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Publication numberUS3768699 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1973
Filing dateJun 3, 1970
Priority dateJun 3, 1970
Publication numberUS 3768699 A, US 3768699A, US-A-3768699, US3768699 A, US3768699A
InventorsRobe H
Original AssigneeRobe Ass
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Squeeze dispenser for flexible packages
US 3768699 A
Abstract
A squeeze dispenser utensil for holding a flexible container and dispensing the contents therefrom, comprising two relatively flat squeeze plates mounted through a suitable linkage means and guides therefor for providing an operative sequence of first bringing the backs of the two plates relatively together to dispense the material from the container in a back-to-front operation; said plates being preferably built with opposed convex surfaces for retaining a forwardly progressing seal, with the plates being flexible and the linkage and guide system being constructed for moving the upper plate forward relative to the lower plate during the dispensing operation. A preferred form of the invention also provides for closure means for multi-time usage and a storage construction for holding the partly full container.
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[ Oct. 30, 1973 SQUEEZE DISPENSER FOR FLEXIBLE PACKAGES [76] Inventor: Harlan Karl Robe, Jr., c/o Robe Associates, 1833 Edgewood Dr., Palo Alto, Calif.

[22] Filed: June 3, 1970 [21] Appl. No.1 43,140

[52] US. Cl. 222/103 [51] Int. Cl. 565d 35/28 [58] Field 01 Search 222/103, 95, 105,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,776,137 9 1930 Strouse 222 130 2,763,401 9/1956 Buras, Jr... 222 105 x Zabriskie 222/103 Buras, Jr 222/105 X Primary ExaminerRobert B. Reeves Assistant Examiner-Norman L. Stack, Jr. AttorneySchapp and Hatch [57] ABSTRACT A squeeze dispenser utensil for holding a flexible container and dispensing the contents therefrom, comprising two relatively flat squeeze plates mounted through a suitable linkage means and guides therefor for providing an operative sequence of first bringing the backs of the two plates relatively together to dispense the material from the container in a back-to-front operation; said plates being preferably built with opposed convex surfaces for retaining a forwardly progressing seal, with the plates being flexible and the linkage and guide system being constructed for moving the upper plate forward relative to the lower plate during the dispensing operation. A preferred form of the invention also provides for closure means for multi-time usage and a storage construction for holding the partly full container.

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SQUEEZE DISPENSER FOR FLEXIBLE PACKAGES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a squeeze dispenser for flexible packages, and more particularly to a squeeze dispenser formed for holding a flexible container filled with flowable material and for dispensing the material therefrom with a minimum of clingage in a rapid and convenient manner.

Flexible thin-walled plastic packages are among the lowest cost forms of containing flowable materials such as foods, pharmaceuticals, glues, paints and the like. However, higher-cost packages, such as glass, plastic bottles and cans, are generally preferred for food containers and other products that are to be used, recapped or reclosed, and stored for further usage. One reason that the conventional flexible film package has not been adopted as a multi-use container is that it does not store as well as a rigid container. In other words, it does not set in a stable posture like a can or a bottle, but, instead, slumps and is unstable, particularly when nearly empty. With both types of containers, but particularly with cans or bottles, a serious problem resides in the difficulty of removing the clingage that remains inside the package after all the pourable material has flowed out by gravity. Even shaking will often not remove all of the catchup, mustard, honey,jelly, adhesive paste, paints, or the like, from a bottle, pour-spout can or plastic pouch.

Some products require careful metering, for example, paint pigments, flavorings, catalysts and various additives, and the amount dispensed directly affects the end product. In such cases the clingage problem causes erratic results, because more clingage will remain under some circumstances than under others.

Some users stand the emptied container upside-down to remove the residual clingage. In the case of removing the clingage from a plastic pouch such as the singleportion packs of the above-listed materials, removal consists of tedious milking of the package between the thumb and index finger, while holding the rear of the package with the other hand. These are time consuming and frustrating operations, and most users tend to waste the remaining product by leaving it in the package.

