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Publication numberUS3771169 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1973
Filing dateAug 10, 1970
Priority dateAug 10, 1970
Publication numberUS 3771169 A, US 3771169A, US-A-3771169, US3771169 A, US3771169A
InventorsE Edmund
Original AssigneeE Edmund
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable size wet suit
US 3771169 A
Abstract
A shirt or jacket and pants of insulating unicellular foam material so designed that they will exclude water when used as a diver's wet suit but are further provided with a system of zippers and method of construction that will allow the garment to be worn comfortably for many hours out of the water without interfering with its prime function of thermal protection when the diver is in the water this being accomplished by a divergent spacing of a long jacket zipper in cooperative relation with and in juxtaposition with long divergent zippers on the arms going over the shoulders, also including pants waist zippers positioned in cooperative relation with long pants leg zippers extending upwardly on the inside of the legs, thence crossing to the top of the thigh and thence upwardly to the lower abdomen.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ NOV. 13, 1973 United States Patent [191 Edmund ADJUSTABLE SIZE WET SUIT Everett w. Edmund, Po. BOX 601, Camden, NJ.

lnventor:

Primary Examiner-George H. Krizmanich AttorneyJohn W, Malley et a1.

22 Filed: Aug. 10, 1970 [57] ABSTRACT A shirt or jacket and pants of insulating unicellular foam material so'designed that they will exclude water Appl. No.: 62,352

Related US. Application Data Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 826,357 1969.

, May 21,

when used as a divers wet suit but are further provided with a system of zippers and method of construction that will allow the garment to be worn comerative relation with and in juxtaposition with long divergent zippers on the arms going over the shoulders, also including pants waist zippers positioned in coop- [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATIONS 2,749,551 Garbellano........................... 2/2.l R erative relation with long pants leg zippers extending 2,871,849 Chatham et a1. 2/2.l A upwardly on the inside of the legs, thence crossing to the top of the thigh and thence upwardly to the 'lower abdomen.

.. 2/79 2 Claims, 12 Drawing Figuresv 861,015 England 865,555 3/1941 France...

PMFNTFUHUV 13 I975 SHEET 10F 4 w wi PATENTEUNUY 13 I975 SHEET 2 OF 4 llu m mmulul PATENTEDHUV13 m SHEET 30F 4 El erezt 14 Edmund (NVE/V TOK 5y m v h/uv HTTORNEY PATENTEDHM 13 1975 SHEET BF 4 Fverett I V. Edmund /Nl/ENTO/ 5y 1. WM

ATTo/e/vEy ADJUSTABLE SIZE WET SUIT This is a Continuation-in-Part of my pending application entitled, ADJUSTABLE SIZE WET SUIT, Ser. No. 826,357, Filed May 2 l 1969, which I hereby abandon without prejudice in favor of the instant application by which it is superseded.

This invention relates to diving suits of unicellular or like foam material of the type designed only to restrict the amount of water entering the suit and not entirely to preclude its entry; this type of garment is now commonly known as a Wet Suit. These suits are worn in water hazardous activities, such as diving, and in various sporting or other activities where the primary function of the garment is to provide thermal protection to a person in cold water or in water for an extended period.

Experience has shown that the thermal protection referred to is adequately provided only if the garment fits the body tightly enough in all areas to prevent water circulation inside the suit. The foam material used is very soft and pliable and in practice a stretch fit is readily accomplished to meet the above objective. Naturally, some problems arise in getting into such a suit. Initially the suit was powdered on the inside to enable it to slide on, but in recent years a Nylon lining has been utilized to obtain this slip effect; and short zippers are commonly provided in the lower arm and ankle areas to ease entry at those points. A zippered opening down the front of the jacket is usually provided for entry.

These wet suits when so designed accomplish their purpose quite well, but one severe limitation remains to their more common use in that being designed to contain body heat they continue to do so when the wearer is out of the water. This causes excessive sweating and consequent weight loss if worn for extended periods, and in addition the garments, being tight-fitting to perform their in the water function, become uncomfortably constrictive when out of the water.

