine which is initially directed onto the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight to aid in directing urine along the fluff batt.

It is known that the fluid storing capacity of a fluff batt is decreased as the percentage of the surface area defined by compressed valleys is increased. Applicant has found, quite surprisingly, that the area of urine transmission along the profiled, embossed fluff batts in the throw-away diapers of this invention is approximately the same, regardless of whether the percentage of compressed area in the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight is less than, or substantially equal to the percentage of compressed area in the other predetermined regions of said fluff batt. Therefore, by reducing the embossed area in the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight, the fluid storing capacity of the diaper is enhanced without adversely affecting the fluid wicking characteristics of said diaper.

In the most preferred embodiments of this invention the compressed valleys extend partially into the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight from at least one of the other regions of the absorbent fluff batt to function as a fluid wick for the urine initially imbibed within the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight to direct urine from the region of greatest fiber weight into other regions of the fluff batt.

In a throw-away diaper of this invention for use by a girl baby the fluff batt is profiled to provide the greatest weight of fibers in the center, elongate one-third region of the absorbent fluff batt. In a throw-away diaper of this invention for use by a boy baby, a main fluff batt is profiled to provide the greatest weight of fibers in the forward, elongate one-third region thereof. Preferably, the throw-away diaper for use by a boy baby is provided with a secondary fluff batt which is disposed forwardly of the main fluff batt and is enclosed within the covering envelope. In use, the forward portion of the diaper containing the secondary fluff batt is infolded such that the secondary fluff batt is superimposed over the forward region of the main fluff batt to provide a thick, absorptive region in the upper front portion of the diaper. In addition, the infolded region provides a ledge, or dam, to prevent leakage of urine which is initially directed, or which flows toward the highest front edge of the diaper.

The flufi' batt utilized in the girl diaper, and the main fluff batt utilized in the boy diaper are contoured to provide a reduced width in the region adapted to be positioned within the crotch and thigh-encircling areas during use of the diaper. This contoured configuration reduces the stresses which are applied to the fluff batts during use of the diapers to a level which will not cause the fluff batts to break up into separated clumps, which would reduce the fluid absorbing capability of said fluff batts. In addition, the contoured configuration of the fluff batt provides an extremely comfortable construction by minimizing bulk in the confining region of the crotch.

The preferred embodiments of the throw-away diapers of this invention have covering envelopes defined by a facing cover layer and a backing cover layer which are substantially identical. Each layer comprises an airlaid, embossed, adhesively bonded web of randomly arranged, intermingled, cellulosic fibers as specifically described in co-pending application Ser. No. 23,752, assigned to the assignee of this application, and hereby incorporated by reference. The facing and backing cover layers have the capability of retaining urine, and therefore, of cooperating with the absorbent pads to provide an extremely high fluid storing capacity in the diapers of this invention. In addition, the facing cover layer is fluid pervious and will permit urine which it is incapable of retaining to be transmitted into the fluff batts.

It is an object of this invention to provide throw-away diapers wherein efficient utilization of all absorbent components thereof is achieved.

It is a further object of this invention to provide throw-away diapers having a different construction for use by boy and girl babies, respectively, and in which urine is retained at least as effectively as it is retained in conventional cloth diapers.

It is a further object of this invention to provide absorbent pads for use in throw-away diapers, wherein said absorbent pads efficiently retain urine during use of said throw-away diapers.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be readily understood by referring to the detailed description which follows taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a first embodiment of a throw-away diaper of this invention for use by a girl; FIG. 2 is a sectional view along line 22 of FIG. 1; FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the fluff batt defining the absorbent pad of the diaper shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an isometric view of a second embodiment of a throw-away diaper of this invention for use by a.

boy;

FIG. 5 is an isometric view of the main and secondary fluff batts defining the absorbent pad of the diaper shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an isometric view of the diaper shown in FIG. 4 in folded condition for use on a boy;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view along line 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a schematic view of an apparatus for forming the fluff batts shown in FIGS. 3 and 5;

FIG. 8A is an enlarged view of the blocked portion identified as 8A in FIG. 8;

FIG. 9 is an exploded isometric view of portions of the apparatus shown in FIG. 9 utilized for forming the absorbent pad shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 10 is an exploded isometric view of portions of the apparatus shown in FIG. 9 utilized for forming the absorbent pad shown in FIG. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The throw-away diapers of this invention each have a profiled, absorbent pad disposed within a covering envelope defined by a fluid-pervious and containing facing cover layer, and a backing cover layer. The throw-away diaper for use by a girl baby has an absorbent pad, or section comprising a fluff batt of cellulosic fibers having a predetermined region of greatest fiber weight therein which is different from the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight in an absorbent pad of a throw-away diaper for use by a boy baby.

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, a throw-away diaper 10 of this invention for use by a girl baby has an elongate, absorbent pad 12 disposed between a fluid-pervious and containing facing cover layer 14, and a backing cover layer 16. The facing and backing cover layers define a covering envelope for the absorbent pad. The backing cover layer 16 has end margins extending beyond end margins of the facing cover layer 14, and the end margins of the backing cover layer are folded over the facing cover layer to form end panels 20, 22. These end panels 20, 22 define thickened, strong regions of the diaper for receiving pins, without tearing, to permit reliable attachment of the diaper about the torso of a girl baby.

The facing cover layer 14 and backing cover layer 16 are preferably identical and each comprises an embossed, adhesively bonded, randomly arranged, intermingled fibrous web having approximately percent wood pulp fibers of short paper-making length less than one-fourth inch, and approximately 25 percent longer synthetic fibers, such as 1% denier, 2 inch rayon fibers. Other short fibers, such as cotton linters, can be utilized in the cover layers; however, wood pulp fibers are preferred because they are less expensive than other short fibers and are readily available. Other long fibers can be utilized which enhance the strength of the covering layers without adversely affecting the absorbency, flexibility, drape, softness and hand of said layers. Also, other ratios of short to long fibers can be utilized; however, it is preferred to use as largea percentage of inexpensive short fibers as possible without adversely affecting the above-referred-to characteritics. These covering layers have a basis weight of up to about 2 ounces per square yard. The facing cover layer 14 and backing cover layer 16 are made with the aid of suitable air-laying equipment such as the Rando- Webber, orRando-Mizer which are both manufactured by Curlator Corporation of Rochester, New York.

A loosely compacted, continuous fibrous web is formed by utilizing the above-described air-laying equipment, and the continuous fibrous web is then sprayed with water and passed through a nip defined between a pair of rolls. At least one of the rolls has a raised pattern on the periphery thereof for embossing the continuous air-laid web to form compressed valleys separated by uncompressed ridges extending over the entire elongate extent of said continuous air-laid web. The mositure content in the web aids in ensuring that the embossed pattern which is impressed into the continuous air-laid web is retained therein. Adhesive is then applied to opposed surfaces of the embossed web to provide strenth and abrasion resistance to said web. Preferably the adhesives utilized are the self-crosslinkable acrylic latices; however, other adhesives which provide the required degree of strength and abrasion resistance can be utilized. The continuous web is then passed through a heating oven in which it is dried and the adhesive is cured to form the facing and backing cover layer material 14 and 16. The above-described facing and backing cover layers 14 and 16, and their method of manufacture are described in detail in United States patent application, Ser. No. 23,752, which was hereinbefore incorporated by reference.