It is therefore desirable to provide a dispenser utensil suitable for dispensing materials from the low-priced, flexible packages. It is particularly desirable to provide such a dispenser capable of rendering flexible packages suitable for multi-time use, as well as to solve or at least alleviate the above-mentioned problems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The dispenser utensil constructed according to the invention comprises a pair of squeeze plates, and a linkage assembly of lever arms formed for providing a rearto-front dispensing pressure simply by pressing a convenient area on one of the squeeze plates and effecting relative movement of the two plates.

One of the squeeze plates is conveniently utilized as a base, and is equipped with a back plate at the rear end and standards on each side of the front end. The linkage assembly is then fit into the back plate and the standard through suitable guide means so as to favor the guiding of the rear end of the linkage assembly downward with respect to the front end of the linkage assembly. In addition, the linkage assembly is constructed to carry the top squeeze plate thereon for movement of the two parts as a unit. In other words, the rear end of the linkage assembly exerts downward pressure on the rear end of the top plate wherever pressure is applied to the top plate and downward movement of the rear of the linkage assembly is favored.

The guide means are formed so as to allow the rear end of the linkage assembly to depress first, then bring the front end of the linkage assembly down and preferably forward also. When the front end of the linkage assembly is moved forward, the rear end of the linkage assembly is also moved forward, and forward movement of the rear end is accommodated without lifting the rear end of the linkage assembly by virtue of a pivoting back plate. Accordingly, the preferred form provides for both rear-to-front action, and also for relative rear-to-front movement of the top plate with respect to the bottom plate.

When it is desired to dispense the contents in multitime usage over a period of time, it is preferred to provide closure means at the front end of the squeeze plates to effect closure of the flexible passage between dispensing operations. It is also a feature of one form of this invention to provide a construction whereby the dispenser may be set vertically on the back plate between dispensing operations so that the dispensing utensil of this invention may also act as a storage unit protecting the plastic container during its partially emptied condition.

Various forms of closure means may be utilized depending upon the type of material being dispensed, frequency of dispensing, size of container, etc. In some cases, it may be desired to utilize an automatic closure,

while in other cases it may be desired to utilize hand operated closure and both types will be more fully described below.

It is therefore a primary object of the present invention to provide a dispenser utensil which may be squeezed to dispense all or part of the contents of a flexible container as needed in a smooth, continuous stream and to empty all the contents with a minimum of residue remaining.

Another object is to provide a dispenser utensil of the character described which is particularly suitable for multi-time use, and which provides a convenient means for storing and protecting the partially used contents for later dispensing.

A further object of the invention is to provide a dispensing device having lever and guide means formed to transfer regular downwards squeezing pressure on a top pressure plate so as to apply a squeezing pressure preferentially to the rear of the package until the rear is depressed, and thence across its full width and continuing toward the front, together with relatively forward movement so as to provide excellent removal of material from within the package.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a device of the character described having closure means for closing off the flexible package between uses in multi-time use situations.

A further object of the invention is to provide a dispenser capable of delivering fluid from across the full width of the package and in an accurate and reproducible manner whereby premeasured amounts of substances may be delivered from prepared flexible packages.

Yet still another object of the invention is to provide a dispenser which is practical, lightweight and relatively inexpensive to make and to use.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will appear as the specification continues, and the new and useful features of the squeeze dispenser for flexible packages will be more fully defined in the claims attached hereto.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The preferred forms of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this description, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a typical apparatus constructed according to the invention, and in position for dispensing of material;

FIG. 2, a perspective view of the dispensing device shown in FIG. 1, but in an upright position for storage between dispensing operations;

FIG. 3, an exploded view showing the various parts that make up the dispenser utensil shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4, a perspective view illustrating an alternate form of linkage assembly that may be used in. place of the linkage assembly of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5A, a vertical sectional view of the dispensing device shown in FIG. 1 illustrating the position of the parts when a full package is inserted just prior to dispensing;

