Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3767220 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1973
Filing dateMar 13, 1972
Priority dateMar 13, 1972
Also published asCA955279A, CA955279A1
Publication numberUS 3767220 A, US 3767220A, US-A-3767220, US3767220 A, US3767220A
InventorsR Peterson
Original AssigneeR Peterson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot worn two-wheeled vehicle
US 3767220 A
Abstract
A two-wheeled vehicle adapted to be worn on a person's feet in the standup position so that they can be maneuvered like snow skis on a slope. Each vehicle is comprised of a frame supporting a pair of wheels at opposite ends and shaped so that the user's feet are located close to ground level. Toe and heel clamp means support the user's boot in the position that affords maximum stability and contol and movable calf support means pivotally connected to the heel clamp means includes a movable brake means for engaging the rear wheel when the user alters his position. Both wheels have relatively large low pressure tires with wide tread and provide a shock absorbing affect and at least one wheel has a one-way clutch hub to enable the user to climb slopes without rolling back.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Peterson [4 Oct. 23, 1973 FOOT WORN TWO-WHEELED VEHICLE [21] Appl. No.: 233,903

[52] US. Cl. 280/1 1.2, 280/1 1.23, 280/11.36 [51] Int. Cl. A63c 17/14 [58] Field of Search 280/11.2, 11.23,

280/11.22,11.37,11.11,11.l9,11.1 R, 11.1 BT,11.21,11.25,11.36

278,004 9/1930 Italy 28011 1.23

. Primary Examiner-Kenneth H. Betts Assistant Examiner-Milton L. Smith Attorney-Roger W. Erickson [57] ABSTRACT A two-wheeled vehicle adapted to be worn on a persons feet in the standup position so that they can be maneuvered like snow'skis on a slope. Each vehicle is comprised of a frame supporting a pair of wheels at opposite ends and shaped so that the users feet are located close to ground level. Toe and heel clamp means support the users boot in the position that affords maximum stability and contol and movable calf support means pivotally connected to the heel clamp means includes a movable brake means for engaging the rear wheel when the user alters his position. Both wheels have relatively large low pressure tires with wide tread and provide a shock absorbing affect and at least one wheel has a one-way clutch hub to enable the user to climb slopes without rolling back.

6 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures Patented Oct. 23, 1973 SSheets-Sheet 5 FIG 5 FlG 6 F001 WORN TWO-WHEELED VEHICLE This inventionrelates to foot-worn vehicles which, when worn in pairs on a persons feet, enables the user to maneuver on slopes of dirt, grass, snow or other surfaces much in the same manner as a person on conventional snow skis.

One general object of the present invention is to provide animproved foot-worn vehicle that will enable the user to attach one vehicle to each foot and perform skilike maneuvers on slopes at relatively high speed, if desired, and yet with a high degree of comfort, stability and safety. Heretofore, foot-worn vehicles when used on slopes, particularly on relatively rough, unpaved terrain were difficult to control both as to direction and speed. This was caused by the relatively large amount of violent vibrations which were produced and had to be absorbed by the wearers leg, a certain amount of imbalance and instability created by the lack of proper positioning of the users feet with respect to the vehicles wheels; and lack of adequate and responsive braking means.

Accordingly, it is another object of my invention to provide foot-worn vehicles which will solve the aforesaid problems of stability and control.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a foot-worn vehicle that is strong, durable and yet particularly well adapted for ease and economy of manufacture.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a foot-worn vehicle with an articulated leg holding means that holds the users feet and legs firmly in a stability enhancing position relative to the vehicle while allowing him a considerable degree of movement to facilitate maneuvering.

The aforesaid objectives are accomplished by a twowheeled foot-worn vehicle which generally comprises a frame or chassis with a center section for supporting the users boot. Sloping upwardly from each opposite end of this center frame section are a pair of members forming a fork, the ends of which support an axle for one wheel. At least one of the wheels has a hub which includes a one-way clutch that prevents any backward rotation and thereby enables the user to walk" up a slope without rolling back. On each wheel is a fairly large air filled tire having a wide tread and preferably of the type that utilizes a relatively low air pressure (e.g. 3 to psi). Toe and clamp means are provided for holding the users boot in place on the chassis center section and at a slight angle with it. A pivotal calf support is connected to the chassis near the heel clamp having a pivot axis which is substantially aligned with the natural foot-ankle joint axis of the wearer so that movement between the wearers foot and calf can be normal. The calf support is adapted to be secured to the wearers leg just below the knee so as to support the leg firmly in the position relative to the vehicle chassis that affords maximum stability. The calf support also comprises structure forming a braking member which can engage the rear wheel of the vehicle when the user simply alters his position. The elements of the vehicle structure are simple but uniquely combined in a cooperative arrangement to provide unusual stability and control for the user.