If desired, a fluid impervious, thin plastic backing layer can either be secured to the exposed surface of the backing cover layer 16, or can be utilized in place of the backing cover layer 16 to provide an outer exposed member through which body fluids cannot pass. A throw-away diaper of this invention which is provided with a fluid impervious backing layer can be utilized without any protective garments, such as rubber, or plastic pants, which are presently required when utilizing conventional cloth diapers. The facing cover layer 14 must be fluid-pervious in order to permit the passage of body fluids into the underlying absorbent pad 12. in the preferred embodiment of this invention the facing cover layer 14, in addition to being fluidpervious, will retain urine therein to cooperate with the absorbent pad 12 in providing an extremely effective moisture absorbing and retaining throw-away diaper.

The elongate absorbent pad 12 is preferably comprised of a fluff batt of cellulosic fibers, such as wood pulp fibers of a short paper-making length less than one-fourth inch. This fluff batt can be formed on any suitable batt forming equipment, such as a Joa Fiberizer which is manufactured by Joa, Inc., of North Wales, Florida. The absorbentpad 12 has a forward end margin 24and a rearward end margin 26 interconnected by opposed, curved side margins 28, 30 to define a contoured absorbent pad of substantially hour glass configuration having a reduced width region adapted to be positioned within the crotch and thighencircling region. This contoured configuration reduces the stresses which are applied to the fluff batt during use of the diaper 10 to thereby prevent the fluff batt from breaking up into separated clumps of fibers which would impair the fluid absorbing capability of said fluff batt.

Referring to FIG. 3, the absorbent pad 12 is com prised of a fluff batt of cellulosic fibers having a forward elongate region 32, a rearward elongate region 34 and a middle elongate region 36, and each of these regions constitutes approximately one-third of the elongate dimension of the absorbent pad 12. It is known that urine emitted by girl babies is initially directed toward the middle region of a diaper; therefore, the ab sorbent pad 12 is profiled to provide the greatest weight of fibers in the middle elongate region 36. Merely placing the greatest weight of fibers in the region of the diaper which initially receives the impingement of urine does not prevent excessive urine leakage from the diaper. Applicant has discovered that the urine which is impinged on the middle region (which is the region of greatest fiber weight) tends to strike completely through the thickness of the fluff batt in said middle region without diffusing along a substantial area of said fluff batt, i.e. large areas of the fluff batt remain dry, and are therefore not utilized to retain urine.

Applicant has discovered that the absorbent pad 12 performs best when an embossed pattern is impressed into the middle elongate region 36 and also into the forward and rearward elongate regions 32 and 34, respectively. The embossed pattern is impressed into the facing cover layer 14 and the underlying absorbent pad 12 to form substantially identical embossed patterns in both the absorbent pad 12 and said facing cover layer 14.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 3, the embossed pattern includes substantially identical patterns in the forward elongate region 32 and the rearward elongate region 34 of the absorbent pad 12. These identical embossed patterns are comprised of compressed valleys defined by a first set of spaced, elongate channels 38 extending for substantially the entire elongate extent of said forward and rearward elongate regions, and extending partially into the middle elongate region 36.. These identical embossed patterns further include a second set of spaced, elongate channels 40 extending transverse to, and intersecting the first set of channels. The elongate channels 38 and 40 preferably are disposed in a straight line; however, other patterns, such as zig-zag, or wavy patterns can be utilized. The intersecting areas of the sets of channels can be compressed in a circular, square, or other geometric configuration.

The embossed pattern in the middle elongate region 36 includes valleys in the form of uniformly spaced, substantially circular, compressed islands 42 defining uncompressed ridges 44 therearoumd. The ratio of the area of compressed islands 42 in the middle region 36 to the total area of said middle region is less than the ratios of the areas of the compressed sets of channels 38 and 40 in each of the forward and rearward regions, to the total area of the respective forward and rearward regions. In one preferred embodiment of this invention the percentage surface area of the compressed regions 42 in the middle elongate region is approximately 6 percent, and the percentage surface area of the compressed sets of channels 38 and 40 in the forward and rearward elongate regions is between approximately 13 to 20 percent. The circular, compressed islands 42 in the middle elongate region 36 prevents excessive strike-through by aiding in dispersing urine along sub stantially the entire extent of the fluff batt. Since the compressed islands 42 account for only a small percentage of the surface area of the middle region 36, these compressed regions do not unduly detract from i the high absorptive capacity of the middle elongate region which results from having the greatest weight of fibers therein. Ithas been found, quite surprisingly, that the compressed islands 42 cooperate with the sets of channels 38 and 40, to direct urine as effectively as a fluff batt in which the compressed islands 42 are replaced by a greater percentage of compressed valleys in the form of sets of channels 38 and 40. The elongate channels 38 extend into the middle elongate region 36 to direct excessive urine in an elongate direction from the middle region into the forward and rearward elongate regions, and the transverse channels 40 direct the urine in a transverse direction between side margins 28 and 30 of the forward and rearward elongate regions.

The above-described profiled, embossed fluff batt provides for an extremely efficient utilization of fibrous material in absorbing urine in the throw-away diaper 10. Applicant is not aware of any suggestion in the prior art of providing an embossed, profiled fluff batt in throw-away diapers; and accordingly, applicant is not aware of any suggestion in the prior art of providing the specific embossed, profiled pattern in a profiled fluff batt as described above.

The fluid absorbing capacity of the throw-away diaper 10 is enhanced by the fact that the facing cover layer 14 is a fibrous web which both retains urine, to act as an absorbent component in cooperation with the elongate absorbent pad 12, and passes quantities of urine into the absorbent pad 12 which it is unable to retain. The facing cover layer 14 preferably is provided with an overall embossed pattern as described above in connection with its method of manufacture. This overall embossed pattern provides a fluid wicking function to direct urine along a substantial area of the facing cover layer to utilize most effectively the fluid absorbing capabilities of said facing cover layer. In addition, this overall embossed pattern cooperates with the embossed pattern impressed into the facing cover layer and underlying absorbent pad 12 to aid in directing fluid along substantially the entire extent of the absorbent pad.

The profiled, contoured absorbent pad 12 is disposed between the facing cover layer 14 and the backing cover layer 16. The facing and backing cover layers 14 and 16 are secured to each other by any suitable securing means such as adhesive stripes or tacks disposed between facing surfaces of said facing and backing cover layers lying outside the region of the absorbent pad 12. The embossed pattern which is impressed into the facing cover layer and fluff batt, in addition to directing urine flow in the fluff batt, serves to stabilize the fluff batt within the facing and backing cover layers.

The following example is illustrative of a preferred form of a girl throw-away diaper l0, and of some of the benefits obtained by said girl diaper. It is understood that different size diapers can be made according to this invention, and that fluff batts of different weight distribution can be utilized depending upon the specific use of the diaper, i.e. daytime use, nighttime use, toddler use, infant use, etc.

Example A throw-away diaper 10 according to this invention has a profiled, contoured, absorbent pad disposed between a facing and backing layer of the embossed structure described above. The facing layer is approximately 16 inches in length and 14 inches wide. The backing layer has a length which exceeds that of thefacing layer by approximately 3 inches, i.e. 19 inches total length, to provide a 1% inch overlap at the op posed ends of the diaper to form end panels 20 and 22. The fluff batt has an elongate dimension of 12 inches, and is contoured in a substantially hour-glass shaped configuration to provide a minimum width in the center thereof of approximately 3 inches. The maximum width of the absorbent pad at the opposed elongate ends thereof is 7 inches. The forward and rearward one-third regions of the absorbent pad have 5 grams of fibrous material therein, and the middle one-third region has 10 grams therein.