FIG. 58, a view similar to FIG. 5A, but showing the position of the parts in an intermediate stage of dispensing;

FIG. 5C, another vertical sectional view, but illustrating the position of the parts when the material is nearly all dispensed from the apparatus;

FIG. 5D, a view similar to FIGS. SA through 5C, but showing the device after all of the material is dispensed therefrom;

FIG. 6, a fragmentary perspective of the front portion ofa dispensing device similar to that of FIGS. ll through 5, but equipped with a closure means;

FIG. 7, a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the device shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8, a dispensing device similar to that shown in FIG. 6, but with an alternate form of closure means;

FIG. 9, a fragmentary perspective view of a dispensing device constructed according to the invention illustrating still another form of closure means; and

FIG. 10, a fragmentary vertical sectional view of the device shown in FIG. 9.

While only the preferred forms of the invention are shown, it should be understood that various changes may be made within the scope of the claims attached hereto without departing from the spirit of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawings in greater detail, and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is shown a dispenser utensil 11 for dispensing flowable material 12 from a flexible container 13, comprising a top squeeze plate 14, a bottom squeeze plate 16, and a linkage assembly 17 having suitable lever arms and pivotal connections for allowing the plates to move relatively toward one another, but inducing a rear-to-front dispensing pressure to the container upon such relative movement of the squeeze plates.

As best seen in FIG. 3, the linkage assembly 17 comprises a back plate 18 pivotally carried on the bottom squeeze plate 16 and a pair of members 19 and 21, which may be separate members as shown in FIG. 3, or connected by a cross member 22 as shown in FIG. 4. The cross member is pivotally attached to the top squeeze plate 14 by suitable pivots 23 and 24 which are here shown as typical stub shafts fitting into appropriate bore holes 25. Typically, the device is made of a plastic material which is sufficiently flexible that the various pivots can be forced into position and may be formed without accommodations for seating the same. However, in the form shown in FIG. 3, the members or levers are easily fit into the appropriate pivots and guides.

Back plate 18 is pivotally connected to bottom squeeze plate 16 through suitable pivots 26 and 27 and the rear end of the lever members 19 and 21 slidingly fit in back plate 18 by means of suitable guide means 20. As here shown, the guide means are in the form of slots 28 on the back plate and stub shafts 29 on the lever members. However, it will be appreciated that these members may be reversed, or any other suitable guide means may be utilized that will accommodate a sliding relation in a single direction;

At the forward end of the dispenser utensil 11, appropriate standards 30 are provided for slidingly accommodating the forward ends of the members 19 and 21 of linkage assembly 17. As here shown, the standards 30 include two upstanding flange-like members 31 and 32 located on each side of the bottom squeeze plate 16 so as to be in an out-of-the-way position insofar as allowing fluid to pass therebetween, and also to help define side boundaries for the device. Guide means 33 are provided on the standard and forward ends of the mem-' bers l9 and 21 linkage assembly to accommodate a linear sliding movement, and this linear sliding movement is both forward and downward. In this way, the top squeeze plate. is brought forward as the front end thereof is moved toward the bottom squeeze plate.

The guide means may be any suitable slidable guides for restricting relative movement in a linear slide path, and a typical guide means includes grooves 34 on the standard to receive stub shafts 36 on numbers 19 and 21. Again; the parts may be reversed or any equivalent structure may be utilized, if desired.

The unit is then assembled from the parts shown in the exploded view of FIG. 3 so as to provide a composite unit, as seen in FIG. 1. However, during assembly it is important that the stop means 37 of the top pressure plate are located under the members 19 and 21 so that as the rear end of the members 19 and 21 push downward, they push the rear end of the top squeeze plate down ahead of them.

