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Publication numberUS3771109 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1973
Filing dateMay 1, 1972
Priority dateMay 1, 1972
Also published asCA993970A1
Publication numberUS 3771109 A, US 3771109A, US-A-3771109, US3771109 A, US3771109A
InventorsBruckner R, Tansky J
Original AssigneeBunker Ramo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector for integrated circuit device
US 3771109 A
Abstract
An electrical connector affording a working cavity for a flat integrated circuit device, requiring no tools for mounting or demounting of the device, and assuring positive orientation of the device in the connector. The connector comprises a one-piece unitary insulator lid hinged to a one-piece unitary insulator base; the lid clamps the integrated circuit device against a plurality of metal contact elements mounted in the base. The contact elements are individually mountable in and removable from the base, by direct insertion and extraction, and afford a wiping contact action ending in high pressure contact as the cover is closed. An integral latch, formed in the free ends of the base and cover members, latches the cover closed, but is finger-pressure releasable for replacement of the integrated circuit devices.
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United States Patent 11 1 Bruckner, et al. Nov. 6, 1973 [54] ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR FOR 3,297,974 1/1967 Pittman 339/17 CF INTEGRATED CTRCUTT DEVICE 2,337,692 12/1943 Todd 339/221 M X 3,116,960 .l/l964 Olsson et al. 339/128 lnvemorsl g g lt g i ,r g i f 3,454,921 7/1969 Coleman etal 339 17 CFX o n ans y, 0 mg ae, 0t 0 Primary ExaminerRichard E. Moore [73] Assignee: Bunker Ramo Corporation, Oak Ass'slam Exammf"'Lawrence Staab Brook, m AttorneyFreder1ck M. Arbuckle [22] Filed: May 1, 1972 57 ABSTRACT [21] Appl. No.: 248,869 An electrical connector affording a working cavity for a flat integrated circuit device, requiring no tools for mounting or demounting of the device, and assuring [52] Cl 339/ 2252 3 positive orientation of the device in the connector. The [51] Int Cl H0 Hosk U16 connector comprises a one-piece unitary insulator lid [58] Fie'ld 339/l7 C 17 CF hinged to a one-piece unitary insulator base; the lid 339 [17 M 74 l clamps the integrated circuit device against a plurality 221 91 R 6 59 174/616 of metal contact elements mounted in the base. The

contact elements are individually mountable in and removable from the base, by direct insertion and extrac- [56] Reerences Cited tion, and afford a wiping contact action ending in high UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 pressure contact as the cover is closed. An integral 3,700,788 10/1972 Spurck 339/176'M X latch, formed in the free ends of the base and cover 3,701,071 Landman MP members latches the cover closed but is finger- 13 st pressure releasable for replacement of the integrated oee am. 3,391,383 7/1968 Antes 3.39 17 CF x 3,151 1,270 10/1971 10 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures Eppler 339/91 R X sir/1.109

sum 1 BF 3 PMENTEUHUY 6 1975 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR FOR INTEGRATED CIRCUIT DEVICE CROSS REFERENCE TO CO-PENDING APPLICATIONS The invention to which this application is directed comprises an improvement upon the connectors described and claimed in the co-pending applications of Brian R. Woodcock and John L. Tansky, Ser. No. 196,676, filed Nov. 8, 1971 and Vincent J. Palecek application Ser. No. 196,022, filed Nov. 5, 1971.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Integrated circuit devices commonly utilize a construction in which the semiconductor integrated circuit chip is mounted upon an insulator base with a plurality of relatively thin electrical connector leads projecting from the base to provide for connection of the device to external circuits. One common construction comprises a dual in-line package, in which the leads protrude from the opposite sides of the device and are bent at right angles, in a common direction, to afford mounting pins for the device. For example, twenty leads may extend from each of two opposed sides for a forty lead device. Devices of this kind are difficult to manufacture, particularly becuase of the need to bend the leads; breakage of the leads is a major source of. trouble and often causes a high rejection rate., The leads may also be broken during testing and shipping, even when a protective carrier is employed, and may be easily damaged in installation. Since the integrated circuits are quite expensive, the problems presented are of a serious nature.

