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Publication numberUS3768808 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1973
Filing dateJun 24, 1971
Priority dateApr 12, 1968
Publication numberUS 3768808 A, US 3768808A, US-A-3768808, US3768808 A, US3768808A
InventorsF Passera
Original AssigneeF Passera
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring or frictional push pull type exercising device
US 3768808 A
Abstract
A portable physical training device which can be assembled or disassembled having a base member and pairs of elongated bars oriented in a generally upright position. The pairs of bars are interchangeably connectable to the base member. The upper ends of the bars receive the feet. The bars of one pair are mounted near their bottom ends for pivotal movement against an adjustable friction resistance. The bars of a second pair are mounted at their bases where there are located adjustable springs to vary the friction resistance to vertical straight-line movements of the bars. In a third pair, tension springs are used to resist directly vertical movements of the bars.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Passera Oct. 30, 1973 [76] Inventor: Franco Ugo Passera, via Idomeneo 72, Lecce, Italy [22] Filed: June 24, 1971 [21] App]. No.: 156,374

[52] U.S. C1 272/80, 272/DIG. 3, 272/83 R,

Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-William R. Browne AttorneyPaul & Paul [57] ABSTRACT A portable physical training device which can be assembled or disassembled having a base member and pairs of elongated bars oriented in a generally upright position. The pairs of bars are interchangeably connectable to the base member. The upper ends of the bars receive the feet. The bars of one pair are mounted near their bottom ends for pivotal movement against an adjustable friction resistance. The bars of a second pair are mounted at their bases where there are located adjustable springs to vary the friction resistance to vertical straight-line movements of the bars. In a third pair, tension springs are used to resist directly vertical movements of the bars.

4 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures Patented Oct. 30, 1973 3,768,808

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR FRANCO UGO PASSERA ATTORNEYS Patented Oct. 30, 1973 3,768,808

3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR FRANCO UGO PASSERA ATTORNEYS Patented Oct. 30, 1973 3,768,808

3 Sheets-Sheet 5 III IIIIII I II I I 2a INVENTOR FRANCO UGO PASSERA ATTORNEYS.

SPRING OR FRICTIONAL PUSH PULL TYPE EXERCISING DEVICE This invention relates to a portable physical training device for activation or reactivation of the muscles of the human body.

Physical training devices are already known, but they do not meet all practical requirements as they only permit to carry out a single exercise and not different types of exercises which are necessary to provide the beneficial results indicated above. Further, the known devices are not very practical to use and not very suitable to achieve the desired effects.

It is the object of the present invention to provide a portable physical training device which eliminates the aforementioned disadvantages, is of simple construction, can be easily and rapidly used and transported, occupies very little space, and is provided with adjusting means for varying the force required to carry out a given exercise. I

The portable physical training device according to the invention substantially comprises a base member, bars connectable to and extending upwardly from the base member and adapted to perform perpendicular oscillating movements, further bars adapted to perform lifting and lowering movements relative to the base member, means pivotally connected to said bars for engagement and connection to the feet of a training person, adjustable friction means for varying the amount of the force required to move the oscillating bars, and resilient traction or friction means determining the force required to move said bars adapted to carry out lifting and lowering movements.

Preferably the base member has the form of a suitcase in which all the bars and the means for engagement and connection to the foot of the training person can be accommodated after use of the training device.

A preferred embodiment of the invention will now be described by way of example and with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic side view showing the. physical training device according to the invention in position of use with a training person shown in the initial phase of a bending and stretching exercise with the legs in the bent position;

FIG. 2 is a similar view showing the training person in the final phase of the bending and stretching exercise with the legs in the stretched position;

FIG. 3 is a front view of the device with a training person shown in the initial phase of an adduction and abduction exercise with the legs in the adduced position;

FIG. 4 is a front view of the device showing the training person in the final phase of the exercise of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side view of the device with a training person shown in the initial phase of an exercise comprising lifting and lowering of the legs, the legs being aligned and stretched in this phase;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the device showing the training person in the final phase of the exercise of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view ofa bar of the physical training device adapted to perform oscillating movements relative to an articulated joint connected to its lower end;

FIG. 8 is a rear elevational view of the bar of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a transverse section on a larger scale showing the bar and its connection means, the section being taken on the line IX-IX in FIG. 7; I

' FIG. 10 is a transverse section of the bar, taken along the line XX in FIG. 7;

FIG. 11 is a transverse section ofthe bar, taken along the line XI-XI in FIG. 7;

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of a first embodiment of a bar adapted to perform lifting and lowering movements relative to a prismatic guide member connected to a base member;

