Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3770318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateJul 28, 1972
Priority dateJul 29, 1971
Also published asCA957262A1, DE2236475A1
Publication numberUS 3770318 A, US 3770318A, US-A-3770318, US3770318 A, US3770318A
InventorsS Fenton
Original AssigneeStorey Brothers & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vehicle seats
US 3770318 A
Abstract
When vehicle seats are covered with a synthetic plastics material there are problems in hot weather because they do not soak up perspiration as would natural leather. On long journeys or on hot days, therefore, passengers clothes in contact with such seat coverings tend to become wet with perspiration. This is mitigated according to the invention by using the seat cushion as a pump which expells air as it is depressed by the movements caused by the person sitting on the seat or vehicle movements and the expelled air is forced out through the front face of the back rest of the seat. Air is also sucked in through the top face of the seat cushion at times when the seat cushion becomes less depressed. In this way a flow of air is provided between the passenger and the seat which removes perspiration.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Fenton 1 Nov. 6, 1.973

[ VEHICLE SEATS [75] Inventor: Sydney Desmond Fenton,

Lancashire, England [73] Assignee: Storey Brothers and Company Limited, Lancaster, England [22] Filed: July 28, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 276,008

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data July 29, 1971 Great Britain 35,815/71 [52] US. Cl 297/453, 5/347, 297/180, 297/DIG. 3

[51] Int. Cl A47c 7/74, A47c 7/02, A47c 7/54 [58] Field of Search 5/347, 348, 351; 297/452, 453, DIG. 3, 180

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 4/1970 Fenton 297/453 6/1964 Karner 297/453 X 3,377,103 4/1968 Borton et al 297/453 Primary ExaminerCasmir A. Nunberg Attorney-William D. Hall et al.

[57] ABSTRACT When vehicle seats are covered with a synthetic plastics material there are problems in hot weather because they do not soak up perspiration as would natural leather. On long journeys or on hot days, therefore,

passengers clothes in contact with such seat coverings tend to become wet with perspiration. This is mitigated according to the invention by using the seat cushion as a pump which expells air as it is depressed by the movements caused by the person sitting on the seat or vehicle movements and the expelled air is forced out through the front face of the back rest of the seat. Air

is also sucked in through the top face of the seat eushion at times when the seat cushion becomes less depressed. In this way a flow of air is provided between the passenger and the seat which removes perspiration.

11 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures PAIENTEUNUVI ems 3.770.318

' SHEET 10F 2 VEHICLE SEATS This invention relates to vehicle seats, particularly car seats.

BACKGROUND or THE INVENTION:

Except on very expensive cars, the seat coverings are generally made from synthetic plastics sheeting or leathercloth. This leads to difficulty, particularly in hot weather, because these synthetic materials do not absorb and soak'up perspiration like real leather seat coverings would do.

It is therefor, desirable to arrange for the removal of perspiration when the seat coverings are made of synthetic materials. v

The seat covering itself can be given a deep embossment or channels may be provided in the shape of the seats. These expedients give a reasonable amount of ventilation over the surface of the seat covering'in the regions in contact with the body of the person sitting on the seat. Even in temperate climates, however, these expedients are not sufficient to prevent areas of the clothes in contact with the seat from becoming wet and sticky on hot days or on long journeys.

In our U. S. Pat. No. 3,506,308 we have described a car seat which comprises a cover of synthetic plastics sheet material over a resilient filling carried on a rigid frame or base, the sheet material of the cover having small perforations therethrough at least some of which are in communication with pump means, the pump means comprising a plurality of bellows fitted within the filling, the outlets of the bellows being in communication with one or more perforations through the covers so that vibrations and similar movements occuring during motion of the vehicle and/or body movements of a person sitting on the seat cause changes in the volumes of the bellows thereby causingair to be pumped through the perforations in communication withthe bellows. The pumping action caused by body movements and movements of the car substantially increases the amount of ventilation and so keeps the person sitting on the seat cooler and drier.

