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Publication numberUS3770279 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateNov 19, 1971
Priority dateNov 19, 1971
Publication numberUS 3770279 A, US 3770279A, US-A-3770279, US3770279 A, US3770279A
InventorsPhinny R
Original AssigneePhinny R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf putter
US 3770279 A
Abstract
The head of a golf putter is substantially rectangular in shape and has a weight distributing channel formed in the top thereof which extends through one end of the putter head. Within the channel is mounted a shaft-receiving boss adapted to hold the shaft of the putter at an angle such that the putter can be held close to the feet of the user with the bottom surface of the putter parallel to the putting surface. The bottom of the putter head has an upwardly curved rear surface and the front and side walls are inwardly tapered from bottom to top. The weight distribution of the putter head together with the shaft angle allow the putter to be employed with a one-arm pendulum-type swing for improved putting accuracy.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191' 1111 3,770,279 1 Nov. 6, 1973 Phinny 1 1 GOLF PUTTER D207,228 3/1967 Solheim.... 283/167DUX 3,387,845 6/1968 Raub 273 171 x [76] f l z" RR Fremont 3,652,093 3 1972 Reuter 273/167 H x 1C [22] Filed: Nov, 19, 1971 Primary ExaminerRichard C. Pinkham [52] U.S. Cl. 273/167 G, 273/167 F, 273/167 H [51] Int. Cl. A63b 53/02, A63b 53/04 [58] Field of Search 273/77 R, 78, 79, 273/80 C, 163 R, 164, 167475; D34/5 GC, 5 GH [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS D202,7l5 11/1965 Solheim 273/167 D UX D204,001 3/1966 Lubin 273/167 D UX 1,154,490 9/1915 Davis 273/78 3,191,936 6/1965 Guier 273/168 R 3,679,207 7/1972 Florianm. 273/78 X 3,042,405 7/1962 Solheim 273/167 G X D206,234 11/1966 Sasse 273/167 D UX 3,567,227 3/1971 Panks 273/168 D204,000 3/1966 Lubin 273/167' D UX Assistant Examiner-Richard J. Apley Attorney-Price, Heneveld, Juizenga and Cooper [57] ABSTRACT The head of a golf putter is substantially rectangular in shape and has a weight distributing channel formed in the top thereof which extends through one end of the putter head. Within the channel is mounted a shaftreceiving boss adapted to hold the shaft of the putter at an angle such that the putter can be held close to the feet of the user with the bottom surface of the putter parallel to the putting surface. The bottom of the putter head has an upwardly curved rear surface and the front and side walls are inwardly tapered from bottom to top. The weight distribution of the putter head together with the shaft angle allow the putter to be employed with a one-arm pendulum-type swing for improved putting accuracy.

- 7 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures GOLF PUTTER The present invention relates to golf clubs, and particularly to a golf putter. A basic goal in golf putting is to obtain a pendulum-type of swing such that the golf ball will travel in a straight line toward the cup once struck. For years, various golf putters have been fabricated to aid the golfer in an attempt to improve his putting accuracy. Several putter heads have been designed in sundry shapes, sizes and weights; as well as with various markings to allow the user to-align the club head with the golf ball. Nearly all of these putters are designed to be gripped with both hands.

When employing a putter designed for a two-handed grip it is very difficult to obtain a pendulum-type of swing because of the difficulty in controlling a putter with the relatively slow swing used in putting when the putter is gripped with two hands. It has been discovered, however, that by employing one arm and gripping an appropriately designed club with only one hand; it is easier toobtain a pendulum swing since there is less chance of the second hand interfering with the smooth pendulum stroke of the club.

Conventional putters cannot be successfully employed with the one-arm swing because they are either too light and therefore are difficult to swing accurately in a pendulum trajectory or their shaft angle is such that the golf club must be held away from the body of the golfer. In such a position the club is relatively unstable during the swing and it is very difficult to achieve a pendulum-type trajectory with a one-arm swing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The golf club of the present invention, however, comprises a putter formed from a generally rectangular putter head which is somewhat heavier than a conventional putter head. The putter head is also designed to hold the club shaft at an angle such that as the golfer holds the club with one hand with his arm relatively straight, the club head will be positioned parallel to the putting surface and relatively close to the feet of the golfer. By so designing the club head, a pendulum-type of swing can be achieved since the club shaft is nearly vertical and the club can easily be guided in a pendulum trajectory with a relaxed one-arm swing.

Putters embodying the present invention comprise a club head having a substantially rectangular body member with a relativel flat bottom surface curved upwardly at one end. The club head includes an open channel formed in the top which extends through one end of the putter. A shaft-receiving boss in the channel holds the putter shaft at an angle to enable the club head to be positioned on the ground relatively close to the feet of the user.

It is an object, therefore, of the present invention to provide a golf putter adapted to be swung with one arm. I i I It is additionally an object of the present invention to provide a golf putter having a relatively heavy club head and a relatively steep shaft angle to allow the putter to be positioned relatively close to the feet of the golfer during use.

