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Publication numberUS3767127 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1973
Filing dateDec 20, 1971
Priority dateDec 20, 1971
Publication numberUS 3767127 A, US 3767127A, US-A-3767127, US3767127 A, US3767127A
InventorsWood B
Original AssigneeWood B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Impact crusher
US 3767127 A
Abstract
An impact crusher having a circular housing with an upper feed tube extending through a cover portion. The feed tube directs material to be reduced to an impeller unit. The impeller unit includes impeller shoes supported between impeller discs which rotate at high speed, and rocks fed to the shoes are impelled by the shoes against outwardly located breaker plates. The impeller shoes are V-shaped in horizontal cross section with the point or apex of the V being directed inwardly toward the center of the impeller unit. The V-shaped impeller shoes have impelling surfaces on two sides thereof for operation in either direction of rotation of the impelling unit. The shoes are held in place by posts and are constructed of at least two plate-like parts disposed flatwise in surface engagement facilitating individual replacement or shifting around to prolong the life of the shoes in their entirety. In one embodiment, the impeller shoes have hardened inserts on the impelling surfaces thereof to provide minimum replacement.
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United States Patent [1 1 Wood Get. 23, 1973 IMPACT CRUSHER [76] Inventor: Bruce V. Wood, 6629 NE. 82nd,

Portland, Oreg. 97220 [22] Filed: Dec. 20, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 209,709

3,578,254 5/1971 Wood 241/275 Primary Examiner-Donald G. Kelly Assistant Examiner-Gary L. Smith Attorney-Eugene M. Eckelman [57] ABSTRACT An impact crusher having a circular housing with an upper feed tube extending through a cover portion. The feed tube directs material to be reduced to an impeller unit. The impeller unit includes impeller shoes supported between impeller discs which rotate at high speed, and rocks fed to the shoes are impelled by the shoes against outwardly located breaker plates. The impeller shoes are V-shaped in horizontal cross section with the point or apex of the V being directed inwardly toward the center of the impeller unit. The V- shaped impeller shoes have impelling surfaces on two sides thereof for operation in either direction of rotation of the impelling unit. The shoes are held in place by posts and are constructed of at least two plate-like parts disposed flatwise in surface engagement facilitating individual replacement or shifting around to prolong the life of the shoes in their entirety. In one embodiment, the impeller shoes have hardened inserts on the impelling surfaces thereof to provide minimum replacement.

5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures FIG.

: PAIENIEDumzs ms I Y W SHEET 10F 2 INVENTOR g BRUCE v. vvooD BY mm ATTY.

IMPACT CRUSI-IER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to new and useful improvements in impact type crus'hers.

In the impact type crusher, rocks are impelled against anvils or breaker elements by rotating impeller shoes. The rock load is in most cases extremely abrasive and hard to crush and impeller shoes and other parts require frequent replacement. Replacing these parts of course comprises an expensive procedure not only in the cost of the parts themselves but in the shut down time of the crusher apparatus. 4

Applicant has heretofore provided in his prior US. Pat. No. 3,652,023 an impeller shoe mechanism which comprised a substantial improvement over the art in that it facilitated easy installation of the impeller shoes to reduce replacement time to a minimum. The structure in such co-pending application also provided a mechanism which had a pair of rock impelling surfaces for operation of the impeller in either forward or reverse directions, thus allowing the impeller shoes to be worn from both sides before replacement was necessary.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A feature of the present invention is to provide improvements in the art and over the structurein applicant's US. Pat. No. 3,652,023 and also to provide in general a structure which has still greater efficiency of wear and ease of installation and replacement.

A more particular object of the present invention is I to provide an impeller structure employing impeller shoes which have a minimum mass of metal therein to reduce their cost but which at the same time have long life and operate efficiently. Such objective is accomplished by constructing the shoes with an open or V- shape with two faces thereof being arranged to sling rock.

Another object is to provide an impeller shoe for an impact type crusher which is formed of two or more parts disposed flatwise in-surface engagement, the parts having different thicknesses for selected relative positioning and repositioning to obtain maximum wear.

Still another object of the invention is to provide in an embodiment of the invention an impeller shoe for an impact type crusher which has hardened inserts embedded in its rock engaging surfaces to prolong the life of the impeller shoe.

