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Publication numberUS3770271 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateSep 25, 1972
Priority dateSep 25, 1972
Publication numberUS 3770271 A, US 3770271A, US-A-3770271, US3770271 A, US3770271A
InventorsKim B
Original AssigneeElectronic Sensing Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Animated display amusement device
US 3770271 A
Abstract
An animated amusement game having a board on which there is displayed a pair of dogs individually and sequentially advancing around the track. A rabbit is displayed as constantly circling the track and passing the dogs disposed thereon. A radio transmitter provides a multiplexed signal to electronic circuitry for controlling the individual advancement of the dogs in response to player actuated buttons on the transmitter which are associated with the respective dogs. Each dog advances a maximum distance if the player actuated button associated therewith is released at the moment that the rabbit passes the dog.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [19] Kim [ Nov. 6, 1973 1 ANIMATED DISPLAY AMUSEMENT DEVICE [75] lnventor: Byoung Woon Kim, Philadelphia, Pa.

[73] Assignee: Electronic Sensing Products, Inc.,

I Hatboro, Pa.

22 Filed: Sept. 25, 1972 211 Appl. No.: 259,492

46/244 R, 244 A, 244 B; 180/2; 104/60, 149

I [56] I References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Primary Examiner-Anton O. Oechsle Att0rneyA. D. Caesar et al.

[57] ABSTRACT An animated amusement game having a board on which there is displayed a pair of dogs individually and sequentially advancing around the track. A rabbit is displayed as constantly circling the track and passing the dogs disposed thereon. A radio transmitter provides a multiplexed signal to electronic circuitry for controlling the individual advancement of the dogs in response to player actuated buttons on the transmitter which are associated with the respective dogs. Each dog advances a maximum distance if the player actuated button associated therewith is released at the moment that the rab- 8 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures 3,587,100 6/1971 Doremus et al 273/86 B X 6t 3.]. passes the dog 2,687,889 8/1954 Wiltshire 273/86 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 323,304 1/1930 Great Britain 273/86 B OUTSIDE D00 INSIDE DOG [D E! LAP m El 'II EEEIEEEI gym saw 010? 12 PATENTEUNUY 6 I975 llllillll EWZU EQE woo wewPDO Pmmmnv 61975 3770.271

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ANIMATED DISPLAY AMUSEMENT DEVICE This invention relates generally to amusement devices and more particularly to animated display amusement games requiring player skill in responding to visual conditions.

With the increasing amount of leisure time enjoyed by people in todays society, there is a growing demand for amusement devices and games for recreational use.

To that end, various amusement devices and games, utilizing animated displays, are commercially available. Although many of such games are arranged to have players compete against one another for score, such games generally do not require much skill of the players to attain a high score and win.

In copending U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 289,491 and filed on Sept. 25, 1972 which is assigned to the same assignee as this invention, there is disclosed and claimed an electronic game which requires a high degree of player skill in responding to visual condition to attain a high score and win. That game'includes a board which displays in an animation sequence, two figures alternately taking turns cocking their arms and throwing a dart at a target. The point at which the figure releases his dart always occurs at the same point in the animation sequence. The game also includes electronic circuitry therein for 'effectuating the animation sequence and a transmitter which establishes a command signal in response to actuation by a player. If the player actuates the transmitter at the precise moment in the animation sequence that the figure is displayed releasing his dart, the dart impacts the bullseye of the target and a maximum score is attained. If the transmitter is actuated either before or after that moment, the dart will miss the bullseye and a lesser score will result, the longer the delay either before or after release of the dart that the player actuates the transmitter, the lower the score attained.

It is a general object of this invention to provide an amusement game having an aminated sequence, which game tests the skill of a player to manually respond to a visual condition in the animation sequence.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an animated sequence amusement game which tests the skill of a player to manually respond to a visual condition in the animation sequence and which condition occurs at different points therein during consecutive sequences.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide an animated sequence amusement game which tests the skill of a player to manually respond to a visual condition in the animation sequence, which condition occurs at different points in the animation sequence depending upon the skill of the player in responding to the visual condition in the immediately prior sequence.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide an animated sequence amusement game utilizing a single channel radio radio signal to control the sequencing of two figures which are displayed racing against one another.

It is yet a further object of this invention to provide an animated amusement game wherein two figures are displayed racing against one another, the individual advancement of said figures being controlled by different players via a transmitted multiplexed radio signal.

