Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3769798 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateMar 22, 1972
Priority dateMar 22, 1972
Publication numberUS 3769798 A, US 3769798A, US-A-3769798, US3769798 A, US3769798A
InventorsH Whittaker
Original AssigneeH Whittaker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-pollution exhaust system for an internal combustion engine
US 3769798 A
Abstract
An anti-pollution exhaust system for an internal combustion engine in which the exhaust gases are first diluted and then are fed through a spiral pipe serving as a centrifugal separator to separate the heavier gaseous material from the lighter gaseous material. The heavier gaseous material is fed back to the air inlet of the carburetor to be burned in the engine. Fumes from the crankcase are fed to a condensing unit in which the liquid oil is retained until drained off with the remaining fumes being fed to the air inlet of the carburetor to be burned in the engine.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Whittaker ANTI-POLLUTION EXHAUST SYSTEM FOR AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE [76] Inventor: Henry C. Whittaker, 6117 Garfield St, Hollywood, Fla. 33024 22 Filed: Mar. 22, 1972 211 Appl. No.: 237,032

[52] US. CL... ..60/279,123/119 A, 123/119 B [51] Int. Cl. F02m 25/06 [58] Field of Search 60/283, 279, 311,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2/1939 Pratt 60/279 Crandall 123/119 B Nov. 6, 1973 3,340,859 9/1967 Williamson 60/279 3,393,668 7/1968 Milgram 60/279 3,397,682 8/1968 Riggan 123/119A 3,495,385 2/1970 GlaSS 60/310 Primary ExaminerDouglas Hart Att0rney-Alexander B. Blair et al.

[5 7] ABSTRACT An anti-pollution exhaust system for an internal combustion engine in which the exhaust gases are first diluted and then are fed through a spiral pipe serving as a centrifugal separator to separate the heavier gaseous material from the lighter gaseous material. The heavier gaseous material is fed back to the air inlet of the carburetor to be burned in the engine. Fumes from the crankcase are fed to a condensing unit in which the liquid oil is retained until drained off with the remaining fumes being fed to the air inlet of the carburetor to be burned in the engine.

4 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures Patented Nov. 6, 1973 3y Sheets-Sheet 1 Patented Nov. 6, 1973 3 Sheets-Sheet 2i Patented Nov. 6, 1973 3 Sheets-Sheet Z6 the direction of the arrows;

FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to anti-pollution exhaust systems for motor vehicles.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The exhaust from the engine is diluted with air under pressure and fed to a centrifugal separator unit utilizing a spiral coil of pipe having perforations on the outer portion thereof so that the heavier pollutent containing portion of the gases is expelled by centrifugal separation with the lighter gases moving onto exhaust. The heavier gases are then backfed to the carburetor air intake to permit them to be burned in the engine. Fumes from the crankcase are condensed to remove as much oil as possible with the remaining fumes being burned in the engine. I l

'The primary object of the invention is to provide an anti-pollution exhaust system for motor vehicles which will eliminate air pollutents while simultaneously increasing gas mileage.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent in the following specification when considered in the light of the attached drawings.

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical cross section taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. I looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a horizontal cross section taken along the line 3-3 of .FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows;

rows;

FIG. is a transverse cross section taken along the FIG. 4 is a transverse cross section taken along the line 5-5of FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is a transverse cross section taken along the line 6--6-of FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken through the centrifugal separator;

FIG. 8 is a transverse cross'section taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 7 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary transverse cross section taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 7looking in FIG. 10 is an enlarged top plan view of the exhaust and supplemental air connection;

FIG; 11 is a top plan view of the carburetor air filter and connection to the centrifugal separator;

FIG. 12 is a transverse cross section taken along the line 12-12 of FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows shown partially broken away for convenience of illustration;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary side elevation of the blower;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged side elevation of the blower mount shown partially broken away and in section;

FIG. 15 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line 15-15 of FIG. 14 looking in the direction of the arrows; and I FIG. 16 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view taken on the line 1616 of FIG. 15looking in the direction of the arrows.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings in detail wherein like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several figures the reference numeral 20 indicates generally an antipollution exhaust system for internal com bustion engines constructed in accordance with the invention.