Thus, in operation, a package is inserted as shown in FIG. 5A, with the top squeeze plate sufficiently moved back in the guides so as to accommodate the flexible package between the squeeze plates. Upon glancing at FIG. 5A, it will be seen that as the top squeeze plate and linkage assembly assume a nearly horizontal position, the front guides offer only a slight incline while the rear guides offer a steep or vertical incline. Accordingly, pressure on the top squeeze plate tends to pivot the entire linkage assembly around the front guide means in the standards and push the rear end of the linkage assembly downward. This, in turn, pushes on stop 37 and forces the top squeeze plate downward at the rear end ahead of it. Thus, it is seen that the guides are formed for preferentially causing the rear end to go down first upon vertical pressure most anywhere on the top of the top squeeze plate. However, it shall also be appreciated that the operator will soon become skilled and provide slight rearward forces at the first part of the operation and slight forward forces at later stages to assist the machine to operate in a smooth skillful hand operation, although the machine will function as intended with straight downward pressure.

It will also be seen that the package is quite well confined between the two plates, and all major surface areas are protected from rupture so that relatively large squeeze pressures may be applied in an effort to express the liquid from inside the container. It will also be appreciated that large forces acting over smaller areas will give especially high hydraulic pressure, and the placement of heavy pressure at the rear will increase the dispensing forces.

As the rear of the top squeeze plate goes down, the major portion and the most easily dispensed portion of the liquid inside the flexible container is moved up through the mouth thereof. When the rear end of the top squeeze plate reaches the bottom squeeze plate, we reach a condition achieved just prior to that shown in FIG. 58. At that point, the back plate 18 is still substantially vertical but the angle of inclination on the front guide means is changed to favor downward movement of the front. Accordingly, the front guide then comes into play and causes the top squeeze plate to move forward and pull the back plate in a pivoting motion through the position shown in FIG. 5B. The pivoting of the back plate continues until a substantially flat position is reached and the forward and downward movement of the front of the squeeze plate continues until the position shown in FIG. 5C is reached; at this time, nearly all of the material has been dispensed and all of the material has been dispensed from the rear end of the flexible package.

In the form here shown, the top squeeze plate is bowed with its convex side facing a substantially flat bottom squeeze plate and this bowed condition is evident in FIG. 5C.

Continued pressure of the top squeeze plate is then made by pushing up toward the forward end and rocking the squeeze plate so as to bring the seal line from rear to front and dispense all of the material in a kind of a milking-and-pushing fashion. In this way substantially all of the material is removed from the flexible package leaving substantially no clingage, and providing an operation which is substantially reproducible.

When used in this fashion it is seen that one-shot dispensing operations may be made for metering accurate quantities. It will also be appreciated that certain multitime uses may be effected by this apparatus in this manner, if desired. In such a case it will often be advantageous to store the package in a normal vertical fashion between operations, and this is achieved by locking the back plate in a position perpendicular to the bottom plate and standing the unit up as shown in FIG. 2. In order to retain the perpendicular position the pivot may be locked by means of a set screw 38, or any other locking means that may be used to lock the unit and also be retracted or unlocked to allow free pivotal movement of the back plate during a dispensing operation.

When the device of this invention is made of plastic,

and the flexible package is also made of plastic, suffi cient friction exists between the package and the container to retain the package normally in place. Howforced eye 41, or the like. In some cases it may be desirable to provide a matching recess (not shown) in upper plate 14 in order to prevent the holding means from physically obstructing the desired flat matching relation of the top and bottom plates.

It will be appreciated that certain design variations may be incorporated in the device without departing from the broad scope of the invention. For example, the back plate 28 could be fixed rather than hinged, and in such a case, the guide means on the back plate would be formed to allow the upper plate to move downwardly and then forwardly. In such a case, an L- shaped guide means would be suitable. In other words, the preferred construction provides for the holding and squeezing ability of the container which allows the preferred dispensing operation to take place, as described above.

