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Publication numberUS3770089 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateFeb 16, 1972
Priority dateFeb 16, 1972
Publication numberUS 3770089 A, US 3770089A, US-A-3770089, US3770089 A, US3770089A
InventorsRosenhagen W, Verduin L
Original AssigneeRowe International Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lottery ticket merchandiser
US 3770089 A
Abstract
A lottery ticket merchandiser of tickets selling at two prices one of which is an integral multiple of the other, in which means responsive both to the deposit of coins and to the deposit of dollar bills establishes a credit aggregating the sum deposited to permit subsequent multiple and alternative selection of lower and higher-priced tickets until the credit is exhausted.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Verduin et al.

Nov. 6, 1973 LOTTERY TICKET MERCHANDISER Inventors: Lee V. Verduin, Grand Rapids,

Mich.; William Rosenhagen, Ossining, N.Y.

21 Appl. No.: 226,667

3,608,689 9/1971 Rosenhagen 194/9 R Primary ExaminerStanley H. Tollberg Attorney-Henry L. Shenier et a1.

[57] ABSTRACT A lottery ticket merchandiser of tickets selling at two [52] US. Cl. 194/1 N, 194/10 [51] Int. Cl. G07f 5/16 Pnces one of whlch an mtegral mumple of the other, 58 Field of Search 194/4, 9, 10, 1 M, in which means responsive both to the deposit of Coins 194 N, l G 8, DICL 2 4 and t0 the deposit Of dollar bills establishes a credit ag- 1 94 gregating the sum deposited to permit subsequent multiple and alternative selection of lower and higher- [56] References Cited priced tickets until the credit is exhausted.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,621,964 11/1971 Riddle 194/10 17 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures {QC P sill CL CR Receptor 4 R5 D1 cRS CanTra/ I, D4

K l 0/! I56 2 m f i i 66 4R =nfi #SRZ 470 G 1 m9 L ILEJ/ ZLEI A PATENTEUNUV 6|973 3770.089

SHEET lUF 2 PATENTEU NOV 6 I975 SHEET 2 BF 2 Um 0G QLxto LOTTERY TICKET MERCHANDISER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION There are known in the prior art complicated arrangements for dispensing a ticket corresponding to one of a number of selections either at a single sum or at one of various prices in response to the deposit of tokens or coins. Not only are these arrangements complicated, but they do not permit multiple selections to be made after a single establishment of credit aggregating at least a multiple of the price at which the ticket is to be dispensed. These systems are responsive only to coins or tokens and will not accept and totalize dollar bills.

We have invented a lottery ticket merchandiser which establishes a credit in response both to the deposit of coins and to the deposit of bills therein. Our merchandiser permits selective dispensing of two tickets at prices which are respective multiples of each other. Our merchandiser permits multiple buys to be made after establishment of a credit which is that multiple of the purchase price. It is relatively simple in construction and in operation as compared with arrangements of the prior art adapted to sell tickets at more than a single price.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION One object of our invention is to provide a lottery ticket merchandiser which permits multiple tickets to be purchased after establishment of a credit which is a multiple of the purchase price.

Another object of our invention is to provide a lottery ticket merchandiser which permits selective dispensing of tickets of different values.

A further object of our invention is to provide a lottery ticket merchandiser which totalizes both bills and coins deposited therein.

Still another object of our invention is to provide a lottery ticket merchandiser which is simple in construction and in operation.

Other and further objects of our invention will appear from the following description.

In general our invention contemplates the provision of a merchandiser for dispensing lottery tickets at two prices, one of which is an integral multiple of the other, in which a totalizer is responsive to the deposit both of coins and of dollar bills so as to permit selective and multiple purchases of tickets at the different prices up to the aggregate of the credit established in the machine.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings which form part of the instant specification and which are to be read in conjunction therewith and in which like reference numerals are used to indicate like parts in the various views:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation of one form of our lottery ticket merchandiser.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view of a mechanical flip-flop forming a part of our lottery ticket merchandiser.

FIG. 3 is a schematic view of one form of ticket dispensing mechanism which may be employed in our lottery ticket merchandiser.

FIG. 4 is a schematic view of one form of electrical circuit which may be employed in our lottery ticket merchandiser.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawings our lottery ticket merchandiser includes a cabinet 10 provided with a coin slot 12 through which coins such as quarters can be deposited in the machine. A dollar bill slot 14 permits dollars to be inserted in the machine to establish the credit in the manner to be described hereinbelow. In the particular form of our merchandiser illustrated in the drawings, quarters and dollar bills are totalizedto permit the selective purchase of lottery tickets priced at 50 cents each or at $2.50 each.

