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Publication numberUS3769769 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateMar 2, 1972
Priority dateMar 2, 1972
Publication numberUS 3769769 A, US 3769769A, US-A-3769769, US3769769 A, US3769769A
InventorsKohl W
Original AssigneeKohl W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Permanent basement window frame and pouring buck
US 3769769 A
Abstract
A window buck adapted to be permanently embedded in a poured concrete wall, the buck including identical half sections molded from a plastic material and having top, bottom and end walls forming a window enclosure. Each half section being adapted to be mounted on the concrete wall mold forms for assembly in a back-to-back relation, interengaging elongate members and recesses are provided on the back sections for mating engagement on assembly. The half sections being substantially identical and adapted to be stored in a nested relation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENIED NOV 6 I973 SHEET 3EF 3 PERMANENT BASEMENT WINDOW FRAME AND POURING BUCK BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The increase in the use of poured concrete basement walls has resulted in an increased demand for window bucks. Window bucks presently available are of the removable type which are supported on the forms and are removed after the poured wall has set. This type of a window buck is generally made as a permanent structure and is intended to be reused many times. These bucks are expensive and require special handling and a large amount of storage space.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The window buck of the present invention provides for the permanent installation of a window frame in the window opening at the time of pouring a concrete wall. A window and a storm window can be installed in the buck. The window buck is generally made in two identical half sections which can be stacked in a nested relation and stored in a minimum of space. The half sections are assembled by merely supporting the sections on the wall forms in a back-to-back relation. The sections are interlocked by elongate members and recesses located on the back of the sections so that they will not shift when the wall is poured. The cost of the window buck is reduced by using a low cost plastic composition to form the buck. Since the buck half sections are identical, they can be stacked in a nested relation reducing storage space requirements.

DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the window buck of this invention showing the two half sections in a spaced relation;

FIG. 2 is a front view in elevation of one of the half sections of the window buck;

FIG. 3 is a back elevation view of the half section shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 2 showing a window supported in one of the half sections;

FIG. 5 is a view of the inside of a portion of one of the ehd walls showing the window latch; and

FIG. 6 is a view of the inside of a portion of one of the end walls showing the storm window latch.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The window buck 10 of this invention provides a permanent window frame for the window openings in a poured concrete basement wall. A wall of this type is generally formed by pouring concrete between wooden forms. The window openings are formed by supporting removable window bucks on the wooden forms. These windows are removed when the wooden forms are removed.

The window buck 10 of this invention is made from two half sections 12 and 14. The half sections are generally identical however variations in wall thickness may require a different depth for the window buck. The half sections are nailed to the wooden forms for the poured concrete wall for assembly in a back-to-backv relation. When concrete is poured into the space between the wooden forms, the concrete will completely surround the outside surface of the two window buck half sections. The concrete readily adheres to the window buck half sections which are left in the wall to form a permanent window frame for the basement window.

More particularly, the half sections 12 and 14 are molded from a plastic material. Generally, this plastic material consists of a polyethylene and asbestos fibre composition. This material has high impact strength, is water resistant and is unaffected by any acids or salts which be contained in the adjacent soil.

Each half section 12 and 14 includes a top wall 16, bottom wall 18 and side walls 20. The walls 16, 18 and 20 are shown in the form of a rectangle and are tapered inwardly toward the back window opening of each half section. An inwardly extending peripheral back flange 22 is provided around the window opening in the back of the half section. An outwardly extending front flange 24 is provided around the periphery of the front window opening of each half section.

The window buck is locked into the concrete wall by means ofa number of fins or flanges 26. The fins 26 are molded as an integral part of the outer surface of the top wall 16 and front flange 24. The tings 26 are shown extending partially back toward the rear of the half sections, however, the fins can extend all of the way back if it is deemed necessary.

Means are provided for interlocking the two half sections 12 and 14 on assembly to minimize the flow of concrete into the window opening in the two half sections 12 and 14. Such means is in the form ofa number of elongate members or protrusions 30 and a corresponding number of elongate recesses 32 provided in the back flange 22. The members 30 and recesses 32 generally have the same contour for mating engagement with the corresponding members 30 and recesses 32 in the back flange of the other half section. In the drawing the members 30 are shown on one half of the back flange 22 and the recesses 32 are shown on the other half of the back flange 22. On assembly, one of the half sections is rotated through to align the members 30 with recesses 32.

Means are provided for supporting the window buck 10 on the wooden forms for the wall mold. Such means is in the form of the front flange 24 which is provided with a number of nailing holes 34. The flange 24 thus forms a nailing strip through which nails can be driven.