In general, it is preferred to utilize stop means in combination with the device already shown and described when multi-use operation is desired. This is particularly true when the multi-time usage will stretch over a relatively long period of time such as in the dispensing of catsup or other similar food stuffs. In such a case, the device may still be stood on end as shown in FIG. 2, but it will preferably contain a modification including stop means at the forward end of the device as illustrated in the embodiments shown in FIGS. 6 through 10.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, there is shown a dispenser utensil 11a comprising a top squeeze plate 14a, a bottom squeeze plate 16a, a linkage assembly 17a, standards 30a and guide means 33a constructed similarly to the correspondingly numbered parts of the embodiments of FIGS. 1 through 5. However, closure means 42 is provided to insure closure of the package when the material is not being dispensed therefrom but constructed for operative opening in response to fluid pressure within the flexible container.

As best seen in FIGS. 6 and 7, the closure means 42 comprises a member 43 in the form of a flat bar cooperating with extension 44 so as to close mouth 46 of the flexible container 13. The bar 43 is yieldably urged toward extension 44 by a yieldable pressure means 45 in the form of leaf springs 48, which springs are also utilized for mounting member 43 in position. Extension 44 may be added to or be an integral part of the bottom squeeze plate 16a and should also serve as the forward end thereof. As best seen in FIG. 7, the member 43 may be manually lifted to the position shown in phantom for insertion of a full package and allowed to assume its normal closure position. When the device is operated as explained above for the embodiment of FIGS. 1

through 6, fluid pressure within the container 13 will urge bar 33 toward the position shown in phantom in an amount sufficient to allow egress of fluid material from within the package. When the squeeze operation is discontinued, the spring will urge bar 43 back into closure position so as to effect an automatic closure of the device.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the bar 43 is provided with a rounded edge 47 to facilitate the pressure operation described above. However, it will be appreciated that various constructions may be provided and that the yieldable closure means capable of effecting automatic closure provides the desired combination in the device to achieve improved results therefrom.

FIGS. 8 through 9 illustrate the two alternate forms of closure means but are manually operated rather than being automatically operated. Thus in FIG. 8, there is shown a dispenser utensil 11b which is similar to the closure device 11a except that a closure means 42b is provided instead of closure means 42. In addition, flexible package 13b is provided having a special mouth end 46b, which mouth is formed with a plurality of open channels 49 and flat permanently closed portions 50 disposed therebetween at the ends of the package. Frong extension 44b is provided with generally semicircular grooves 51 formed to conform with channel openings 49 in the mouth of the flexible package.

The closure means 42b comprises a bar 43b having semi-circular grooves 52 formed to cooperate with the grooves 51 and provide circular openings, with the circular openings conforming with channels 49 in the package. The flat bar 43b is mounted on standards 30b for anchoring same. As here shown, the mounting is a pivotal connection with the bar pivoted at 53 through a suitable pivot pin so that the bar 43b may be swung out of the way when loading the flexible container.

In operation, the bar 43b is swung out of the way, a suitable flexible package 13b loaded in the container and the bar 43!) swung back into position as shown in FIG. 8. Locking means (not shown) may be provided to hold the bar in operative position, although a suitable self-holding pivot is also satisfactory. With the channels 49 of the mouth of the package registering in grooves 51 and 52 as shown in FIG. 8, fluid may be dispensed by the operation described above in connection with FIGS. I through 5. When it is desired to close the package, the operator will grasp one or both edges of the package at the mouth thereof and move the mouth of the package as shown in Arrow 54 so to line up the flat permanent portions of the package mouth with the grooves 51 and 52 and squeeze the channels between flat bar 4312 and extension 44b. When it is again desired to dispense material, the operator grasps the mouth of the package at the other side thereof, and moves the package mouth as shown by Arrow 56 so as to line up the openings again.

FIGS. 9 and show still another form of closure means utilizing a cam-action principle to close a single special channel opening 48c of flexible container 13c. Although only one large openings is shown, it will be appreciated that a plurality of openings could be pro- 57 at the front end thereof. This groove is provided to match the channel of flexible container 13c. Closure means 42c is provided to cooperate with the package and channel construction to effect manual closure by the operator.