After the establishment of at least 50 cents in credit, in order to purchase a 50 cent ticket, the customer actuates a push button 18 to cause a ticket to be delivered through a slot 22 in a manner to be described. Similarly, when the apparatus is set to sell $2.50 tickets also and when at least $2.50 credit established, operation of a push button 20 causes a $2.50 ticket to be delivered to the customer through a slot 24. Respective empty signal lamps 26 and 28 are adapted to be illuminated to indicate to the customer that the supply of either the lower priced or higher priced tickets is exhausted. A lamp 30 is illuminated to indicate to the customer that sufficient credit has been established to permit him to purchase a lower priced ticket. Similarly, a lamp 32 lights to indicate to the customer that sufficient credit has been established to permit him to purchase a higher priced ticket. As will be explained more fully hereinbelow, we may provide our machine with means for enabling the operator to set the left and right units associated with buttons 18 and 20 to dispense tickets at the same price.

- Referring now to FIG. 2, quarters deposited in the coin slot 12 enter into a common coin path portion 36 of a coin path provided by an assembly indicated generally by thereference character 34. From the commoncoin path portion 36, quarters travel either along a branch path portion 38 or a branch path portion 40. A diverter 42 having the configuration of an equilateral triangle is pivotally supported on a pin 44 for movement between an initial position illustrated in full lines in FIG. 2 and another position shown in broken lines. The first quarter enteringupon the common coin path portion 36 falls downwardly and strikes the diverter 42 which directs the coin into the branch path portion 38.

In so doing, the diverter is moved from the full line position to the broken line position illustrated in FIG. 2. The next quarter deposited in the slot 12 travels along path portion 36 and is directed by the diverter 42 to the branch path portion 40 from which it travels out of the assembly 34 to strike the actuator 46 of a coin switch CS. Thus, every first quarter deposited in the assembly 34 is merely collected while every second quarter actuates the coin switch CS. In this manner switch CS is actuated once for each 50 cents deposited in the coin slot 12.

Each of'the 50 cent and $2.50 units of our merchandiser 10 includes a ticket dispenser of any suitable type known to the art adapted to deliver tickets one at a time in response to actuation thereof. Referring now to FIG. 3, one of the units such for example as the 50 cents unit may include a drive motor 48 adapted to be energized for one revolution of the shaft 50 thereof in a manner to be described. Shaft 50 carries for rotation therewith a toothed wheel 52 adapted to engage holes 3 adjacent to the periphery of a strip of tickets '54 in a manner known to the art. As the shaft 50 rotates, the

tickets are advanced along the space between guides 56 and 58 and past a guillotine comprising a moveable cutter blade 60 and a stationary cutter blade 62. Tickets from the guides 56 and 58 emerge for example through the slot 22 in thefront of the cabinet 10.

Shaft 50 also carries for rotation therewith a cam 64 provided with a cam track 66 adapted to receive a follower 68 carried by one end of a lever 70 pivotally supported on a pin 72 carried by a bracket 74 on the machine frame. The end of lever 70 remote from the follower 68 carries a pin 76 which rides in a slot 78 formed in the member carrying blade 60. From the shape of the cam track 66 shown in FIG. 3, it will readily be apparent that upon rotation of the shaft 50 in the direction of the arrow in FIG. 3 the lever 70 will be oscillated toward the end of a complete revolution of the shaft so as to move cutter blade 60 downwardly into cooperative relationship with the blade 62 to cut a ticket from the length 54. It'will readily be appreciated that the length of a ticket is related to the size of the other parts of the mechanism so that a complete ticket has passed the guillotine by the time the blade 60 descends to cut off the ticket.

Referring now to FIG. 4 the electrical circuit for our lottery ticket merchandiser includes a totalizer switch indicated generally by the reference character 80 including a shaft 82 carrying a brush assembly 84 which supports spaced brushes 86a, 86b, 86c, 86d, 86e, 86f, and 86g. In the embodiment illustrated in the drawings, we electrically connect brushes 86a and 86b. We also interconnect brushes 860 through 863. The brush assembly 84 is adapted to he stepped from a home or no credit position to be described more fully hereinafter through steps until a maximum credit has been established. The switch 80 includes a plurality of commutator rings, the outer ring of which includes segments 88, 90, 92, 94 and 96 corresponding to the no credit and the first four credit steps of the switch 80. We connect segments 90, 92, 94 and 96 to a common terminal 98. A segment 100 completes the outer ring and is connected to a terminal 102. Brush 86a is associated with the outer ring.