In a more recently introducedtype of integrated circuit construction, thesemiconductor chip is mounted upon an insulator base having a plurality of flat conductive pads along one edge-of the base. The device can then be inserted a short distance into a mounting slot in an edge-mount connector to connect the integrated circuit to external circuits. In an electrical module of this kind, the edge of the base for the integrated circuit device provides some physical support for the device in addition to affording conductive elements for engagement with contacts in the connector. Edge-mount devices of this kind do not have the problems associated with those empploying external leads. However, the devices are usually quite thin and brittle and can be damaged unless adequately supported. Moreover, because the edge-mount construction engages the contacts of the connector along only one edge, it is usually necessary to make all connections from the integrated circuit chip to individual conductive pads along that edge, resulting in rather difficult problems in the design of a pattern of interconnecting conductors. This tends to require a grossly elongated base with lengthy interconnecting conductors and with an increased possibility of undesired coupling between the conductors.

More recently developed forms of electrical connector for an integrated circuit device, as described in the aforementioned co-pending applications Ser. No. 196,022 and Ser. No. 196,676, are used with integrated circuit devices in which the electrical connections are provided by conductive pads disposed along two opposed sides of one surface of the insulator base for the device. In these connectors, the integrated circuit device is clamped between an insulator base and an insulator cover. The base includes a plurality of individual metal contacts, one for each conductive pad on the integrated circuit device; these electrical contacts may be of relatively rigid and strong construction, eliminating the problems associated with external leads in convenconnectors usually require at least some tools for mounting or removing an integrated circuit device from the connector. Furthermore, the connectors may permit improper mounting of the integrated circuit, leading to possible damage to the integrated circuit device or to other difficulties when used by unskilled manufacturing or repair personnel.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a principle object of the invention, therefore, to provide a new and improved electrical connector, for supporting and for completing electrical connections to a flat integrated circuit device of the kind having a plurality of electrically conductive pads arranged in a predetermined pattern along at least two opposed sides of a substantially planar connection surface, that effectively and inherently eliminates or overcomes the problems and difficulties encountered in previously known connectors.

A particular object of the invention is to provide a new and improved electrical connector for an integrated circuit device that effectively encloses and protects the device but that requires no tools for either removal or insertion of the integrated circuit device.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved electrical connector for a flat integrated circuit device, in which the complete connector includes only two insulator members, each a unitary onepiece molded element, constituting a base and a cover, that are hinged together in a permanent structure and that incorporate an integral latch, readily actuated by finger pressure, effective to maintain the connector in closed condition clamping an integrated circuit device between the cover and the base.

A specific object of the invention is to provide a new and improved electrical connector for an integrated circuit device which incorporates orientation means for orienting the integrated circuit device, between a cover member and a base member, in a single fixed position and that does not permit improper mounting of the integrated circuit in the connector. More specifically, the orientation means precludes mis-orientation by way of reversal end-to-end, reversal side-to-side, or reversal face-to-face.

A specific object of the invention is to provide a new and improved electrical connector for a flat integrated circuit device that is inherently inexpensive to manufacture, requires no particular skill or training for use, yet affords long term reliability coupled with full mechanical protection for the integrated circuit device.

Accordingly, the present invention relates to an electrical connector for supporting and for completing electrical connections to a flat integrated circuit device having a plurality of electrically conductive pads arranged in a predetermined pattern along at least two opposed sides of a substantially planar connection surface. The connector comprises a unitary, one-piece insulator base affording two substantially coplanar upwardly facing locating surfaces that correspond generally in size and configuration to the aforementioned opposed sides of the connection surface on the integrated circuit device. The base has a plurality of contact cavities, corresponding in number to the conductive pads on the integrated circuit device; these cavities are arranged in a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the conductive pads on the integrated circuit device, extending downwardly through the base from the locating surfaces. A corresponding plurality of individual metal contact elements are incorporated in the base, each contact element being inserted downwardly into one of the aforementioned contact cavities and projecting downwardly outwardly of the base. Each contact element includes a resilient contact portion projecting a short distance above one of the locating surfaces. A