Still another object is toprovide an impeller unit assembly for an impact type crusher which has a novel arrangement of impeller shoes, impeller discs, wear plates and protective rings which in their assemblage provide maximum protection and wear of the various parts. I

The invention will be better understood and additional objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which illustrate preferred forms of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevational view of the present invention with a central portion thereof being shown in section, taken on the line 11 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary plan view of an impeller unit portion of the invention, this view being taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 and being partly broken away;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 33 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing a modified form of impeller shoe.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Reference is now made to the drawings and first to FIG. 1. The present crusher comprises a circular housing having anenlarged peripheral extension 12 at the top. This extension has a bottom wall 14. A cover plate 16 is connected detachably to the housing by stud connections 18 and has a central feed tube 20 projecting therethrough for receiving rock from a hopper 22 or other means such as a conveyor. The bottom of the housing is open for discharge of crushed rock and is seated on a raised support 24,'shown in phantom, for discharge of the crushed material out the bottom.

Disposed in the housing 10 is a pulley enclosure 26 having a top protective wall 28. Enclosure 26 houses a plurality of pulleys 30 engaged by V-belts 32 having a drive engagement with motor driven pulleys not shown. The pulleys 30 are keyed or otherwise secured to a vertical shaft 34 projecting upwardly through the pulley enclosure and journaled in an upstanding bearing block 36 supported integrally on the pulley enclosure. The upper end of the shaft 34 is tapered at 38 and projects beyond the end of bearing block 36 for reception in a tapered bore 40 of a base member 42 having a roassembly having an outer ring 52 and a clamping core member 54. Ring 52 and core member 54 have a tapered interfitting engagement 56 and are secured to the base member 42 by means of a central stud 58 passing down through the core member 54 and threadedly engaging the shaft 34. The feed disc assembly just described rotates with the base 42, and the upper surfaces of the ring 52 and core member 54 generally taper down toward the outside whereby rock admitted through the feed tube 20 is delivered outwardly for movement through the crusher. The tapered connection between the ring 52 and core member 54 and the bolted connection of the latter with the shaft 34 provides easy replacement of one or the other, or both of the members 52 and 54.

Secured to the upper surface of the base member 42, as by welding, is an annular impeller disc or plate 62, also seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, on which is secured a plurality of upright posts or anchors 64. These posts are secured to the impeller disc 62 by welding or the like and also have a central bore 66 for receiving a bolt 68 which has threaded engagement 70 at its lower end with impeller disc 62.

Posts 64 provide anchoring means for impeller shoe assemblies 72. Four of such assemblies are shown, FIG.

2, but more or less may be used. Each impeller shoe assembly includes a pair of V-shaped members 72a and 72b supported in a horizontal plane and engageable with each other in a flat surface arrangement. The V- shape of the shoe parts forms a pair of leg portions meeting in an apex 74 and a rearwardly opening recess 75. Posts 64 are triangular in cross section and correspond in shape and size to the recess 75 of the V- shaped shoe parts for abutted engagement with two inner side surfaces of the post. That is, an apex portion of the triangularly shaped post 64 is directed inwardly toward the center of the impeller disc and fits in the recess of the V-shaped shoe parts. Since the shoe parts are held so that the apex or point 74 thereof is directed toward the center of the impeller unit, the two surfaces 76 leading from the apex serve as the impelling or slinging faces. The shoe parts need not be secured to the posts since they are held in abutting engagement therewith by centrifugal force, the triangular shape of recesses 75 and the posts providing a non-rotatable anchoring engagement of the shoes. One of the faces 76 is used as the impelling surface in one direction of rotation of the impeller unit and the other face is used as the impelling surface in the other direction of rotation. Such dual use of the impeller shoes provides maximum wear of the shoes in that when one side thereof has become worn it is merely necessary to reverse the direction of rotation of the driving motor to subject the other side to wear. The forward and reverse rotation of the impeller unit is accomplished by a reversible drive motor, not shown, which drives the belts 32.

Another feature of the impeller shoe assemblies is that one of the shoes is of greater thickness than the other. ln the usual case, the thicker shoe part 72b will be disposed on the bottom since such comprises the greatest wear area. However, these parts may be interchanged if desired for maximum efficiency of wear and of course the relative thickness may vary as determined empirically for best results. In order to obtain maximum wear from the shoe parts, they may be turned over if they wear unevenly.

The impeller unit also employs an upper impeller disc 80. This impeller disc is annular in shape similar to the lower impeller disc 62 for receiving the feed tube 20 through its center. Impeller disc 80 is bolted in place by bolts 68 in an assembly now to be described.