Other objects, advantages and features of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of one preferred embodiment thereof, presented in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a view in perspective of a pair of vehicles according to my invention showing the user in the normal stance for free running down a slope;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 showing the vehicle as they appear when the user is applying brakes FIG. 3 is an enlarged view in side elevation of my foot-worn vehicle;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the vehicle shown in FIG. 3 with portions of the front wheel broken away to show its hub in detail;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of my vehicle; 7

FIG. 6 is a view in section of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 8 is a view taken along line 8-% of FIG. 5.

With reference to the drawing, FIGS. 1 and 2 show a pair of two-wheel vehicles llti embodying the principles of the present invention as they appear when worn by a person for amusement or sport activity by rolling down a sloped ground surface. These vehicles, worn on the users feet are easily maneuvered in much the same manner as conventional skis are on snow slopes. The user maintains the vehicles parallel with his legs as close together as possible and he can follow either a straight line path or make turns and transverse from side to side when coming down a hill. Contrary to conventional skis, the vehicles are provided with means for braking which is operable by the user by simply changing his position, as shown in FIG. 2.

In general, each vehicle 10 is comprised of a frame 12 having central platform 14 formed of a rigid material such as a suitable metal and having a length and width that are great enough to accommodate a good sized boot that may be similar to but not necessarily identical with a conventional ski boot. Extending upwardly at an acute angle (e.g. l5-25) from the forward end of the central platform and from the opposite sides thereof are a pair of forward fork members 116.

These fork members are also preferably made from a rigid metal and at their outer ends 18 they are journalled to support an axle 20 for a front wheel 22 and its tire 24.

A similar pair of fork members 26 are fixed to the rear end of the central platform M and extend rearwardly and upwardly therefrom at substantially the same angle as the front fork members. These rear fork members are also journaled at their outer ends to support a rear axle for a rear wheel 28 and its tire 30. Thus, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the boat supporting platform 14 is considerably lower and closer to the ground than the axes of the wheels.

The front and rear wheels 22 and 2% are fairly small in diameter, but in accordance with my invention the tires 24 and 30 have a wide tread that may be I-% to two times greater than the width of the platform 14. These tires are preferably of the type that operate at relatively low pressure (e.g. less than 5 psi). Thus, the tires have a fairly large ground contact area or foot print of the size of the vehicle to provide good traction and they are relatively soft so that they can readily absorb small shocks or vibrations during running when small ground irregularities and/or rocks are encountered. In order for the front and rear fork members to accommodate the large wide tires they are curved outwardly from their inner ends that are fixed to the central platform 14.

On the central platform suitable binding means are provided as shown in FIGS. 4 7 for holding the users boot 32 firmly in position without allowing it to move. A toe binding means comprises an arcuate plate 34 that is supported along one edge by a curved upright stop member 36 extending between a pair of bosses 38, all of which are fixed to the central platform. A pair of bolts 40 extend through openings near opposite ends of the plate and are threadedly secured in the bosses. When the welt of users boot is under the edge of the plate 34 with the front edge of its sole against the stop member, the bolts can be tightened to hold it firmly in place.

A heel binding means for the users boot comprises a transverse stop member 42 fixed to the central platform having a substantially semi-circular curved portion 44 within which the boot heel can fit. This stop member may be strengthened and supported by a rearward transverse member 46 and a top plate 48 adapted to fit over the welt of the boot sole, all of which are welded together and fixed to the central platform. As shown in FIG. 5, the heel binding means, and more particularly its curved portion 44 on both vehicles are oriented on their respective central platforms so as to cause the users boots to toe outwardly a slight amount from the longitudinal vehicle axis through the two wheels designated by the numeral 50. I have found that this provides a stability and control factor which enhances the safe maneuverability of my foot-worn vehicles.

Now, attached to the rear fork members 26 and to the rear end of the central platform on each vehicle are bracket means 52 for a combined calf-supporting and brake member 54. This bracket means has a pair of similar portions connected to each rear fork member, each one of which has a forwardly projecting bearing member 56. Extending rearwardly and above these bearing members are tapered bracket portions to which are journaled a transverse cylindrical bar 57 that serves as a forward position stop.