The foregoing as well as other objects of the invention are achieved by providing an animated amusement game including a display board, first means for establishing an animated display of a first object sequentially moving along a first path made up of plural positions on the board and second means for establishing an animated display of the second object sequentially moving along a second path made up of plural positions on the board. The second path is adjacent to the first path. The first means is arranged such that the first object overtakes and passes the second object. The second means is operative in response to first player actuated means wherein the second object advances a predetermined number of positions if the first player actuated means is operated at the moment that the first object overtakes the second object, whereas the second object.

advances a lesser number of positions if the first player actuated means is operated before or after said moment.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed discription when considered in connection with accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of an amusement game in accordance with the preferred embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged elevational view of the arrangement of the illumination lamps for the board;

FIG. 3 is a functional schematic block diagram of the electronic circuitry forming the game shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a functional schematic block diagram of the transmitter of the invention herein;

FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of the transmitter;

FIG. 6 is a functional schematic block diagram of the receiver of the invention herein; 9

FIG. 7 is a schematic and functional block diagram of the receiver;

FIG. 8 is a schematic circuitry and block diagram of the rabbit advancing circuitry;

7 FIG. 9 is a schematic circuitry block diagram of one of the dog position counter and illumination circuit therein;

FIG. 10 is a schematic drawing of the logic of the game control circuitry;

FIG. 11 is a schematic drawing of logic of the scoring pulse forming circuit;

FIG. 12 is a schematic drawing of the logic coincidence detector circuits;

FIG. 13 is a schematic logic of the dog advancing circuits;

FIG. 14 is a schematic circuit block diagram of the lap decoder and illumination circuit;

FIG. 15 is a schematic logic diagram of the winner decoder and illumination circuit;

FIG. 16 is a schematic circuit block diagram of the infield and play again decoder and illumination circuits.

Referring now in greater detail to the various figures of the drawing wherein like reference characters refer to like parts, an animated display electronic amusement game embodying the present invention is shown at 400 in FIG. 1. As can be seen game 400 includes a board 402, a coin box 404 and a transmitter 406.

The board402' includes a front face 403 upon which is graphically represented a race track. The race track is oval in shape and disposed about its inner rail are graphical representations 32 rabbits, each of said rabbits being represented by an oval R each of which being equally spaced about the periphery of the inside rail of sented by 16 ovals DI equally spaced around the track and adjacent to the rabbits. A second second set of 16 dogs are graphically represented by 16 ovals do spaced around the track adjacent and outside of the first set of dogs. The two sets of dogs are arranged such that each dog of one set is substantially radially aligned with a corresponding dog of the second set and with two rabbits.

In the upper left hand corner of the board there is the legend Outside Dog." Below this legend are numerals 1, 2 and 3. The legend Winner appears on the board immediately below said numerals. The upper left hand corner of the board also includes the legend Inside Dog. Below this legend there appears numerals 1, 2 and 3. The legend Winner appears between the sets of numerals and the legend Dead Heat appear under the legend Lap. In the upper right hand corner of the board a grandstand or infield is graphically represented.

In the center of the oval track there appears the legend Play Again.

Board 402 includes a plurality of lamps which are disposed behind the front face 403 of the board at selected points. The lamps are shown schematically by circles on the face of the board.

The lamps are arranged to be illuminated in a sequence to result in animating the figures on the board such that a rabbit appears to be running around the track and that a dog immediately adjacent the rabbit, hereinafter called the inside dog, and a dog outside of the inside dog, hereinafter called the outside dog, also appears to be running around the track.

Logic circuitry is provided within the board 402 to establish the animation sequence, when enabled by the insertion ofa coin in a coin slot in the coin box 404 and in respnse to signals received from the transmitter 406. An electrical cable connects the coin box to the circuitry inside board 402.

Transmitter 406 is a R. F. transmitter and includes a pair of buttons 410 and 412. The depression and release of button 410 controls the sequencing of the inside dog and depression and release of transmitter button 412 controls the sequencing of the outside dog.

The object of the game is to have ones dog (i.e. either the inside or outside dog) complete three laps of the track before the opponents dog completes the three laps. The game is arranged such that the rabbit constantly encircles the track. If the transmitter button associated with a players dog is released at the precise moment that the rabbit passes that dog, the dog will advance four positions, advancing one position at a time as as to appear as if it is running. If the player released the button either before or after the moment of coincidence, a lesser dog advance occurs, depending upon how early or how late the button is released. Even if the button is not released the dog will nevertheless advance one position. If the button is released it should be redepressed after the dog advances to prepare the transmitter for the next pass of the rabbit. To that end when the rabbit has circled the track and is coincident with the dog in its advanced position, the transmitter button should again be released to effectuate the maximum advance of the dog around the track.

The transmitter is operative to provide the signals to both dogs, to effectuate their advance, over a single radio channel, even if both buttons are released at the same time and irrespective of whether or not the dogs are beside one another.

Each time that a dog completes a lap of the track, the board lights up indicating the number of laps so completed. When a dog completes three laps the board lights up with the legend Winner." If both dogs complete three laps at the same time the board lights up with the legend Dead Heat. Upon either dog winning or upon a dead heat, the infield lights up for a preselected period of time and thereafter goes out at which time the legend Play Again in the center of the track lights up. The game is now reset for subsequent play.

As should be appreciated the game requires a high degree of player skill to coordinate the release of the button with the visual display of the coincidence of rabbit and a dog particularly so since the position at which the rabbit and the dog become coincident changes with each succeeding lap of the rabbit.

FIG. 2 shows the arrangement of the lamps with respect the board 402. As can be seen therein lamps l, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, and 32 are respectively behind disposed the 32 graphically represented rabbits on the face of the board.