While these small bellows work excellently in the cushion of the seat they are not always as satisfactory when, incorporated in the back rest or squab of the seat because the back rest tends to be subjected to fewer and smaller compression movements than the seat cushion. Therefore, the clothes on the back of the person sitting on the seat still tend to become wet with perspiration, most of which occursin the lumbar regions.

It is therefore an object of the invention to improve the comfort of seats covered with synthetic materials.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THEINVENTION through the upper face of the seat cushion when this is subjected to decreases in depression.

In this way one can provide roughly equal ventilation of the back rest and seat cushion of the seat and so improve the comfort of the person sitting on the seat.

Although it is not essential, it is preferred to ensure that the air passes almost entirely from the seat cushion to the backrest and this pumping action can best be achieved by providing suitable valves to prevent substantial egress of air from the top surface of the seat cushion and substantial return of air from the back rest to the seat cushion.

The seat cushion can be provided with one or more individual bellows similar to those shown and described in our US. Pat. No. 3,506,308 which are arranged to suck air in through small holes in the upper surface of I the cushion, suitable ducts being provided to transmit the air to be expelled at the back rest of the seat.

Preferably, however, the whole seat cushion acts as the pump or' bellows membersince then even very slight depression of the top surface of the seat cushion will then displace a comparatively large volume of air. For'example, if the seat cushion has a surface area of 1 400 sqare inches, e.g., inches by 20 inches, and its whole surface is depressed by as little as one-sixteenth inch, the volume of air displaced is cubic inches.

The seat can be ofany convenient construction. Preferably however, the cover for the seat cushion pad back rest have both been made by vacuum forming, for

example, by the method described in our copending United Kingdom Pat. No. 1,232,381. Preferably, the covers formed inthis way have then-been filed with a foamable mixture, e.g, a polyurethane foam, which is foamed in situ so becoming bonded to the cover, the foam being of the open-celled type so that air can be displaced from the foam when the seat cushion is compressed.

Desirably a number of small holes, e.g. four, are provided in the upper-surface of the seat cushion through which air can be sucked as the cushion becomes less depressed due to body movements or jolts caused by the motion of the car. These holes are desirably near the centre of the area in contact with the body of the person on the seat and coincide with a number of elongated depressions or recesses, preferably interconnected, in the shape of the upper surface of the seat cushion which provide a network of passages extending over the region of the cushion in contact with the person and along which aircan pass to the holes when someone is sitting on the seat.

The back rest of the seat is also preferably provided with similar vent holes coinciding with elongated depressions or recesses so that the air expelled through these holes is spread over the area of the face of the back rest of the seat in contact with the person sitting on the seat.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS A car seat in accordance with the invention will now be described, by way of .example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the seat according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an upright cross-section taken centrally of the seat; and

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional detail.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The car seat 10 shown in the drawings has a seat cushion 12 and a back rest or squab 14 joined to one another by metal plates 16.

The seat cushion 12 consists of a cover 20 of an embossed plasticizedpolyvinyl chloride in which has been foamed in situ an open-celled polyurethane foam 22. This seat cushion 12 has been made in the manner described in our United Kingdom Pat. No. 1,232,381. This cushion 12 sits in a metal frame 24.

The back rest or squab 14 comprises of a padded cushion 30 consisting of a cover 31 and padding foam 32 and is of similar construction to the seat cushion 12, a surrounding metal frame 33, and a rear sealing sheet 34 of embossed plasticized polyvinyl chloride welded to the shaped cover 31.

The top face of the cushion 12 has formed in it a number of channels 40 which are arranged in a crisscross pattern. These channels 40 are formed in the area which will normally be in contact with a person sitting on the seat so as to ensure excellent ventilation in that area between the person and the cover. Similarly, the front face of the cushion 30 has formed in its face similar channels 42, again formed in a criss-cross pattern in the area likely to be in contact with a person sitting on the seat 10.

Four holes 50 are provided through the cover 20 at the junction of transverse extending channels 40 and below these holes are passages 52 through the foam 22 leading to a common passage 54. Immediately below the holes 50, are hinged flaps 56 (FIG. 3) which act as non-return valves and so ensure that air only passes in through the holes 50. The common passage 54 leads to an outlet 58 from the seat cushion l2.