The calf supporting member 54 for each vehicle is made of some suitable rigid material such as aluminum and comprises an open, substantially semi-circular cuff portion 58 and integral side portions 60 that extend downwardly therefrom. A suitable pin 62 pivotally connects a lower end of each side portion with a bracket bearing member 56 and this pin is located so that it will be substantially aligned with the axis of the users foot and ankle joint. The cuff portion 58 has a strap 64 for securing it to the user's leg. As shown in FIG. 8, the side portions 60 extending downwardly from it are bent slightly outwardly a few degrees with respect to a centerline (61) that is perpendicular to the central platform. This places the cuff portion 58 and thus the users knees outwardly from the axial center line of the vehicles, thereby causing the vehicle to tilt slightly towards each other as the user brings his knees together. I have discovered that this further enhances the stability and controllability of the vehicles when worn, particularly when the user maintains his knees close together during downhill runs.

Attached to the cuff portion 58 and the downwardly extending leg portions 60 of each calf supporting member by means of rearwardly extending brackets 66 is a brake member 68 on each vehicle 10. Essentially, this brake member is a curved piece of rigid metal having approximately the same radius of curvature as the outside tire diameter. A lining 70 of a suitable brake material is preferably bonded to the concave side of the brake member. At its bottom end, the brake member has curved integral hook portions 72 that are posi tioned to engage the transverse bar 57 so as to limit the forward inclination of the user as he is rolling down a slope (See FIG. 1).

As shown in the broken portion of FIG. 4, at least one of the wheels is provided with a hub 72 having a clutch 74 that provides only forward rotation of the wheel. Such non-reversible clutches are well known in the art and therefore will not be described in detail here. The use of such a one-way mechanism on the wheels enables the vehicle user to climb up a slope easily without rolling backward between forward steps.

In operation, my foot-worn vehicles are controlled on downhill slopes much like conventional snow skis. The vehicles are kept essentially parallel, and as they roll forward the relatively soft tires absorb the shock of minor bumps, ruts or small ground obstructions. Turns are made by shifting the users weight and tilting the vehicles to one side or the other.

From the foregoing it should be apparent that the present invention comprises a foot worn vehicle capable of providing recreation much like conventional skis on gentle or even relatively steep slopes with ease and safety. Moreover, the arrangement and construction of components is such that my vehicles can be manufactured at relatively low cost and will be long lasting and relatively free of expensive maintenance.

To those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, many changes in construction and widely differing embodiments and applications of the invention will suggest themselves without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The disclosures and the description herein are purely illustrative and are not intended to be in any sense limiting.

I claim:

1. A vehicle adapted to be worn with a similar vehicle on a persons feet for recreational use comprising:

a central platform;

frame means fixed to and extending upwardly at an angle from opposite ends of said platform; front and rear wheel means supported by the ends of said frame means so that their axes are above said platform, and a tire on each said wheel means;

means on said central platform for securing the user's footwear; and

a combined calf supporting member and brake means comprising a pair of elongated side members pivotally journalled at their lower ends to bearing means attached to said platform adapted to be substantially aligned with the wearers foot and ankle joint, a cuff portion fixed to the upper ends of said side members, and an arcuate brake member fixed to said side members and said cuff portion and pivotal therewith with respect to said platform to engage the rear tire by movement of the users legs thereby enabling control of the vehicle on a downhill slope.

2. The vehicle as described in claim 1 including a transverse member fixed to said bearing means and stop means on the lower end of said arcuate brake member to engage said transverse member and limit the forward pivotal range of said calf supporting member.

3. The vehicle as described in claim 2 wherein said tranverse member is a fixed rod extending between said bearing means and said stop means comprises a hooked portion at the ends of said brake member.

4. A vehicle adapted to be worn on a persons foot for recreational use comprising:

a central platform;

a pair of curved fork members fixed to opposite ends of said platform and extending upwardly therefrom at a small angle;

front and rear wheel means supported by the ends of said pairs of fork members, and a relatively large low pressure tire on each said wheel means;

means on said central platform for securing the users footwear including toe clamp means and heel clamp means on said central platform spaced inwardly from said toe clamp means with respect to a longitudinal axis perpendicular to the axes of rotation of the front and rear wheels, whereby the users feet are automatically toed outwardly when vehicles are attached to both feet; and

a combined calf supporting member and brake means pivotally connected to said central platform, said brake means being engageable with said rear wheel by movement of the users legs thereby enabling control of the vehicle on a downhill slope.