In a similar manner lamps 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109,110, 111, 112,113, 114, 115, and 1 16 are respectively disposed behind the 16 graphically represented inside dogs and lamps, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215 and 216 are respectively disposed behind the sixteen graphically represented outside dogs.

Lamps 301, 302, 303 are disposed behind the numerals 1, 2 and 3 respectively, under the legend Outside Dog on the face of board 402. Lamps 304, 305 and 306 are disposed behind the numerals 1, 2 and 3, respectively, under the legend Inside Dog on the face of board 402. Lamp 307 is disposed behind the legend Winner and under the legend Outside Dog and lamp 308 is disposed behind the legend Winner and under the legend Inside Dog." Lamp 309 is disposed behind the legend Dead Heat. Lamp 310 is disposed behind the legend Play Again at the center of the oval track and lamp 311 is disposed behind the infield -quentially lit when the transmitter button is released at the optimum time) such that the inside dog does not advance more than four positions during each lamp of the track by the rabbit. The lamps 201 through 216, which define the animation sequence for the outside dog, are lit in a similar manner to the lamps 101 through 116-forming the animation sequence for the i s de d s- FIG. 3 is a functional block diagram of the logic and electrical circuitry for game 400. As can be seen therein, game 400 includes a power supply 414 which is suitably connected to the various components of the circuitry illumination power to the circuitry of the game.

The logic circuitry of the game includes Game Control Circuit 416. The Game Control Circuit includes one input connected to the output of the Coin Box 404 and another input connected to the output of Receiver 418. The output of the Game Control Circuit is connected as an input to Inside Dog Position Counter 420 and as an input to the Outside Dog Position Counter 422.

A clock pulse generator 424 is connected to and provides 30 hz clock pulses, I5 hz clock pulses, 7.5 hz clock pulses and 3.75 hz clock pulses inputs to the Scoring Pulse Forming Circuit 426. The 3.75 hz clock pulse output is also connected as an input to the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit 428, the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit 430, the Rabbit Position Counter 432, the Rabbit Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 434V and the Winner Decoder and Illumination Circuit 448. The 30hz output is also connected to input terminals of the inside and outside dog advance circuits 428 and 430, respectively.

An output of Receiver 418 is connected to an input of the Inside Dog position Advance Circuit 428, another output of the Receiver is connected to an input the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit 430.

The output of the Rabbit Position Counter Circuit 432 is connected to an input of the Coincidence Detector Circuit 436 and the Coincidence Detector Circuit 438. A second input to Coincidence Detector 436 is connected to an output of the Inside Dog Position Counter 420. A second input of the Coincidence Detector 438 is connected to an output of the Outside Dog Position Counter 422. The output of Coincidence Detector 436 is connected to aninput of the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit 428 and the output of the Coincidence Detector 438 is connected to an input of the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit 430.

The output of Inside Dog Position Counter 420 is connected to the input of the Dog Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 440 and the output of the Outside Dog Position Coutner 422 is connected to the Inside Dog Position and Illumination Circuit 442. Another output of .the Inside Dog Position Counter 420 is connected to an input of the Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit 444 and a second output of the Outside Dog Position Counter 422 is connected to the Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit 446. The output of the Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit 444 and the Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit 446 are connected'to inputs of the Winner Decoder and Illumination Circuit 448. An output of Winner Decoder Illumination Circuit 448 is connected as an input to Game Control Circuit 416. Other outputs of the Winner Decode and Illumination Circuit 448 are connected to the Infield and Play Again Decoder and Illumination Circuit 450 and to the dog advance circuits 428 and 430. The Infield and Play again Decoder and Illumination circuit 450 includes a second input which is connected to an output of the Game Control Circuit 416 and a third input which is connected to the Coin Box 103.

Operation of the game is as follows: Upon the power supply 414 being energized, Inside and Outside Dog Position Advance Circuits 428 and 430 are cleared and enabled for operation. Upon receipt ,of a coin in the Coin Box, a signal is provided therefrom to Game Control Circuit 416. At this time circuit 416 is in'its Idle condition wherein, in response to the signal from the coin box it provides a reset signal to the Inside Dog P0- sition Counter 420 and to the Outside Dog Position Counter 422. This signal precludes any dog from advancing so long as the signal persists.

Upon either button 410 or 412 in the Transmitter being depresed, a multiplexed radio frequency signal is transmitted by the transmitter and is received by Receiver 418. The receiver provides a signal to the Game Control Circuit 416 which causes that circuit to switch from its Idle condition (wherein it supplies reset signals to the outside and inside dog position counters to disable them) to a Play condition (wherein it ceases providing reset signals thereto.

As soon as the power supply 414 is energized the Clock Pulse Generator 414 provides clock signals at its output terminals The 3.75hz clock pulse output signals therefrom are provided as an input to the Rabbit Position Counter 432 and into the Rabbit Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 434, whereupon lamps 1 through 32 therein light sequentially, such that rabbit appears to run around the track.

