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Publication numberUS3769977 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateMay 8, 1972
Priority dateMay 8, 1972
Publication numberUS 3769977 A, US 3769977A, US-A-3769977, US3769977 A, US3769977A
InventorsE Victory
Original AssigneePulsatron Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hygienic irrigator
US 3769977 A
Abstract
A fluidic pulse generator is utilized to provide a pulsating flow of water to a lavage syringe from a pressurized source. The generator is releasably coupled to a water supply, e.g., a lavatory tap and the pulsating outflow of the generator is channeled through tubing to the syringe. An additive solution carried in a well is aspirated into the outflow through a control channel of the generator. Lavative flow is controlled at the syringe with a fingertip valve; ventilation passageways in the generator drain unutilized water at a rate determined by the valve constriction.
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ll mted States Patent 1 [111 3,769,977

Victory 1 1 Nov. 6, 1973 [54] HYGllENlC IRRIGATOR 3,537,444 11/1970 Garn et al 128/66 [75] Inventor: Ebrahim Victory, New York, NY.

Primary Examiner-Lucie H. Laudensla or [73] Ass1gnee: Pulsatron Corp., Forest Hllls, N.Y. Attorney seth Natter g [22] Filed: May 8, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 250,926 [57] ABSTRACT Related U S A l i Data A fluidic pulse generator is utilized to provide a pulsat- [63] continuatiommpart of Sen No. 205,136 Dec 6, ing flow of water to a lavage syringe from a pressurized 1971. source. The generator is releasably coupled to a water supply, e.g., a lavatory tap and the pulsating outflow of 52 us. on 128/229, 128/66, 128/251 the generator is Channeled through tubing to the [51 7 Int. Cl A6lm 3/00 ringeadditive solution carried a is aspirated [58] Field of Search 128/66, 239, 229, into the Outflow through a control channel of the 128/251, 230, 224 erator. Lavative flow is controlled at the syringe with a fingertip valve; ventilation passageways in the genera- [56] References Cited tor drain unutilized water at a rate determined by the UNITED STATES PATENTS Valve 3,612,045 10/1971 Dudas et al 128/66 10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures 1 HYGIENIC IRRIGATORY V ous application, Ser. No. 205,136 filed Dec. 6, 1971 and entitled Irrigation Apparatus.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to body treatment and care devices, and more particularly. to a hygienic irrigator.

Specifically, this invention encompasses a hygienic irrigator designed to produce an efficient and thorough lavage for both routine cleansing and therapeutic applications.

2. Description of the Prior Art Ofthe prior hygienic irrigator devices, commonly employed ones generally utilized a collapsible bulb or bag coupled to a syringe for discharging a quantity of liquid from the liquid source, i.e., the bulb or bag, through a syringe. Unfortunately, these devices were not able to provide a syringe outflow having the maximum effectiveness per volume unit of liquid discharged.- Furthermore theyrequired frequent flow interruption to resupply the liquid source.

Prior patents revealed devices designed to .be coupled via a hose to a source of liquid under pressure such asa water faucet. These devices, however, included inherent disadvantages which precluded their widespread acceptance. Among the deterrents was the difficulty encountered in controlling syringe flow with the faucet valve; It will be appreciated that the syringe was utilized with the operator and the syringe at lavative sta tion which permitted'proper drainage of reflux flow. Such station was usually remote from the faucet valve and therefore flow control necessitated moving from the lavative station to reach the tap valve. Other devices proposed heretofore included mechanical pumps which provided a discharge flow from a reservoir through a syringe. Numerous shortcomings such as leakage around pump fittings, piston wear, sediment in pump components and cumbersome set up procedures, accompanied the use of these devices.