The second commutator ring associated with brush 86b has a single segment 104 connected to aterminal 106. The commutator ring associated with brush 860 includes a segment 108 adapted to be engaged by the brush 86c in the no credit position, a segment 110 adapted to be engaged by the brush in the one unit credit position, a segment 112 adapted to be engaged by the brush in the second, third and fourth credit positions, a segment 114 adapted to be engaged by the brush in the fifth to seventh credit positions and a segment 116 adapted to be engaged by the brush in all other credit positions of the brush assembly. The next inward commutator ring includes a segment 118 adapted to be engaged by brush 86d in the second to seventh credit positions and is completed by a segment 120 adapted to be engaged by the brush in all other credit positions and connected to a terminal 122. The ring associated with brush 86c includes a segment 124, adapted to be engaged by the brush in the first to sixth credit positions and a ring 126 adapted to be engaged by the brush in all other credit positions. The next inward ring includes a segment 128 engaged by brush 86f in the no credit to fifth credit positions and a ring 130 engaged by the brush in all other credit positions and connected to a terminal 132. The inner commutator ring includes a segment 134 extending to the fifth credit position and a segment 136 extending through all other credit positions and connected to a terminal 138.

In addition to the connections thus far described, we connect segments 112 and 118 over the second to fourth positions of credit. Segment 114 is connected to segment segment 118 is connected to segment 126; segment 124 is connected to segment and segment 128 is connected to segment 136.

The switch 80 and its associated actuating mechanism is more fully shown and described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,337,018 issued Aug. 22, 1967 to C. J. Boorsma for Check Controlled Adjustable Credit Unit. As is more fully pointed out in the Boorsma patent, shaft 80 is adapted to be stepped throughone unit of credit in response to the concomitant energization of a credit solenoid CR and a credit stop solenoid CRS. Energi zation of credit solenoid CR alone steps the brush arm 84 through two units of credit. Concomitant energization of the credit cancel winding CA and the cancel stop solenoid produces a rotation of shaft 82 in such a direction as to subtract one unit of credit. In the particular embodiment we have illustrated and in accordance with the teaching of the Boorsma patent, we so set the credit unit that energization of the cancel winding alone produces a movement of brush arm 24 amounting to a cancellation of five units of credit or $2.50.

The circuit of our lottery ticket merchandiser includes a bill acceptor control center indicated generally by the reference character 140. The bill acceptor unit 140 is supplied with power from the terminals 142 and 144 of a suitable source of power by means of conductors 146 and 148. The control unit 140 includes a bill acceptor of the type shown in Hooker US. Pat. No. 3,485,358. As is disclosed therein, the acceptor puts out a signal on a line 152 in response to passage of a valid dollar bill therethrough. In addition, the control unit puts out a control circuit potential on line 150, credit lamp and empty flasher lamp voltages on lines 156 and 158 and provides a common ground line 154 and a low voltage return line 159, in any suitable manner known to the art. A switch 165 is adapted to be closed to reverse the bill acceptor motor to return a bill to the customer before credit is established. Line 163 is adapted to be connected to ground in a manner to be described to disable the bill acceptor motor.

In establishing credit in response to the deposit of coins such as quarters in the coin slot 12, it will be remembered that every second quarterpasses through the mechanical flip-flop shown in FIG. 2 to strike the actuator 46 to close the coin switch CS. When that occurs, a circuit for the credit winding CR and for the credit stop winding CS is established from the 30 volt line to ground 154 through a diode D1. As is pointed out more fully in the Boorsma patent referred to hereinabove, concomitant energization of CR and CR5 steps the brush assembly 84 in a clockwise direction through one step of credit. In the arrangement we have shown each step of credit corresponds to 50 cents and the assembly 84 is stepped through one step for each two quarters deposited in the slot 12.

In establishing credit in response to the insertion of bills into the unit 140, as is pointed out more fully in the Hooker patent referred to hereinabove, each time a valid bill passes through the acceptor of unit 140 an output pulse is produced on line 152. This signal is applied to a voltage divider including resistors R1 and R2 by means of a diode D2. The voltage across resistor R2 is applied to an amplifier 164 the output collector circuit of which includes a relay winding 1R. Thus, in response to the passage of a valid dollar bill through the acceptor 140 winding IR is energized to close two normally open switches 1R1 and 1R2. Switch 1R1 connects the lock-out line 163 to ground 154 through a diode D3 to prevent another bill from being inserted in the acceptor 140 while credit is being established. Switch 1R2 closes to complete the circuit to ground line 154 of the credit winding CR through a diode D4. It will be seen that under these conditions, only winding CR is energized and the credit stop winding CRS is not energized. When this occurs, the winding CR steps the brush assembly 84 through two steps of credit to stablish $1.00 worth of credit. In addition, closure of the switch 1R2 also completes the circuit of the bill counter solenoid BC which actuates a counter of any suitable type known to the art to count the total number of bills which have been inserted in the merchandiser.