Four diapers each of the following constructions were prepared:

I. No additional embossed pattern impressed into the fluff batt through the facing cover layer.

II. Compressed sets of channels 38 and 40 impressed into the forward and rearward regions of the fluff batt through the facing cover layer. The middle region was left unembossed, and the sets of channels did not extend into the middle region of the fluff batt.

III. The same as II, with the addition of circular, compressed islands 42 impressed into the facing cover layer and the underlying fluff batt in the middle region of said fluff batt.

IV. The same as III with the exception that the compressed set of channels 38 extend approximately onehalf inch into the middle region of the fluff batt.

V. Compressed sets of channels 38 and 40 impressed into the facing cover layer and the underlying fluff batt in the forward, rearward and middle regions thereof. The compressed channels 38 and 40 in the above samples comprise straight lines having approximately a one-sixteenth inch width. The compressed lines are spaced on approximately thirteen-sixteenths inch centers, and the intersections of the sets of channels are defined by one-fourth inch diameter circular compressed regions. The compressed islands 42 are substantially circular and are approximately one-fourth inch in diameter. These islands are disposed in transversely extending rows, with the islands in each row being transversely offset midway between the islands of an adjacent row. The islands within each row are spaced on linch centers, and the spacing between adjacent rows in approximately three-eighths inch.

Fifty cubic centimeters of water was emptied from a buret in approximately 60 seconds directly onto the middle region of each of the diapers, i.e. the region containing the greatest weight of fibers therein. Three minutes after the water was emptied onto the diaper the facing cover layer was peeled off of the fluff batt, and the area of fluid spread on the fluff batt was measured. In addition, the area of fluid spread along the backing cover layer was also measured. Averages of the four diapers of each sample were calculated and these averages are reported in the following table:

SAMPLES AREA OF FLUID SPREAD (in) I II III IV V Along the upper surface of fluff batt 1.98 1.6 15.5 26.6 24.4 Along backing cover layer 27.0 25.8 12.1 14.4 10.2

As can be seen from the above results, the samples which did not contain any embossed pattern in the middle region of the fluff batt (I and II) did not effectively spread urine along the fluff batt. In addition, substantial urine strike-through occured "through the backing cover layer as indicated by the high values of surface area spread on the backing cover layer. Samples III, IV and V had approximately the same area of fluid spread on the backing cover layer, and this area of fluid spread was substantially less than that encountered in samples I and II. This suggests that the embossing of the middle region affects the fluid wicking characterisitics along the fluff batt to prevent excessive strikethrough of fluid. In addition, Sample IV, which contained the compressed channels 38 extending partially into the middle region of the fluff batt, wicked fluid substantially better than a diaper in which the compressed channels 38 did not extend into the middle region (Sample III). In fact, the area of fluid spread along the fluff batt was greater in Sample IV, wherein a dot pattern was included in the middle region than in Sample V, wherein the compressed sets of channels 38 and 40 extended completely along the forward, rearward and middle regions of the fluff batt.

The above test was conducted on a substantially flat diaper, and therefore, the specific values obtained may not validly represent the values which would be obtained when the diaper is in use. However, the above testing procedure I is believed to reliably indicate the relative values of area of fluid spread which one would expect in utilizing the diapers of the above five constructions. Therefore, the test procedure utilized above is believed to clearly indicate the desirability of providing an embossed pattern in all regions of a profiled fluff batt, and furthermore, is believed to indicate the desirability of extending the compressed channels 38 into the middle region of greatest fiber weight to aid in spreading urine along the fluff batt to effectively utilize the absorbent material of said fluff batt. Furthermore, it is more desirable to utilize uniformly spaced, substantially circular compressed islands 42 in the middle region of the diaper, than it is to utilize the sets of embossed channels 38 and 40 in said region, since the compressed islands constitute a smaller percentage of the surface area of the middle region than the compressed sets of channels, and therefore, will not adversely affect the fluid storing capabilities of the middle region as greatly as would the sets of compressed channels.

Referring now to FIGS. 4-7, a throw-away diaper 10a specifically constructed for use by a boy baby has an elongate absorbent pad 12a which is different from the elongate absorbent pad 12 of the first embodiment. The facing cover layer 14a and backing cover layer 16a form a covering envelope which is identical to the covering envelope formed by the facing and backing cover layers 14 and 16 of the throw-away diaper 10. The backing and facing cover layers 14a and 16a cooperate with the absorbent pad 12a, in the same manner as the covering envelope cooperates with the absorbent pad 12 in the throw-away diaper l0, and a fluid impervious, thin plastic backing layer can be provided in the throwaway diaper 10a in the same manner as in the throwaway diaper 10.

Referring to FIG. 5, the absorbent pad 12a comprises a main fluff batt 50 and a secondary fluff batt 52. The

main fluff batt 50 has an elongate dimension defined between spaced forward and rearward end margins 54 and 56, respectively. The facing and backing cover layers 14a and 16a extend beyond the forward end margin 54 of the main fluff batt to define a forward marginal region 55 of the throw-away diaper 10a in which the secondary fluff batt 52 is disposed. This secondary fluff batt 52 is spaced from the forward and margin 54 of the main fluff batt 50 to define a transversely extending region 58 having a lower bulk than the transversely regions of said diaper including the main and secondary fluff batts to define a transverse fold line along which the forward marginal region 55 can be infolded to superimpose the secondary fluff batt 52 over the forward section of the main fluff batt 50 (FIGS. 6 and 7). If desired, a single fluff batt can be provided with a transverse compressed line to define the main and secondary fluff batts on opposed sides thereof; the compressed line constituting the low bulk region along which the diaper can be infolded.

Referring to FIG. 5, the main flulff batt 50 is profiled to define a forwardelongate region 32a, a rearward elongate region 34a and a middle elongate region 36a, each of which constitutes approximately one-third of the elongate extent of said main fluff batt 50. It is known that a boy baby initially directs urine to the forward region of a diaper; therefore, themain fluff batt 50 is profiled to provide a greater weight of fibers in the forward elongate region 32a than in the rearward and middle regions 34a and 36a, to provide a greater weight of fibers in the region wherein the greatest absorptive capacity is required. The rearward elongate region 34a has the least weight of fibers because it is intended to absorb primarily the moisture content contained in the fecal matter, and is not relied upon to retain a large volume of urine. The secondary fluff batt 52 has substantially the same weight of fibers as the middle elongate region 36a, and is approximately one-half of the elongate extent of the forward elongate region 32a of the main fluff batt 50.

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, an embossed pattern is impressed into the facing layer 14a and the underlying absorbent pad 12a in the regions of the forward elongate region 32a, the middle elongate region 36a and the rearward elongate region 340. The embossed pattern in the middle and rearward elongate regions is comprised of compressed valleys defined by a first set of spaced, elongate channels 38a extending for substantially the entire elongate extent of said rearward and middle elongate regions, and only partially into the forward elongate region 32a. This embossed pattern further includes a second set of spaced, elongate channels 40a I extending transverse to, and intersecting the first set of channels in both the rearward and middle elongate regions for directing urine transversely along said fluff batt. The sets of channels 38a and 40a are identical to the sets of channels 38 and 40 in the girl throw-away diaper 10. The embossed pattern in the forward elongate region 32a includes valleys in the form of spaced, substantially circular, compressed Islands 420 defining uncompressed regions 44a therearound. These islands 42a are identical to the islands 42 of the girl throw away diaper 10.