The utilization of electrically powered pumps presented, 'in addition to the above disadvantages, a serious danger of electrical shock hazard. This hazard became accentuated when a medicament solution was added to the liquid discharged from the syringe since such additives generally increased the electricalconductivity of the liquid.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly, the hygienic irrigator of the present invention includes a fluidic pulsator interconnecting a source of pressurized liquid and a vaginal syringe. A snap fit collet is utilized to releasably couple the pulsator to a lavatory tap such that the pulsator is supported by the faucet in an orientation over a drainage collector, e. g., a lavatory basin, to dispose the liquid not discharged through the syringe. The pulsator includes a fluidic pulse generator having passageways for liquid flow to the syringe with a resistance-capacitance feedback loop to divert a liquid power stream for intermittent or pulsating output flow through the syringe. An additive, e.g., a medicament solution-may be added'to the generator outflow by aspiration through a control channel of the generator. 1 I

Having thus summarized the invention, it can now be seen that an object thereof is to provide a hygienic irrigator of the general character described which is so constructed that it is not subject to any of the aforementioned disadvantages.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a hygienic irrigator of the general character described which is well suited for routine feminine lavage application.

Another object of the present invention .is to provide a hygienic irrigator of the general character described adapted for feminine lavage application and utilizing a fluidic pulse generator to provide a pulsating outflow from a syringe. I I

A further object of the present invention is to provide a hygienic irrigator of the general character described wherein an additive carried in a well is automatically aspirated into a pulsating outflow of a lavage syringe.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a hygienic irrigator of the general character described wherein a fluidic pulse generator is releasably coupled to a source of pressurized liquid while providing a remote means to control the utilized outflow of the generator.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a hygienic irrigator of the general character described .which is well suited for conventional mass production techniques to thereby provide a lavaging device which is relatively inexpensive in cost.

Other objects of the invention in part will be obvious and in part will be pointed out hereinafter.

With these ends in view, the invention has embodiment in certain features of construction, combinations of components and arrangements of parts by which the said objects and certain other objects are hereinafter attained, all as fully described with reference to the accompanying drawings, and thescope of which is more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings in which is shown one of the various possible embodiments of the invention,

FIG. 1 is a perspective illustration of the hygienic irrigator constructed'in accordance with and embodying the invention and fragmentarily illustrating a water supply faucet having a spigot tip above a flow pulsator to show the relative positioning of components;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view through the flow pulsator,'the same being-taken substantially along the plane 2-2 of FIG. 1, and with the faucet being coupled to the irrigator through a releasable collet;

FIG. 3 is a further enlarged sectional view through the pulsator, the same being taken substantially along the plane 3-3 of FIG. 1 and showing the internal construction of a pulse generator which forms a component of the flow pulsator with the floor of the pulsator broken away; I

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional illustration through a portion of the flow pulsator taken substantially along the same plane as FIG. 2 yet showing the collet mechanism in a position adapted to accept or release a spigot tip;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view through the flow pulsator with portions deleted for clarity, the same being taken substantially along the line 5-5 of FIG. 3, and better illustrating a capacitance chamber forming a portion of a feedback loop to the pulse generator; additionally shown is an additive in fluid communication with the pulse generator and well adapted to supply a medicament solution for introducing into a control channel of the generator; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary greatly enlarged sectional view taken substantially along theline 6-6 of FIG. 3 and illustrating ventilation passageways through the generator.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now in detail to the drawings, the reference numeral 10 denotes generally a hygienic irrigator constructed in accordance with and embodying the invention. The irrigator 10 includes a water flow pulsator unit 12 adapted to be selectively coupled to a lavatory faucet or other convenient supply of water under pressure. In addition to the flow pulsator 12, the irrigator includes a length of flexible tubing 14 having a lavage syringe 16 affixed to the distal end thereof. As will be subsequently discussed, the flow pulsator 12 is so designed and constructed as to provide a course for the flow of water from the pressurized source to the syringe 16; however, in accordance with the invention, such flow is modified in that although a steady flow exits from the source, the flow entering the tubing 14 will be pulsating in nature, such that the flow from the pulsator is intermittent or broken up so that bursts of spurts are expelled from the syringe and impinge the cavity which is being lavaged.