A resistor R3 normally applies the potential on line 150 to an amplifier 166 to energize a coin lockout winding CL. Winding CL normally disables a lockout mechanism (not shown) of any suitable type known to the art. De-energization of winding CL enables the lockout mechanism to block the coin slot 12 to prevent further coins from being inserted in the machine as the dollar credit is being established. When switch 1R1 closes in the manner described above it grounds the input to amplifier 166 to turn the amplifier off to deenergize winding CL. As a result the coin lockout mechanism prevents coins from being inserted in the machine. Owing to this arrangement a loss of power also results in activation of the coin lockout so that the customer is not cheated.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that for each two quarters inserted in the slot 12 the brush assembly is stepped to establish 50 cents worth of credit and the quarter counter winding is energized to count each 50 cents inserted in the machine. Similarly, each dollar passing through the acceptor 140 steps the brush assembly through two steps of credit indicating that l dollars worth of credit has been established. Bill counter winding BC is energized in response to the passage of each dollar through the acceptor 140 so that the total number of dollar bills inserted in the merchandiser is counted.

Our machine includes a selector switch having ganged contact arms 1S, 2S and 3S adapted to engage respective contacts 1S1, 152 and 153 in a first position and to engage respective contacts 251, 2S2 and 283 in a second position. As will be apparent from the description hereinbelow in the first position of the selector switch both units sell tickets at the same price while in the second position of the selector switch the left unit sells tickets at a lower price while the right unit sells tickets at a higher price. By way of example, the units may sell tickets at respective prices of 50 cents and $2.50. For purposes of clarity we have illustrated and will describe our machine in the second position of the selector switch.

We connect contacts 1S1 and 1S2 respectively to the lower terminal of the cancel stop solenoid CAS and to the common terminal of solenoids CA and CAS. Terminal 281 is connected to terminal 98 while terminal 2S2 is inactive. We connect terminals 381 and 382 respectively to terminals 132 and 122. When thefirst 50 cents worth of credit has been established, so that the brush assembly 84 is in the one credit unit position, brushes 86a and 86b connect terminal 98 and thus terminal 2S1 to terminal 106 owing to the engagement of brush 86a with segment 90 and the engagement of brush 86b with segment 104.

Our merchandiser includes respective empty switches associated with the lefthand or low-priced unit and with the righthand or higher-priced unit for indicating when the supply of tickets for the particular unit is exhausted. The left hand empty switch includes contact arms lLE and 2LE which normally engage respective contacts lLEl and 2LE1 and which are adapted to engage respective contacts 1LE2 and 2LE2. Similarly, the higher-priced empty switch includes respective arms IRE and 2RE which engage contacts lREl and 2RE1 when a supply of tickets is available and which are adapted to engage respective contacts 1RE2 and 2RE2. We arrange the switches of each pair so as to be operated consecutively a few tickets apart.

Respective diodes D6 and D7 connect terminals 98 and 102 to one terminal of a 50 cent credit lamp L1 the other terminal of which is connected to contact lLEl. A diode D8 connects terminal 102 to a $2.50 credit lamp L2 the other terminal of which is connected to contact lREl. As has been pointed out hereinabove, when 50 cents worth of credit is established terminal 106 is connected to terminal 98 through brushes 86a and 86b in contact with segments 90 and 104. A circuit is then complete from line 156 through terminal 106 through the switch 80 to terminal 98 and through diode D6 to lamp L1 and from the lamp through contact lLEl, arm lLE to return line 159. Lamp L1 lights to indicate that 50 cents worth of credit has been established and a 50 cent ticket may, if desired, be purchased. This operation continues for the first eight quarters deposited in the machine until $2.00 of credit has been established. Similarly, two one dollar bills inserted in the machine actuate the switch 80 to light lamp L1 in the manner described above to indicate that a 50 cent ticket can be purchased.

As the tenth quarter is deposited in the slot 12 the arm 84 steps to a position at which terminal 106 is connected to terminal 102 through brush 86b in engagement with segment 104 and through brush 86a in engagement with segment leading to terminal 102. Under these conditions diode D7 connects terminal 102 to lamp L1 so that the 50 cents purchase, lamp remains energized. Another diode D8 connects terminal 102 to lamp L2 to complete the circuit of the lamp from line 156 to terminal 106 through the switch to terminal 102 through D8 and lamp L2 to contact lREl and through arm IRE to line 159. Thus, the $2.50 purchase lamp L2 is illuminated. These conditions continue until the total amount of credit has been established.