The output signal of the Inside Dog Position Counter 420 is provided to the Inside Dog Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 440 to effectuate the illumination of lamp 101 which lights up the image of the inside dog at the start position. In a similar manner the output signal of the outside Dog Position Counter 422 is provided to the Outside Dog Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 442 to effectuate the illumination of lamp 201 which lights up the image of the outside dog at the start position.

At the beginning of the game no laps will have been completed, thus the output of the Inside Dog Position Counter 420, as decoded by the decoder and circuit 444, results in all of the lamps in said latter circuit being out. In a similar manner decoder circuit 446 decodes the position of the Outside Dog Position Counter 422 such that all of the lamps in the circuit 446 are out.

Upon the Rabbit Position Counter completing one cycle, i.e., upon the rabbit completing one transversal of the track, the Coincidence Detectors 436 and 438 provide signals to the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit 428 and the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit 430, respectively. In response to the occurrence of the signals from the coincidence detectors, 30hz clock pulses are provided to registers within each of the dog advance circuits. The registers are four stage registers, which are adapted for either serial or parallel operation. In response to the signals from the coincidence detectors indicating that the rabbit is coincident with a dog, the register associated therewith switches to parallel operation wherein at the occurrence of the first 30hz clock pulse, a first stage therein goes high, at the occurence of the second 30hz clock pulse the first and second stages go high, at the occurence of the third 30hz clock pulse the first, second and third stages go high and at the occurrence of the fourth 3O hz clock pulse all of the stages are high, i.e., all stages are high at the point in time that the rabbit passes the dog. At the point in time that the rabbit passes the dogs the players controlling the inside and outside dogs should release their associated transmitter buttons to effectuatethe maximum advance of their dogs.

Assuming that the player associated with the inside dog releases his button at the moment the rabbit passes his dog and that the player associated with the outside dog is very slow to react and fails to release his button at all, operation is as follows.

Insofar as the inside dog is concerned, the input signal received from receiver 418 causes a register within the Inside Dog Position Circuit 428 to begin shifting high signals therein in response to 30hz pulses from the clock pulse generator 424. At the precise moment that the rabbit just passes the dog, the register inside the dog position advance circuit is completely full, i.e., it contains four high signals therein;

Insofar as the outside dog is concerned its associated advance circuit operates in the identical manner as the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit, up until the moment the rabbit passes the outside dog.

Upon release of transmitter button 410, Receiver 418 provides a signal to the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit which causes the register therein a stop counting (i.e., disables the register). The failure to release button 412 does not result in the disabling of the counter in the Outside Dog Position Advance.

At the end of the coincidence interval (i.e., when the rabbit passes a dog) both of the coincidence detectors 436 and 438 provide signals to their associated position advance circuits, which signals cause the registers therein to shift into a serial mode of operation wherein low signals are shifted into the register. Since Receiver 418 is providing signals to the position advance circuit 428 to preclude its register from shifting, the register remains full even though the signal from the coincidence detector 436 indicates the lack of coincidence.

Insofar as the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit is concerned, the Coincidence Detector, 438 provides a signal indicating that the outside dog and rabbit are not longer coincident. This signal, in conjunction with the 30hz clock pulses applied to the register, now in its serial mode of operation, causes the register to start emptying, i. e., to shift lows therein.

The dog position advance circuits are operative to provide clock pulses to the clock inputs of their as cociated dog position counters so long as a high input remains on the first stage output of their registers. The advance circuits are also operative (as will be explained later to provide a clock pulse to their associated dog counter even if their registers are empty at the occurrence of the first 3.75hz clock pulse after the rabbit passes the dogs associated therewith.

The Scoring Pulse Forming Circuit 426 enables every eighth 30hz pulse from the clock pulse generator to be provided to both the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit and to the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit 430. These signals called scoring pulses cause flip-flops in the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit and the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit to change states, whereupon during the second 3.75 hz interval after the rabbit passes the dog, a first 3.75 hz clock pulse is provided to the Inside Dog Position Counter and to the Outside Dog Position Counter. Accordingly, both the inside and Outside dogs advance one position.

The Inside Dog Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 440 detects the counter position, such that lamp 102 illuminates. In a similar manner the Outside Dog Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 442 detects the position of Outside Dog Counter 422 and illuminates lamp 202 in response thereto.

The second 3.75 hz clock pulse following the moment at which the rabbit passes the dogs, causes the last stage in the register of the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit 428 to empty whereas, the register in the Outside Dog Position Counter will have completely'emptied by this point intime (as a result of being clocked by the 30 ha pulses from the clock pulse generator from the time the register shifts into its serial made of operation). The next successive 3.75 hz pulse (i.e. the third 3.75 hz pulse after the rabbit passes the dog), to appear at the output of the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit clocks the Inside Dog Position Counter 420 to cause the counter to advance to a second position. The Inside Dog Position Decoder and illumination Circuit 7 440 decodes the counter position and illuminates lamp 103. At the same time the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit 430 does not provide any 3.75 hz pulses to the Dog Position Counter 422 since the register in the advance circuit is empty. Accordingly, the dog position counter 422 remains its first position whereupon, the lamp 202 remains lit.