The flow pulsator 12 is constructed of a cover shell 18 having the general shape of a truncated cone with a substantially horizontal upper wall 20 and a depending peripheral skirt 22. The cover shell 18 partially encloses and surrounds a pulse generator 24. The pulse generator 24 and cover shell 18 are preferably constructed of a fluid impervious material such as an injection moldable thermoplastic, e.g., acrilonitrilebutadiene-styrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, etc. The generator 24 is formed of two face abutting planar panels, substantially circular in plan profile. The upper panel may be cal-led a passageway panel 26, while the lower panel is a floor panel 28 having a larger diameter than the panel 26 and forming a supporting surface for the skirt'22 which encases the panel 26. As will be subsequently described, the passageway panel 26 is thicker than the floor panel and includes a plurality of passageways for liquid flow, which passageways are so designed that although steady liquid flow under constant pressure enters the pulsator 12, the flow discharged through the tubing 14 is pulsating in nature.

An annular inlet throat 30 projects upwardly from the passageway panel 26 to provide a ductway 32 for liquid flow entering the pulse generator. The throat 30 is furcated adjacent its upper end by a plurality of vertical spaces into a plurality of. jaws 34 to form a collet 36 in order to releasably couple a source of liquid under pressure. The collet 36 further includes an annular collar 38 which is biased to a normal position circumscribing the jaws (shown in FIG. 2) by a helical coil spring 40 extending between the collar 38 and the upper floor of the panel 26. It will be appreciated that not only does the throat 30 project through a suitable orifice 42 in the upper wall 20, but the collar 38 is normally biased to the same elevation. The collar 38 includes a radial stop flange 39 which abuts the undersurface of the wall 20 when the collar is in its normal position.

The collet 36 is constructed to accommodate and seal against a spigot nozzle tip 44 which is matingly received within the ductway 32. The spigot tip 44 is adapted for threaded securement to the end of a lavatory faucet in lieu of an aerator and includes a generally barrel shaped hollow body having a conventional strainer or aerator mechanism therein. Various adapters such as that disclosed in U. S. Pat. No. 2,721,089 may be utilized to obtain the proper engagement between the faucet and the spigot tip 44. The spigot tip 44 is preferably permanently secured to the faucet and the aerator or strainer mechanism provides a flow stream for normal usage of the faucet when the flow pulsator 12 is not united therewith.

The maximum diameter of the spigot tip 44 is such that it is accommodatingly received in the ductway 32 and the upper (faucet) ;end of the tip includes an annular groove 46 which is engaged by an inwardly extending bead 48 at the free ends of each jaw 34. In order to provide an effective water seal, a resilient yet flexible O-ring 50 is seated in a peripheral groove extending around the body of the tip 44 in a generally horizontal plane. The O-ring 50 seals against the ductway 32 and any liquid within the ductway 32 beneath the spigot tip exerts pressures such that the O-ring is forced upwardly into abutting and sealing engagement against the ductway.

To couple the flow pulsator 12 to the spigot tip 44 it is first necessary to permit the jaws 34 to dilate so that the spigot tip 44 may be introduced into the ductway. This is accomplished by manually depressing the collar 28. With the flow pulsator 12 positioned beneath the spigot tip 44 and the ductway 32 in registry with the spigot tip 44, the flow pulsator 12 is raised to urge the ductway over the tip. Slight spreading of the jaws 34 to accommodate the tip 44 is permitted since the collar 38 is depressed beneath the jaws. Once the flow pulsator 12 is raised to a position wherein the beads 48 are at the same elevation as the groove 46, the collar 38 is released. The spring urges the collar upwardly to constrict the jaws 34 against the spigot tip and urge the beads 48 thereof into locking engagement with the groove 46. When so coupled, the pulsator 12 is supported from and rigidly connected to the faucet.

The pulse generator 24 is provided with a plurality of interior passageways, the sum effect of which is to provide an intermittent output flow from a steady input. The side and top walls of the passageways are formed in one of the panels, i.e., the passageway panel 26, and are desirably molded in one piece therewith. It is for this reason that this panel 26 is relatively thick. The floor panel 28 forms the bottom walls of the passageways. Optionally, a laminated generator could be constructed with a center panel having the side walls of the passageway formed therein, and abutting sealing panels forming the top and bottom walls of the passageways. Further modifications could include two panels with three walls of one or more passageways formed in each.