Establishment of credit in the manner described above also conditions the machine for purchase of either a 50 cent ticket or a $2.50 ticket if sufficient credit has been established. As soon as the first 50 cents of credit has been established in the manner described above, brush 862 in engagement with segment 124 and brush 86f in engagement with segment 128 connect terminal 138 to terminal 132. As a result of this connection, a potential is coupled to the upper terminal of a left hand unit selecting relay winding 2R in the following manner. From the 30 volt line 150 a connection is made through a normally closed relay switch 6R1 to the terminal 138. Terminal 132 is connected by a normally closed switch 3R1 associated with the right hand selecting unit relay winding 3R and by a diode D16 to the upper terminal of winding 2R. A normally closed push button switch 2PB2 associated with the right hand selecting button 2P8 and a normally open push button switch IP82 associated with the left hand unit selecting switch lPB are adapted to connect the lower terminal of winding 2R to contact lLEl which is connected by arm ILE to the return line 159. In this manner, the selecting relay winding 2R associated with the left hand unit is conditioned for energization upon actuation of push button switch IPB. These conditions are maintained during all of theremaining credit positions of the totalizer switch 80.

As soon as the brush assembly 84 moves to the fifth credit position at which $2.50 worth of credit is established, a conditioning potential also is applied to the upper terminal of the right hand unit selecting relay winding 3R. In that position of the brush assembly 84 and in all higher credit positions terminal 138 is connected to terminal 122. This is achieved by the coupling between brush 860 in engagement with segment 114 and brush 86f in-engagement with segment 128. For higher credit positions, these two terminals 138 and 122 remain interconnected through variuos brushes and segments of the switch 80. Switch arm 38 in engagement with contact 352 couples this potential through a normally closed switch 2R1 associated with winding 2R to a diode D9 which applies the potential to the upper terminal of winding 3R. A normally open push button switch 2PBl associated with the right hand selecting push button switch 2PB and a normally closed push button switch lPBl associated with the left hand selecting switch lPB are adapted to connect the lower terminal of winding 3R to contact lREl which is connected by arm IRE to the return line 159.

From the foregoing it willbe seen that in the position of the selectorswitch illustrated in the drawings relay winding 2R is conditioned for energization in all credit positions of the brush assembly 84. Relay winding 3R is conditioned for energization at all credit positions of the assembly 84 above $2.00 worth of credit. We provide our merchandiser with a left hand motor control relay including a winding 4R adapted to be energized to close a switch 4R1 to energize the motor M1 and to close a second normally open switch 4R2 to complete the holding circuit for winding 4R through a one revolution limit switch lLS. A earn 168 driven by motor M1 is adapted to open limit switch lLS as the motor shaft completes a single revolution to interrupt the holding circuit of relay winding 4R.

Our merchandiser further includes a second drive motor M2 which may be associated with the right hand unit adapted to deliver for example $2.50 lottery tickets. A motor-control relay winding 5R associated with motor M2 is adapted to be energized in a manner to be described to close a normally open switch 5R1 to energize motor M2 from the source terminals 142 and 144. When energized, winding 5R also closes a switch 5R2 to complete the holding circuit for winding 5R through a limit switch 2LS. We provide a cam 170 associated with motor M2 for opening switch 2LS as the motor for winding SR.

A common relay winding GR is adapted to be energized through either of two diodes D19 and D20 when either of the windings 4R or SR is energized. When energized, winding 6R opens a normally closed switch 6R1 to remove power from the credit switch terminal 138. In addition, it closes a normally open switch 6R2 to connect the lockout line of acceptor to ground through diode D3 thus to disable the acceptor and to connect R3 to ground to disable coin lockour coil C2.

