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Publication numberUS3768810 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1973
Filing dateDec 27, 1971
Priority dateDec 27, 1971
Also published asCA960718A1
Publication numberUS 3768810 A, US 3768810A, US-A-3768810, US3768810 A, US3768810A
InventorsA Goldfarb
Original AssigneeA Goldfarb
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board for play of collision game
US 3768810 A
Abstract
A board game comprising a board with a pair of tracks or pathways thereon which intersect one another at speced intervals. One track which may take a curved or circuitous route is longer than the other. A target playpiece, such as a marble, is caused to move along one track; then the other shooter playpiece is caused to travel along the other track. The shooter playpiece is moved at a speed and in timed relation to the movement of the target playpiece so as to attempt to collide with the target at a selected one of the intersections.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Goldtarb et al.

[ Oct. 30, 1973 GAME BOARD FOR PLAY OF COLLISION GAME [75] Inventors: Adolph E. Goldfarb, Tarzana; Rene Soriano, Los Angeles, both of Calif.

[73] Assignee: Adolph E. Goldfarb, Tarzana, Calif.

[22] Filed: Dec. 27, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 212,599

[52] US. Cl. 273/120 R, 46/43 51 Int. Cl. A63t 7/14 [58] Field of Search 273/11 R, 11 C, 108,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS D158,032 4/1950 Willaert 273/134 GP 811,148 1/1906 Johnson 273/123 R 1,080,955 12/1913 Clement 273/115 1,424,450 8/1922 Childs 273/121 R 2,616,696 11/1952 Field 46/43 X 2,806,323 9/1957 Oback 273/108 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,299,660 6/1962 France 46/43 130,817 3/1959 U.S.S.R. 273/134 GP 473,859 1111926 Gennany 273/119 R Primary ExaminerRichard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Richard J. Apley Attorney-Robert M. Ashen [57] ABSTRACT A board game comprising a board with a pair of tracks or pathways thereon which intersect one another at speced intervals. One track which may take a curved or circuitous route is longer than the other. A target playpiece, such as a marble, is caused to move along one track; then the other shooter playpiece is caused to travel along the other track. The shooter playpiece is moved at a speed and in timed relation to the movement of the target playpiece so as to attempt to collide with the target at a selected one of the intersections.

4 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures Patented Oct. 30, 1973 3,768,810

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 iatented Oct. 30, 1973 2 Sheets-Sheet 2;:

GAME BOARD FOR PLAY OF COLLISION GAME The present game combines quick movement, skill and excitement with relative low cost and simplicity. Causing objects or playpieces to meet and collide in a toy or game is, of course, not itself new; however applicant is not aware of any prior device where multiple intersecting locations are provided so that the player can select the desired intersecting location for the collison to take place. Neither is applicant aware of a comparable game board which is inclined and provides a pair of intersecting paths of different lengths along which objects may move solely under the force of gravity. The presently preferred form of game of the invention, which is illustrated in the drawings, comprises generally a game board having a starting end and a finish end. A pair of tracks or pathways extend from the starting end toward the finish end of the board. The first or longer track may be curved and is shown in the form of a sine wave of diminishing amplitude toward the finish end of the board. The illustrated second pathway is a generally straight line, extending end-to-end down the center of the game board, and intersecting the curved pathway each time the latter changes direction to provide a criss-cross pattern. A target playpiece, illustrated as a steel ball or marble, is caused to roll along the curved track and then a shooter playpiece is rolled along the straight second track in timed relation to the movement of the target playpiece in an effort to meet and collide with the target playpiece at an intersection of the two tracks selected by the player. When a collison occurs the target playpiece is knocked from the board into a receptacle formed adjacent the various intersections. Point total for knocking the target playpiece into receptacles increase as the distance of the intersection and the associated receptacles from the starting point increases. Thus, the player may elect to try to create an easier collison at an intersection closer to him or he may wait and attempt to create a more difficult collison at an intersection further away from him. If he fails to cause a collison, the other player may get a number of points. The difficulty of more remote intersection collisons may be controlled by various factors including the amplitude of the curve. In one form the board may be inclined downwardly from start to finish so that the balls will roll toward the finish end under the force of gravity.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the presently preferred form of game board of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the game board of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an end view taken generally along line 33 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken generally along line 44 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken generally along line 5-5 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged plan view of an intersection of the board of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken generally along line 7-7 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a modified form of game board.