unitary one-piece insulator cover is hingedly mounted on one side of the base for movement between open and closed positions, the cover including two substantially coplanar pressure surfaces that are aligned with the locating surfaces on the base whenever the cover is closed. The connector is provided with pressurereleasable resilient latch means for latching the cover member in closed position on the base member; this latch means comprises complementary latch and retainer elements formed integrally with the cover member and the base member. The connector also includes orientation means comprising at least two posts, each formed integrally with one of the base and cover members and each projecting into an opening in the other of those two members. These posts orient an integrated circuit device between the cover member and the base member in a single fixed position with each contact element engaging one conductive pad on the integrated circuit device in firm pressure contact when the cover is closed and latched.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric view, larger than actual size, of an electrical connector, constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, shown in closed condition;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the connector of FIG. 1, in open condition, together with an integrated circuit device to be mounted in the connector;

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view of the connector of FIGS. 1 and 2, in closed condition, taken approximately along line 3-3 in FIG. 1 but drawn to a larger scale; FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view, similar to FIG. 3 but with the connector shown in open condition;

FIG. 5 is a plan view, on a smaller scale than FIGS. 3 and 4, of the base of the electrical connector;

FIG. 6 is a greatly enlarged detail sectional view taken approximately along line 6-6 in FIG. 5, but omitting the electrical contact;

FIG. 7 is a detail sectional view taken approximately along line 7-7 in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a detail plan view-of a single contact cavity in the base of FIG. 5;

FIG. 9 is a bottom view of the cover for the electrical connector of FIGS. 1 and 2; and

FIG. 10 is a detail sectional view of the hinge construction joining the connector cover to the connector base, taken approximately along line 10-10 in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The electrical connector 20, illustrated in closed condition in FIGS. 1 and 3 and in open condition in FIGS. 2 and 4, comprises a unitary, one-piece insulator base 21 upon which a unitary, one-piece insulator cover 22 is hingedly mounted. Connector 20, which comprises a preferred embodiment of the present invention, is utilized for supporting and for completing electrical connections to a flat integrated circuit device 23 best illustrated in FIG. 2. When device 23 is mounted in connector 20, and the connector cover 22 is closed, device 23 is almost completely enclosed and protected, as will be apparent from FIGS. 1 and 3. Base 21 is a single, onepiece molded resin member, the resin being selected to afford reasonable strength and resiliency; suitable resins include nylon and the aliphatic polysulphones. Similarly, cover 22 is a single, one-piece molded resin member, the resin again being selected to afford reasonable resiliency.

In FIG. 2, it can be seen that the integrated circuit device 23 comprises a thin flat elongated insulator support member 24. Although other materials can be utilized, the insulator support member 24 is usually formed of ceramic material. There are a series of electrically conductive pads 25 arranged in a predetermined pattern along one side of the surface 32 of the insulator support 24. A plurality of similar electrically conductive pads are arranged in a predetermined pattern along the opposite longitudinal sides of the surface 32 of the insulator base or body 24. Surface 32 of base 24, referred to sometimes hereinafter as the connection surface of the integrated circuit device 23, is a closely controlled, flat, planar surface.

An integrated circuit semiconductor chip 27 is mounted on the central portion of the connection surface 32 of device 23. The semiconductor chip 27 is electrically connected, by appropriate conductors mounted on the connection surface 32, to the conductive pads 25 and 26. The conductor pattern may vary, depending upon the nature of the integrated circuit chip 27; accordingly, the conductors have not been shown in the drawing. There are two locating apertures 28 and 29 in the central portion of the insulator support 24 of integrated circuit device 23. In addition, a polarizing slot 31 is formed in one end of support member 24. The apertures 28, 29 and 31 are utilized as a part of an orientation means assuring accurate singleposition mounting of the integrated circuit device 23 in connector 20, as described more fully hereinafter.