The ratio of the area of compressed islands 42a in the forwardelongate region 32a to the total area of said forward elongate region isless than the ratios of the area of the compressed sets of channels 38a and 40a in each of the forward and rearward elongate regions to total area of the respective forward and rearward regions. In one preferred embodiment of this invention the percentage surface area of the compressed islands 42a in the forward elongate region is approximately 6 percent, and the percentage surface area of the compressed sets of channels 38a and 40a in the rearward and middle elongate regions is between 13-20 percent. The circular compressed islands 42a, and the sets of compressed channels 38a and 40a perform the same function in their respective sections as the circular, compressed islands 42 and the sets of compressed channels 38 and 40 perform in their respective sections of the absorbent pad 12. In the preferred embodiment of this invention, the secondary fluff batt 52 also is provided with the elongate and transverse channels 38a and 40a, respectively, to aid in directing fluid along said secondary fluff batt.

The main fluff batt 50 has a contour defined by shaped side margins 28a and 30a to define a reduced width in the region of said main fluff batt which is adapted to be disposed within the crotch and thighencircling areas during use. This contoured configuration reduces the stresses which are applied to the main fluff batt during use to thereby prevent said main fluff batt from breaking up into separated clumps of fibers which would impair the fluid absorbing capability of said fluff batt.

The throw-away diaper a is intended for use with its forward marginal region 55 infolded, as indicated in FIGS. 6 and 7, to a position wherein the secondary fluff batt 52 is disposed in overlying relationship with the forward elongate region 32a of the main fluff batt 50. This infolded arrangement provides the two-fold function of placing a greater quantity of absorbent material in the forward area of the diaper where it is needed for absorbing urine emitted by a boy baby; and of providing a damlike structure which acts as a physical impediment to the escape of urine directed at the forward end of the diaper. The urine will tend to be blocked by the stepped configuration resulting from the infolding of the forward marginal region 55 of the diaper about its transverse fold line 58, as indicated in FIG. 7.

The following example describes a preferred form of a boy throw-away diaper 10a according to this invention, and is intended as illustrative only. It is understood that different size diapers can be made according to this invention, and that fluff batts of different weight distribution can be utilized depending upon the specific use of the diaper, i.e. daytime use, nighttime use, toddler use, infant use, etc.

Example A main fluff batt and secondary fluff batt are disposed between a facing cover layer and a backing cover layer made in the manner indicated above. The facing cover layer has an elongate dimension of 17 inches and a width-wise dimension of 14 inches. The backing cover layer has an elongate dimension of 19-34 inches to provide a l-% inch overlapof the facing cover layer at each end thereof to form the end panels 20 and 22. The main fluff batt has an elongate dimension of 12 inches and has forward, rearward, and middle elongate regions, each of which has an elongate dimension of 4 inches. The middle elongate region has a reduced transverse dimension defining a 3 inch minimum width of the main absorbent batt. The forward region of the main fluff batt is substantially rectangular and has a width of approximately 5 inches. The rearward region of the main fluff batt is substantially square having a width-wise dimension of 4 inches. The secondary fluff batt is spaced approximately one-fourth inch from the forward region of the main fluff batt and has 4.3 grams of fibrous material therein. The forward region of the main fluff batt has 8.6 grams of fibers therein, the middle region of the main fluff batt has 4.3 grams of fibers therein and the rearward region of the main fluff batt has 2.8 grams of fibers therein. The embossed pattern impressed into the facing cover layer is identical to that described with respect to the girl throw-away diaper 10.

The profiled fluff batts of this invention include fluff batts having a region of greatest fiber weight which is thicker and/or denser than other regions thereof. When the density of the entire profiled fluff batt is substantially uniform, the region of greatest fiber weight will be the thickest region of the fluff batt. When the thickness of the entire profiled fluff batt is substantially uniform, the region of greatest fiber weight will be the densest region of the fluff batt.

Referring to FIGS. 8, 8A and 9, an apparatus is shown for forming the profiled, contoured, absorbent pads 12 utilized in the throw-away diaper 10 for use by girl babies. This apparatus 100 is the invention of Charles G. Kolbach, and will be covered in a later filed patent application.

Referring to FIG. 8, a fiberizing section 101 includes a rotary lickerin roll 102 disposed within a formation chamber 103. The lickerin roll 102 is of conventional design, and comprises a plurality of teeth disposed about the outer periphery thereof for doffing individual fibers from sheets of pulp lap 104 and 104' and entraining said fibers in an airstream. The fibers which are entrained in the airstream are directed into discrete compartments 120 of a formation belt assembly 106 within the formation chamber 103 by a pressure differential created through the compartments I20 by pad-forming vacuum boxes 108, 110 and 112 disposed under, and in close proximity to an upper run 114 of the formation belt assembly 106. The formation belt assembly 106 is trained about spaced support rolls 1 09 and 11 l, at least one of which is driven to drive the formation belt assembly through the formation chamber 103 in the direction indicated by arrow 107.

If desired, only one of the sheets 104, 104' can be fed into the fiberizing section. Also, the fiberizing section 101 can be relocated to the position shown in dotted representation at 101'. Alternatively, a second fiberizing section can be located at 101', and two fiberizing sections can be utilized in forming the profiled, conwith spaced openings 113 adjacent end margins thereof to cooperate with pins (not shown) on the belt assembly support rolls 109 and 111. The fluid impervious belt 118 is preferably made of a semi-conductive material which dissipates static charges developed during the pad-forming operation. Each compartment 120 has a lower surface which is defined by the open mesh conveyor belt 116 (FIGS. 8A and 9), and the absorbent pads 12 are formed with their elongate dimension extending transverse to the direction of feed of the formation belt assembly 106.

Profiling masks 122, 124 and 126 are disposed over the pad-forming vacuum boxes 108, 110 and 112, re spectively, between said pad-forming vacuum boxes and the open mesh conveyor belt 116. The profiling mask 122 has an open mesh, air-pervious center elon gate region 122a, and air-impervious and elongate re gions 122b and 1220. The profiling mask 124 also has an open mesh, air-pervious center elongate region 124a, and air-impervious end elongate regions l24b and 124a. The profiling mask 126 has an air-impervious center elongate region 126a, and open mesh, airpervious end elongate regions'l26b and 1260.

The individual pad-forming vacuum boxes 108, 110 and 112 are connected to an exhaust fan, or similar exhaust device (not shown), through connecting conduits 127 (only one of which is shown inFlG. 9). Each connecting conduit 127 can be provided with a suitable valve therein to control the volume of air which is pulled through its respective vacuum box. Alternatively, the valves can be omitted and separate exhaust fans can be connected to each of the vacuum boxes.

In operation, the formation belt assembly 106 moves sequentially over the profiling masks 122, 124 and 126 in the direction indicated by arrow 107. The airsuspension of fibers is pulled into the compartments 120 by each of the vacuum boxes causing the fibers to be deposited on the conveyor belt 116, as the air which carries said fibers is pulled through the conveyor belt.

The elongate, middle region 36 of each absorbent pad 12 is formed in the center region of each compartment 120, and this region is aligned with the center regions 122a, 124a and 126a of the profiling masks 122, 124 and 126, respectively. The forward and rearward regions 132 and 134 of each absorbent pad 12 is formed in the end regions of each compartment 120, and these end regions are aligned with the end regions of each of the profiling masks 122, 124 and 126, respectively. Therefore, the air-suspension of fibers is directed into the center region of each compartment to form the middle, elongate region 36 of each absorbent pad 12 ad each compartment 120 passes over the profiling masks 122 and 124 and the underlying vacuum boxes 108 and 110, respectively, since this is the only region of each compartment 120 through which air is pulled by the operation of vacuum boxes 108 and 110. The airsuspension of fibers is directed into the end regions of each compartment 120 to form the forward and rearward elongate regions 132 and 136 of each absorbent pad 12 as each compartment 120 passes over the profiling mask 126 since the end regions are the only ones through which air is directed by operation of the vacuum box 112. Since the center region of each compartment 120 is exposed to the pressure differential created by the operation of the. vacuum boxes for a greater length of time than the end regions of each compartment, a greater weight of fibers will be deposited in'the center region than in the end regions to form the profiled elongate, absorbent pads 12.