As here shown, closure means 42c comprises a rod member 58 having an eccentric or cam-like portion 59 formed for seating in groove 57 and closing channel 480 when so seated. Rotation of the rod 58 is effected by handle 61 and the eccentric is constructed so that when the handle moves in closure position as shown in FIG. 10, the cam is rotated slightly past dead center. With this construction, the pressure of fluid within the container will tend to hold the closure in the closed position. The operation of the device is similar to the operation of the other devices described herein, except that the operator opens and closes the the package by operation of lever 61 as indicated.

It will be appreciated that other forms of closure means may be provided, if desired, and that the forms herein are illustrative of the preferred combination of the disclosure device of this invention and suitable closure means therefor.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that the dispenser package of the present invention is particularly suitable for improving the dispensing of material from flexible packages and increase the incentive for using same. It is also apparent from the foregoing description that the dispensing device of this invention provides for accurate dispensing with a minimum of clingage, as well as for providing multi-time use and storage operations together with other advantages.

I claim:

1. A dispenser utensil for dispensing material from a flexible container, comprising a pair of squeeze plates including a bottom plate and a top plate, and a linkage assembly of lever arms connecting said plates for relative movement; said linkage assembly comprising a back plate attached to the bottom squeeze plate and formed with a pair of slots therein, and a pair of lever members having projections formed for sliding movement in said slots, said lever members being pivotally attached to the upper squeeze plate at a middle position thereon, and said upper squeeze plate having stopmeans for limiting the pivot with respect to the lever members of the linkage assembly at a location juxtaposed to the sliding attachments of the levers within the slots, with the slots and pivots being formed and positioned to provide a rear-to-front dispensing pressure on relative movement of the squeeze plates.

2. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 1, which also comprises a part of standards extending upwardly from the bottom plate at the front end thereof, said standards having guide means formed to cooperate with the forward portion of the linkage assembly for guiding the movement of the linkage assembly in a forward and downward direction.

3. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 2, in which closure means are provided at the forward end of the bottom squeeze plate and formed for effecting closure of a flexible package held in dispensing position in the device.

4. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 3, in which the closure means comprisesa bar mounted for clamping against the bottom plate at the mouth of the flexible container, and spring means for normally urging the top bar into a clamped position and yieldably effect a closure, whereby fluid will be dispensed from the package upon exertion of sufficient internal pressure within the package to exceed the spring pressure, and automatic closing is effected upon release of said pressure.

5. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 3, in which the closure means comprises a pressure bar mounted for positioning adjacent the bottom squeeze plate, said pressure bar and bottom squeeze plate having the flat areas and open areas for accommodating a container having a mouth including flat closed areas and at least one open area, said areas of the closure means and flexible container being formed for effecting closure in one lateral position of the flexible package and for providing an opening in a second lateral position, whereby opening and closure of the package may be effected by movement of the package laterally between a closed and an opened position.

6. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 3, in which the closure means comprises a top pressure bar formed with a cam for clamping against the bottom squeeze plate and effecting closure, said bottom plate including a cam seat formed for allowing fluid to pass therethrough when the cam is out of the seat and for closure when the cam is in the seat, and handle means for moving the top pressure bar between a closure position and an open position.

7. A dispenser unit as defined in claim 6, in which the top pressure bar is rotatably mounted in the standards, and the top pressure bar is slightly arcuate and formed with sufficient resiliency that the bar acts as a leaf spring when the bar is rotated and the cam is seated in closure position.

8. A dispenser unit as defined in claim 7, in which the cam of the top pressure bar is eccentrically mounted to pass a dead-center position at a complete closure point, and in which stop means are provided for stopping the rotation of the pressure bar at a point slightly beyond the dead-center position of the eccentric whereby the yieldable action of the eccentric holds the cam in said stop position and retains closure.