In broad terms, the illustrated game 10 is comprised of an inclined game board 12 having a pair of tracks 14 and 16 which meet at intersections 18 as well as a pair of playpieces in the form of a target ball 20 and a shooter ball 22.

The inclined game board 12 is generally elongated, having an upper end 26 and a lower end 28. It may be formed of any suitable material such as a rigid plastic, wood, metal or fiberboard. The illustrated game board 12 is molded rigid plastic for low cost and light weight. The illutstrated board 12 has generally upright side walls 30 and a top or upper wall 32 on which the tracks or pathways 14 and 16 are formed. The illustrated board is a single integral molded plastic part, although of course, it could be formed of separate parts secured together to form the desired board.

The first and longer curve track or pathway 14 is in the general shape of a sine wave and has the greatest amplitude at the upper end 26 of the board, with its amplitude progressively reduced as it progresses toward the lower end 28 of the board. The illustrated track 14 formed by portions of the upper surface of the top wall 32 and by a parallelset of side walls or. rails 34 (FIG.

5). The side rails 34 are spaced apart so as to receive the target marble 20 therebetween and guide and contain it as it rolls down along the track 14. In particular, the slope of the track is selected and the track and rails 34 are so proportioned relative to the size of the target marble 20 to control the speed of travel of the marble 20. This is especially important in ensuring that the target marble 20 will negotiate the curves of track 14 without jumping the rail and leaving the track. In other words, the targetmarble 20 sits deeply in the track 14, compared to the seating of the shooter marble 22 in its track 16 as will be explained below. For example, the marble 20 may ride on the rails 34 as shown in FIG. 5. The surface of track 14 slopes downwardly in the direction from upper end 26 of the board to lower end 28.

of the board (FIG. 2), and it also slopes downwardly from side to side as shown best in FIG. 3.

The second shorter straight track 16 of the illustrated board extends the length of the board from its upper end to itslower end, thereby intersecting the curved track 14 along its longitudinal center at each transversely extending portion of that first curved track. The straight track 16 is of similar configuration to the curved track 14, being formed by a portion of the upper surface of the top wall 32 and by a pair of parallel side rails 36. Track 16 has a downward slope as it progresses from the upper end 26 of the board to the lower end of the board The illustrated straight track 16 may be somewhat narrower, however, then the illustrated curved track 14 since the shooter marble 22 follows a straight path and can be permitted to achieve greater speed than the target marble 20 without fear of the shooter marble 22 jumping the track as noted above. The shooter marble 22 rides higher then the target marble 20. FIG. 4 shows the shooter marble 22 riding in the illustrated device high up upon the rails 36.

Where the tracks 14 and 16 intersect at locations marked 18, the side rails 34 and 36 also intersect. At these intersections of the rails 34 and 36, instead of sharp corners at generally right angles, such corners have in effect been cut off by a small angled wall section 38 (FIGS. 6 and 7) which might alternatively be rounded or otherwise relieve these sharp corners. The removal of these corners virtually eliminates the possibility of either marble 20 or 22 being diverted from its own track and further eliminates the sharp corner which may momentarily stop or deflect one of the marbles in its travel.

The game board 12 is formed with sections adjacent each of the intersections that provide receptacles 40 slightly below and outwardly of each intersection of side rails. Thus, for each intersection of the tracks 14 and 16 there are provided four receptacles 40. As seen best in FIGS. 1 and 4, each receptacle 40 is formed by a depressed bottom wall portion 41, inner vertical walls 43 extending down from the tracks 14 and 16, and outer vertical walls 45 which surround the receptacles 40 and are provided by arcuate, receptacle defining board sections 47.

As noted above, the receptacle 40 closest to the upper end 26 of the board carries the lower point values with these point values increasing for receptacles positioned at intersections closer and closer to the lower end 28 of the board. Illustrative value numbers are shown on P10. 1. At the lower end 28 of the board, a final receptacle 49 is provided to catch the target 20 if it is missed. In such event, the player of the target marble 20 may receive a certain number of points.

The illustrated game board is provided with an extension 42 which is releasably connected to the upper end 26 of the board. The extension 42 provides an additional length of the straight track 16 which extends upwardly and outwardly at the upper end of the board.