Similarly four holes 60 are provided through th cover 31 at the junction of transverse extending channels 42 and between these holes 60 and a common passage 62 are small passages 64. The common passage 62 has an inlet 66 and joining this inlet 66 and the outlet 50 from the seat cushionis a length of flexible tubing 68. To ensure the non-return of air from the back rest to the seat cushion 12, a hinged flap valve 70 is provided across the inlet 66.

Brass eyelets 72 define the holes 50 and 60 to prevent.

tearing of the covers 20 and 31.

As will be appreciated any body movement or jolting caused by the motion of the car when a person is sitting on the seat 10 will cause a varying depression of the Y seat cushion 12. This will cause changes in its volume.

As its volume decreases, air is expelled through the tubing 68 to the back rest 14, the flaps 56 substantially preventing expulsion of air thorugh the holes 50. The air passing to the back rest 14 is expelled through the holes 60 and the passes along the passages formed between the back of the personvand the channels 42. This air helps to cool the person and the seat and also removes perspiration so reducing or preventing the person's clothes from becoming wet and sticky.

As the volume of the seat cushion 12 again increases, air is sucked in through the holes 50, the flap valve 70 preventing the return of air from the back rest. The air sucked in through the holes 50 passes along the passages defined between the person on the seat and the channels 40, so helping to cool the person and the seat and also removing perspiration.

It is found that the flaps 56 and flap valve 70 are not always necessary.

The covers 20 and 31 are also preferably deeply embossed so improving the comfort of the seat.

As will be appreciated the seat according to the invention is simple and relatively cheap to construct. Ex-

cellent ventilation of the areas of the seat in contact with the person on the seat is achieved, however, so ensuring that the perspiration is removed. This makes the seats comfortable'in hot weather and a long journeys, even though the covers 30 and 31 are not formed of leather. j

A latitude of modification, change and substitution is intended in the foregoing disclosure and in some instances some features of the invention will be employed without a corresponding use of other features. Accordingly it is appropriate that the appended claims be construed broadly and in a manner consistent with the spirit and scope of the invention herein.

I claim:

1. A vehicle seat comprising:

a. a resilient seat cushion having a top face on which a passenger sits,

b. a resilient back rest having a front face arranged. to support the back of a passenger sitting on said seat cushion,

c. air inlet means through the said top face of said seat cushion,

d. air outlet means from said seat cushion through which air is expelled when said top face is depressed, i

e. at least one air outlet means through said front face of said back rest,

f. means for conducting air expelled from said air outlet means from said seat cushion to said air outlet through said front face of said back rest.

2. A vehicle seat according to claim 1 further comprising non return valve means to prevent substantial egress of air from said top face of said seat cushion and substantial return of air from said back rest to said seat cushion.

3. A vehicle seat according to claim 2 further comprising at least one bellows unit positioned within said seat cushion, each bellows unit having an air inlet in communication with a small hole through said top face of said seat cushion, and an air outlet in communication with said means for the passage of air to said back rest.

4. A vehicle seat according to claim 1 in which said seat cushion comprises a shaped cover of synthetic plastics material, a resilient fill of open-celled foam material, and a number of small holes in said top face of said seat cushion, whereby depression of said top face causes air to be expelled from said foam through said air outlet means.

5. A vehicle seat according to claim 4 further comprising passages through said foam leading from said small holes, a common passage to which said passages through said foam lead, flap valves immediately below said small holes to prevent expulsion of air through said holes, said common passage leading to said air outlet means from said seat cushion.

6. A vehicle according to claim 5 further comprising elongated depressions in said top face of said seat cushion, said small holes being in alignment with said elongated depressions.

7. A vehicle seat according to claim 5 in which said elongated depressions are interconnected.

8. A vehicle seat according to claim 6 further comprising elongated depressions in said front face of said seat cushion and small holes through said front face in alignment with said depressions, said small holes constituting said air outlets through said front face of said back rest.