Upon the occurrence of the second clock pulse to the clock input of the Inside Dog Lposition Counter the fourth and third stages of the register in the Dog Position Advance Circuit 428 empty. Since the register still contains a high signal at its first stage upon the occurrence of the next consecutive 3.75 hz clock pulse (i.e., the fourth 3.75 clock pulse after the point at which the rabbit passes the dog), said pulse is provided by the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit to the clock input of the Inside Dog Position Counter to advance the counter a third position. The Inside Dog Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit 440 thereby effectuates the illumination of lamp 104 (all the while lamp 202 of the outside dog remains lit).

Upon the passage of the third clock pulse to the clock input of the Inside Dog Position Counter the fourth, third and second stages of the register within the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit empty, thereby leaving only a high signal on the first stage. Accordingly, upon the next successive 3.75 hz clock pulse from the clock pulse generator 424, i.e., the fifth consecutive clock pulse after the point at which the rabbit passes the dog, the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit provides said clock pulse to the clock input of the Inside Dog Position Counter 420. This action advances the counter a fourth position. The Dog Position Decoder and Illumination Circuit decodes the counter 420 and illuminates lamp 105 in response thereto.

Upon the fourth clock pulse being applied to the Inside Dog Position Counter, the register within the Inside Dog Position Circuit 428 is completely empty; i.e., contains only lows. At this point in time the Inside Dog Position Advance Circuit, like the Outside Dog Position Advance Circuit, no longer provides clock pulses to its associated counter until the rabbit recircles the track and is again coincident with the dog, whereupon the above described sequence of operation can occur again.

When the Inside Dog Position Counter 420 reaches the end of its count cycle, the Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit monitors such a condition and provides a signal indicating that the inside dog has completed one lap, i.e., lamp 304 is lit. The Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit 444 provides a signal to light lamp 305 and indicate that a second lap has been completed when the Inside Dog Position Counter completes a second count sequence and provides a signal to illuminate lamp 306 when the Inside Dog Position Counter has completed a third count sequence.

Operation of the Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit 446 is identical to that of Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit 444.

When either Lap Decoder and Illumination Circuit indicate that three laps have been completed, the Winner Decoder and Illumination Circuit 448, illuminates either lamp 307 (if the outside dog wins), lamp 308 (if the inside dog wins), or lamp 309 (if it is a dead heat). Upon either a win or a dead heat, the Winner Decoder and Illumination Circuit provides a signal to the Infield and Play Again Decoder and Illumination Circuit 448. This action results in lamp 311 therein illuminating, to light up the infield on the face of the board 402. The infield remains lit for apredetermined period of time which period is established by the Game Control Circuit 416. After that period of time the Game Control Circuit provides a signal to the Infield and Play Again Decoder and Illumination Circuit to cause lamp 311 therein to go out and to cause lamp 310 to illuminate. This action results in the illumination of the Play Again legend.

The radio transmitter 406 provides a multiplexed signal to the receiver 418. That signal is produced by modulating a radio frequency carrier signal by two audio signals, depending upon whether or not an associated transmitter button is depressed. In FIG. 4 there is shown a block diagram of the radio transmitter.

As can be seen therein the transmitter includes a pair of audio oscillator s, 452 and 454. Audio oscillator 452 is adapted for providing oscillations at a frequency of 5 KHZ and oscillator 454 is adapted for providing oscillations at a frequency of 7.5 KHZ.

The oscillators are provided during alternate intervals as will be described in detail hereinafter such that during one interval of time only oscillator 452 is providing oscillations and during the next succeeding interval oscillator 454 is providing oscillations. Either oscillator 452 or 454 can be disabled from providing oscillations in accordance with the condition of the transmitter button associated therewith.

The sequencing of oscillator operation is determined by a Timing Generator Circuit 456 and a Timing Sequencer Circuit 458.

The output of oscillator 452 is provided as one input to NOR gate 460 and the output of the other oscillator 454 is provided as another input to the NOR gate. The output of the NOR gate is provided as one input to a Radio Frequency Amplifier 464. A crystal controlled Radio Frequency Oscillator 462 is adapted for providing a main carrier signal to the Radio Frequency Amplifier 464. The radio frequency amplifier modulates the carrier signal and amplifies same in accordance with signals received from NOR gate 460 and provides the modulated and amplified signal to a tuned antenna 466. The antenna provides the modulated radio signals through the air to an antenna coupled to receiver.

FIG. 5 shows the details of the circuitry forming the transmitter 406. As can be seen therein a Battery VI is provided in the transmitter and is coupled to one side of a pair of dual-contact, ganged switches SW1 and SW2. Switch SW1 is connected to the transmitter button 410 and both. of its pairs of contacts are closed when the transmitter button is depressed. Switch SW2 is connected to transmitter button 412 and both of its pairs of contacts are closed when switch SW2 is depressed.

Switch SW1 is adapted when closed for providing power to Timing Generator Circuit 456, the Timing Sequencer 458, the Audio Oscillator 452, the Crystal Oscillator 462 and the Radio Frequency Amplifier 464. Switch SW2 is adapted, when closed, for providing power to the Timing Generator Circuit 456 the Timing Sequencer 458, the Audio Oscillator 454, the Crystal Oscillator 462, and the Radio Frequency Amplifier 464.