FIG. 13 is a rear elevational view of the bar of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a transverse section of the bar, taken along the line XIVXIV in FIG. 12;

FIG. 15 is a longitudinal section and part view on a larger scale of the bar with its means for engaging and connection to the foot of the training person;

FIG. 16 is a lateral elevational view of another embodiment of the bar of FIG. 12;

FIG. 17 .is a part longitudinal section, on a larger scale, of the bar of FIG. 16 and its associated prismatic guide member, the section being taken along the line XVIIXVII in FIG. 16;

FIG. 18 is a top plan view of the base member of the physical training device;

FIG. 19 is a transverse section of the base member of the device, the section being taken along the line XIX- XIX in FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is a part longitudinal section, on a larger scale, showing the mounting means at the lower ends of the prismatic guide members of the bars performing lifting and lowering movements, and

FIG. 21 is a part longitudinal section of the base member of the physical training device.

The portable physical training device shown in FIGS. 1 to 21 comprises a base member 1 (FIG. 18) in the form of a container adapted to be carried like a suitcase. On its upper surface the base member 1 is provided with a first pair of seats 2 and 20 for receiving support members 3 of articulated joints 4 (FIGS. 7 and 8) connected to the lower ends of bars 5 adapted to perform oscillating movements, and a second pair of seats 6 and 60 arranged perpendicularly to the first pair of seats 2 and 2a, respectively, for receiving either the support members 3 of the articulated joints 4 connected to the lower ends of the bars 5 performing oscillating movements, or the lower ends of prismatic tubular guide members 7 of bars 8 (FIGS. 12, l3, 16) adapted to perform lifting and lowering movements.

The base member 1 may be loaded by ballast, for example, a cast iron plate, to stabilize it during use of the physical training device. The bars 5 (FIGS. 7 and 8) adapted to perform oscillating movements relative to the articulated joints 4 connected to their lower ends are preferably hollow and may be made, for example, of stainless steel. At its lower end each of the bars 5 is provided with a resilient fork 9 between the arms of which the articulated joint generally indicated by 4 is pivotally and frictionally mounted. At its upper end each bar 5 receives in a prismatic coupling bayonets 10 or 10a of a removable bracket 11 carrying an articulated joint for connection to the means engaging and securing the foot of the training person to the device when the training person wants to carry out a bending and stretching exercise or an adduction and abduction exercise.

A clamping screw 12 permits the bayonets l and a to be firmly locked on the upper end of the hollow bar 5. The removable bracket 11 is provided with a lower flat abutment surface 13 from which the two perpendicular bayonets l0 and 10a project. The abutment surface 13 serves as an abutment for limiting the path of movement of the bayonets 10 and 1% relative to the hollow bar 5. At its upper portion the removable bracket 11 carries a plate 14 which on its two surfaces is provided with seats for receiving coatings l5 and 16 of friction material (FIG. 9). Pivotally mounted on the plate 14 is the means for engaging and connection to the foot of the training person, this means essentially comprising a sheet metal sole 17 to which two Z- shaped plates 18, likewise of sheet metal, are welded. One end of the Z-shaped plates 18 is welded to a U- shaped member 19 which embraces the foot of the training person-to support it laterally and downwardly. Said foot engaging and connection means is further provided with preferably removable pads 20 for protecting the foot and with belts 21 for securing the foot thereto.

As mentioned above, the means for engaging and connection to the foot of the training person are detachable from the bar 5 and may be placed into the interior of the base member 1 together with the members 3, 5 and 7,8. Thus the entire device may be easily transported in the suitcase formed by the base member 1.

In its upper portion the plate 14 is provided with an adjusting screwv forming an adjustable abutment for said foot engaging and connection means. The ends 18a of theZ-shaped plates 18 adjacent the sheet metal sole 17 have a circular profile and flank the two surfaces of the plate 14 of the removable bracket 11 in the manner of a resilient fork between the two arms of which the plate 14 is pivotally mounted. The plate may be clamped on the friction coatings 15 and 16 by turning a knob 22 threaded on a bolt 23 extending through the plate 14, friction coatings 15, 16, and ends 18a of Z-shaped plates 18. In this manner an articulated joint is obtained whose degree of clamping can be varied as desired by the training person.