Referring now to the illustration of FIG. 3 wherein the bottom of the passageway panel 26 is exposed, it will be observed that at the ductway 32, liquid flow from the steady input of the spigot tip 44 extends through a supply passageway 52 which terminates at a power nozzle 54 opening into a flow control chamber 56. From the control chamber, flow is bifurcated into two separate outflow passageways 58 and 60.

8 Output flow is directed in a flip-flop fashion between the output passageways through a resistancecapacitance feedback, loop leading from the outflow passageway 58 to a control passageway 62. The control passageway 62 includes a control nozzle at the control chamber 56 adjacent the power nozzle 54 and designed to issue a feedback control stream biasing against the power flow through the power nozzle to thereby deflect the power flow to the outflow passageway 60. A mating control passageway 64 includes a control nozzle at the control chamber 56 adjacent the power nozzle 54 and in directly opposed relationship to the control nozzle of the passageway 62. The control stream may be either perpendicular to or inclined at an angle of up to approximately 45 toward the direction of the power flow.

Two ventilation passageways 68, 70 are positioned in communication with the control chamber 56, downstream of the outflow passageways 58, 60. From an examination of FIG. 6 it will be observed that appropriate access bores .72, 74 are provided through the floor panel 28 for atmospheric communication with each of the ventilation passageways. It should also be noted that since, during actual operation, liquid drains through the ventilation passageways, the unclersurface of the floor panel includes'an appropriate protuberance adjacent each of the access bores to facilitate drainage directly from each of the bores. Satisfactory results have been obtained with only a single ventilation passageway andbore'.

The resistance-capacitance feedback loop leads from the outflow passageway 58 to the control passageway 62 to interrupt output flow through the outflow passageway 60 in a flip flop fashion. The feedback loop includes a shunt passageway 76 which directs the entire flow through the outflow passageway 58 to a capacitance chamber 78. The capacitance chamber 78 is molded of one piece construction with the passageway panel 26, as isthe throat 30. The chamber 78 empties into the-control passageway 62 (see FIG. for issuing a feedback control stream to divert the power stream issuing from the powernozzle 54 toward the outflow passageway 68. Although the chamber 78 is illustrated of generally crescent shaped plan configuration with a sloped upper wall, such configuration is not critical and the factors affecting the configuration include the clearance between the undersurface of the cover shell l8, and, of more significance, the volumetric capacity of the chamber for proper liquid flow characteristics (a function of passageway dimensions, etc.) such that a desired frequency of oscillations results.

Along with the capacitance chamber 78, the feedback loop includes channel constrictions to provide a resistance to flow therethrough. Such constrictions are inherent in the control channel and its nozzle.

An additive may be introduced into the intermittent flow ejected from the flow pulsator. For this purpose, an additive well 80 is formed on the-upper wall of the cover shell 18. The well may be open topped and thereforeit is desirable that when the flow pulsator 12 is operatively connected to the faucet through the ductway 32 between the collet and the spigot tip 44, the flow pulsator 112 should lie in a generally horizontal position so that spilling of the additive from the well is avoided. Normally, since the faucet is vertically extended at the tip 44, the pulsator 12 will lie in a horizontal plane.

Although the shape of the well 80 is not of particular import, it has been found that a suitable well configuration is that of an inverted conical section cut along a vertical plane substantially through its axis. From an observation of FIG. 2 it will be seen that the well terminates with a drainage nipple 82 molded in one piece construction with the well and the cover shell 18. The nipple 82 is substantially cylindrical and is seated within a socket 84 in communication with the control channel 64.

The additive enters the control chamber 56 and is aspirated with power flow through the chamber so that outflow of the pulse generator 24 carries with it an effective proportion of admixed additive. lt has been previously mentioned that a single ventilation passageway and bore may be utilized. This may be accomplished by covering or eliminating the access bore 74. With only a single bore 72, increased additive aspiration rate results due to lower pressures in the control chamber adjacent the control channel 64.