The Timing Generator Circuit 456 incudes a unijunction transistor, UJT, having a resistor R1 connected between contacts of switch 1 and the emitter of the unijunction transistor. The emitter of the unujunction transistor, is connected via a diode D1, and the parallel combination of a capacitor C1 nad a resistor R2 and a series connected potentiometer R3, to ground. A resistor R4 is connected between the base of the unijunction trnasistor and one side of switches SW1 and SW2.

A transistor O1 is coupled to the unijunction transistor. To that end a resistor R6 is coupled between the base 1 of the unijunction transistor and the base of transistor Q1. The emitter of transistor O1 is connected to ground. The collector of transistor O1 is connected,

via a resistor R7, to the common connection of resistors R1 and R4.

As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art the voltage on the emitter of the unijunction transistor increases as the current through the path comprising resistor R1, diode D1, resistors R2 and R3 charges capacitor C1, the time constant of the charging path being the parallel resistance of R1 and R3 times the capacitance of C1. During the time that the unijunction transistor is off, the base of transistor O1 is at ground potential and O1 is off. Accordingly, the output on the collector of O1 is high (some positive value).

- When the unijunction transistor emitter reaches its peak-point voltage, the unijunction transistor conducts and capacitor C1 discharges through the resistors R2 and R3. During the discahrge cycle of the unijunction the base of transistor O1 is biased positive, whereupon transistor Q1 becomes conductive thereby lowering the collector voltage to ground potential. All during the time that the unijunction transistor is conducting the collector voltage of O1 is at ground potential. When the unijunction transistor turns off and begins recharging again transistor Q1 turns off and the potential on its collector again beg ins to rise to said positive value.

The discharge time constant for the circuit 604 is established such that it is approximately of the same duration as the charging time constant. As should therefore be appreciated during the interval of time that the unijunction transistor is nonconductive, i.e., when it is charging, the output of the circuit 456 is a predetermined positive voltage and during the next successive interval, i.e., the interval during which the unijunction transistor is conducting the output of circuit 456 is at ground potential. The unijunction transistor is free running, such that during successive intervals of time positive voltage and ground potential alternately appear at the output of circuit 456.

The Timing Sequencer Circuit 458 includes'a pair of Transistors Q2 and Q3 whose bases are coupled via resistors R8 and R9, respectively, to the collector of transistor Q1 of circuit 456. The collector of transistor O2 -is connected, via resistor R10, to one side of switch SW1 and to one side of switch SW2. The emitter of transistor O2 is connected to ground.

In a similar manner, the emitter of transistor O3 is connected to ground. The collector of transistor is connected, via resistors RIB-and R17, to one side of switch SW2. A capacitor C2 is connected across the emitterto-base junction of transistor Q2. A resistor R1 1 is connected from the collector of transistor O2 to the base of a transistor Q4. The emitter of transistor Q4 is connected to ground and the collector thereof is connected to the base of a transistor Q in the Audio Oscillator 452. In a similar manner, the collector of transistor Q3 is connected to the base of a transistor O6 in the Audio Oscillator 454.

Operation of the Timing Sequencer Circuit 458 is as follows, assuming that both switches SW1 and SW2 are closed. During the interval that the output of Timing Generator 456 is at ground potential both transistors Q2 and Q3 are biased off whereupon the base of transistor Q6 in Oscillator Circuit 454 is at some positive potential. When transistor O2 is off, transistor Q4 is conductive. Accordingly, the base of transistor Q5 in Oscillator Circuit 452 is effectively at ground potential. During immediately succeeding interval in time (i.e.,

when the output of circuit 456 is at some positive potential) both transistor Q2 and Q3 are rendered conductive. Upon transistor Q3 conducting, the base of transistor O6 is effectively at ground potential. Upon transistor Q2 conducting transistor Q4 is rendered nonconductive, whereupon some positive voltage appears at the base of transistor Q5, via resistor R12.

Each of the audio'oscillators is of the Hartley type. For example, Oscillator 452 comprises a transistor Q5 and a resistor R12 connected between its collector and its base. A capacitor C5 is connected between the base of transistor Q5 and one end of an inductor L1. The other end of inductor L1 is connected to ground. A capacitor C3 is connected across inductor L1. Inductor Ll includes a center tap which is connected to the emitter of transistor Q5.

In a similar manner Oscillator 454 incudes a transistor Q6 whose collector is connected to its base via resistor R13. A capacitor C6 is connected between the base of transistor Q6 and one end of an inductor L2.

The other end of the inductor L2 is connected to.

ground. A capacitor C4 is connected across inductor L2. A center tap of inductor L2 is connected to the emitter of transistor Q6.

As can be seen, a variable potentiometer R16 is connected between the collector of transistor Q5 and one contact of switch SW1 and a variable potentiometer R17 is connected between the collector of transistor Q6 and one contact of switch SW2.