The insulator base 21 of connector 20 is formed as a one-piece unitary molded member. Typically, the base 21 may be molded from a plastic resin material such as glass-reinforced nylon, although other molded insulator materials may be utilized as desired. As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 5, base 21 includes two upwardly facing coplanar locating surfaces 35 and 36. The locating surfaces 35 and 36 correspond generally in size and configuration to the opposed sides of the connection surface 32 of the integrated circuit device 23 on which the conductive pads 25 and 26 are positioned (FIG. 2). The two locating surfaces and 36 are preferably slightly longer than the sides of the integrated circuit device and the overall width of base 21, at the plane of the locating surfaces 35 and 36, is preferably Slightly wider than th overall width of the integrated circuit device.

Throughout this specification, and in the appended claims, directional terms such as upwardly," downwardly," and the like refer to the particular position of connector 21) shown in the drawings. It should be understood, however, that this terminology is employed only for convenience in description. Connector 20 can be mounted in virtually any desired orientation, even upside down, if necessary.

In base 21, there are a plurality of contact cavities 37, each of the cavities 37 extending downwardly through the base from the locating surface 35. At the opposite side of base 21, there are a plurality of contact cavities 38 extending downwardly through the base from the locating surface 36. A plurality of individual metal contact elements 45 are mounted in the contact cavities 37, each contact element being inserted downwardly into one of the cavities and projecting downwardly outwardly of base 21 as described more fully hereinafter. Similarly, a plurality of individual metal contact eleme nts 46 are mounted in the cavities 38 at thg Opposite side of the base. Each of the contact elements 45 and 46 includes a resilient contact portion that projects a short distance above one of the base locating surfaces 35 and 36.

On one side of base 21 there are a series of four integral hinge lugs 41, 42, 43 and 44 that project upwardly a substantial distance above the plane of the locating surface 36 (FIGS. 1, 2 and 5). The connector cover 22 includes three integral hinge projections 51, 52 and 53 which extend into the spaces between lugs 41-44 (FIGS. 1, 2 and 9). The hinge projections 5153 comprise extensions of a pressure surface 54 that is a part of cover 22 and that moves into alignment with the locating surface 36 of base 21 when the connector 20 is closed (FIGS. 1 and 3). The opposite side of cover 22 includes an elongated pressure surface 55 that is substantially coplanar with pressure surface 54 and that is aligned with the locating surface 35 on the base of the connector when the connector is closed.

The free side of the connector cover 22 (FIGS. 1, 2, and 9) includes an elongated slot 57 disposed entirely in cover 22 that extends for the major portion of the length of the cover, defining a resilient, elongated latch arm 58. Two wedge-shaped latch pads 59 and 61 are formed integrally with the opposite ends of latch arm 58 which is movable inwardly into slot 57 for release of the latching mechanism and project outwardly thereof. The central portion of latch arm 58 includes a release projection 62 as a release means integrally formed on arm 58 for releasing the latch mechanism.

The side of base 21 oppgsile the h ir e l u gs 4l 43includes two integral latch housings or retainers 63 and 64. The latch retainer 63 is of generally U- shaped construction and includes a slot 65 that is aligned with the latch pad 59 on the cover 22 (see FIGS. 1 and 3). Similarly, latch retainer 64 includes a slot 66 that is aligned with latch pad 61. The central portion of the front wall of the base 21, between the two latch retainers 63 and 64, affords a slot 67 for receiving the release projection 62 of latch arm 58.

The upper central portion 69 of the insulator base 21 is depressed below the level of the plane of the locating surfaces 35 and 36. Two locating posts 71 and 72 project upwardly from the surface 69 in alignment with two locating apertures 73 and 74 in cover 22 (FIGS. 1 and 2). The locating posts 71 and 72, in the illustrated construction, are positioned on the longitudinal center line of connector 20. A polarizing post 75 projects upwardly from surface 69 at one end of base 21 in alignment with a slot 76 in one end of the cover 22. The polarizing post 75 should be positioned a substantial distance to one side or the other of the longitudinal center line of the connector; in this, post 75 is located considerably closer to the locating surface 36 than to the 10- cating surface 35 on the opposite side of the insulator base 21. Base 21 has a central aperture 60, and cover 22 has a central aperture 70, to provide for circulation of cooling air to the central portion of device 23, particularly chip 27.