It is still an additional object of the present invention to provide a golf putter having a club head with a channel therethrough to distribute the weight of the putter such that it can be used with a one-arm swing.

These and other objects of the present inventionwill become apparent upon an examination of the figures and accompanying description thereof.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of the putter head of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a rear elevational view of the putter head of the present invention; and

FIG. 6 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the putter head of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF- THE FIGURES Referring now to the figures, there is shown a golf putter 10 having a head 20 and a shaft 50 coupled thereto. The club head is cast from any suitable material such as brass, bronze, or the like, and is generally rectangular in shape. The club head 20 includes a generally U-shaped channel 25 formed in the top and extending from the front or toe portion of the club head through the rear or heel of the head 20 as shown in FIGS. v1 and 3. The club head has a striking surface 21, a rear surface 22, a front surface 23, a bottom surface 24, and a top surface 27. The bottom surface 24 of the putter head 20 is generally flat but curves upwardly at the rear end of the head at the area 26 shown in FIG. 2. The front surface 23 is tapered inwardly from the bottom to the top of the putter as shown in FIG. 2. Sides 21 and 22 are tapered slightly inwardly from bottom to top and from an angle ,8 (FIG. 4) between a vertical line V and the plane of the sides 21 and 22. In the preferred embodiment, angle [3 was between 4 and 6.

The U-shaped channel 25 has a floor or bottom surface 28 (FIG. 3) and a two-leveled step at the front portion of the putter head 20. The step comprises a beveled portion 29 and-a flat plateau portion 31 with a surface intermediate the top surface 27 of the putter head and the floor 28.

' The channel 25 in the putter head 20 defines a first wall 32 with an outside surface forming the striking surface 21 and a second wall 34. The inner surface of front wall 32 has a shaft receiving boss 35 which is integrally molded to the front wall 32 and to the floor 28 of the head 20. The shaft receiving boss 35 includes an aperture 36 therein adapted to receive the end of the shaft 30 such that the shaft will extend from the head at an angle between the axis of the shaft 50 and top surface I 27 of the head 20 as shown in FIG. 2. In the preferred embodiment, angle a was approximately 78 and can be varied between a range of to 80 for optimum performance of the club with a one-armed swing.

The club shown in these figures is adapted for use by a right-handed golfer. For use as a left-handed club, it is only necessary to shift the boss 35 from the first wall 32 to the second wall 34 whose'outside surface would then become the striking surface. By shaping the channel member 25 as shown and providing the steps comprising the beveled portion 29 and flat plateau. 31, the weight distribution for the putter is such that it can easily be employed with a one-armed swing. It is noted that surfaces 24, 27, 28 and 31 lie in substantially parallel planes at the front and middle portions of the club head. In the preferred embodiment the putter head has a weight of approximately 12% ounces. This weight may vary depending upon the material used for the club head; it has been found, however, that a club head greater than 12 ounces in weight provides the most desirable characteristics for one-armed putting. The weight of the putter head 20 can be varied however to suit the individual by grinding the surfaces of the putter evenly and symmetrically during a finishing stage of manufacture. The top surface 27 of the putter head may be sand blasted or otherwise treated to provide a non-reflecting matte surface.

The shaft 50 of the club is of conventional design and includes a grip 52 at the end of the shaft remote from its junction with the club head 20. The shaft 50 may be somewhat shorter than a conventional putter shaft such that when the club 10 is held by a golfer with the club head relatively close to the feet of the golfer, the grip 52 is positioned at a vertical height convenient for gripping by one hand with the arm extended. Shaft 50 can of course be made of different lengths to fit the height of individual golfers.

The club head can be modified as shown in FIG. 6 by providing a partition 40 between the boss 35 and the second wall 34 to add structural support for the boss 35, and increase the support between walls 32 and 34. The partition 40 includes an aperture 41 drilled therethrough to facilitate drainage of water from the channel between the front portion of the club and the partition 40. In some designs, aperture 41 may be omitted.

The club 10 is used by the golfer by holding the grip 52 of the club with one hand, preferably the left, and positioning the club head 20 relatively close to the body with the striking surface facing the hole. In this position the bottom surface 24 of the club head 20 is parallel to the putting surface and the club can be swung in a pendulum trajectory with a relatively relaxed swinging motion of the left arm.

Although the invention is described in the environment of a golf putter, it could likewise be incorporated in other clubs such as short irons by varying the pitch of the striking surface. Also, although specifically designed for one-arm use, it is conceivable that the putter could be manipulated with a two-armed swing probably however with a loss in accuracy.

Various other modifications to the club will be apparent to those skilled in the art and will fall within the scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows.

l. A golf club head comprises a substantially rectangular body having front and rear ends and a top surface, said body including an open channel formed downwardly through said top surface into said body to define a floor of said channel, said channel extending through said rear end and forming first and second walls of said club head; said open channel including a beveled surface at an end of said channel adjacent said front end of said club head, a step joining said beveled edge and the remainder of said channel, said step having a surface which lies intermediate said top surface of said club head and said floor of said channel and lying in a plane substantially parallel to said top surface; said body including an exterior bottom surface which is substantially flat at the front and middle portion and curved upwardly at said rear end of said body; and a shaft receiving boss integrally molded to one of said walls of said body and said floor of said channel, said boss including an aperture adapted to receive and hold a club shaft at an angle of to inclusive between the longitudinal axis of the shaft and the plane of the top surface of the club head to enable the club head to be positioned on the ground relatively close to the feet of the user.