The lower impeller disc 62 supports a circumferential ring 82 adjacent to its outer edge, such ring having a downwardly directed offset or shoulder portion 84 for seated support on the impeller disc. Another ring 86 is associated with the upper impeller disc 80, such ring having an upwardly directed offset or shoulder portion 88 on which the upper impeller disc is seated. Ring 86 seats on the impeller shoes. Spacer pieces 90 are disposed underneath the shoe assemblies 72 and have a width dimension no greater than the width of the shoe, and similar spacer pieces 92 are provided at the top between the impeller shoe assemblies and the upper impeller disc 80. These spacers are secured as by welding to their respective impeller discs.

In the setup of the parts, the ring 82 is supported on the lower impeller disc 62, the impeller shoes are supported on this ring and on the spacers 90, the ring 86 is supported on the impeller shoes, and the upper impeller disc 80 is supported on the ring 86. The posts 64 are preferably of a selected height to terminate at their upper ends in a plane substantially level with the shoulder 88 of the upper ring 86 so that upon tightening the bolts 68 such posts bear the clamping pressure rather than allowing any pressure to be applied to the shoes.

The upper side of the lower impeller disc 62 in the area between the shoes 72 is protected by wear plates 94, FIGS. 2 and 3. These wear plates are suitably shaped to fill substantially the entire area between the shoes and are secured to the said impeller disc by bolts 96. Similarly, the underside of upper impeller disc in the area between the impeller shoes 72 is protected by wear plates 98 bolted thereto by bolts 100.

In addition to the particular shape and the repositioning capability of the shoes, the parts are arranged to provide maximum protection and ease of replacement. That is, the impeller discs are protected from flying rock by the wear plates 94 and 98 and also by the peripheral rings 82 and 86. The posts 64 are entirely protected. When it is desired to replace the shoe parts or reposition them, it is merely necessary to tap the upper shoes 72a on their outer edges to move them inwardly an amount to take them out or turn them over. The cover 16 is the only part that has to be removed for this operation. To replace the lower shoe part 72h or turn it over, it is necessary to remove the upper shoe part 72a since such lower shoe part can then be moved inwardly by raising it slightly to clear center ring 52. The replacement or repositioning of the shoe parts can be accomplished without loosening the bolts 68.

The impeller shoe assemblies 72 are arranged to throw rock outwardly against anvil or breaker plates 102 secured in the side extension 12 of the housing. In a preferred arrangement, the breaker plates are disposed in a main circumferential row 102 and a lower auxiliary row 104.

With reference to FIG. 4, an impeller shoe part 106 is illustrated which has similar shape and construction to the parts 72a and 72b described hereinbefore but includes on its impelling surfaces 76! a plurality ofinserts 108 of hardened material such as tungsten carbide or tool steel. Such inserts may comprise rectangular strips inserted in rectangular recesses 110 in the surfaces 76'. If desired, however, the insert may take other shapes, all to the purpose of prolonging the wear of the impelling surfaces.

lt is to be understood that the form of my invention herein shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same and that various changes in the shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of my invention or the scope of the subjoined claims.

Having thus described my invention, 1 claim:

1. In an impact type crusher a. a housing,

b. an impeller unit rotatably mounted in said housing and having inner and outer radially disposed portions;

c. at least one impeller shoe mounted on said impeller unit arranged to impell rock outwardly,

(1. said impeller shoe being V-shaped, having a pair of leg portions of substantially the same length and meeting horizontally in an apex,

e. the area between said leg portions forming an outwardly opening recess,

f. said apex being directed inwardly of the impeller unit,

g. said leg portions having outer side surfaces which comprise rock engaging faces for impelling rock outwardly,

h, said side surfaces being arranged such that one of said surfaces impels rock outwardly in the forward direction of rotation of said impeller unit and the other of said surfaces impels rock outwardly in the reverse direction of rotation of said impeller unit,

i. and anchor means secured to said impeller unit and engaged in said recess of said shoe to hold the latter on the impeller unit.

2. The impact type crusher of claim 1 wherein said recess is V-shaped and said anchor means comprise posts having angled side surfaces abutting against the walls of said recess for holding said shoe on the impeller unit.

3. The impact type crusher of claim 1 wherein said shoe has free abutting engagement with the post for easy installation and removal.

4. The impact type crusher of claim 2 wherein said impeller unit includes a plurality of said shoes and said post means in spaced relation therearound, a. lower impeller disc supporting said shoes freely thereon and integrally supporting said post means, and wear plates secured on the upper surface of said impeller disc in the area between said shoes to protect said disc from flying rock.