The outflow passageway 60 terminates at a hollow open ended union 86. The union 86 is formed of two mating half cylinder sections, one being molded with the passageway panel 26, and the other molded with the floor panel 28. The upper section projects through a notch in the skirt 22. The mating cylindrical halves of the union 86 are sealed together in any conventional manner, e.g., with an adhesive. A thermoplastic shrink band 88 having a plurality of peripheral flukes 90 is first slipped over the union 86 and then heat shrunk. The exterior flukes 90 seal against and retain the tubing 14 adjacent one end thereof. It will be appreciated that the utilization of the shrink band is merely an exemplary manner in which the union 86 may be secured to the tubing 14. Optionally, the tubing 14 may be forced over the union directly with the union itself having one or more peripheral flukes.

In operation, a substantially continuous and steady flow of water at a selected temperature and at substantially uniform pressure is released and enters the ductway 32 from which it is directed through the supply passageway 52. Water is ejected from the power nozzle 54 as a power stream issuing from the upstream end of lected in the capacitance chamber 78 and a portion thereof commences to issue as a feedback control stream through the control channel 62 to deflect the power stream issuing from the power nozzle 54. The power stream is diverted so that substantially all of its flow enters the outflow passageway 60. At this point, the flow of liquid to the outflow passageway 58 has substantially terminated and the pressure within the feedback loop is reduced.

Because of the reduced pressure at the control pas sageway 62, aspiration through the control passageway 64 will occur. If the well does not contain an additive solution, air will be aspirated through the control passageway 64 from the well. If an additive is carried in the well, theadditive is aspirated into the control chamber 56 through the control channel 64. The net effect of this introduction of air or additive through the control channel 64 is to substantially divert the power stream to the outflow passageway 58 to thereby continue the cycle of output oscillations between the output passageways 58 and 60. The term additive as employed herein is intended to apply generally to any suitable lavage additive and includes any number of desired medicaments, deodorants, etc. dissolved or dispersed in a liquid base.

It should be appreciated that the capacitance chamber 78 and the flow constrictions in the feedback loop are mutually coordinated such that the feedback loop is suitable for producing the desired frequency of oscillations. Changes in the dimensions or proportions of both the capacitance chamber and constrictions in the feedback loop may be made to achieve the desired oscillation frequency.

It has been found that, by way of example, with typical household tap pressures ranging between p.s.i.g. through 40 p.s.i.g., the interrupted or pulsating outflow through the pulsator l2 and into a vaginal cavity through the syringe 16 is in the order of 0.7 liters per minute with a frequency of approximately 20 cycles per second.

It should be noted that there are many possible variations of the aforedescribed pulse generator 24, for example, a monostable passageway system might be used. Furthermore, it is also contemplated to control the power stream through the utilization of two resistance capacitance feedback loops, each in communication between one of the outflow passageways. In such instance a second length of tubing would be desirable as would a syringe having two separate flow ducts. An example of such latter oscillator structure is illustrated in U. S. Pat. No. 3,158,166.

In a typical lavage application, the flexible tubing 14 is coupled at its end remote from the flow pulsator 12 to the syringe 16. The syringe 16 is anatomically contoured to facilitate insertion and removal during usage and includes a shaft like body with an upper stem and a lower section 94 terminating with a bulbous head 96. An internal duct provides a passageway for delivering the outflow stream pulsating through the tubing 14 to the ribbed section 94 for discharge through a plurality of apertures 98.

Regulation of the outflow stream through the syringe 16 is achieved through a flow control valve 100 which includes a cylindrical valve core (not shown) journalled in the stem 92 to selectively and adjustably constrict flow. With the flow control valve in a closed position, there will be no outflow through the discharge apertures 98 and water flow through the outflow passageway 60 of the pulse generator 24 is blocked. The water entering the pulse generator 24 will be directed through the vent passageways 68, 70 and into the lavatory basin through the access bores 72, 74.

The ribbed syringe section 94 is cruciform in transverse cross section and assists in both flow turbulence within the cavity and in drainage from the cavity being lavaged. The rate of cavity drainage flow may be controlled with a slidable gland 102 positioned in circumscribing relationship around the stem 92. In use, the gland may be manipulated and presented at a desirable position with respect to the cavity being lavaged to thereby control the drainage rate.