Assuming that sufficient credit has been established to permit the selection of either a 50 cent ticket or a $2.50 ticket, and that the customer desires to purchase a 50 cent ticket, he operates push button switch lPB to open the normally closed switch lPBl to disable to $2.50 relazy winding 3R. 'At the same time, switch 1PB2 closes to complete the circuit of winding 2R in the manner described above. Energization of winding 2R opens normally closed switch 2R1 to disconnect the upper terminal of winding 3R from the switch arm 35. At the same time, normally open switch 2R2 closes to complete the circuit to ground line 154 of both the cancel winding CA and the cancel stop winding CAS. As is more fully pointed out in the Boorsma patent referred to hereinabove, concomitant energization of windings CA and CAS steps the brush assembly 84 one step backward to control 50 cents worth of credit which has previously been established. 'Energization of winding 2R further closes normally-open switch 2R3, to connect the upper terminal of control. winding 4R to terminal 142 to energize the winding. This winding, when energized, closes swith 4R1 to energize motor M1 and closes switch 4R2 to complete the holding circuit of the winding through switch lLS which is opened at the end of a revolution of the motor shaft by cam 168. The closing of the switch IP32 in addition to energizing winding 2R, also grounds resistor R3 through diode D10 to de-energize the coin lockout coil CL and it grounds the lockout line 163 through a diode D13 to prevent the bill acceptor from running when the button is pushed.

As has been pointed out hereinabove, when at least $2.50 of credit has been established, a potential is applied to the upper terminal of winding 3R to conditionthat relay for energization. With sufficient credit in the machine and in order to select a $2.50 ticket, the customer pushes button 2PB to open normally closed switch 2PB2 to disable the 50 cents select 'reiay 2R and to close normally open switch 2PB1 to energize winding 3R. When energized, winding 3R opens the switch 3R1 to disable winding 2R. It further closes switch 3R2 to energize only the cancel coil CA through arm 18 and contact 152. The switch 80 has been so set pursuant to the showing of the Boorsma patent so that energization of winding CA alone steps the switch assembly 84 backward through five steps to cancel $2.50 worth of credit. Energization of winding 3R also closes switch 3R3 to energize winding 5R. Winding 5R when energized closes switch 5R1 to energize motor M2 and closes switch 5R2 to complete the holding circuit for winding 5R which remains complete until the motor completes a revolution at which time cam opens switch 2L8 to interrupt the circuit of winding 5R. Switch 2P8 when closed also grounds resistor R3 through diode D11 to energize the coin lockout coil and it grounds the bill lockout line 163 through diode D14 to disable the bill acceptor.

When either of the windings 4R or SR is energized, winding 6R also is energized through either diode D19 or diode D20. When energized, winding 6R opens switch 6R1 to remove potential from terminal 138 of the switch 80. In addition, it closes switch 6R2 to ensure that the coin lockout winding CL is disabled and that the bill transport is deactivated through diodes D3 and D5 all during the time over which either motor is in operation. This results from the fact that the holding circuits for the respective windings 4R and SR also provide a holding circuit for winding 6R.

As the supply of tickets in the left hand unit is depleted switch ZLE first moves into engagement with contact 2LE2 and then switch lLE moves into engagement with contact 1LE2. Depletion of the supply in the right hand unit sequentially actuates 2RE and IRE. As soon as both switches 2LE and ZRE are actuated a circuit is complete from resistor R3 and from lockout line 63 to ground through respective diodes D12 and D15 so that money will no longer be accepted. When both switches 2LE and 2RE are actuated both empty lamps L3 and L4 are energized. When either lLlEv or IRE is actuated the corresponding lamp L3 or L4 is energized and tickets from the corresponding section can no longer be sold. This arrangement permits a customer to use all the credit he has established.

In the full line positions of arms 15, 2S and 38 shown in the drawings, the left hand unit is adapted to dispense relatively less expensive lottery tickets such for example as 50 cent tickets while the right hand unit is adapted to dispense relatively more expensive tickets such for example as tickets selling for $2.50. if, for any reason, it should be desired to have both the left and right hand units sell tickets for the lower price of 50 cents, the operator merely moves the switch arms from the positions shown to the positions at which they engage respective contacts 1S1, 281 and 381. With the switches in that position, each of the units will dispense 50 cents tickets in the manner described above.

The operation of our merchandiser in dispensing lottery tickets selling at two different prices will readily be apparent from the description hereinabove. Every second quarter deposited in the machine closes coin switch CS to step brush assembly 84 through one step of credit and to energize the quarter count coil QC to register cents on the totalizing counter. Alternatively, bills fed into the bill acceptor 40 through slot 14 result in a signal on line 152 which energizes credit winding CR to step the assembly 84 through two steps to indicate a dollor of credit. At the same time, the bill counter winding BC is energized to count the bill. Whenever a bill is deposited and as the bill acceptor runs, both the coin lockout winding CL is deenergized and the lockout line 163 is grounded to disable the bill acceptor.