The system 20 is used with an internal combustion engine indicated generally at 21 which includes opposed exhaust manifolds 22, 23, a carburetor 24, and an air filter 25 for the carburetor. A shaft 26 extends out of the forward end of the engine21and has a pulley 27 secured thereto. An air blower 28 has a shaft 29 carrying a coupler 30 thereon coupled to the outer end of the shaft26. Blower 28 is secured to the engine 21 by an angle bracket31. The blower38 has an air inlet A and a fan F for blowing the air.

A branched exhaust connector 32 is positioned rearwardly of the engine 21 and has a conduit 33 connected to an exhaust pipe 34 which extends from the exhaust manifold 22. The connector 32. has a conduit 35 connected to an exhaust pipe 36 which extends from the exhaust manifold 23. The connector 32 has a conduit 37 connected to an elongate conduit 38 which extends from the air blower 28. The connector 32'has a conduit 39 extending rearwardly therefrom into a' pipe 40 which communicates with the intake pipe 41 of the centrifugal gas separator indicated generally at 42. The separator 42 includes a generally cylindrical chamber 43 having an inlet end wall 44 and an outlet end wall 45 to seal the separator 42. The inlet pipe 41 extends through the end wall 44 and is formed into a spiral 46 having a plurality of bores 47 on the outer surface thereof. The spiral 45 straightens into an outlet conduit 48 which extends through the end wall 45 and is connected to a tail pipe 49 leading to the rear of the vehicle on which the. engine 21 is-mounted. The chamber 43 has a plurality of internal ribs 50 extendinglongitudi- .nally therealong to center the spiral 46 therein.

A hollow fitting 51 communicates with the interior of I the-chamber 43 and -has a conduit 52 connected thereto. The conduit 52 extends forwardly and communicates with the air intake horn 53 of the air filter 25.

An oil condenser indicated generally at 54 consists of a tank 55 mounted on the frame 56 of the'vehicle in which the engine 21 is mounted. The tank 55 has a plurality of transversely extending upright partitions 57, 58, 59, 60, and 61 arranged in spaced parallel relation. An X-shaped spacer 62 engages the partition 61 to secure the partitions 57, 58, 59, and 61 in their respective positions within the tank 55. Bores 63 are formed in the partitions to'permit the flow of gases through the tank 55. I

A conduit 64 extends fromthe crankcase of the engine 21 into the tank 55 at one end thereof and the gases pass through the bores 63 and out a conduit 65 at the opposite end of the tank 65. The conduit 65 extendsto the air cleaner 25 and communicates therewith. A check .valve indicated generally at 66 includes a ball valve 67 seated by a spring 68 andarranged to communicate with the tank 55 through a bore 69. Vacuum forming in the tank 55. beyond] a desired level will cause the ball .67 to be drawn inwardly to permit the vacuum to be reduced by admitting air to the tank 55.

In the use and operation of the invention the internal combustion engine 21 is operated normally and the exhaust gases pass rearwardly from the exhaust manifolds 22, 23 through the exhaust pipes 34, 36 respectively into the connector 32. Air from the air blower 28 passes rearwardly through the conduit 38 into the connector 32 to dilute the exhaust gases also flowing into the connector 32. The diluted gases then pass through the conduit 39 into the conduit 40 through the conduit 41 into the spiral 46. The gases are moving at relatively high speed so that the gases tend to separate in the spiral 46 with the heavier gases being thrown to the outside where they are permitted to exit through the bores 47. The lighter exhaust gases pass on rearwardly through the conduit 48 and out through the tailpipe 49 to the atmosphere. The heavier exhaust gases enter the tank 55 from the spiral 46 and pass therefrom into the fitting 51 and the conduit 52 where they are conducted to the air inlet horn 53 of the air cleaner 25. The unburned hydrocarbons in the materials passing through the conduit 52 are then burned in the engine 21. It should be noted that the gases passing through the conduit 52 are further diluted by air passing through the air horn 53.

Fumes arising from the crankcase of the engine 21 pass into the oil condenser 54 and at least a portion of the oil in the fumes is condensed in the tank 54 and falls to the bottom thereof. The remaining gases pass through the conduit 55 to the air intake 25. Suction on the air intake 25 provides suction on the tank 55 to assist in drawing the fumes therethrough. Oil collects in the tank 55 in the bottom thereof until drained off through an outlet plug 70. The partitions 57, 58, 59, 60 and 61 are each provided with drain holes 71 to permit the oil to flow to the outlet plug 70.

It has been found in practice that sufficient burnable materials pass from the separator 42 and the condenser 54 to provide at least a portion of the fuel required to operate the engine 21 so that a distinct increase in gas mileage is obtained.