Referring to FIG. 10, absorbent pads 12a are manufactured by substituting in apparatus 100 the formation belt assembly 106 for the formation belt assembly 106, and substituting profiling masks 122', 12' and 126' for the profiling masks 122, 124 and 126, respectively. The formation belt assembly 106' includes a relatively thin, open mesh conveyor belt 116' to which is laminated a relatively thick (e.g. approximately one-half inch) fluid-impervious belt 118'. The conveyor belt 116' is identical to conveyor belt 116, and the fluidimpervious belt 118 differs from the fluidimpervious belt 118 by having sections removed therefrom to define a plurality of sets of compartments; each set comprising transversely aligned main and secondary compartments 120' and 120". The main compartments 120' have a contour corresponding to the contour of the main fluff batt 50 of the absorbent pad 12a, and the secondary compartments 120 have a contour corresponding to thevcontour of the secondary fluff batt 52 of the absorbent pad 12a. Each set of compartments is spaced from an adjacent set of compartments in the direction of feed of the formation belt which is indicated by the arrow 107'.

The profiling mask 122 is disposed over'the padforming vacuum box 108, and is comprised of four discrete regions 122a, 1221;, 1220' and 122d. The regions 122a and 122d are of an open mesh construction, and are therefore permeable to the passage of air which is pulled therethrough by an exhaust fan, or similar exhaust device (not shown), which is connected through a conduit (not shown) to the vacuum box 108. The air-pervious region 122a is in alignment with the center region of each main compartment 120' in which the middle elongate region 36a of the main fluff batt 50 is formed, and the air-pervipus region 122d is in alignment with each secondary'compartment 120", as the formation belt assembly 106' is passed over the vacuum box 108 in the direction indicated by arrow 107 Therefore, as each set of compartments 120' and 120" passes over the vacuum box 108, the air-usspension of fibers in the formation chamber 103 is directed into the center region of the main compartment 120', and into the secondary compartment 120" to deposit the fibers on the mesh conveyor belt 116'.

The profiling mask 124' has only one region 124a which is of an open mesh construction and is pervious to air; the remaining regions being impervious to air. This region 124a is in alignment with the end region of each compartment 120' in which the forward elongate region 32a of the main fluff batt 50 is formed. As each set of compartments 120' and 120" pass over the vacuum box the air-suspension of fibers in the formation chamber 103 is directed into the end region of the main compartment to form the forward elongate region 32a of the main fluff batt 50. Since the forward elongate region 32a of the diaper is required to have a greater weight of fibers therein than the other regions of the absorbent pad 12a, a greater volume of air is pulled through vacuum box 110 than through vacuum boxes 108 and 112 byv appropriately adjusting valves (not shown) which are disposed in the conduits 127 which interconnect the exhaust fan, or similar exhaust device, to the vacuum boxes.

The'profiling mask 126 has only one region 126a which is of an open mesh construction and therefore pervious to air; the remaining regions of this profiling mask being impervious to air. The air-pervious region 126a is aligned with the end region of the main compartment 120 in which the rearward region 34a of the main fluff batt 50 is formed. Since the weight of fibers disposed in the rearward region 34a is less than the weight of fibers contained in the other regions of the absorbent pads 12a, the least volume of air is pulled through vacuum box 112.

In operation, as each set of compartments passes over the vacuum box 108,, and its superimposed profiling mask 122, the center region 36a of the main fluff batt 50 and the secondary fluff batt 52 are formed with the same weight of fibers therein. As each set of compartments passes over the vacuum box 110, and its superimposed profiling mask 124', the forward elongate region 320 of the main fluff batt 50 is formed, andas each set of compartments passes over the vacuum box 112, and its superimposed profiling mask 126, the rearward region 34a of the main fluff batt is formed.

Referring to FIGS. 9 and 10, each profiling mask is provided with a handle 130, or other similar grasping means, adjacent one end thereof to permit easy removal of each profiling mask when it is desired to substitute a different profiling mask therefor or run the apparatus 200 without a profiling mask. By substituting or omitting profiling masks, the apparatus 100 can be utilized to form many different varieties of absorbent pads.

In manufacturing both the throw-away diapers 10 for use by girl babies and the throw-away diapers 10a for use by boy babies, the method and apparatus for positioning formed absorbent pads between a facing cover layer and a backing cover layer is identical. Therefore, the following description will be limited to the method of positioning the formed absorbent pads 12 between the facing cover layer 14 and backing cover layer 16 in manufacturing the throw-away diapers 10 for use by girl babies.

Referring to FIGS. 8 and 8A, the formed absorbent pads 12, in the form of fluff batts of cellulosic fibers,

. have an exposed upper surface 140 which is leveled by the teeth, or bristles, of a rotating spinnerette 142 disposed at the exit end of the formation chamber 103. The absorbent pads 12 are then fed about the formation belt assembly support roll 109 where they are contacted by the locking cover layer 16. This backing cover layer 16 cooperates with the mesh conveyor belt 116 to confine the absorbent pads within the compartments 120. The backing cover layer 16 is moved in synchronism with the formation belt 106 by drive means (not shown) to a position where it is in contact with the upper run 144 of a transfer conveyor 146. The backing cover layer 16, and the overlying absorbent pads 12 are fed over a transfer vacuum box 148 disposed directly under the upper run 144 of the transfer conveyor 146. The vacuum applied through the vacuum box 148 creates a pressure differential across the fluff batt 12 to transfer allegiance of the fluff batt from the lower run of the formation belt assembly 106 to the upper run 144 of the transfer conveyor 146. This vacuum can be pulled through the backing cover layer 16 since said backing cover layer is air-pervious; however, the fluff batt is relatively thick, and prevents the air drawn through the vacuum box from being drawn easily through the fluff batt to thereby create the abovedescribed pressure'differential. This pressure differential is maintained on the fluff batt as the formation belt assembly 106 passes around the formation belt assembly support roll 111 to separate the lower run of the formation belt assembly 106 from the upper run of the transfer conveyor 146. The absorbent pads 12 are positioned on the backing cover layer 16 as the backing 1 is superimposed over the spaced absorbent pads l2 downstream of the adhesive station 150 to form a composite structure consisting of the absorbent pads 12 and the facing and backing cover layers 14 and '16. The composite structure is then fed to subsequent finishing stations (not shown) whereat the individual throwaway diapers are formed.

The apparatus has been disclosed to clearly indicate a method in which contoured, profiled absorbent fluff batts are formed in manufacturing the throw-away diapers 20 and 10a of this invention. It is understood that converting equipment for positioning the fluff batts between facing and backing cover layers to form a composite structure, and forming complete individual diapers from the composite structure is well within the purview of one skilled in the art, and therefore, a complete disclosure of this converting equipment has been omitted from this application.

What is claimed is:

1. An absorbent pad comprising an elongate, absorbent section of cellulosic fibers having opposed major surfaces, said absorbent section having predetermined regions of different fiber weight wherein the greatest weight of fibers is included in a predetermined region where it is most needed to retain body fluids; said absorbent section having an embossed pattern in at least one major surface thereof, said embossed pattern defining a plurality of ridges and valleys disposed in both said predetermined region of greatest fiber weight and in said other predetermined regions, the density of said batt in said valleys being greater than the density of said batt in said ridges; the pattern of valleys in the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight being different than the pattern of valleys in the other predetermined regions such that the percentage of the area of said predetermined region of greatest fiber weight constituted by valleys is less than the percentage of the area of the other predetermined regions which is constituted by valleys.