To mount the integrated circuit device 23 in the connector 20, the integrated circuit device is placed on the base 21. The position of the integrated circuit device is controlled completely by the orientation means comprising the locating posts 71 and 72 and the polarizing post 75. Thus, the integrated circuit device 23 is positioned on the base 21 with post 71 extending through the aperture 28 in the integrated circuit device. Post 72 projects through the aperture 29 in device 23, and the polarizing post 75 is engaged in the slot 31 in the integrated circuit device. It will be-apparent that the posts 71, 72 and 75 orient the integrated circuit device in a single fixed position with the contact elements 45 each engaging one of the conductive pads 25 and with the contacts 46 each engaging one of the conductive pads 26. Cover 22 is then closed to the position illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3. As the cover is closed, latch pad 59 is cammed inwardly by retainer 63 and then snaps outwardly to engage in the aperture 65 (FIG. 3). Similarly, latch pad 61 engages in the aperture 66 in retainer 64 (FIG. 1). When the cover is closed, the orientation posts 71, 72 and 75 project through the apertures 73, 74 and 76, respectively, in cover 22, affording guides for the cover as well as assuring accurate orientation of the integrated circuit device 23 in connector 20.

If it becomes necessary or desirable to remove the integrated circuit device 23 from connector 20, pressure is applied to the projection 62 on the resilient latch arm 58 to force the latch arm inwardly from the position shown in FIG. 1 and thus release the latch pads 59 and 61 from their engagement with the latch retainers 63 and 64. This makes it possible to swing the cover 22 open, immediately exposing the integrated circuit device 23 for ready and convenient removal from connector 20. It will thus be apparent that no tools of any kind are necessary for inserting or removing the integrated circuit device 23 in connector 20. Furthermore, no particular training or skill is necessary, since it is literally impossible for an assembler or repairman to place the integrated circuit device 23 in the connecor 20 in any position other than the requisite accurately aligned position relative to the connector contacts.

The configuration of one of the contact cavities 38 and one of the individual contact elements 46 is shown in detail in FIGS. 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8. As best illustrated in FIGS. 6-8, the lower outer end of cavity 38 comprises a relatively narrow channel 81 with a projection 82 extending into the channel from the outer wall, at the bottom end only of the channel. The upper portion of cavity 38 includes three relatively wide sections, from outside to inside, identified by reference numerals 83, 84 and 85, respectively. The section of cavity 38 between sections 83 and 84 constitutes a restriction affording an internal barrier wall 86 on both sides of the cavityfiA similar restriction occurs between cavity sections 84 and 85, affording a barrier wall 87 at the opposite end of section 84.

As shown in FIG. 4, the metal contact element 46 includes a shank or pin segment 91 which extends downwardly through the cavity channel 81 (FIGS. 6 and 7). The pin segment 91 of contact element 46 is generally U-shaped in cross section, to afford a rigid connector pin, and fits around the projection 82 at the bottom of channel 81. Projection 82 serves to orient the connector pin segment 91 of the metal contact relative "to base 21 and to the other contact elements. The connector pin segment 91 of contact element 46 may be provided with a barb or spur 92 to engage one wall of channel 81 and thus assure firm retention of the contact element in insulator base 21.

The upper part of contact element 46, as shown in FIG. 4, comprises a spring segment 93 that projects horizontally inwardly of cavity 38, through sections 84 and 85 (FIG. 8). The spring contact segment 93 is bent back toward the outer surface of cavity 38 at an acute angle, and extends upwardly above locating surface 36..

in an inverted substantially U-shaped active contact portion 94. When the contact element 46 is not under stress, with the connector open as shown in FIG. 4, the active contact portion 94 is engaged with the barrier wall 87 in cavity 38.