9. A vehicle seat according to claim 8 in which said back rest comprises a shaped cover of synthetic plastics material, a resilient interior covered by said shaped cover, and passages through said resilient interior leading to said small holes through said front face of said back rest, a common passage leading from said air outlet means from said seat cover to said passages through said resilient interior.

10. A vehicle seat according to claim 9 further comprsing a flap valve in said common passage to prevent substantial return of air from said back rest to said seat cushion.

11. A vehicle seat comprising:

a. a resilient seat cushion having a top face on which a passenger sits, 'b. a shaped covering for said cushion made of synthetic plastics material,

c. an open-celled resilient foam within said shaped covering,

(1. a number of small holes in said top face of said shaped covering,

e. passages through said resilient foam leading from said small holes,

f. flap valves positioned in said passages immediately below said small holes,

g. a common passage to which said passages lead said common passage having an air outlet,

h. a resilient back rest having a front face arranged to support the back of a passenger sitting on said seat cushion,

i. a shaped covering for said back rest made of synthetic plastics material,

j. a resilient filling within said shaped covering for said back rest,

k. a number of holes through said shaped covering for said back rest,

1. a number of passages through said resilient filling leading to said small holes,

m. a common passage from which said number of passages lead, said common passages having an air inlet,

n. a pipe joining said air inlet of said common passage and said air outlet from said common passage, and