With the machine set to deliver tickets at two different prices whenever at lest 50 cents but not more than $2.00 worth of credit has been registered winding 2R is conditioned for energization upon operation of push button lPB. When push button lPB is operated it energizes motor M 1 for one revolution to cause the associated ticket dispenser to deliver one ticket. At the same time, both the cancel windings A and CAS are energized to step switch 80 backward through one step of credit. Repeated purchases of tickets in the manner dei V scribed can be made so long as sufficient credit remains in the switch to permit a purchase to be made.

When at least $2.50 worth of credit has been registered both windings 2R and 3R are conditioned for energization so that the customer may selectively buty either a 50 cent ticket or a $2.50 ticket. If he selects a $2.50 ticket, motor M2 is energized for one revolution to deliver a $2.50 ticket. At the same time, winding CA but not winding CAS is energized, so that switch assembly 84 is stepped back through five steps to subtract $2.50 worth of credit. Repeated purchases of $2.50 tickets can be made until the amount of credit falls below $2.50. From there on only 50 cent tickets can be purchased. It is possible also with greater than $2.50 of credit on the machine to purchase 50 cent tickets if desired.

It is to be remembered that at any time when the totalizer is registering money which already has been deposited, the bill and coil lockouts are active. Moreover these lockouts are activated whenever either of the motors M1 and M2 is operating to deliver a ticket. As the supply of tickets in a section is depleted the empty switches such as ZLE and lLE are operated in sequence a few tickets apart. If both switches ZLE and ZRE are actuated money will no longer be accepted and both lamps L3 and L4 are energized. If either switch lLE or IRE is actuated the corresponding lamp L3 or L4 is energized and tickets can no longer be sold from the corresponding unit.

It will be seen that we have accomplished the objects of our invention. We have provided a lottery ticket merchandiser which permits repeated purchases to be made after establishment of a credit which is a multiple of the purchase price of a ticket selected. Our merchandiser permits selective purchase of tickets at two different prices so long as credit aggregating at least the purchase price of the higher priced ticket has been deposited in the machine. Our ticket merchandiser is relatively simple in construction and in operation for the result achieved thereby.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of our claims. It is further obvious that various changes may be made in details within the scope of our claims without departing from the spirit of our invention. It is, therefore, to be understood that our invention is not to be limited to the specific details shown and described.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim 1. A merchandiser for selling tickets at a certain price including in combination, manually operable means adapted to be enabled to deliver a ticket upon operation thereof, means adapted to be actuated to register and to store a credit equal to an integral multiple of said purchase price, means responsive to the deposit of money therein for actuating said credit registering means to register and to store a credit aggregating an integral multiple of said purchase price, means including said credit registering and storing means for enabling said ticket delivery means upon the registration of a credit equalling said certain price, and means responsive to operation of said ticket delivery means for actuating said credit registering and storing means to subtract an amount equal to said certain price from the credit stored in said credit registering and storage means to leave a credit therein at least equal to said certain price.

2. A merchandiser as in claim 1 in which said money responsive means comprises means responsive to the deposit of coins for actuating said credit registering means and means responsive to the deposit of bills for actuating said credit registering means.

3. A merchandiser as in claim 2 in which said coin responsive means actuates said credit registering means in response to the deposit of every second coin therein.

4. A merchandiser as in claim 1 in which said credit registering means is adapted to be actuated in steps in registering credit, said money responsive means comprising means responsive to deposit every second coin for stepping said credit registering means through one step and means responsive to deposit of a bill for stepping said credit registering means through two steps.

5. A merchandiser for selling first tickets at a lower price and second tickets at a higher price which is at least n times said lower price where n is an integer greater than 1 including in combination, first manually operable means adapted to be enabled to deliver said first tickets upon operation thereof, second manually operable means adapted to be enabled to deliver said second tickets upon operation thereof, means adapted to be actuated to register and to store a credit at least equal to said higher price, means responsive to the deposit of money therein for actuating said credit registering means to register and to store a credit at least equal to said higher price, means including said credit registering and storing means for enabling said first ticket delivering means upon the establishment and storage of any credit at least equal to said lower price, means including said credit registering and storage for enabling said second ticket delivering means upon the establishment and storage of a credit equalling at least said higher price, means responsive to operation of said first ticket delivering means for actuating said credit registering and storing means to subtract a credit equal to the price of said first ticket from the credit stored in said credit registering and storage means to leave a credit therein at least equal to said lower price, and means responsive to operation of said second ticket delivering means for actuating said credit registering and storage means to subtract a credit equal to the purchase price of a second ticket from the credit stored in the credit registering and storage means.

6. A merchandiser as in claim 5 in which said means responsive to the deposit of money comprises first means responsive to the deposit of coins for actuating said credit registering means and second means responsive to the deposit of dollar bills for actuating said credit registering means.