The contact elements 45 and 46 may be formed of beryllium copper or of a similar resilient and highly conductive material. The active contact portions of the contact elements, such as the contact portion 94 of the contact element 46 (FIG. 4) may be gold plated to reduce contact resistance. The thickness of the metal in the contact elements may be of the order of 0.006 inch. The width of the active contact portion 94 may be of the order of 0.025 to 0.03 inch. The unstressed height of the contact element, from the top'of the connector pin segment 91 to the top of the active contact portion 94, may be of the order of 0.15 inch, with otherdimensions in approximately the same proportions as illustrated in the drawing. These dimensions are not critical and are not to be construed as limitations, except that it is important to proportion the contact elements properly in relation to the resiliency of the metal from which they are formed in order to obtain the operational results described herein.

When connector 20 is being closed, the initial engagement between the cover 22 and the integrated circuit device 23 occurs when the pressure surface 54 on the cover contacts the upper surface of the integrated circuit device in the area immediately above the contact elements 46. Continued closing movement applies a downward pressure on the integrated circuit device 23. The pressure is applied at an angle, however, and tends to drive the active contact portion 94 of contact element 46 in a wiping motion across one of the conductive pads 26 on the integrated circuit device, from the position shown in FIG. 4 to the position illustrated in FIG. 3. The wiping motion is interrupted when the active contact portion 94 of the contact element 46 engages the outer barrier 86 within cavity 38. That is, the horizontal wiping movement of the metal contact is interrupted in the position shown in FIG. 3. Thereafter, the continued downward movement of cover 22 serves only to increase the contact pressure between portion 94 of contact element 46 and the mating conductive pad 26 on the integrated circuit device 23 with essentially no deformation of pad 26. Thus, barrier 86 controls the horizontal travel of the active portion 94 of contact element 46 to prevent the contact from wiping off the edge of the conductive pad 26 on the integrated circuit device.

Thecontact 46 wipes the conductive pad 26 with a minimum force, precluding excessive wear on device 23, but maintains a relatively high pressure for excellent electrical conductivity when connector 20 is completely closed. Preferably, the ultimate contact force is of the order of fifty grams in a typical connector construction. The other contact elements 45 and 46 of connector 20, and their cavities 37 and 38, correspond in all respects to those described in detail above. Contact elements 45, like elements 46, first wipe across the mating conductive pads 26 on device 23, and then apply a relatively high contact pressure, once their wiping motion is interrupted.

As shown in FIG. 9, each of the hinge projections 51, 52 and 53 on cover 22 is provided with a pair of hinge pins 101. Hinge pins 101 may be formed integrally with cover 22, as molded plastic elements, alternatively, the hinge pins may be formed from suitable metal stock and may be heat-staked into the hinge projections 51, 52 and 53. The hinge pins are all aligned with a common axis constituting the hinge axis for cover 22.

FIG. 10 affords a detail sectional view, through the hinge lug 42 of connector 20, that is typical of all sections of the assembled hinge. As shown therein, hinge lug 42 is of inverted U-shaped configuration, with the outer wall 102 of the lug terminating in a position which admits entry of the hinge pin 101 into a vertical channel 103 in the hinge lug. In assembly of connector 20, cover 21 is positioned behind base 22 and is maneuvered to bring the hinge lugs 101' up to the tops of the channels 103 in the hingelugs 41-44. The outer wall.

102 of each hinge lug is then deformed inwardly, under heat and pressure, as indicated by the inward projection 104 in FIG. 10. In this manner, cover 22 is permanently mounted on base 21, affording a single-unit connector structure.