o. a flap valve arranged to allow flow through said N pipe solelv in thedirection from said seat cushion to said back rest.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3137523 *Sep 20, 1963Jun 16, 1964Frank KarnerAir conditioned seat
US3377103 *Aug 17, 1966Apr 9, 1968Us Rubber CoVentilated cushion and method of making same
US3506308 *Dec 7, 1967Apr 14, 1970Storey Brothers & CoCar seats
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3895841 *Sep 3, 1974Jul 22, 1975Lebert Herbert AVacuum actuated vehicle safety device
US4043544 *Mar 8, 1976Aug 23, 1977Walter IsmerReinforced and ventilated seats
US4084775 *Sep 17, 1976Apr 18, 1978Sears Manufacturing CompanyVehicle seat
US4306747 *Feb 25, 1980Dec 22, 1981Moss Lulu CTherapeutic seat
US4311339 *Nov 7, 1979Jan 19, 1982Rainsfords Metal Products Pty. Ltd.Infant carrier
US4615561 *May 14, 1984Oct 7, 1986Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaVehicle seat
US4615563 *Nov 9, 1984Oct 7, 1986Tachikawa Spring Co., Ltd.Vehicle seat
US4712832 *Jun 24, 1986Dec 15, 1987Adriano AntoliniCover, particularly for vehicle seats
US5408711 *May 17, 1994Apr 25, 1995Mcclelland; MarionAir mattress assembly
US6520541 *Dec 22, 1998Feb 18, 2003Penn State Research FoundationVehicle safety seat system
US7052091Jan 26, 2005May 30, 2006W.E.T. Automotive Systems Ltd.Automotive vehicle seat insert
US7083227Mar 10, 2005Aug 1, 2006W.E.T. Automotive Systems, AgAutomotive vehicle seating comfort system
US7108319 *Jul 27, 2002Sep 19, 2006Johnson Controls GmbhAir conditioned cushion part for a vehicle seat
US7131689Jul 21, 2005Nov 7, 2006W.E.T. Automotive Systems, AgAutomotive vehicle seating comfort system
US7175900Apr 8, 2003Feb 13, 2007Contour Fabricators, Inc.Reinforced pad and method of making
US7197801Feb 17, 2006Apr 3, 2007W.E.T. Automotive Systems Ltd.Automotive vehicle seat insert
US7201441Dec 17, 2003Apr 10, 2007W.E.T. Automotive Systems, AgAir conditioned seat and air conditioning apparatus for a ventilated seat
US7213876Nov 28, 2005May 8, 2007W.E.T. Automotive System AgVehicle seat and associated air conditioning apparatus
US7229129Oct 26, 2005Jun 12, 2007Johnson Controls Technology CompanyVentilated seat
US7274007Sep 21, 2004Sep 25, 2007W.E.T. Automotive Systems Ltd.Control system for operating automotive vehicle components
US7338117Apr 12, 2004Mar 4, 2008W.E.T. Automotive System, Ltd.Ventilated seat
US7356912Apr 12, 2004Apr 15, 2008W.E.T. Automotive Systems, Ltd.Method for ventilating a seat
US7370911Oct 15, 2004May 13, 2008W.E.T. Automotive Systems, AgAutomotive vehicle seat insert
US7461892Dec 1, 2004Dec 9, 2008W.E.T. Automotive Systems, A.C.Valve layer for a seat
US7467823Apr 7, 2004Dec 23, 2008Johnson Controls GmbhVehicle seat
US7475938Apr 6, 2007Jan 13, 2009W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAir conditioned seat and air conditioning apparatus for a ventilated seat
US7478869Aug 16, 2006Jan 20, 2009W.E.T. Automotive Systems, AgAutomotive vehicle seat insert
US7506938Aug 31, 2006Mar 24, 2009W.E.T. Automotive Systems, A.G.Automotive vehicle seating comfort system
US7578552Oct 31, 2007Aug 25, 2009W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAutomotive vehicle seat having a comfort system
US7588288Apr 14, 2008Sep 15, 2009W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAutomotive vehicle seat insert
US7618089Apr 18, 2006Nov 17, 2009W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAir conditioning system for a seat
US7637564 *Oct 9, 2007Dec 29, 2009Schroeder Zachary DVacuum system for a highchair
US7637573Jan 17, 2007Dec 29, 2009W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAutomotive vehicle seating insert
US7735932Jan 15, 2009Jun 15, 2010W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAutomotive vehicle seat insert
US7781704Aug 21, 2007Aug 24, 2010W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgControl system for operating automotive vehicle components
US7918498Nov 6, 2008Apr 5, 2011W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgValve layer for a seat
US7971931Aug 16, 2010Jul 5, 2011W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAutomotive vehicle seat insert
US8042873 *Mar 11, 2009Oct 25, 2011Kubota CorporationDriver's seat of work vehicle
US8106320 *Apr 23, 2008Jan 31, 2012Polymatech Co., Ltd.Decorative sheet, decorative molded body, decorative key sheet, and decorative sheet manufacturing method
US8162391Jun 29, 2011Apr 24, 2012W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgAutomotive vehicle seat insert
US8235462Mar 30, 2011Aug 7, 2012W.E.T. Automotive Systems, Ltd.Valve layer for a seat
US8309892Aug 23, 2010Nov 13, 2012W.E.T. Automotive System, LtdControl system for operating automotive vehicle components
US8360517Mar 28, 2012Jan 29, 2013W.E.T. Automotive Systems, Ag.Automotive vehicle seat insert
US8777320Dec 21, 2009Jul 15, 2014W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgVentilation system
US8888573Dec 3, 2008Nov 18, 2014W.E.T. Automotive Systems AgSeat conditioning module and method
US9085255Mar 18, 2009Jul 21, 2015Gentherm GmbhVentilation means
US20140077517 *Aug 2, 2013Mar 20, 2014Grupo Antolin-Ingenieria S.ASelf-supported cushion assembly for an interior vehicle part
US20140077524 *Jul 31, 2013Mar 20, 2014Grupo Antolin-Ingenieria, S. ASelf-supported cushion assembly for an interior vehicle part
WO2004028857A1 *Aug 16, 2003Apr 8, 2004Daimler Chrysler AgCushion for a vehicle seat
WO2004082555A1 *Mar 18, 2004Sep 30, 2004Boeckh Franx XaverDental treatment chair provided with a burl padding
WO2014085907A1 *Dec 5, 2013Jun 12, 2014Proprietect L.P.Ventilated seat element
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/452.47, 297/DIG.300
International ClassificationB60N2/70, A47C7/74
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/74, Y10S297/03, B60N2/7082
European ClassificationB60N2/70W4C6, A47C7/74