A similar oscillating articulated friction joint is provided at the lower end of each bar S. In fact, the support member 3 of the articulated joint in its upper portion is provided with a plate 24 of circular profile on the lateral surface of which there are provided seats for housing coatings 2S and 26 of friction material (FIG. 1 l This plate 24 of circular profile is inserted between the two arms of the resilient fork 9 at the lower end of the bar 5 and then these two arms are clamped against the friction coatings 25 and 26 by turning a screw knob 27 threaded on a through bolt 28 thus providing an articulated joint whose extent of clamping can be varied as desired by the training person. The arms or blades of the resilient fork 9 advantageously have the form of discs 2Q and 30 of the same contouras the plate 24 to ensure a better clamping effect. Further, the plate 24 may be provided with a lug 31 on its periphery, as shown in FIG. 7, to act as an abutment in limiting the path of movement of each oscillating bar 5. Near the upper end of the support member 3 of the articulated friction joint 4 this support member 3 is provided with a shoulder 32 serving as an abutment for limiting the extent of insertion of the support member 3 in the base member 1 by abutting on the upper surface of the latter.

The bars shown in FIGS. 12 and 13 are designed to perform lifting and lowering movements relative to the base member I and substantially comprise a bar 8 slidably mounted on a prismatic tubular guide member 7 rigidly connected to the base member I and extending upwardly therefrom. Thus, the members 7 and 8 are kinematically coupled and such kinematic coupling permits them to be moved one relative to the other. In a first embodiment of this coupling this relative movement is restrained by the elastic reaction of helical springs and in another embodiment of such coupling this relative movement is restrained by the friction generated by clamping at least one blade spring against the bar 8.

Means for engaging and connection to the foot of the training person are pivotally mounted on the upper end of each bar 8 and this means is substantially the same as that decribed with reference to FIGS. 7 to 9 except that in this case the pivotal connection is obtained by means of a plain pivot 33, as shown in FIGS. 12 to 16, instead of an articulated friction joint.

The aforementioned first embodiment of the kinematic coupling is illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13 wherein the prismatic guide members 7 are each provided with a pair of opposed pins 34 and 34a located near their lower ends. The lower ends of a pair of helical springs 35 and 35a are attached to the pins 34 and 34a, respectively, and the upper ends of these helical springs 35 and 35a are attached to the two ends of the pivot 33 of the upper articulated joint so that the two helical springs 35 and 35a provide an elastic force of resistance to the lifting or lowering movement of the bars 8. This embodiment is particularly suitable for making lifting exercises of the kind illustrated schematically in FIGS. 5 and 6.

The second embodiment of the kinematic coupling is shown in greater detail in FIGS. 16 and 17. In this embodiment resistance to relative movement of the members 7 and 8 is produced by friction. For this purpose a pair of blade springs 36 accommodated in appropriate elongated recesses in the guide member 7, as shown in FIG. 17, are urged against two adjacent opposite surfaces of the bar 8. The resistance exerted by the blade springs 36 to the relative movement of the members 7 and 8 is adjustable by means of a pressure screw 37 in accordance with the requirements of the training person.

As in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, an abutment shoulder 38 is provided at the end of the prismatic guide member 7 and abuts on the upper surface of the base member 1 to limit the downward movement of the guide member 7. Additionally, a through hole 39 is provided in'the guide member 7 near its lower end to permit the latter to be locked in the base member 1 by means of a setscrew 40 (FIG. 20) to prevent the guide member 7 from being detached from the base member 1 during the lifting exercise.

The simple and practical operation of the physical training device is as follows: For carrying out bending and stretching exercises the oscillating bars 5 are inserted in the seats 6 and 6a of the base member 1, then the training person sits down on a chair in front of the training device, places his feet in the feet engaging and connection means of the device, and tightens the belts 21. Then the training person maystart his exercises after having regulated the degree of clamping of the articulated joints as required.

For carrying out adduction and abduction exercises the oscillating bars 5 are still inserted in the seats 2 and 221 but the foot engaging and connection means are turned through 90 and the bayonets at the upper ends of the hollow bars 5 are replaced by the bayonets 10a. Then the device is ready for carrying out adduction and abduction exercises as described above.

For carrying out lifting and lowering exercises the prismatic guide members 7 of the bars 8 are inserted in the seats 6 and 6a of the base member 1 and the setscrews 40 are tightened. With the aforedescribed first embodiment of the kinematic coupling between the members 7 and 8 with the use of the helical springs 35 and 35a, the training device is then ready for use, whereas with the second embodiment of said coupling shown in FIG. 17, the pressure screws 37 have to be regulated first according to the requirements of the training person before exercises can be started.