2. The absorbent pad according to claim 1, wherein said absorbent section comprises a fluff batt of cellulosic fibers having a transverse dimension defined between spaced, elongate side margins, at least a portion of said side margins being recessed to define a narrow crotch region.

3. The absorbent pad according to claim 2, wherein said predetermined regions? are aligned with each other in the elongate direction of said fluff batt.

4. the absorbent pad according to claim 3, wherein said fluff batt has an elongate dimension defined between forward and rearward end margins; said fluff batt having a forward elongate region terminating at one end adjacent said forward end margin. a rearward elongate region terminating at one end adjacent said rearward end margin and a middle elongate region disposed between said forward and rearward regions; the weight of fibers in one of said forward and middle regions comprising the predetermined region of' greatest fiber weight.

5. The absorbent pad according to claim 4, wherein at least some of said valleys bridge the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight with the regions adjacent thereto.

6. the absorbent pad according to claim 4, wherein the weight of fibers within each of said predetermined regions is substantially uniform over substantially the entire extent of said respective region.

7.The absorbent pad according to claim 6, wherein the elongate dimension of said forward, middle and rearward elongate regions is substantially the same,

each comprising substantially one-third of the elongate dimension of said fluff batt.

8. The absorbent pad according to claim 4 adapted for use as an absorbent component in a throw-away diaper for use by a boy baby, wherein said forward region is the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight.

9. the absorbent pad according to claim 8, wherein the embossed pattern includes valleys comprising a first set of spaced, elongate channels extending substantially in the elongate direction of said batt and for substantially the entire elongate dimension of said rearward and middle regions of said batt and only partially into said forward region of said batt.

10. The absorbent pad according to claim 9, wherein the embossed pattern further includes valleys comprising substantially uniformly spaced compressed islands in said forward region, and valleys comprising a second set of spaced channels in said rearward and middle regions of said batt, each of said channels of said second set extending substantially transverse to the channels of said first set for directing fluids transversely along said batt.

ll. The absorbent pad according to claim 4 adapted for use as an absorbent component in a throw-away diaper for use by a girl baby, wherein said middle region is the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight.

12. the absorbent pad according to claim 11, wherein the embossed pattern includes valleys comprising a first set of spaced, elongate channels extending substantially in the elongate direction of said fluff batt for substantially the entire elongate dimension of said rearward region and said forwardregion and only partially into said middle region. i

13. the absorbent pad accordingto claim 12, wherein the embossed pattern further includes valleys comprising substantially uniformly spaced compressed islands in said middle region, and valleys comprising a second set of spaced channels in said rearward and forward regions of said batt, each of said channels of said second set extending substantially transverse to the channels of said first set for directing fluids transversely along said batt.

14. A throw-away diaper having an elongate, absorbent fluff batt of cellulosic fibers disposed within a covering envelope which has a fluid pervious facing layer, said absorbent batt having a predetermined regions of differing fiber weight wherein the greatest weight of fibers is included in a predetermined region where it is most needed to retain body fluids; a first embossed pat mined regions, the density of said batt in said valleys being greater than the density of said batt in said ridges; the pattern of valleys in the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight being different than the pattern of valleys. in the order predetermined regions such that the percentage of the area of the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight which is constituted by valleys is less than the percentage of the area of the other predetermined regions which is constituted by valleys.

15. The throw-away diaper according to claim 14, wherein said absorbent batt has an elongate dimension defined between forward and rearward end margins, said batt having a forward elongate region terminating at one end adjacent said forward end margins, a rearward elongate region terminating at one end adjacent said rearward end margin and a middle elongate region disposed between said forward and rearward regions, the weight of fibers in one of said forward and middle regions comprising the predetermined region of great est fiber weight.

16. a throw-away diaper according to claim 15 for use by a girl baby, wherein said middle region is the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight.

17. The throw-away diaper according to claim 16, wherein said facing layer is comprised of a sheet of randomly arranged, intermingled, short cellulosic fibers and longer reinforcing synthetic fibers, said sheet having a second embossed pattern in the outer surface thereof for enhancing the flexibility and fluid directing characteristics of said sheet, said second embossed pattern being defined by a plurality of ridges and valleys extending over substantially the entire surface of said sheet, the density of the sheet in said valleys of said second embossed pattern being greater than the density of said sheet in said ridges of said second embossed pattern; and an adhesive network interconnecting fibers of said sheet for enhancing the strength and abrasion resistance of said sheet without destroying the flexibility thereof.

18. The throw-away diaper according to claim 17, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising a first set of spaced, elongate channels extending substantially inthe elongate direction of said fluff batt and for substantially the entire elongate dimension of said rearward region and said forward region and only partially into said middle region.

19. The throw-away diaper according to claim 18, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising substantially uniformly spaced compressed islands in said middleregion, and valleys comprising a second set of spaced channels in said rearward and forward regions of said fluff batt, each of said channels of said second set extending substantially transverse to the channels of said first set of directing body fluids transversely along said fluff batt.

20. A throw-away diaper according to claim 15 for use by a boy baby, wherein said forward region is the predetermined region of greatest fiber weight.

21. The. throw-away diaper according to claim 20, wherein said facing layer is comprised of a sheetof randomly arranged, intermingled short cellulosic fibers and longer reinforcing synthetic fibers, said sheet having a second embossed pattern in the outer surface thereof for enhancing the flexibility and fluid directing characteristics of said sheet, said second embossed pattern being defined by a plurality of ridges and valleys extending over substantially the entire surface of said sheet, the density of the sheet in said valleys of said secondembossed pattern being greater than the density of said sheet in said ridges of .said second embossed pattern; and an adhesive network interconnecting fibers of said sheet for enhancing the strength and abrasion resistance of said without destroying the flexibility thereof.

22. The throw-away diaper according to claim 21, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising a first set of spaced, elongate channels extending substantially in the elongate direction of said fluff batt and for substantially the entire elongate dimension of said rearward region and said middle region and only partially into said forward region.

23. The throw-away diaper according to claim 22, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising substantially uniformly spaced compressed islands in said forward region, and valleys comprising a second set of spaced channels in said rearward and middle regions of said fluff batt, each of said channels of said second set extending substantially transverse to the channels of said first set for directing body fluids transversely along said fluff batt.

24. The throw-away diaper according to claim 20, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising a first set of spaced, elongate channels extending substantially in the elongate direction of said fluff batt and for substantially the entire elongate dimension of said rearward region and said middle region and only partially into said forward region.

25. A throw-away diaper according to claim 24,

wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising substantially uniformly spaced compressed islands in said forward region, and valleys comprising a second set of spaced channels in said rearward and middle regions of said fluff batt, each of said channels of said second set extending substantially transverse to the channels of said first set for directing body fluids transversely along said fluff batt.

26. the throw-away diaper according to claim 16, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising a first set of spaced, elongate channels extending substantially in the elongate direction of said fluff batt and for substantially the entire elongate dimension of said rearward region and said forward region and only partially into said middle region.

27. The throw-away diaper according to claim 26, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising substantially uniformly spaced compressed islands in said middle region, and valleys comprising a second set of spaced channels in said rearward and forward regions of said flufl' batt, each of channels of said second set extending substantially transverse to the channels of said first for directing body fluids transversely along said fluff batt.