With the hygienic irrigator in operation, pulsating jets issue from the syringe apertures 98 at a hydrostatic pressure sufficient to cause localized depression in the area of impingement. The rate of flow pulsation (e.g., 20 cycles per second) is such that the duration between alternate pulses permits the relaxation or recovery of the depressed area, thus providing not only a salubrious massaging effect, but in addition facilitating a hydrodynamic cleansing of the cavity walls and permitting a thorough degree of medicament penetration heretofore unavailable. The therapeutic massaging effect of the pulsating jets which impinge the cavity walls not only stimulates blood circulation but it is believed that the beneficial results include an overall improvement through the utilization of an effective cleansing expedi ent.

The pulsating spray also improves the effectiveness of additives which may be carried in the outflow. With a conventional non-pulsating or steady flow, the fluid, upon contacting a surface such as a cavity wall forms a boundary layer and covers the surface which prevents further liquid contact. In effect, a thin shield of liquid forms a barrier against intimate contact by additives in the latter liquid flow introduced into the cavity. The pulsating effect disrupts this boundary layer or static covering of liquid and permits interrupted yet repeated surface contact with the liquid and medicament or other additive. Because the syringe flow is in interrupted bursts, a greater proportionate quantity of additive will effectively impinge the cavity walls. Furthermore, a deeper penetration of liquid into interstices of the cavity is achieved.

The beneficial flow turbulence resulting from pulsating delivery of liquid to the syringe results in extremely effective utilization for a given volume of additive carried in the well or any given volume of liquid entering the cavity to be lavaged. Furthermore, such turbulence assures a thorough mixing of any aspirated additive with the flow.

As other possible embodiments may be made in the present invention, and as various changes may be made in the above embodiment, it is to be understood that all matter herein described or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described the invention, there is claim ed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent:

1. A hygienic irrigator suitable for the application of a lavage for the routine cleansing and therapeutic treatment of a body cavity, said irrigator comprising a flow pulsator, a lavage syringe, means providing an anatomic contour to the syringe for insertion into the body cavity, means interconnecting the pulsator and the syringe for liquid flow therebetween and means releasably coupling the pulsator to a source of liquid under pressure for supplying a flow of liquid, the flow pulsator including a pulse generator having means forming two outflow passageways and at least one control channel, liquid under pressure from the source flowing through the coupling means to the generator, and in the generator as a power flow, and resistance-capacitance feedback means including a capacitance chamber adapted to divert at least a portion of the power flow from one of the outflow passageways into the control channel, the control channel adapted to issue the diverted flow as a control stream to cause the power flow to enter the other outflow passageway, the interconnecting means syringe and into the cavity.

linking the other outflow passageway and the syringe, whereby the power flow of liquid leaving the syringe is intermittent and broken into spurts to provide a therapeutic pulsating liquid turbulence in the cavity.

' 2. A hygienic irrigator constructed in accordance with claim 1 wherein the means releasably coupling the pulsator to the source of liquid under pressure includes means selectively forming a rigid coupling directly to a lavatory faucet, the pulsator being supported from the faucet when coupled thereto.

3. A hygienic irrigator constructed in accordance with claim 1 wherein the syringe includes means forming a variable constriction against power flow therethrough, the generator further including means forming atleast one ventilation passageway, the ventilation passageway providing a discharge route for unutilized power flow.

4. A hygienic irrigator constructed in accordance withclairn 1 wherein the syringe includes means for controlling the rate of cavity drainage flow, the control means including a gland adjustably secured to the sy ringe.

5. A hygienic irrigator constructed in accordance with claim 1 wherein means for the introduction of an additive into the power flow is provided, said introduction means including means forming a second control channel in the generator and additive storage means in fluid communication with the second control channel to provide an additive admixed liquid flow through the 6 A hygienic irrigator constructedin accordance with claim wherein the flow pulsator includes a cover shell, said shell being positioned over at least a portion of thepulse generator, and the additive storage means includes a well formed in the shell.