The Window Support Each of the half sections 12 and 14 is provided with means for supporting a thin line window 40 of the hopper in type. Such means is in the form of a ledge 36 provided on the inside surface of the bottom wall 18 across the full width of the window buck. The window 40 is locked in position against the back flange 22 by means of a pair of latches 42 provided on the end walls 20. The latches 42 (FIG. 5) are provided with a cam groove 44 and are secured to the end walls 20 by means of screws 46. By sliding the latch downward on the screws 42, the handle will be cammed by the groove 44 toward the back flange 22 to lock the window 40 in position. When the window is opened, the latch 42 is raised and pivoted to the position shown in phantom in FIG. 4. The window is held in the opened position by means of the hook 43 at the end of the latch 42.

Although a hopper insert window has been shown and described above, a slide window can also be used in the window back of this invention. The slide insert would be held in place in substantially the same manner as the hopper insert window.

Means can be provided on the other half section for securing a storm window or screen window to the back flange 22. in this regard, a small latch 50 (FIG. 6) is secured to the end walls 20 by screws 52. The latch 50 is merely rotated to lock the storm window in position.

I claim:

1. A window buck and frame for a poured concrete wall comprising:

a pair of identical half sections, each of said half sections being molded from a plastic material and having top, bottom and side walls defining front and back window closure openings,

an outwardly extending peripheral flange around said front window closure opening,

means connected between said outwardly extending flange and the outside surface of said walls for locking said sections in position in the wall,

an inwardly extending peripheral flange around said back window closure opening,

a number of projections extending rearwardly from one half of said inwardly extending flange,

and a number of recesses of corresponding configuration to interengage with said projections on the other half of said rearwardly extending flange, said members and said recesses in each of said half sections being located for mating engagement with the corresponding members and recesses in the other of said half sections when placed back-to-back to form the window buck.

2. The assembly according to claim 1 wherein said top, bottom and side walls of each of said half sections are tapered inwardly from said front closure opening towards said back closure opening.

3. The assembly according to claim 1 wherein one of said half sections includes means mounted on said sidewalls for supporting a window against said inwardly extending flange.

4. The window buck assembly according to claim 3 wherein said supporting means comprises a latch mounted on each of the side walls and having a camming groove.

5. The window buck assembly according to claim 1 wherein each of said half sections is molded as an integral unit from a material containing polyethylene and asbestos fiber.

6. A permanent window buck for a poured concrete wall according to claim 1 wherein said walls taper inwardly from the front toward the back whereby each half section can be stacked partially within another half section.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4112645 *Mar 16, 1977Sep 12, 1978Frederick Dale GreenfieldPorthole arrangement
US4989381 *Apr 10, 1986Feb 5, 1991Odl, IncorporatedVentilated door light
US5319884 *Dec 9, 1992Jun 14, 1994Bergeron Jean GuyBuck frame and window frame removably fitted therein
US5369922 *Apr 26, 1994Dec 6, 1994Tehrmoform A/SWindow frame assembly
US5729942 *Apr 10, 1996Mar 24, 1998Moore, Jr.; FranklinWall assembly of foam blocks with internal concrete grid and integral window frame
US6101772 *Feb 23, 1999Aug 15, 2000Dinesol Plastics, Inc.Window-mounting device
US6185884Jan 15, 1999Feb 13, 2001Feather Lite Innovations Inc.Window buck system for concrete walls and method of installing a window
US6192640 *Sep 3, 1998Feb 27, 2001Darryl L. SnyderDouble divisible connector frame for mounting air grilles and louvers to heating and cooling duct outlets
US6530185 *Aug 3, 1998Mar 11, 2003Arxx Building Products, Inc.Buck for use with insulated concrete forms
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US6601356 *Feb 26, 2001Aug 5, 2003Snyder National CorporationConnector frame for ventilation opening
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US7490442Jul 27, 2004Feb 17, 2009Feather Lite Innovations, Inc.Window system for concrete walls and associated method
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US8458969 *Jul 21, 2010Jun 11, 2013Cfs Concrete Forming Systems Inc.Stay-in-place form systems for form-work edges, windows and other building openings
US8544224 *Mar 21, 2011Oct 1, 2013Jim HafendorferThermally efficient frames for use in construction of structures using insulated concrete forms (ICF) and methods for making and using same
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/212, 52/216
International ClassificationE06B5/00, E06B5/02
Cooperative ClassificationE06B5/02
European ClassificationE06B5/02