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Publication numberUS3770061 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateNov 3, 1971
Priority dateNov 3, 1971
Also published asDE2253934A1, US3865193
Publication numberUS 3770061 A, US 3770061A, US-A-3770061, US3770061 A, US3770061A
InventorsT Hall
Original AssigneeT Hall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air scrubber apparatus with improved fire extinguishing means
US 3770061 A
Abstract
A fire extinguisher safety system for an air scrubber apparatus of the type using pressurized fire extinguishing material, comprising a housing with spray means and fire extinguisher nozzle means mounted to the housing. A chemical container is connected to the fire extinguishing nozzle means by a conduit which is adapted by diverter means to carry fire extinguishing material originating from the chemical container to the nozzle means.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Hall 1 1 Nov. 6, 1973 AIR SCRUBBER APPARATUS WITH 2,546,259 3/1951 Ft-nn 1 55/22 1 x IMPROVED FIRE EXTINGUISHING MEANS 3,055,285 9/1962 Gaylord l69/2 R X 3,242,652 3/1966 1461666111111... 55/010. 36 Inventor: Trenton O- 3,463,233 8/1969 Haessler 2 169/1 R [22] Filed: No 3, 1971 3,433,146 3/1969 Russell 55/DIG. 36

211 Appl. No.2 195,170

Related U.S. Application Data Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant Examiner John J. Love Attorney-Martin Fleit [57] ABSTRACT A fire extinguisher safety system for an air scrubber apparatus of the type using pressurized fire extinguishing material, comprising a housing with spray means and fire extinguisher nozzle means mounted to the housing. A chemical container is connected to the fire extinguishing nozzle means by a conduit which is adapted by diverter means to carry fire extinguishing material originating from the chemical container to the nozzle means.

17 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PAIENTEIJuuv SIQIS 3.770.05

' SHEET 1 BF 2 INVENTOR Trenton 0./-/o// ATTORNEYJ E BY w y PAIENTEllnnv 6191s 3770.061 SHEET 28F 2 46 INVENTOR Fen/0n 0. Hal/ This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 92,822 filed Nov. 25, 1970, now abandoned.

The present invention generally relates to a fluidcleaning apparatus and more specifically to a fluidcleaning apparatus which cleans gases arising from a cooking apparatus or surface. The gases are cleaned by passing the gas through a fog blanket or fluid spray, which scrubs the gas, removing solid matter and pollutants.

The present invention is specifically envisioned as being used in connection with cooking apparatus so that smoke, grease, cooking odors and other consensable contaminants emanating from a cooking surface pass through a fog blanket discharged by the spray means of the apparatus and a baffle means positioned within the apparatus. The gas passing through the fog blanket is cleaned and the particles thus entrained in the spray droplets pass downward to the baffle means and are directed by the baffle means in a suitable depository, which carries the contaminant-carrying fluid away. When the heated grease, condensable contaminants and/or other particles contact the fog blanket, they are turned to steam, thus further atomizing the grease and condensable contaminants.

The construction of the invention effects a quick and highly efficient elimination of the impurities contained in the gases, thus preventing the impurities from being deposited into the atmosphere outside of the building in which the air scrubber is located. The present invention thus significantly contributes in cutting down air pollution.

There are many contaminate and grease-cleaning devices known in the prior art, but these devices are cumbersome and expensive to construct. While these known devices include apparatus for washing or collecting grease, it is extremely difficult to clean the interior of the devices and, due to the stringent fire regulations of many states and the standards set forth by fire insurance underwriters, these known devices have insufficient fire extinguishing means so that they cannot be used through all sections of the country. These prior devices disclose automatic means for fire extinguishing, but such means primarily utilize spray or damper means to put out any fire which occurs. Such devices are disclosed in US. Pat. Nos. 2,813,477, 3,433,146 and 3,490.206.

The present invention provides an improved air scrubber which can be manufactured efficiently and economically with an adequate fire-extinguishing system, while at the same time being continuously selfdraining. The fire-extinguishing system reduces the danger of the likelihood of fire and provides a simple means for extinguishing fires if they should arise.

Other advantages and embodiments of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description and I upon reference to the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:

FIG. 1 shows a side view, partially in section, of the air scrubber invention.