5. A vehicle adapted to be worn on a persons foot for recreational use comprising:

a central platform;

a pair of curved fork members fixed to opposite ends of said platform and extending upwardly therefrom at a small angle;

front and rear wheel means supported by the ends of said pairs of fork members, and a relatively large low pressure tire on each said wheel means;

means on said central platform for securing the users footwear; and

a combined calf supporting member and brake means pivotally connected to said central platform, said calf-supporting member comprising a curved, open cuff portion adapted to retain the rear portion of the users calf muscle and a front strap member and downwardly extending leg portions onsaid cuff portion pivotally attached to said central platform, said leg portions being bent at a slight angle from their lower ends with respect to a line perpendicular to the platform so that said cuff portion is not located directly above the platform, said brake means being engageable with said rear wheel by movement of the users legs thereby enabling control of the vehicle on a downhill slope.

6. A vehicle adapted to be worn on a person's foot for recreational use comprising:

a central platform;

a pair of curved fork members fixed to opposite ends of said platform and extending upwardly therefrom at a small angle;

front and rear wheel means supported by the ends of said pairs of fork members, and a relatively large low pressure tire on each said wheel means;

means on said central platform for securing the users footwear; and

a combined calf supporting member and brake means pivotally connected to said central platform, said brake means including a curved metallic member having substantially the same outer diameter as said rear tire and a lining material bonded thereto, said metallic member being fixed to said calfsupporting member, said brake means being engageable with said rear wheel by movement of the users legs thereby enabling control of the vehicle on a downhill slope.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US538526 *Jul 5, 1894Apr 30, 1895 Roller-skate
US622815 *Mar 16, 1898Apr 11, 1899 Augustus n
US681368 *Jan 12, 1898Aug 27, 1901William J KentRoller-skate.
US1402010 *Mar 5, 1920Jan 3, 1922Ormiston Perley LRoller skate
DE379724C *Aug 28, 1923Rudolf Nebel Dipl IngKugelfoermiges Pneumatikrad fuer Rollschuhe
DE857006C *Nov 22, 1950Nov 27, 1952Carl Dipl-Ing KlaasZweiradroller, bestehend aus zwei in derselben Laufrichtung mit fusslangem oder groesserem Abstand hintereinander angeordneten Laufraedern
IT278004A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4033596 *Aug 25, 1975Jul 5, 1977John Peter AndorsenRoller ski having leg operated braking means
US4050705 *Mar 1, 1976Sep 27, 1977Philipp KreisBraking device for ski scooters
US4275895 *Jan 24, 1980Jun 30, 1981Edwards Jesse ORoller skate brake
US4363492 *Mar 4, 1980Dec 14, 1982Arne ErikssonRoller ski for training long distance skiing
US4836567 *May 9, 1987Jun 6, 1989Engelbert SchmidRoller skis
US4943075 *Aug 18, 1989Jul 24, 1990Gates Patrick GPair of wheeled skate-skis with brakes usable on most terrains
US5048851 *Aug 30, 1990Sep 17, 1991David AlarconPortable vehicle apparatus
US5163710 *Oct 28, 1991Nov 17, 1992Chirtel Stuart JRoller skating pole
US5232231 *Aug 12, 1992Aug 3, 1993Bruce CarlsmithBrake for roller skates
US5398950 *Nov 4, 1993Mar 21, 1995Tkaczyk; JohnInterchangeable roller skate
US5415419 *Dec 22, 1993May 16, 1995Canstar Sports Group Inc.Braking system for in-line skates
US5435580 *Feb 14, 1994Jul 25, 1995Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5437466 *Jul 19, 1993Aug 1, 1995K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US5452907 *Sep 13, 1993Sep 26, 1995K-2 CorporationSkate with adjustable base and frame
US5465984 *Sep 1, 1993Nov 14, 1995Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5468004 *May 12, 1995Nov 21, 1995O.S. Designs, Inc.Anti-lock brake for in-line skate