We claim:

1. An electrical connector for supporting and for completing electrical connections to a flat integrated circuit device having a plurality of electrically conductive pads arranged in a predetermined pattern along at least two opposed sides of a substantially planar connection surface, said connector comprising:

a unitary one-piece insulator base affording two upwardly facing locating surfaces corresponding generally in size and configuration to said opposedsides of said connection surface of said integrated circuit device and having a corresponding plurality of contact cavities formed therein in a pattern corresponding to the pattern of said conductive pads; a corresponding plurality of individual metal contact elements, such inserted downwardly into one of said contact cavities and projecting downwardly outwardly of said base, each contact element including a resilient contact portion projecting a short distance above one of said locating surfaces; a unitary one-piece insulator cover; hinge means hingedly mounting one side of said cover on one side of said base adjacent one of said locating surfaces for movement between open and closed positions, said cover including two pressure surfaces aligned with the locating surfaces of the base when the cover is closed; pressure releasable resilient latch means, comprising complementary latch and retainer elements formed integrally with said cover member and with said base member, on the side thereof opposite said hinge means, for latching said cover member in closed position on said base member and including an elongated resilient latch arm, extending along the free side of said cover arid separated from the body of said cover by an elongated slot, at least one latch pad formed integrally with said latch arm and projecting outwardly of said latch arm, and at least one latch retainer element, formed integrally with said other side of said base member and projecting upwardly of the plane of said locating surfaces, in alignment with and in position to releasably engage said latch pad; and orientation means, comprising at least two posts, each formed integrally with one of said base and cover members and projecting into an opening in the other of said members, for orienting an integrated circuit device between said cover member and said base member in a single fixed position, with each contact element engaging one conductive pad on the integrated circuit device in form pressure contact when said cover member is closed and latched. I 2. An electrical connector for an integrated circuit device, according to claim 1, in which said orientation means comprises a locating post projecting upwardly from the longitudinal center line of said base member, and a polarizing post projecting upwardly from said base member at a point substantially displaced from said center line.

3. An electrical connector for an integrated circuit device, according to claim 2, in which said orientation means comprises a second locating post projecting upwardly from the longitudinal center line of said base at" a point substantially displaced from the first locating post.

4. An electrical connector for an integrated circuit device, according to claim 1 in which said latch means comprises two latch pads located at spaced points on said latch arm and two latch retainer elements aligned one-for-one with said latch pads, said latch means further comprises a pressure projection, at the center of said latch arm, projecting outwardly of said latch arm to facilitate release of the latch means for opening the connector.

5. An electrical connector for supporting and for completing electrical connections to a flat integrated circuit device having a plurality of electrically conductive pads arranged in a predetermined pattern along at least two opposed sides of a substantiallyplanar connection surface, said connector comprising:

a unitary one-piece insulator base affording two upwardly facing locating surfaces corresponding generally in size and configuration to said opposed sides of said connection surface of said integrated circuit device and having a corresponding plurality of contact cavities formed therein in a pattern corresponding to the pattern of said conductive pads;

corresponding plurality of individual metal contact 5 elements, each inserted downwardly into one of said contact cavities and projecting downwardly outwardly of said base, each contact element including a resilient contact portion projecting a short distance above one of said locating surfaces and a relatively rigid connector pin segment projecting from said cavity downwardly and outwardly of said base, and a resilient contact segment extending approximately horizontally from the top of said pin connector segment, inwardly of one of said cavities, and then back atan acute angle upwardly to an integral vertically projecting contact portion, said cavity including two spaced internal barriers limiting horizontal movement of said contact portion to a wiping action across one conductive pad on said device a unitary one-piece insulator cover;

hinge means hingedly mounted one side of said cover on one side of said base adjacent one of said locating surfaces for movement between open and closed positions, said cover including two pressure surfaces aligned with the locating surfaces of the base when the cover is closed pressure-releasable resilient latch means, comprising complementary latch and retainer elements formed integrally with said cover member and with said base member, on the sides thereof opposite said hing means, for latching said cover member in closed position on said base member;

and orientation means, comprising at least two posts, each formed integrally with one of said base and cover members and projecting into an opening in the other of said members, for orienting an integrated circuit device between said cover member and said base member in a single fixed position, with each contact element engaging one conductive pad on the integrated circuit device in firm pressure contact when said cover member is closed and latched.