FIG. 2 discloses a partial side elevational view of the air scrubber FIG. 3 discloses a partial enlarged view of the extinguishing system shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged reversed sectional side view of the scrubber portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 shoes an enlarged front elevational view of the apparatus partially in section.

FIG. 6 shows a planar view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:

'The air scrubber as desclosed in FIGS. 1 through 6 comprises a housing 10 having a gas inlet 11 and a gas outlet 13, which is adapted to be mounted over a cooking appliance, such as a broiler, frying plate, or a french fryer. The housing is preferably constructed of stainless steel, butany other suitable material can be used.

The apparatus is constructed to purify or clean gases which arise from a heat source carrying contaminants such as grease, smoke, fumes, or other added materials. The air scrubber cleans the gases passing through it with the gases passing from the top of the housing up into a centrifugal upblast exhauster 12, which discharges the purified gaseous material into the atmosphere.

A suitable type of exhauster which can be used with the invention is a centrifugal top discharge roof ex hauster manufactured by the Greenh'eck Fan and Ventilator Corporation, model VCBX. The housing 10 is preferably of rectangular construction, having a front wall, rear wall and connecting side walls. I-lowever, housing of a circular or angular configuration could be used within the scope of the invention. The inlet end 11 of the housing takes in gases emanating from the cooking appliances or foodstuffs being cooked, while the other end has a discharge outlet 13 which is adapted to be connected to a discharge duct 15, which can extend into the atmosphere outside the building in which the apparatus is located or to an exhauster. In the preferred embodiment, a centrifugal upblaster 12 is attached to the outlet or to a duct leading from the outlet to draw the gas into and through the housing. A fan or blower could be adapted to be used in place of the centrifugal upblaster, if desired. The housing 10 preferably has baffle means comprising baffle plates or members secured to the inner surface of the gear wall and/or sides of the housing. The baffle means projects inward to define a substantially serpentine path for the flow of gases and entrained particles rising from the broiler or cooking area, with a lower baffle member 16 serving as a fluid catchpan to carry the fluid condensed from the spray means down a predetermined path into a drain system 19.

The particle-carrying gas stream enters the gas inlet 11, where it comes into contact with the bottom surface of baffle member 16, which effects an approxmately reversal in the direction of flow of the gas. Another gas-flow direction reversal occurs when the gas flow passes from the bottom surface of baffle member 16 to the bottom surface of baffle member 34, whereupon the gas flow assumes its original upward direction of flow. The centrifugal action resulting from this flow reversal causes some of the condensable grease and oil entrained in the gas stream to be deposited, thereby providing an initial extraction stage.

7 The baffle members 16 and 34 are preferably secured to the inner sides of the housing 10 at an approximate 45 angle with respect to the sides of the housing. The

lower end of baffle member 16 is preferably constructed in a substantially L shape. The flange or extension 17 of the baffle member 16 serves to form an inclined trough 18, which gathers liquid and particles entrained in the liquid condensed on the baffle member surfaces and guides the liquid along a path through a drain conduit 19, which is preferably located at the end of each inclined trough 18.

The drain conduit 19 is preferably constructed of copper or some other heat transfer material so that it will not have grease forming on its interior surface, because the heat of the rising bases will keep the grease and particles entrained in the fluid until the fluid is drained off. A fluid spray means 30 is utilized in connection with the baffle member 16, 34 and 42 to provide a liquid fog which forms a blanket or filter through which the gas from the heated surface must pass on its way to the atmosphere. The spray means 30 causes the water to be mixed in the gas in the form ofa fog so that the spray droplets serve as vehicles for collecting and carrying impurities in the gas and cooling the heated gas. The spray then collects on the baffle members surfaces, where it condenses and is carried to a suitable point of discharge. Any hot water source, preferably between l40-l80, can be used to provide water for the spray means 30. In the apparatus the water passes from a water conduit source 22 which is connected with a solenoid means 26.