7. A merchandiser as in claim 6 including means responsive to operation of said second actuating means for disabling said coin responsive means.

8. A merchandiser as in claim 5 including first means responsive to operation of said registering means for indicating the establishment of a credit aggregating the purchase price of a first ticket and second means responsive to operation of said registering means for indi- 10. A merchandiser as in claim 5 including means for disabling said second delivery means when the credit in said credit registering means falls below the purchase price of a second ticket.

11. A merchandiser as in claim 5 including first and second empty switches associated with said first ticket delivery means, said first and second switches being sequentially actuated in response to a predetermined operation of said first delivery means, third and fourth empty switches associated with said second ticket delivery means, said third and fourth switches being sequentially actuated in response to a predetermined operation of the second ticket delivery means, means responsive to the concomitant actuation of said first and third switches for inhibiting said means responsive to the deposit of money and respective means responsive to the actuation of said second and fourth switches for disabling the corresponding delivery means.

12. A merchandiser as in claim 11 including respective empty signal lamps associated with said first and second delivery means and means responsive to concomitant actuation of said first and third switches for energizing said lamps.

13. A merchandiser as in claim 11 in which said first and second switches and said third and fourth switches are spaced by the length of at least one ticket.

14. A merchandiser as in claim 1 including first and second e'mpty switches associated with said delivery means, said switches being actuated in sequence in response to a predetermined operation of said delivery means, means responsive to operation of said first switch for disabling said money responsive means,and means responsive to actuation of said second switch for disabling said delivery means. 7

15. A merchandiser as in claim 14 in which said switches are spaced by at least the length of a ticket.

16. A merchandiser for selling tickets including in combination, firstmeans for delivery tickets, second means for delivering tickets, means adapted to be actuated to register a credit equal to an integral multiple of the price of a ticket, means responsive to the deposit of money therein for actuating said credit registering means to register a credit aggregating an integral multiple of said purchase price, means including said credit registering means for enabling said ticket delivery means upon the registerion of a credit equalling the price of a ticket, means responsive to operation of one of said delivering means for actuating said credit registering means to subtract from said credit an amount equal to the price of a ticket delivered by the unit, first and second empty switches associated with said first delivery means, third and fourth empty switches associated with said second delivery means, said first and second switches and said second and fourth switches being actuated sequentially in response to predetermined operations of the respective first and second delivery means, means responsive to concomitant operation of the first and third switches for disabling said means responsive to the deposit of money and means responsive to respective actuation of said second and fourth switches for disabling said delivery means.

17. A merchandiser as in claim 16 including respective empty signal indicators associated with said delivery means and means responsive to concomitant operation of said first and third switches for energizing said indicators.

t V UNITED STATESPATENT FFI E CERTIFICATE 0F JG EC IQN PatentiN o. 3,770,089; Dated NQVe'mber .1973

Inventor(s) Leevf v erduin and William Ros'enh agen It is certified that error appears in the abover-identified patent and" that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 12, line 46, registerion should read --pregistration Signed and sealed this 12th day of March 1974..

(SEAL) Attest: v v

EDWARD M. FLETCHER,JR.- c MARSHALL DANN .Atte sting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM P0 1050 (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 1: us. eovinnmzri'r PRINTING OFFICE 19! o-sss-au.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3608689 *Sep 22, 1969Sep 28, 1971Rowe International IncBinary coin totalizer
US3621964 *Sep 22, 1969Nov 23, 1971Micro Magnetic IndProgrammed multiple stamp dispensing apparatus employing optical electronic stamp counting and auxiliary stamp roll capacity
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3925619 *Mar 25, 1974Dec 9, 1975Ralph Charles FreethyApparatus for transmitting information regarding monetary transactions
US4008792 *Aug 20, 1975Feb 22, 1977H. R. Electronics CompanyVend control circuits capable of vending different quantities at different prices
US4724334 *Mar 19, 1987Feb 9, 1988Bernard MelekMoney-operated unit control system
US5113990 *Aug 15, 1989May 19, 1992Bally Manufacturing CorporationBill validation and change system for a slot machine
US5301834 *Jan 21, 1993Apr 12, 1994The Lift TicketCard vending machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/206, 194/221
International ClassificationG07F5/20, G07F5/16, G07F11/00, G07F5/00, G07F5/22, G07C15/00, G07F11/68
Cooperative ClassificationG07C15/005, G07F5/16, G07F5/22, G07F11/68
European ClassificationG07F5/22, G07F5/16, G07F11/68, G07C15/00D