In some instances the plug 72 in the tank 55 is used to put water into the tank 55 up to its level. In such cases the fumes from the crankcase pass through the water in the separator 54 with an oil mist sticking to the water and collecting on top of the water. The plug 72 acts also as a gauge to control the amount of water put into the tank 55. Oil mist escaping from the water is collected on the baffle plates or partitions as the fumes pass through the port holes therein.

The separator operates either wet or dry but is more effective wet.

Having thus described the preferred embodiment of the invention it should be understood that numerous structural modifications and adaptations may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. An exhaust system for internal combustion engines of the type including a carburetor having an air filter comprising a spiral exhaust gas separator for receiving all of the exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine and separating the exhaust gas into a heavy component and a light component with said separator including a chamber, and a spiral tubular coil having a plurality of bores along the outer edge thereof communicating with said chamber, means extending from said coil in said separator to the atmosphere to convey the light component of the exhaust gases to the atmosphere, means extending from said chamber of said separator to the air filter of an internal combustion engine for feeding the heavier component through the engine, and means for supplying a stream of diluting cooling air under pressure to the exhaust gases just prior to entering the separator.

2. A device as claimed in claim 1 including an oil condenser for said engine, means connecting the crankcase of said engine to said oil condenser to conduct oil fumes thereto, and means extending from said oil condenser to the air cleaner of said engine for conducting oil fumes thereto.

3. A device as claimed in claim 2 wherein means are provided on said oil condenser for admitting air to maintain said oil condenser at the desired vacuum level.

4. A device as claimed in claim 2 wherein means are provided on said oil condenser for collecting and discharging condensed oil therefrom.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2147671 *Jul 15, 1937Feb 21, 1939Motor Power IncCentrifugal gas separator
US2860618 *Nov 5, 1957Nov 18, 1958William R MansfieldInjection device for internal combustion engines
US3013546 *Jun 8, 1959Dec 19, 1961Wilfred G PerkinsExhaust treatment device
US3241536 *Nov 27, 1964Mar 22, 1966James P MaloneAnti-smog means
US3250263 *May 18, 1964May 10, 1966Fred W GerjetsApparatus for reducing air pollution by combustion engines
US3266474 *Jun 8, 1964Aug 16, 1966Crandall Morris NVapor-removing devices
US3340859 *Jun 2, 1965Sep 12, 1967Victor L WilliamsonEngine exhaust gas treatment system
US3393668 *Aug 22, 1966Jul 23, 1968Frank L. MilgramEngine-exhaust-treatment system
US3397682 *Nov 25, 1966Aug 20, 1968Homer D. RigganApparatus for exhaust gas separation
US3495385 *Aug 21, 1967Feb 17, 1970Adolph C GlassAir pollution control device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4089309 *Dec 31, 1975May 16, 1978Bush Elmer WCrankcase emission separator and collector
US4404936 *Jan 16, 1981Sep 20, 1983Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaBreather device for overhead valve engines
US4501234 *Nov 8, 1983Feb 26, 1985Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaBlow-by gas passage system for internal combustion engines
US4502424 *Oct 27, 1983Mar 5, 1985Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaBlow-by gas recovering system for internal combustion engines
US5383440 *Sep 15, 1993Jan 24, 1995Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaBlow-by gas circulating system for 4-cycle engine
US5967127 *Jul 20, 1998Oct 19, 1999Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha KaishaBlow-by gas treatment for engine
US7320316Jun 29, 2006Jan 22, 2008Caterpillar Inc.Closed crankcase ventilation system
US7434571Jun 29, 2006Oct 14, 2008Caterpillar Inc.Closed crankcase ventilation system
US7762060Apr 28, 2006Jul 27, 2010Caterpillar Inc.Exhaust treatment system
US8419834Jun 30, 2010Apr 16, 2013Kohler Co.Air cleaner assembly
US8808432Jun 2, 2009Aug 19, 2014Kohler Co.Cyclonic air cleaner
USRE30682 *May 15, 1980Jul 21, 1981 Crankcase emission separator and collector
DE10040669A1 *Aug 19, 2000Feb 28, 2002Volkswagen AgVehicle drive device has oil radiator and filter module offset from engine on frame towards main body of vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification60/279, 123/572
International ClassificationF01N3/00, F02M25/06
Cooperative ClassificationY02T10/121, F01N3/00, F02M25/06, Y02T10/20
European ClassificationF02M25/06, F01N3/00