The solenoid means 26 is preferably connected with a blower on the broiler or with a fuel feed to the cooking appliance so that when the cooking appliance is ac tivated, the solenoid means 26 is likewise activated. The solenoid means 26 is preferably constructed with a valve which serves to close or open, thus determining the flow of water through conduit 24. The water flow passing through the solenoid means 26 and conduit 24 enters a pressure regulator 28 which is adapted to regulate the water pressure at a preferred 25 psi. pressure so that the spray means 30 will be under a constant pressure. If desired, the solenoid means 26 can be connected to a detergent source so that detergentcan be added to the water for periodic cleaning. After being regulated by pressure regulator 28, the water travels along a conduit 25 which is mounted on pipe support means 32 where it is discharged or expelled into the inner surface of the housing through the spray means or nozzle 30. The nozzle 30 is preferably constructed so that a fog blanket of spray is discharged. The spray preferably is projected from the nozzle against the side of the housing to provide a cleaning action. Conduit 25 is preferably supported by a pipe support 32 which has its other end secured to baffle member 42. When hot water flows through the nozzle 30, a spray is discharged causing a blanket or curtain of water to be put forth in the center area of the housing so that grease and soot laden gases passing from the head source and/or a cooking apparatus come into contact with the water spray blanket leaving the particles of grease, carbon and other matter entrained on the water droplets while at the same time cooling the temperature of the heated gases passing therethrough. The action of gravity and force of the discharge of the nozzle 30 causes the water droplets to fall on the baffle members 16 and 34, which directs the flow of condensate over their upper surface into inclined through 18, and trough connected to drain 19. The baffle means is a combination air baffle and fluid baffle with the fluid carrying being accomplished up the upper surface of the baffle and the trough and the air direction accomplished by positioning the baffle members to force the particle-laden gas to follow a serpentine path so that the heavier grease and other particles are partially separated from the gas at the angular turns due to the directional flow change and change in velocity. As fluid flows down the baffle members into trough 18 and it is directed to drain 19 and is diverted into proper sewerage or other adequate disposal units.

The trough shape and drain usage in the lower sections of the baffle members prevent drainage from the spray means from dripping or flowing off the edges of the trough so that the heated gas rising from the cooking surface does not break up the liquid in the trough and lift the liquid back to the upper portion of the housing. The liquid condensate is drained off, leaving the upper parts of the apparatus relatively clean. Deflector plates or sections 42 are placed at the top of the air scrubber housing 10 and are secured to the sides of the housing to form a passage, causing the initially scrubbed heated air to flow in a serpentine path up through the housing. The deflector plates 42 prevent any water from passing out through discharge 14. An access door 46 is provided in the front wall of the housing 10 for cleaning the interior of the housing and for making adjustments in the interior of the scrubber. A viewing lens or window 48, as shown in FIG. 2, is also provided in the body of the housing so that the interior of the housing can be viewed from the outside to determine if the apparatus is correctly functioning.

Positioned in the upper portion of the housing is a thermometer means which is mounted in the upper portion of the housing so that the thermometer bulb 8], which can be positioned in several ways, one of which is shown in FIG. 6, projects into the gas stream or path close to the spray nozle means 30. The thermometer means is utilized to determine if the spray nozzle 30 has been blocked by dirt or other foreign particles carried into it by the incoming fluid. If there is blockage in the nozzle, a rise in temperature will occur. Thus the thermometer means 80 is used as an indicator that something is wrong with the nozzle 30.

Tests have shown that the temperature at the bottom of of the scrubber apparatus around inlet 11 can run around 900 F., while the temperature above the fog blanket producted by the spray means 30 is approximately 225-250 F. it is apparent that any decrease in the fog blanket will result in an immediate temperature rise. If desired, an acoustic or light signal can be attached to the thermometer means 80 for automatic activation when the temperature reaches a predetermined degree. A 50-500 F. thermometer is preferably used in connection with the apparatus.

An extinguishing safety system with control head 50 is also preferably used with the air scrubber body in this system. A container 53 of fire-extinguishing chemical, which is preferably of the dry pressurized type, is secured to the housing 10 by support brackets 54. A conduit 56 leads from the chemical container 53 to the upper section of the housing 10 where it is mounted inside the housing 10. The conduit 56 terminates in an extinguishing system venturi 58, which is used to divert the fire-extinguishing material either towards tee 60, which serves as distribution head for nozzles 61 inside housing 10, or along conduit 62 towards venturi 63. If additional protection is required, venturi 63 is used to divert the fire-extinguishing material either along conduit 64, which terminates at duct nozzle assembly 65, or along conduit 70, which terminates at the surface.