This extension permits greater length of the straight track 16 for a given package or box size for the game and permits greater speed to be imparted to the shooter marble 22. Extension 42 may be releasably secured in place as by means of screws, clamps or a snap-fit frictipn connection, all of which are well known in the art.

To provide good stability to the game board, it may be supported as shown in the drawings, on a pair of legs 44 at opposite sides of the larger upper end 26 and a single adjustable leg 46 which is provided centrally of the lower end 28 of the board. In the illustrated board, the leg 46 is threaded in the board for vertical movement so that it may be adjustably positioned relative to the lower end of the board to raise or lower that end of the board relative to a supporting surface 47.

The playpieces shown in the drawings are in the form of spherical balls or marbles; however, other suitable playpieces may be substituted if desiredfFor example, a toy wheeled vehicle could be utilized as one or both of these playpieces rolling down the track. The playpiece which moves down the generally straight track 16 is particularly susceptible of substitution since it need not transverse curved track sections. Thus, while a rolling object entails a minimum of friction resistance, a low friction sliding playpiece might be utilized, particularly for a straight or only slightly curved track, with the parts being of suitable materials and with there being an adequate incline to the board. It would be possible if desired to provide drive means (not shown) for effecting movement of the target playpiece, although the illustrated form of game is much simpler and less expensive then such a device. If a driven target were utilized it could, of course, travel on a flat or level surface or it could even move up an incline. The shooter playpiece 22 could still be gravity operated. In general, it would be possible for one or both of the playpieces to be rolled (or possibly slid) along a level or up and down, oreven up an ascending incline. Thus, if desired, the board need not be inclined but could be flat. Also, while a particular curved pathway, and a generally straight intersecting pathway are shown, the shapes of the pathways could be varied as desired. For example, the straight pathway could describe a reversing curve. Lesser or no variation in length of the pathways could be compensated for by the speed at which the pieces are caused to move so long as the shooter is able to catch up with and collide with the target. Further, mechanical starting means (not shown) might be provided, and a timer (not shown) could also be provided to assist the players.

Another variation is shown in FIG. 8 where a target vehicle 20a is moved along a circuitous track which is intersected at a number of locations along its length by a plurality of tracks 16a which are adjacent at their upper ends so that the player may select which of the tracks 16a he will propel his shooter playpiece along so as to achieve a collison with the target playpiece 20a.

We claim:

1. A game board having a starting end and a finishing end, means on the board defining a first pathway and a second pathway, each of said pathways extending from the starting end toward the finishing end, said first pathway being longer than said second pathway, said first pathway being a generally reversing curve having a plurality of transverse portions, said second pathway intersecting said reversing curve at two or more of said transverse portions, said pathways each being provided by a spaced apart pair of upright parallel rails for receiving a ball for rolling therealong, the rails for the first pathway being spaced for receiving a greater portion of a ball than received by the rails for the second pathway.

2. A game board as defined in claim 1 wherein said reversing curve has a generally decreasing amplitude progressing from the starting end to the finish end of the board.

3. A game board as defined in claim 1 wherein said rails join where the pathways intersect, the corners where the rails intersect being rounded off.

4. A game board as defined in claim 1 wherein said starting end is elevated above said finishing end.

Patent Citations
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US811148 *Feb 7, 1905Jan 30, 1906Martin M JohnsonGame-table.
US1080955 *Sep 11, 1912Dec 9, 1913Alfred J B ClementPuzzle.
US1424450 *Jun 13, 1921Aug 1, 1922Ella M ShuteToy
US2616696 *Jun 24, 1949Nov 4, 1952Dexter Freeman BApparatus for simulating a game of football
US2806323 *May 24, 1954Sep 17, 1957Oback Nels EMagnetically controlled game device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4120501 *Sep 29, 1977Oct 17, 1978Roger Lee AthertonInclined track ball and dice game
US4595369 *Mar 8, 1985Jun 17, 1986Downs Arthur REducational and amusement device
US5477814 *Feb 6, 1995Dec 26, 1995Pets International, Ltd.Track system with exercise ball
US5564962 *Mar 1, 1995Oct 15, 1996Mac Molto, S.A.Modular track for toy cars
US20120272921 *Apr 27, 2012Nov 1, 2012Paul SantarsieroKinetic rocking toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/120.00R, 446/168
International ClassificationA63F7/36, A63F9/00, A63F7/02, A63F7/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/3622, A63F7/04
European ClassificationA63F7/36D, A63F7/04