US5505469 *Nov 24, 1993Apr 9, 1996Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5511804 *Feb 13, 1995Apr 30, 1996Nordica S.P.A.Braking device, particularly for skates
US5564718 *May 31, 1994Oct 15, 1996Out Of Line Sports Inc.Ground engaging skate brake
US5651556 *May 3, 1996Jul 29, 1997Out Of Line Sports, Inc.Ground engaging movable skate brake
US5664794 *Sep 27, 1995Sep 9, 1997Out Of Line Sports, Inc.Ground engaging movable skate brake
US5755449 *Oct 31, 1994May 26, 1998Nordica, S.P.A.In-line skate
US5769433 *Apr 5, 1996Jun 23, 1998Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5836590 *Feb 18, 1997Nov 17, 1998Out Of Line Sports, Inc.Method and apparatus for slowing or stopping a roller skate
US5848796 *Mar 3, 1997Dec 15, 1998K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US5868408 *Dec 17, 1996Feb 9, 1999M & R Innovations LlcTurf board
US5882019 *Feb 13, 1995Mar 16, 1999Nordica, S.P.A.Braking device, particularly for skates
US5911423 *Sep 28, 1998Jun 15, 1999Nordica, S.P.A.Braking device, particularly for skates
US5918888 *Jun 7, 1995Jul 6, 1999Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US5992862 *Apr 17, 1996Nov 30, 1999Benetton Sportsystem Usa Inc.Skate brake system and methods
US6012725 *Nov 6, 1998Jan 11, 2000Out Of Line Sports, Inc.Skate brake systems and methods
US6089579 *Jun 11, 1999Jul 18, 2000Nordica S.P.A.Braking device particularly for skates
US6123348 *Mar 4, 1998Sep 26, 2000M & R Innovations, LlcBrake system for downhill wheeled board
US6139030 *Aug 23, 1999Oct 31, 2000K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US6152459 *Dec 9, 1998Nov 28, 2000K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US6254110Jun 1, 2000Jul 3, 2001K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US6367818Jun 8, 2001Apr 9, 2002K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US6592129 *Jul 27, 2000Jul 15, 2003Patrick G GatesPair of wheeled skate-skis with brakes usable on most terrains
US6598888Sep 30, 2002Jul 29, 2003K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US6676138 *Feb 28, 2000Jan 13, 2004Michele RossoRoller skate
US6749203Apr 28, 2003Jun 15, 2004K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US7172205 *May 28, 2004Feb 6, 2007Vujtech James ATwo-wheeled riding-board apparatus
US7213823 *Jan 13, 2005May 8, 2007Vujtech James ATwo-wheeled riding-board apparatus
US7226063 *Feb 5, 2004Jun 5, 2007Timothy PaddockAll-terrain board
US7677600 *Mar 16, 2010Johnson Lennart BRoller ski
US20030164269 *Jul 17, 2001Sep 4, 2003Attey Graeme ScottAn all-terrain board with leg operated brake
US20040155421 *Feb 5, 2004Aug 12, 2004Timothy PaddockAll-terrain board
US20040173982 *Mar 11, 2004Sep 9, 2004Attey Graeme ScottAll-terrain board with leg operated brake
US20040207164 *May 7, 2004Oct 21, 2004K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US20060038364 *Aug 17, 2004Feb 23, 2006Te-Fu HsuSkate having a brake device
US20060113832 *Dec 23, 2003Jun 1, 2006Mario HerzogWheel
US20080231019 *Jul 19, 2006Sep 25, 2008Sportissimo SarlCross-Country Ski with Wheels
US20090134589 *Oct 29, 2007May 28, 2009Johnson Lennart BRoller ski
DE2925555A1 *Jun 25, 1979Jan 15, 1981Otto Dipl Ing LachnerScooter assembly with two rollers - has two parallel support units and binding devices to keep user's shoe in position
DE4126062C2 *Aug 3, 1991Nov 2, 2000Gerd LemanowiczSportgerät in Form eines einspurigen Rollbrettes
EP0169185A2 *Jul 17, 1985Jan 22, 1986Samhall HöglandRoller ski
EP1322388A1 *Jul 17, 2001Jul 2, 2003Design Science PTY. Ltd.An all-terrain board with leg operated brake
WO2003013670A1 *Aug 7, 2002Feb 20, 2003Timothy PaddockAll-terrain board
WO2016062748A1 *Oct 21, 2015Apr 28, 2016PAN-KRUEGER, LiBraking device for ski rollers, roller skis or skis
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/842, 280/11.233, 280/11.215, 280/11.36
International ClassificationA63C17/14, A63C5/06, A63C5/035, A63C17/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/045, A63C17/1409, A63C2017/1481
European ClassificationA63C17/04B, A63C17/14B