Oscillator 452 is adapted for providing 5 khz oscillations when enabled'by the closure of switch SW1 and during the interval in time that the output of the Timing Generator Circuit 456 is at some positive potential. Oscillator 454 is adapted for providing 7.5 khz oscillations when enabled by the closure of switch SW2, during the next succeeding interval in time that output of the Timing Generator Circuit 456 is at ground potential.

The operation of either oscillator, when enabled and during their associated interval, proceeds in a similar manner. To that end only the operation of oscillator 454 will be described.

When the base of transistor O6 in oscillator 454 is at some positive potential, transistor 06 turns on, whereupon current flows therethrough and through a portion of the inductor L2 from the center tap to ground. The

current flowing through that portion of the inductor induces a flux in the core which results in an emf in the remaining portion of the coil. The emf is fed back to the base of transistor Q6 so that oscillations result therefrom. The oscillations are amplified by transistor Q6 and are provided at its emitter. The emitter of transistor Q6 serves as one input to Norgate 460. The emitter of transistor O5 in oscillator 452 provides another input into the norgate.

As previously discussed, only one oscillator is enabled to oscillate during a conduction interval as defined by the Timing Generator Circuit and the Timing Sequencer, irrespective of whether or not both switches are closed. For example when switch SW1 is closed oscillator 452 operates during alternate intervals. During intermediate intervals oscillator 454 operates if switch 2 is also closed. If switch 2 is open no oscillations are produced during said intermediate interval. If switch 2 is closed and switch 1 is open, during the intermediate intervals, oscillator 454 provides oscillations during the alternate intervals.

The output of oscillator 452 is provided as one input to NOr gate 460 and the output of oscillator 454 is provided an another input ot the Norgate. To that end the emitter of transistor Q5 is connected, via a resistor R14, to the base of transistor Q7 in the Norgate and the emitter of transistor Q6 is connected, vai a resistor R15, to the base of transistor Q8 therein. The emitters of transistors Q7 and Q8 are connected together and to ground and the collectors thereof are connected together to form the output of the NOR gate.

Operation of the NOR gate is as follows, assuming that during one interval oscillations are provided to the base of transistor Q7 via oscillator 452. During the negative going half cycles of the oscillations, transistor Q7 is off and some positive voltage appears at the collector of transistor Q7. During the positive going half cycles of the oscillations, the transistor Q7 is on and its emitter is at ground potential. Accordingly, the oscillations from Oscillator Circuit 452 are converted in NOR gate 608 to a group of positive pulses at the frequency of the oscillations. In a similar manner, the NOR gate converts the oscillations from oscillator 454 into a group of pulses whose frequency is the frequency of the oscillations from circuit 454. Therefore, in the embodiment shown, during one interval pulses at a frequency of 7.5 khz appear at the output of the NOR gate and during the next successive interval pulses at a frequency of 6 khz appear at the output thereof (assuming of course that both switches SW1 and SW2 are closed).

The Crystal Oscillator 462 is of the Pierce type and comprises a transistor Q9 having a crystal, connected between its collector and its base. A resistor R18 is connected between the base of the transistor and one contact of switch SW1 and one contact of switch SW2. The emitter of transistor O9 is connected to ground via a resistor R20. A resistor R19 is connected between the base of transistor Q9 and ground. A capacitor C8 is connected between ground and one side of switch SW2. A pair of capacitors C14 and C15 are connected between ground and respective contacts of switches SW1 and SW2.

The crystal oscillator 462 operates in a conventional manner and provides oscillations of a frequency approximately 27 megahertz via inductor L3 to the base of transistor Q10. The 27 megahertz oscillations act as the main carrier signal for the transmitter and receiver.

The Radio Frequency Amplifier 464 is operative for modulating the carrier signal with the signals received from the NOR gate 460 i.e., either the 7.5 khz pulses or the Skhz pulses, depending upon the conduction internal of Timing Generator Circuit 456. The Radio Frequency Amplifier 460 amplifies the modulated signal and provides the amplified signal to a tuned antenna 466 for transmission to the receiver.

The Radio Frequency Amplifier comprises a transistor Q10 whose emitter is connected to one side of another winding of inductor L3 and a resistor R21 is connected between the other side of that winding and the base of transistor Q10. A capacitor C11 is connected in parallel with resistor R21. The output of the NOR gate 460 (i.e., the collectors of transistors Q7 and Q8) is connected to the junction of resistor R21 and the other winding of L3. The collector of transistor Q10 is connected to the center tap of winding L4. A capacitor C12 and a tuning capacitor C13 are connected in parallel with each other and across L4 to form the tuned antenna 466.

Operation of the Radio Frequency Amplifier is as follows assuming that during a particular interval, oscillator 452 is operating whereupon pulses of a frequency of khz are provided by the NOR gate 608 to a winding of L3. As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, during the time between each 5 khz pulse the emitter of transistor Q will effectively be at ground potential and the 27 megahertz carrier signal will be amplified by transistor Q10 and be applied to the tuned antenna.