7. A hygienic irrigator suitable for the application of a lavage for the routine cleansing and therapeutic treatment of a vaginal cavity having an access orifice, said irrigator comprising a flow pulsator, a lavage syringe, means providing an anatomic contour to the syringe to facilitate insertion into the vaginal cavity, the syringe being dimensioned such that it is circumscribingly accommodated through the access orifice and within the cavity, means interconnecting the pulsator and the syringe for liquid flow therebetween and means releasably coupling the pulsator to a source of liquid under pressure for supplying a flow of liquid, the flow pulsator including a pulse generator having means forming two outflow passageways and at least one control channel,

' liquid under pressure from the source flowing through the coupling means to the generator, and in the generator as a power flow, and feedback means adapted to divert the power flow from one of the outflow passageways into the control channel, the control channel adapted to issue the diverted flow as a control stream to cause the power flow to enter the other outflow passageway, the interconnecting means linking the other outflow passageway and the syringe, and means for the introduction of an additive into the power flow, said introduction means including means forming a second control channel in the generator and additive storage means in fluid communication with the second control channel, whereby the power flow of liquid leaving the syringe is intermittent and broken into spurts having an aspirated additive admixed therewith.

8. A hygienic irrigator constructed in accordance with claim 7 wherein the additive storage means includes a well formed in the flow pulsator.

9. A hygienic irrigator constructed in accordance with claim 7 wherein the means releasably coupling the pulsator to the source of liquid under pressure includes means selectively forming a rigid coupling to a lavatory faucet, the pulsator being supported from the faucet when coupled thereto.

10. A hygienic irrigator suitable for the application of a lavage for the routine cleansing and therapeutic treatment of a body cavity, said irrigator comprising a flow pulsator, a lavage syringe, means providing an anatomic contour to the syringe for insertion into the body cavity, means interconnecting the pulsator and the syringe for liquid flow therebetween and means for releasably coupling the pulsator to a lavatory faucet for supplying a flow of liquid, the flow pulsator including a pulse generator having means forming two outflow passageways and at least one control channel, liquid under pressure from the faucet flowing through the coupling means to the generator, and in the generator as a power flow, and feedback means adapted to divert the power flow from one of the outflow passageways into the control channel, the control channel adapted to issue the diverted flow as a control stream to cause the power flow to enter the other outflow passageway, the interconnecting means linking the other outflow passageway and the syringe, the coupling means including a substantially cylindrical throat extending upwardly from the pulse generator and adapted to be urged around a spigot tip extending from the lavatory faucet, the throat including locking means adapted for engagement against the spigot tip, the coupling means further including a collar mounted to the throat and slidable along the throat from a first position wherein the locking means is permitted to dilate so that the spigot tip may be released from or joined to the throat to a second position wherein the locking means is constricted against the spigot tip whereby the pulsator may be supported directly from the faucet when releasably coupled thereto.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3612045 *Feb 18, 1969Oct 12, 1971Dudas Juypers Rowan LtdPulsating dental syringe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3908246 *Jun 3, 1974Sep 30, 1975Champion CoEmbalming apparatus
US4000742 *Oct 20, 1975Jan 4, 1977Digicomo Edward FWall mounted hygienic device
US4178931 *Dec 5, 1977Dec 18, 1979Burchman Edmund KPortable bidet, enema and douche
US4203437 *Mar 10, 1978May 20, 1980Gregory Bernard BergeronApparatus and method for alleviating physiological conditions by directed spray of liquid toward body tissue
US4254770 *Sep 27, 1979Mar 10, 1981Gregory BergeronApparatus and method for alleviating physiological conditions by directed spray of liquid toward body tissue
US5081985 *Feb 9, 1990Jan 21, 1992Urological Instruments Research, Inc.Vibratory method and device for treating female voiding dysfunctions
US5102387 *May 9, 1991Apr 7, 1992Jorde Edward PTransportable douche attachment
US5685028 *Sep 7, 1995Nov 11, 1997Miller; CeliaBidet sprayer unit and apparatus for mounting
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/150, 601/160, 128/DIG.100
International ClassificationA61M3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M3/0275, Y10S128/10
European ClassificationA61M3/02G