The nozzle 61 is preferably constructed to discharge spray towards the sides of housing 10. When a fire or high temperature increase occurs, either in the housing or at the tee assembly 60, the fire extinguisher system is automatically activated by termal link assembly 57 or by a manual release lever 66, if the fire is discovered before the thermal link assembly has time to function. The manual lever or release handle 66 turns a cable assembly, which activates the fire-extinguishing system, allowing the extinguishing chemical or material to be discharged through the nozzle assemblies 61 and 65 to put out any flameup or overheating. The automatic extinguishing assembly 57 used with the invention is preferably mounted in the center section of the housing. The automatic extinguishing assembly 57 is located in conduit 56 between cylinder 54 and venturi 58 inside housing 10 and comprises a cable insideconduit 56 connected to release handle 66 at control head 50 and terminating at a fusible link 59 which is held in place by extinguishing assembly 57.

The automatic extinguishing assembly 57 is constructed so that it is spring activated, with projections on two opposing parts at the base of .57, the assembly being connected together by a fusible link 59. The fusible link 59 preferably has a 360F. melting point. When a predetermined amount of heat rises up through the housing and contacts the fusible link 59, the fusible link will melt, causing the opposing parts of the activator to be no longer connected to each othen'The pressure from the container 54 will cause the nozzle 61 to allow the fire-extinguishing chemical or materials to be sprayed into the interiorof the air-scrubbing housing, thus putting out any fire which may flame through the interior housing. t

It should be noted that the fusible link 59 is positioned above the spray means 30 so that it is not affected by. the heat of thevarious cooking operations and only responds to flame temperature in the housing.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been disclosed, it is understood that the invention is not limited to such an embodiment, since it may be otherwise embodied in the scope of-the appended claims.

What is claimed is: 1

1. An enclosed air scrubber apparatus for removing contaminants from a gas comprising a housing comprising a plurality of vertical walls, said vertical walls defining inlet means at the bottom of said housing and outlet means at the top of said housing,-said housing defining a passageway through which gas can travel, fan means connected to said outlet means, said fan means being adapted to pull air through said housing passageway,

spray means mounted inside said housing between a plurality of baffle members secured to said housing, said plurality of baffle members serving as a scrubber section for said apparatus to entrain contaminants in a spray discharged from said spray means, said spray means comprising at least onenozzle adapted to discharge fluid in spray fog form, said spraymeans being connected to a source of fluid and adapted to discharge said fluid in a spray fog form to clean and cool gas traveling through said housing passage, a plurality of downwardly projecting baffle members secured to said housing below said spray means, said plurality of baffle members directing said gas along a serpentine flow path to serve as a primary separation section for an initial separation of contaminates fromsaid gas and to carry off fluid discharged from said spray means to disposal means connected to at least one of said initial separation baffle members an access door mounted to said housing opposite said spray means, at least one baffle member positioned above said spray means to prevent spray from being carried into said fan means and fire extinguishing means mounted on the side of said housing, said fire extinguishing means comprising a container for holding pressurized fire extinguishing material and discharge means connected to said container to allow for the discharge of fire extinguishing material into said housing above said spray means.

2. An enclosed air scrubber apparatus comprising a housing having a plurality of walls forming an inlet, and outlet and an elongated chamber for receiving contaminated gases, a first nozzle means mounted within said housing, said first nozzle means being connected to a fire extinguishing container and adapted to discharge fire extinguishing material into said housing, a second nozzle means mounted in said housing, said second nozzle means being positioned below said first nozzle means and connected to a source of fluid so that it can spray fluid into said housing, a plurality of baffle members secured against said housing below said second nozzle'means, and at least one baffle member secured against said housing above said second nozzle means, said plurality of baffle members defining a serpentine passageway for an incoming gaseous flow and directing fluid discharge from said second nozzle means into disposal means, each of said baffle members extending inwardlyinto said chamber from said walls.

' 3. An air scrubber apparatus as claimed in claim 2, wherein said housing has an access door pivotally mounted thereto.

4. An air scrubber apparatus as claimed in claim 2, wherein at least one of said baffle members positioned below said second nozzle means defines a trough at its extended end, said trough connected to said disposal means, so that said disposal means discharges fluid originating from said second nozzle means. l

5. An air scrubber apparatusas claimed in claim 2, wherein said baffle members positioned below said second nozzle means projects downwardly from said housing walls at least 45 from a perpendicular line extending from said walls.

6. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas comprising a vertical housing having an inlet for receiving a particle laden gaseous stream and an outlet through which gas can be discharged, a plurality of downwardly inclined gas directing baffle members secured to said housing, said baffle members forming an angle with said vertical housing not greater than 45, said baffle members and said housing defining a serpentine passageway for the incoming gas stream so that the gas stream reverses its flow path, a spray nozzle means mounted to said housing and positioned inside said housing above said gas directing baffle members, said spray nozzle means being connected to a fluid flow and adapted to spray fluid inside said housing to form a fog blanket, a second plurality of downwardly inclined baffle members secured to said housing above said spray nozzle means, fluid disposal means connected to said housing and; positioned in the bottom section of said housing for the disposal of particle laden fluid flowing from said baflle members, said fluid disposal means comprising a trough formed by one of said first baffle member and conduit means connected to said trough and fire extinguisher means connected to said housing, said fire extinguisher means being adapted to discharge fire extinguishing material automatically into said housing when the temperature above said nozzle means in said housing reaches a predetermined level.

7. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 6 wherein the fluid flow to said spray nozzle means is controlled by a solenoid.

8. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 7 including a detergent supply means connected to said solenoid and activated by said solenoid.

9. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 7, wherein said housing is mounted over a cooking appliance having fuel feed means, and said flow of fluid to said spray nozzle means is controlled by said solenoid activated by said fuel feed means.

10. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 7, including an exhaust fan means mounted to said housing over said second baffle member, said exhaust fan means being connected to said solenoid.

11. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 6, wherein said spraying nozzle means includes a pressure regulator.

12. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 6 including spray nozzle clogging sensing means mounted to said housing.

13. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 12, wherein said spray nozzle clogging sensing means is a thermometer.

14. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 6, wherein fluid heating means is connected to said spray nozzle means.

15. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 6, wherein said automatic fire extinguishing means comprises a nozzle assembly, and conduit means connecting said nozzle assembly to a fire extinguisher container, said nozzle assembly being held in an inoperative position by means of a fusible link.

16. Apparatus for separating particles from a stream of gas as claimed in claim 14, wherein said fusible link has a melting point of approximately 360 F.

17. An air scrubber as claimed in claim 7, wherein said fire extinguisher has automatic activation means, said automatic activation means comprising a fusible link assembly, cable means connected to said fusible link assembly, release means mounted on said container, said fusible link assembly being adapted to separate when contacted by a pre-determined amount of heat releasing said cable to allow material from said chemical container to pass into at least one nozzle assembly.

- IIK

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3893831 *Oct 10, 1972Jul 8, 1975Doane Mfg CoGrease extractor for kitchen ventilating systems
US3971642 *Dec 18, 1974Jul 27, 1976Aerosols Control CorporationGas scrubber
US5427135 *Nov 24, 1993Jun 27, 1995Nibco, Inc.Valve lock
US5860412 *Nov 5, 1997Jan 19, 1999Way; Joseph E.Kitchen ventilation duct degreasing system
US6241809 *Sep 20, 1999Jun 5, 2001Dan HopkinsApparatus and method for liquid scrubbing contaminants from a gas flow
US6797246Jun 4, 2001Sep 28, 2004Danny L. HopkinsApparatus and method for cleaning, neutralizing and recirculating exhaust air in a confined environment
DE3423164A1 *Jun 22, 1984Jan 2, 1986Hoelter HeinzApparatus for avoiding the risk of explosion in smoking chambers for butchers' shops, fried fish shops and the like, while simultaneously eliminating odour substances and pollutants
EP0034420A2 *Jan 27, 1981Aug 26, 1981John David TongeFire extinguishing apparatus for ducting systems
WO2012076720A1 *Dec 12, 2011Jun 14, 2012Sprinkler Punkt AsSystem and method for preventing fire propagation in ventilation system of a kitchen
Classifications
U.S. Classification169/59, 169/16, 96/239, 169/65, 55/DIG.360, 169/9
International ClassificationF24F3/16, F24C15/20, B01D47/06
Cooperative ClassificationB01D47/06, F24C15/20, F24F3/16, B05B15/02, Y10S55/36
European ClassificationF24C15/20, F24F3/16, B01D47/06