6. An electrical connector for an integrated circuit device, according to claim 5,, in which said connector pin segment of each contact element is of substantially U-shaped construction, in cross section; and in which the lower portion of each cavity comprises a channel having a central guide projection for orienting said connector pin segment relative to said base and to the connector pin segments of the other contact elements.

7. An electrical connector for supporting andfor completing electrical connections to a flat integrated circuit device having a plurality of electrically conductive pads arranged in a predetermined pattern along at least two opposed longitudinal sides of a substantially planar connection surface of an insulator body, said connector comprising:

a unitary one-piece insulator base affording two upwardly facing locating surfaces corresponding generally in size and configuration to said opposed sides of said connection surface of said integrated circuit device and having a corresponding plurality of contact cavities formed therein in a pattern corresponding to the pattern of said conductive pads;

a corresponding plurality of individual metal contact elements, each inserted downwardly into one of said contact cavities and projecting downwardly outwardly of said base, each contact element including a resilient contact portion projecting a short distance above one of said locating surfaces;

a unitary one-piece insulator cover;

hinge means hingedly mounting one side of said cover on one side of said base adjacent one of. said locating surfaces for movement between open and closed positions, said cover including two pressure surfaces aligned with the locating surfaces of the base when the cover is closed;

pressure-releasable resilient latch means, comprising complmentary latch and retainer elements formed integrally with said cover member and with said base member, on the sides thereof opposite said hinge means, for latching said cover member in closed position on said base member, said latch means including an elongated resilient latch arrn, extending along the free side of said cover and separated from the body of said cover by an elongated slot, at least one latch pad formed integrally with said latch arm and projecting outwardly of said latch arm, at least one latch retainer element, formed integrally with said other side of said base member and projecting upwardly of the plane of device, according to claim 7, in which said latch means comprises two latch pads located at spaced points on said latch arm and two latch retainer elements aligned one-for-one with said latch pads, said latch means further comprises a pressure projection as said release means at the center of said latch arm, projecting outwardly of said latch arm to facilitate release of the latch means for opening the connector.

9. An electrical connector for an integrated circuit device, according to claim 7, in which said sides of said base with said hinge means and latch means extend longitudinally along said longitudinal sides of said insulation body of said device.

10. An electrical connector for an integrated circuit device, according to claim 7, in which said slot is disposed entirely in said cover enabling said latch arm to be moved inwardly into said slot for release of said latch means.

UNITED STATES IA'IICN'I OFFICE CISRIII ICAITE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 1 3, 771, 109

DATED November 6, 1973 |NVENTOR(S) Richard Bruckner and John L. Tansky It is certlhed that error appears in the above-ldentrtied patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below.

Column 1, line 22, change "becuase" to -because-;

Column 2 line 16, change "of" to -or-.

Column 5, line 7, change "th" to -the-; line 59, change "lugs" to projections.

Column 8, line 65, change "such" to -each.

Column 10, line 22, change "mounted" to -mounting; line 32, change "hing" to -hinge+.

Signed and Sealed this thirtieth D f March 1976 [SEAL] Arrest:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner oj'Parenrs and Trademarks

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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/331, 439/71, 439/345
International ClassificationH01L23/32, H01R12/16, H01R33/76, H05K7/10, H01R12/00
Cooperative ClassificationH05K7/1069
European ClassificationH05K7/10F2B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 12, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: AMPHENOL CORPORATION A CORP. OF DELAWARE
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE;REEL/FRAME:006147/0887
Effective date: 19911114
Oct 1, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: AMPHENOL CORPORATION, LISLE, ILLINOIS A CORP. OF D
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ALLIED CORPORATION, A CORP. OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004844/0850
Effective date: 19870602
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ALLIED CORPORATION, A CORP. OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004844/0850
Owner name: AMPHENOL CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE, ILLINOIS
Jul 2, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE, NEW YORK AGENC
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AMPHENOL CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004879/0030
Effective date: 19870515
Jun 15, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: ALLIED CORPORATION COLUMBIA ROAD AND PARK AVENUE,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BUNKER RAMO CORPORATION A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004149/0365
Effective date: 19820922