2. The golf club head as defined in claim 1 and further including a partition extending from said boss across said channel and joined to said wall remote from said boss.

3. A golf putter comprising: a club head comprising a substantially rectangular body with top and bottom surfaces, front and rear ends and a channelformed in said body and extending through said rear end to form first and second walls, one of said walls having an outer surface for striking a golf ball and wherein said bottom surface of said head is curved upwardly at said rear end; said channel including a beveled front edge and a step forming a plateau extending rearwardly from said beveled edge, said plateau lying in a plane substantially parallel with said top surface of said club head, said head having a weight greater than 12 ounces; a shaft receiving boss integrally molded to one of said walls and extending into said channel for receiving a shaft at an angle between the longitudinal axis of the shaft and the plane of the top surface of the club head of 75 to 80 inclusive; and a club shaft rigidly coupled to said shaft receiving boss.

4. A golf club head comprising:

a molded rectangular body having a substantially flat top surface, said body including a substantially rectangular channel formed downwardly through said top surface into said body to define a floor of said channel and extending from a toe portion of said club head through a heel end of said head opposite said toe, said channel defining front and rear walls having interior surfaces substantially perpendicular to said floor; and

a shaft receiving boss integrally molded to only one of said walls and extending into said channel therefrom, said boss spaced inwardly from the heel end of said club head and including a shaft receiving aperture adapted to receive a club shaft at an angle to enable the club head to be positioned on the ground relatively close to the feet of the user.

5. The club head as defined in claim 4 wherein said boss is molded to the wall whose exterior surface forms the ball striking surface of said club head.

6. The club head as defined in claim 5 wherein said toe portion of said club head includes a step formed downwardly in said body from said top surface and spaced inwardly from the toe end of said club head, said step in communication with said channel and having asurface lying intermediate said top surface and said floor and substantially parallel to said top surface.

7. The club head as defined in claim 6 wherein said aperture in said boss holds a club shaft at a fixed angle of from 75 to 80 inclusive measured from the longitudinal axis of the shaft and the plane of said top surface of said body.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1154490 *Feb 5, 1915Sep 21, 1915Robert Hobart DavisGolf-club.
US3042405 *Mar 23, 1959Jul 3, 1962Karsten SolheimGolf club
US3191936 *Apr 11, 1962Jun 29, 1965William GuierGolf club including soft metal to lock grooved shaft end to head
US3387845 *Oct 5, 1965Jun 11, 1968Clifford G. RaubGolf putter
US3567227 *Aug 13, 1968Mar 2, 1971Panks Allen TGolf putter with two triangularly shaped hitting faces
US3652093 *Jul 20, 1970Mar 28, 1972John Reuter Jr IncGolf putter head with hollow toe and heel portions
US3679207 *Aug 3, 1970Jul 25, 1972Florian Raymond JGolf putter construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3888492 *Jun 19, 1974Jun 10, 1975Nat CabotGolf putter with true stroke checking device
US3909004 *Jan 8, 1974Sep 30, 1975Vella Tony JPutter having circular level
US4010958 *Nov 19, 1973Mar 8, 1977Long Steven KGolf putter
US5344141 *Apr 8, 1993Sep 6, 1994Smith James DPutter
US5377979 *Feb 3, 1994Jan 3, 1995Progroup, Inc.Backspin reducing putter
US5830078 *Oct 2, 1997Nov 3, 1998Mcmahan; Clifton H.Golf club head
US5913731 *Nov 10, 1997Jun 22, 1999Westerman; Clive B.Golf putter
US6203445Aug 16, 1999Mar 20, 2001Vertex, L.L.C.Golf putter head
US6796911 *Jan 10, 2003Sep 28, 2004Macgregor Golf CompanyHigh moment of inertia putter
US6896625 *Aug 13, 2003May 24, 2005Macgregor Golf CompanyHigh moment of inertia putter having adjustable weights
US6929559 *Jun 2, 2003Aug 16, 2005Macgregor Golf CompanyHigh moment for inertia putter having three weights
US7048639Feb 4, 2004May 23, 2006Macgregor Golf CompanyHigh moment of inertia putter
US7244189 *Oct 23, 2004Jul 17, 2007Stobbe Richard EGolf club with heel and toe weighting
US7588499 *Apr 9, 2007Sep 15, 2009Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd.Putter head
US8206234 *Apr 1, 2011Jun 26, 2012Slater Robert FAcrylic putter head
US8979667May 31, 2013Mar 17, 2015The University Of TulsaGolf putter head
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/313, 473/340
International ClassificationA63B53/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/0487, A63B59/0055, A63B49/06
European ClassificationA63B53/04P