9. A dispenser utensil for dispensing material from a flexible container, comprising a bottom squeeze plate, a back plate attached to the bottom squeeze plate at one end thereof,

a pair of standards extending upwardly from the bottom plate at the other end thereof,

a linkage assembly of frame-like construction extending between the back plate and the standards,

a first guide means formed on the back plate and on the linkage assembly for allowing the linkage assembly to move slidably and pivotally with respect to the back plate,

a second guide means formed on the standards and on said linkage assembly for accommodating pivotal movement of the linkage assembly and sliding movement in a forward and downward direction with respect to the standards, and

a top squeeze plate attached to said linkage for operative movement generally corresponding to the movement of the linkage assembly and formed to hold a flexible container between the top squeeze plate and the bottom squeeze plate.

10. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 9, in which the second guide means is formed to favor a pivot of the top squeeze plate at its initial position and accommodate movement of the rear ends of the squeeze plates relatively together at first, and then guide the upper squeeze plate in a forward direction as the two plates are pressed relatively together, said forward movement being accommodated by the pivot and slot construction on the back plate so as to allow the entire upper squeeze plate to move forward with respect to the lower squeeze plate.

11. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 9, in which the top squeeze plate is pivotally attached to the linkage assembly at each side within the rear end thereof, and in which stop-means are provided to prevent the rear end of the top squeeze plate from pivoting above the rear of said linkage assembly, whereby downward forces on the rear end of the linkage assembly positively forces the rear end of the top squeeze plate in a downward direction.

12. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 9, in which the bottom squeeze plate and top squeeze plate are formed with opposing relatively convex surfaces so that one plate rocks forward on the other when the plates are pressed relatively together to move the contents in the flexible package toward the front end outlet thereof.

13. A dispenser utensil as described in claim 12, in which the curved squeeze plate is made sufficiently flexible to conform with the shape of the other squeeze plate when the squeeze plates are pressed toward each other. i

14. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 9, in which the bottom squeeze plate is rigid and the back plate is formed to provide a base on which the dispenser can be stored upright.

15. A dispenser utensil as defined in claim 14, in which lock means are provided to hold the movable back plate against pivoting and in fixed approximately perpendicular position with respect to the bottom squeeze plate when the back plate is to serve as a base for storage upright, said lock means being formed for remaining in unlocked position during normal use of the device.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4172536 *May 30, 1978Oct 30, 1979Holt Roger ACollapsible tube dispenser
US4692157 *Dec 23, 1985Sep 8, 1987ErgomedSqueeze-actuated syringe with position-selectable lock
US5322194 *Aug 4, 1992Jun 21, 1994Roberts Allen LDispenser for collapsible tubes
US5657903 *Apr 17, 1996Aug 19, 1997Roberts; Jodie SchmidtDevice for emptying contents from a flexible container
US5810205 *May 6, 1997Sep 22, 1998Kohen; NuriDispenser for a collapsible tube
US7377403 *Jul 19, 2005May 27, 2008Megan Alexandria GorrieToothpaste tube squeezer and method for efficiently removing toothpaste from a toothpaste tube
US8640920 *Oct 12, 2009Feb 4, 2014Momentive Performance Materials Inc.Method of forming and filling a pouch
US8757438 *Sep 25, 2012Jun 24, 2014Hector GarciaMultiple compartmented and condiment dispensing apparatus
US20100115891 *Oct 12, 2009May 13, 2010Phillip Neal SharpMethod of forming a pouch
EP0554099A1 *Jan 28, 1993Aug 4, 1993Unilever PlcPressure fluid dispenser
WO1986004246A1 *Jan 21, 1986Jul 31, 1986ErgomedSqueeze-actuated syringe
WO1994016960A1 *May 11, 1993Aug 4, 1994Marc SouzaTube dispenser
WO2004106184A2 *May 26, 2004Dec 9, 2004Akzo Nobel Coatings Int BvSystem for supplying liquid or paste-like substances
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/103
International ClassificationB65D35/24, B65D35/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65D35/28
European ClassificationB65D35/28