28. A throw-away diaper for use by a boy baby comprising an absorbent pad disposed within a covering envelope which has a fluid pervious facing layer; said absorbent pad comprising a main absorbent member and a secondary absorbent member, said main absorbent member having an elongate dimension defined between spaced forward and rearward margins, said covering envelope extending beyond the forward margin of said main absorbent member to define a forward marginal region, said secondary absorbent member being disposed in said forward marginal region within said covering envelope, said secondary absorbent member being separated from said main absorbent member by a transversely extending region having lower bulk than the transverse regions of said diaper which include said main and secondary absorbent members wherein said transverse region of lower bulk defines a transverse fold line region along which the forward marginal region can be infolded to superimpose said secondary absorbent member over said main absorbent member to increase the absorptive capacity in the superimposed region and to provide a physical impediment to the escape of urine through the forward end of the diaper.

29. the throw-away diaper according to claim 28, wherein said main absorbent member and said secondary absorbent member comprise fluff batts of cellulosic fibers.

30. The throw-away diaper according to claim 29, said main and secondary fluff batts being defined by separate fluff batts of cellulosic fibers, said secondary fluff batt being spaced forwardly of said main fluff batt to define the transverse fold line region between said main and secondary fluff batts.

31. The throw-away diaper according to claim 29, said main fluff batt and said secondary fluff batt being defined in a unitary fluff batt of cellulosic fibers and being separated form each other by a transversely extending compressed zone in said unitary fluff batt, said transversely extending compressed zone defining said transverse fold line region.

32. The throw-away diaper according to claim 29, wherein said main fluff batt has a forward elongate region terminating at one end adjacent said forward margin, a rearward elongate region terminating at one end adjacent said rearward margin and a middle elongate region disposed between said forward and rearward regions, the weight of fibers in said forward region being greater than the weight of fibers in the other two of said regions.

33. The throw-away diaper according to claim 32, wherein said covering envelope includes a backing layer and a facing layer, said facing and backing layer each comprising an elongate sheet having side margins extending beyond side margins of the main and secondary fluff batts and secured to each other in the regions which extend beyond said side margins of said fluff batts.

34. The throw-away diaper according to claim 33 fur ther comprising a first embossed pattern defining a plurality of superimposed ridges and superimposed valleys in said facing layer and in said forward, rearward and middle elongate regions of said main fluff batt, the density of said fluff batt in said valleys being greater than the density of said fluff batt in said ridges.

35. The throw-away diaper according to claim 34, wherein said facing sheet is comprised of randomly arranged, intermingled, short cellulosic fibers and longer reinforcing synthetic fibers, said facing sheet having a second embossed pattern in the outer surface thereof for enhancing the flexibility and fluid-directing characteristics of said sheet, said second embossed pattern being defined by a plurality of ridges and valleys extending over substantially the entire surface of said sheet, the density of the sheet in said valleys of said second embossed pattern being greater than the density of said sheet in said ridges of said second embossed pattern; and an adhesive network interconnecting fibers of embossed pattern in the forward region of the main fluff hint to the total area of said forward region is less than the ratio of the area of the valleys of said first embossed pattern in the middle region of the main fluff batt to the total area of said middle region, and is less than the ratio of the area of the valleys of said first embossed pattern in the rearward region of the main fluff batt to the total area of said rearward region.

37. The throw-away diaper according to claim 35, wherein the first embossed pattern includes valleys comprising a first set of spaced, elongate channels extending substantially in the elongate direction of said fluff batt and for substantially the entire elongate dimension of said rearward and middle regions and only partially into said forward region.