The antenna radiates the 27 megahertz carrier Signal in a burst of 5 khz pulses during alternate intervals and the 27 megahertz carrier in bursts of 7.5 khz pulses during the intermediate intervals, assuming that both oscillators 452 and 454 are operating. If only switch SW1 is closed, oscillator 452 operates, thus the input to the receiver is the 27 megahertz carrier provided in a burst of 5 khz pulses during alternate intervals and no signal during the intermediate intervals. If, on the other hand, only switch SW2 is closed, oscillator 454 operates, thus the antenna radiates the 27 megahertz carrier in bursts of 7.5 khz pulses during the intermediate intervals and no signal during the alternate intervals.

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of the Receiver 418. As can be seen therein the receiver is of the superhetrodyne type in that the carrier signal is mixed with a local oscillation signal to provide an intermediate frequency (IF) signal. The lF signal is demodulated or detected to remove the carrier and to provideat its output the 5 khz pulses, if any, during-the intermediate intervals. To that 1 end the receiver includes an antenna 468 which provides the modulated 27 megahertz, carrier signal with the oscillation from a local oscillator 472. The local oscillator is tuned such that its output is 455 i 15 lower than the 27 megahertz carrier. This results in 455 i 15 khz oscillations appearing in either 5 khz pulses or 7.5 khz pulses, (depending upon the interval and the state of the switches SW1 and SW2 in the transmitter). The IF signal is provided to IF amplifier 472 which amplifiers the input and feeds the amplified output to a detector circuit 475.

In the detector circuit the 455 i 15 khz IF signal is rectified and filtered to remove the carrier and the remaining signal (i.e.,.the 5 or 7.5 khz pulses) is provided as an input into two detection channels, 476 and 478. Channel 476 is a channel for separating the 5 khz pulses from the carrier and for providing an output signal indicative of the presence of such pulses. Channel 478 is provided for separating the 7.5 khz pulses from the carrier and for providing an output signal indicative of the present of such pulses. To that end channel 476 comprises an Audio Frequency Amplifier 480, a 5 khz Band Pass Filter 482 a Detector 484, a Schmitt Trigger 486, and an Integrating Circuit 488. Channel 478 comprises an Audio Frequency Amplifier 492, a 7.5 khz Band Pass Filter 494 a Detector 496, a Schmitt Trigger 498 and an Integrating Circuit 500.

Operation of channel 476 is as follows. The Audio Frequency Amplifier 480 provides amplified oscillations at the frequency of the input signals provided thereto. The oscillations are provided to the 5 khz Band Pass Filter which filters out all signals other than the 5 khz oscillations (i.e., it filters out any 7.5 khz oscillations which may exist during the intermediate intervals). The 5 khz output of the Band Pass Filter is provided to Detector 484 which rectifies the oscillations and filters out the rectified signal to provide a positive signal during each interval in which the 5 khz oscillations appear. The output signal from the detector is shaped in Schmitt Trigger 486. The output of the Schmitt Trigger is fed into an Integrator 488 which provides a ground or logically low signal so long as the Schmitt Trigger provides it with positive output signals. As should thus be appreciated the output of the Integrator will be logically low'whenever the transmitter button 410 is depressed and will be at a logical high whenever the transmitter button is released.

Channel 478 operates in a similar manner to channel 476 to provide a logically low signal whenever transmitter button 412 is depressed and a logically high signal when the transmitter button is released.

The details of a portion of the receiver are shown in FIG. 7. As can be seen therein the output of the IF amplifier 474 is provided to the Detector 475 via a winding of transformer L5 and is coupled via diode D2 across capacitor C16. One side of C16 is connected to ground. Capacitor C16 forms a side of a Pi arranged filter which includes another capacitor C17, one side of which is connected to ground and a resistor R22 connected between the non-grounded sides of both capacitors. A load resister R23 is provided across capacitor C17 and forms the output of the detector. The output of the detector is coupled via a capacitor C18 to the input of the audio frequency amplifier 480 in channel 476 and via capacitor C19 to the audio freuqency amplifier 492 in channel 478.

Audio frequency amplifier 480 comprises a transistor Q11 whose base serves as the input to the amplifier. A diode D3 is connected between ground and the base of Q11. A resister R24 is connected between the collector and Q11 and the base thereof.

The 5 khz Band Pass Filter 482 is connected via a capacitor C20 and a resister R25 to the collector of transistor Q11 and is also connected to a source of positive bias voltage such as 10 volts. The Band Pass Filter is formed of capacitor C22 and inductor L6, the values of which are selected so as to enable the passage 5 khz signals therethrough but to prevent 7.5 khz signals from passing therethrough. Audio Amplifier 492 comprises a transistor Q12 whose base serves as the input to the amplifier. A diode D4 is connected between ground and the base of transistor Q12. A resistor R26 is connected between the collector of Q12 and the base thereof.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4249735 *Jun 28, 1978Feb 10, 1981Eric BromleyElectronic simulated football game and method
US4781377 *Oct 24, 1986Nov 1, 1988Mcvean Charles DHybrid sporting event and game show
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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/6, 463/40
International ClassificationA63F9/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/143
European ClassificationA63F9/14E