5. The impact type crusherof claim 2 wherein said impeller unit includes a plurality of said shoes and said from flying rock.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1787526 *Nov 15, 1928Jan 6, 1931Vernon G HonstainProcess of making pulverizing devices
US3540667 *May 23, 1967Nov 17, 1970Charles T Parker ConstructionImpact type rock crusher
US3578254 *Sep 23, 1968May 11, 1971Wood Bruce VImpact crusher
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3873047 *Mar 22, 1973Mar 25, 1975Louis W JohnsonImpact crusher
US3880369 *Sep 21, 1973Apr 29, 1975Boehler & Co Ag GebImpact strip for impact pulverizers
US3955767 *Mar 5, 1975May 11, 1976Hise Mason RSecondary impact crusher
US4065063 *Jul 6, 1976Dec 27, 1977El-Jay, Inc.Impact crusher
US4126922 *Jun 20, 1977Nov 28, 1978Brunswick Industrial Supply CompanySand muller reconditioning method and structure
US4166585 *Dec 9, 1977Sep 4, 1979El-Jay, Inc.Impact crusher table construction
US4390136 *Jul 17, 1981Jun 28, 1983Burk John HReplacement wear pins and replaceable impeller assembly for impact crusher
US5037035 *Nov 17, 1988Aug 6, 1991Impact Technology LimitedMachine for comminuting materials
US5497951 *Dec 23, 1993Mar 12, 1996Nakayama Iron Works, Ltd.Rotor blade structure for vertical shaft impact crusher
US5639030 *Apr 10, 1995Jun 17, 1997Nakayama Iron Works, Ltd.Vertical shaft impact crusher and operating method therefor
US6405953Jul 30, 1999Jun 18, 2002Impact Service CorporationImpeller shoe for an impact crusher
US7051964Dec 29, 2003May 30, 2006Rosemarie Johanna Van Der ZandenStrengthening plate and method for the use thereof
US7243869 *Mar 24, 2005Jul 17, 2007Hong-Soon HurDistribution structure, vertical shaft impact crusher having the distribution structure and method of fabricating the distribution structure
US7677484Aug 27, 2003Mar 16, 2010Sandvik Intellectual Proerty ABWear part for a crusher
USRE29798 *Mar 16, 1977Oct 10, 1978El-Jay, Inc.Impact crusher
CN1069228C *Jan 16, 1993Aug 8, 2001株式会社中山铁工所Verical shaft impact crusher
EP0562194A2 *Dec 8, 1992Sep 29, 1993Nakayama Iron Works, Ltd.Vertical shaft impact crusher
EP0607977A2 *Jan 20, 1994Jul 27, 1994Nakayama Iron Works, Ltd.Rotor blade structure for vertical shaft impact crusher
EP2441521A1Aug 27, 2003Apr 18, 2012Sandvik Intellectual Property ABA wear part for a crusher
WO1989004720A1 *Nov 17, 1988Jun 1, 1989Impact TechnologyMachine for comminuting materials
WO2003000423A2 *Jun 26, 2002Jan 3, 2003Van Der Zanden Johannes PetrusStrengthening plate and method for the use thereof
WO2003039752A1 *Nov 5, 2002May 15, 2003Van Der Zanden Johannes PetrusRotor with removable support member
WO2004020101A1Aug 27, 2003Mar 11, 2004Rowan DallimoreA wear part for a crusher
WO2013113495A1Jan 30, 2013Aug 8, 2013DICHTER, IngridSliding block and attachment member
WO2013127508A1Feb 23, 2013Sep 6, 2013Dichter IngridCrusher housing with controlled particle traffic
WO2013140049A1 *Mar 25, 2013Sep 26, 2013Metso Minerals, Inc.Improvements in the mounting of wear parts for vertical shaft impact crushers
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/275, 241/300
International ClassificationB02C13/00, B02C13/18
Cooperative ClassificationB02C13/1835
European ClassificationB02C13/18B4
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 29, 1984AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: ACROWOOD CORPORATION, P.O. BOX 1028, 4425 S. THIRD
Effective date: 19840813
Owner name: BC FOREST PODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC.
Aug 29, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: ACROWOOD CORPORATION, P.O. BOX 1028, 4425 S. THIRD
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. EFFECTIVE JUNE 22, 1984;ASSIGNOR:BC FOREST PODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004302/0787
Effective date: 19840813