channels are impressed into the facing layer and underlying secondary fluff batt.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2788003 *Jun 6, 1955Apr 9, 1957Chicopee Mfg CorpDisposable absorbent pad
US2890700 *Feb 18, 1954Jun 16, 1959Ethel C Lonberg-HolmDisposable diaper
US3063452 *May 2, 1960Nov 13, 1962Modella Mfg Company IncInfant's garments
US3180335 *Jul 17, 1961Apr 27, 1965Procter & GambleDisposable diaper
US3211147 *Nov 1, 1962Oct 12, 1965Int Paper CanadaDisposable diaper pad
US3386442 *Mar 29, 1965Jun 4, 1968Sabee ReinhardtDisposable diaper
US3402715 *May 9, 1966Sep 24, 1968Johnson & JohnsonDiaper
US3498296 *Oct 3, 1966Mar 3, 1970Marion C GallagherDiaper panty and the like
US3592194 *Mar 5, 1969Jul 13, 1971Procter & GambleDiaper having improved wicking and dryness
US3612055 *Jan 29, 1970Oct 12, 1971Johnson & JohnsonDisposable diaper or the like and method of manufacture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3848598 *Jul 9, 1973Nov 19, 1974Johnson & JohnsonDisposable diaper with double contoured panel
US3860002 *May 14, 1973Jan 14, 1975Scott Paper CoAbsorbent articles
US3939240 *May 16, 1974Feb 17, 1976Scott Paper CompanyMethod for forming fibrous pads
US3973291 *May 31, 1974Aug 10, 1976Scott Paper CompanyMethod for forming fibrous pads
US3975222 *Aug 1, 1974Aug 17, 1976Johnson & JohnsonMethod of forming a fibrous web
US4016628 *Aug 12, 1974Apr 12, 1977Scott Paper CompanyMethod and apparatus for forming absorbent articles
US4027672 *Dec 29, 1975Jun 7, 1977Colgate-Palmolive CompanyAbsorbent article with improved pad and method
US4069822 *Oct 30, 1975Jan 24, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanyPorous fibrous web to a substrate and articles therefrom
US4336803 *Dec 17, 1979Jun 29, 1982Johnson & Johnson Baby Products CompanyShaped absorbent pad for disposable diapers
US4388056 *Jul 6, 1982Jun 14, 1983The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for continuously making an air-laid fibrous web having patterned basis weight distribution
US4585448 *Dec 19, 1984Apr 29, 1986Kimberly-Clark CorporationDisposable garment having high-absorbency area
US4666647 *Dec 10, 1985May 19, 1987Kimberly-Clark CorporationApparatus and process for forming a laid fibrous web
US4685915 *Apr 6, 1984Aug 11, 1987The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable diaper having density and basis weight profiled absorbent core
US4761258 *Dec 10, 1985Aug 2, 1988Kimberly-Clark CorporationControlled formation of light and heavy fluff zones
US4795452 *Sep 23, 1987Jan 3, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article having cantilevered cuff members
US4834735 *Jul 18, 1986May 30, 1989The Proctor & Gamble CompanyHigh density absorbent members having lower density and lower basis weight acquisition zones
US4861652 *Oct 13, 1987Aug 29, 1989Kimberly-Clark CorporationDiaper article with elasticized waist panel
US5047023 *Feb 11, 1991Sep 10, 1991The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent members having low density and basis weight acquisition zones
US5128193 *Sep 4, 1991Jul 7, 1992ChicopeeAbsorbent fibrous structure
US5300053 *Nov 4, 1991Apr 5, 1994Henry Dreyfuss AssociatesAbsorbent brief
US5300192 *Aug 17, 1992Apr 5, 1994Weyerhaeuser CompanyWet laid fiber sheet manufacturing with reactivatable binders for binding particles to fibers
US5308896 *Aug 17, 1992May 3, 1994Weyerhaeuser CompanyBinding superabsorbent particles to cellulose fibers, diapers
US5352480 *Aug 17, 1992Oct 4, 1994Weyerhaeuser CompanyHydrogen bonding
US5447977 *Nov 15, 1993Sep 5, 1995Weyerhaeuser CompanyParticle binders for high bulk fibers
US5451442 *Apr 19, 1993Sep 19, 1995Paragon Trade Brands, Inc.Absorbent panel structure for a disposable garment
US5538783 *Aug 17, 1992Jul 23, 1996Hansen; Michael R.Non-polymeric organic binders for binding particles to fibers
US5543215 *Aug 17, 1992Aug 6, 1996Weyerhaeuser CompanyFibers, superabsorbant particles with hydrogen bonding and binders
US5547541 *Feb 16, 1994Aug 20, 1996Weyerhaeuser CompanyAdding polymeric or nonpolymeric organic materials and inorganic materials to fibers, compressing, releasing pressure; disposable materials
US5547745 *Aug 17, 1993Aug 20, 1996Weyerhaeuser CompanySuperabsorbent polymer fibers
US5571618 *Jun 17, 1994Nov 5, 1996Weyerhaeuser CompanyReactivatable binders for binding particles to fibers
US5589256 *Aug 17, 1992Dec 31, 1996Weyerhaeuser CompanyParticle binders that enhance fiber densification
US5607759 *Aug 17, 1993Mar 4, 1997Weyerhaeuser CompanyParticle binding to fibers
US5609727 *Feb 7, 1994Mar 11, 1997Weyerhaeuser CompanyFibrous product for binding particles
US5611885 *Jun 7, 1995Mar 18, 1997Weyerhaeuser CompanyParticle binders
US5614570 *Apr 4, 1995Mar 25, 1997Weyerhaeuser CompanyAbsorbent articles containing binder carrying high bulk fibers
US5641561 *Aug 17, 1993Jun 24, 1997Weyerhaeuser CompanyParticle binding to fibers
US5672418 *Aug 17, 1993Sep 30, 1997Weyerhaeuser CompanyParticle binders
US5693411 *Aug 17, 1993Dec 2, 1997Weyerhaeuser CompanyFibers having water soluble particles adhered thereto with binder by hydrogen bonding
US5766388 *Mar 4, 1997Jun 16, 1998Mcneil-Ppc, Inc.Process for forming laminated absorbent structures having reduced delamination tendencies
US5789326 *Nov 19, 1996Aug 4, 1998Weyerhaeuser CompanyParticle binders
US5807364 *Apr 4, 1995Sep 15, 1998Weyerhaeuser CompanyBinder treated fibrous webs and products
US5833679 *Nov 18, 1996Nov 10, 1998Uni-Charm CorporationAbsorbent structure of sanitary article
US5998032 *Jul 5, 1996Dec 7, 1999Weyerhaeuser CompanyEnhancing agent molecules having at least one functional group capable of forming a hydrogen bond or a coordinate covalent bond with the superabsorbent material
US6069294 *Oct 11, 1994May 30, 2000PeadouceAn absorbent pad arranged between a liquid-impervious outer sheet and a liquid-permeable inner sheet for forming a nappy-pant and other sanitary products
US6071549 *Aug 6, 1998Jun 6, 2000Weyerhaeuser CompanyAttaching particles to fiber with salt of organic hydroxyacid; hybrid ionic bonding
US6159881 *Feb 28, 1997Dec 12, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Thermoformable barrier nonwoven laminate
US6222092Jul 21, 1997Apr 24, 2001Paragon Trade Brands, Inc.Disposable products
US6270893Mar 7, 1994Aug 7, 2001Weyerhaeuser CompanyFor absorbent atricles
US6340411Oct 7, 1998Jan 22, 2002Weyerhaeuser CompanyFibrous product containing densifying agent
US6391453 *Mar 4, 1998May 21, 2002Weyernaeuser CompanyBinder treated particles
US6395395Dec 6, 1999May 28, 2002Weyerhaeuser CompanyMethod and compositions for enhancing blood absorbence by superabsorbent materials
US6425979May 3, 2001Jul 30, 2002Weyerhaeuser CompanyCoating the absorber particles with the nonpolymeric glycol binder and activating; hydrogen binding to the cellulosic fibers and forming a web; compressing; easily densifying at a lower external pressure; materials handling
US6461553Jan 31, 1997Oct 8, 2002WeyerhaeuserMethod of binding binder treated particles to fibers
US6521087May 4, 2001Feb 18, 2003Weyerhaeuser CompanyCoating the absorber particles with the nonpolymeric glycol binder and activating; hydrogen binding to the cellulosic fibers and forming a web; compressing; easily densifying at a lower external pressure; materials handling
US6521339May 18, 2000Feb 18, 2003Weyerhaeuser CompanyDiol treated particles combined with fibers
US6596103Nov 1, 2000Jul 22, 2003Weyerhaeuser CompanyHaving hydrogen bonding functional sites; nonpolymeric binder comprising propylene glycol; cellulose fibers
US6627249Mar 18, 2002Sep 30, 2003Weyerhaeuser CompanyHydrogen bonding
US6890622Dec 20, 2001May 10, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Composite fluid distribution and fluid retention layer having selective material deposition zones for personal care products
US6921570 *Dec 21, 2001Jul 26, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Pattern unbonded nonwoven web and process for making same
US7018490May 7, 2003Mar 28, 2006Weyerhaeuser CompanyMethod of binding binder treated particles to fibers
US7067711 *Feb 14, 2005Jun 27, 2006Uni-Charm CorporationElongated absorbent article
US7144474Aug 15, 2000Dec 5, 2006Weyerhaeuser Co.Method of binding particles to binder treated fibers
US7276642Apr 1, 2005Oct 2, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Pattern unbonded nonwoven web and process for making same
US7291138 *Dec 12, 2003Nov 6, 2007Hakujuji Kabushiki KaishaDisposable absorbent article
US7807086 *Nov 14, 2004Oct 5, 2010Sca Hygiene Products AbMethod of strengthen a fibrous body for absorbent articles
US7824389Oct 24, 2003Nov 2, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Disposable absorbent undergarment for males
US8079994Apr 18, 2008Dec 20, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Disposable absorbent articles having gender-specific containment flaps
US8143177May 14, 2007Mar 27, 2012Uni-Charm CorporationNonwoven fabric
US8147472Nov 24, 2003Apr 3, 2012Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Folded absorbent product
US8153856 *Dec 28, 2007Apr 10, 2012Sca Hygiene Products AbAbsorbent article having absorbent core including regions of lower density
US8183431 *Jun 13, 2007May 22, 2012Uni-Charm CorporationAbsorbent body, multilayer absorbent body and absorbent article
US8211078 *Feb 17, 2005Jul 3, 2012The Procter And Gamble CompanySanitary napkins capable of taking complex three-dimensional shape in use
US8304600 *Jun 22, 2007Nov 6, 2012Uni-Charm CorporationAbsorbent article
USH1511 *Sep 10, 1992Dec 5, 1995Chappell; Charles W.Absorbent articles having improved longitudinal fluid movement
USRE29789 *Nov 20, 1975Oct 3, 1978Scott Paper CompanyAbsorbent articles for disposable diaper
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/374, 604/366, 604/375, 604/380, 19/148
International ClassificationA61L15/16, A61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/511, A61F13/15634, A61F13/15626, A61F13/49466, A61F13/532, A61F13/4915, D21H5/2607, A61F2013/5326, A61F13/491
European ClassificationA61F13/532, A61F13/494B, A61F13/491, A61F13/491A, A61F13/511, A61F13/15M3C, D21H5/26B, A61F13/15M3B