Although preferred embodiments of the invention have been described in detail herein and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to this precise embodiment and that various changes and modifications may be effected therein without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A portable physical training apparatus of the kit or readily assemblable and disassemblable type having a plurality of components adapted for assembly together, comprising a base member adapted for floor mounting or the like, a pair of generally elongated bars each substantially unarticulated between opposite first and second ends thereof, means at first ends of the bars for individually mounting the bars in vertically extending relation relative to said base member, attachment means at the upper end of said base memberfor cooperating with said first ends of the bars for holding said bars in generally upstanding relation in the assembled condition of the apparatus, and engagement means at second ends of said bars opposite said first ends for engagement with the feet of a user, with means at least partially carried by said bars facilitating movement of at least said engagement means and said second ends of said bars relative to said base member in the assembled condition of the apparatus for their movement in response to forces applied by a user, and resistance means at least partially carried by said bars for yieldingly resisting movement of the bars relative to said base member upon the application of forces by a user, wherein said bars, in the assembled condition of the apparatus, are disposed for movement of their said second ends independently of each other, wherein said means facilitating movement comprise each said bar being of longitudinally extensible telescopic contruction, wherein said resistance means comprises extension spring means for resisting movements of the bars.

2. A portable physical training apparatus of the kit or readily assemblable and disassemblable type having a plurality of components adapted for assembly together, comprising a base member adapted for floor mounting or the like, a pair of generally elongated bars each substantially unarticulated between opposite first and second ends thereof, means at first ends of the bars for individually mounting the bars in vertically extending relation relative to said base member, attachment means at the upper end of said base member for cooperating with said first ends of the bars for holding said bars in generally upstanding relation in the assembled condition of the apparatus, and engagement means at second ends of said bars opposite said first ends for engage ment with the feet of a user, with means at least partially carried by said bars facilitating movement of at least said engagement means and said second ends of said bars relative to said base member in the assembled condition of the apparatus for their movement in response to forces applied by a user, and resistance means at least partially carried by said bars for yieldingly resisting movement of the bars relative to said base member upon the application of forces by a user, wherein said bars, in the assembled condition of the apparatus, are disposed for movement of their said second ends independently of each other, wherein said means facilitating move-ment comprise each said bar being of longitudinally extensible telescopic construction, wherein said resistance means comprises friction means for frictionally resisting movements of the bars.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said friction type resistance means comprises leaf springs, and wherein said telescopic construction of each said bar comprises a member mounted against longitudinal movement and a member mounted for longitudinal movement, with said leaf springs being disposed therebetween, and including adjustment means for said leaf springs for adjusting the amount of friction resistance applied thereby.

4. A physical training apparatus of the'type adapted for ready assembly and disassembly, having a plurality of separate and optional functions comprising a base member, plural attachment means at an upper end of. the base member for attachment of first ends of optionally selected ones of a plurality of movable bar members to the base member for holding the movable bar members in generally upstanding positions in the assembled condition of selected elements of the apparatus, a plurality of bar members, each adapted for op tional attachment to one of said plural attachment means, foot engagement means at second ends of said bar members, with moving means carried by the bar members facilitating movement of at least said second ends thereof'relative to the base member in the assembled condition of the apparatus in response to application of force by a user, resistance means at least partially carried by said bar members for yieldingly resisting the movement of said second ends thereof relative to the base member, in response to the application of force by a user, in the assembled condition of the apparatus, with said bar members and said attachment means and said moving meansv together comprising means facilitating optional movement of the feet of a user in two generally horizontal directions each perpendicular to the other, and in one vertical direction.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3985354 *May 21, 1975Oct 12, 1976William SchulkinExercise device with spring biased telescoping members
US4022463 *Nov 14, 1975May 10, 1977Elmer's Weights, Inc.Spring type exercising device
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US4204676 *Dec 21, 1977May 27, 1980Givens Edmond WBack exerciser
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US20070037666 *May 21, 2004Feb 15, 2007Guy GagnonOrthopedic exerciser
US20100029449 *Aug 1, 2008Feb 4, 2010Seong Woong KimExercise machine
US20130123080 *Dec 31, 2012May 16, 2013Michael FailerPortable training device, in particular for arm exercises
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/114, 482/130, 482/79
International ClassificationA63B21/055, A63B21/012, A63B21/04, A63B21/015, A63B23/04, A63B23/035, A63B23/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/00069, A63B21/0428, A63B2210/50, A63B21/04, A63B21/055, A63B22/0061, A63B21/015, A63B21/012, A63B2208/0238, A63B21/023, A63B2071/026, A63B22/0056, A63B23/0488, A63B23/08, A63B23/03533, A63B2208/0228
European ClassificationA63B22/00P8, A63B22/00P6, A63B23/035C4, A63B21/04, A63B21/015, A63B21/012, A63B21/02B