A practical solution of the problem is needed, for divers must often stand around for considerable periods of time between dives, or between jobs. Divers tenders are required to be ready to go into the water in emergencies and, therefore, must be dressed for quick diving action. Sports divers move from wreck to wreck, and sometimes hours will drag on trying to find the subsequent wreck. Helicopter crewmen must spend from two to eight hours dressed in a wet suit ready for action, and urgently need thermal relief. Coast Guardsmen on bad weather patrols have found the wet suit to be an essential life saving tool, and yet in wearing them for long hours they urgently need relief from heat and constriction. Motor boatsmen and sailors can well find this garment their best bad weather safety protection upon so lution of the overheating and constriction problem in a practical manner. Therefore, some of the principal objects of this invention are to provide:

a. A tight fitting wet suit that excludes-water to the extent necessary to give adequate thermal protection;

b. A means of completely relieving the tightness of the suit on all areas of the body and thus eliminating constriction and discomfort;

c. Providing for the release of body heat at various openings since in practice the suit may be worn for as much as 6 and 8 hours per day; and

d. A system of quick entry into the wet suit far exceeding that currently offered by nylon lining or powdering.

The basic requirements mentioned cannot be met with a one-piece suit for the reason that the release of heat and the need for aeration of the suit necessitates an open waist configuration, which is provided in my improved wet suit by using a separate jacket and pants configuration. The loosening of the suit in the manner provided for eliminates the usual necessity for a nylon lining inside the suit (for slip-in purposes), and thus provides a warmer garment as the nylon next to the skin has a colder feeling than has the bare neoprene.

In the fabrication of my improved wet suit it is first necessary to provide means for loosening the entire sleeves as well as the entire shirt or jacket body, which is accomplished by a system of cooperative zippers or zipper-like fasteners as will hereinafter be described.

Other objects and advantages of my improved wet suit will be apparent or pointed out in the following specification in which reference is directed to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof and in which FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a shirt or jacket of an improved adjustable wet suit in accordance with my invention in its initial loose fitting condition;

FIG. 2 is a detail section taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIGS is a detail section taken on the line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1, but showing the jacket tightened around the wearers body and arms;

FIG. 5 is a detail section similar to FIG. 2 taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a detail section similar to FIG. 3 taken on the line 66 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the entire wet suit in its initial loose fitting condition;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7, but with the jacket and pants tightened around the wearers body, arms and legs;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged perspective view of the pants of the wet suit in its initial loose fitting condition;

FIG. 10 is a schematic plan section taken on the line 10l0 of FIG. 7 showing the jacket and sleeves as they would appear if in circular peripheral formation before being tightened around the body and arms of the wearer;

FIG. 1 l is a schematic plan section similar to FIG. 10, but taken on the line l1--l l of FIG. 9 to show the top portion of the separate pants of the wet suit before being tightened around the body of the wearer; and

7 FIG. 12 is a schematic'plan section similar to FIG. 11 taken on the line 12l2 of FIG. 9.

Referring to the drawings, in which like numerals designate like parts or elements in the several views, the set suit designated generally by the numeral 10 is shown as comprising a shirt or jacket 12 in combination with separate pants having legs 14.

As previously mentioned, in the fabrication of my improved wet suit it is first necessary to provide a means for loosening the entire sleeves 16 as well as the entire jacket body 12 and also a means for loosening the legs 14 and the waist portion 14a of the pants.

To that end extra material 22 is allowed in the sleeves l6, and zipper or zipper-like halves l8 and 20 are installed the full length of the sleeves 16 that run up over the top 12a of the jacket 12, and diverging from a point on each shoulder 12a to the bottom edges of the sleeves, this extra material being taken-up and folded inside the sleeves when the zipper halves are drawn to gether in tightening the sleeves around the arms of the wearer. The usual zipper 24 is installed in the front of the jacket for closing the front opening 120 (FIGS. 7 and 8), that being the only opening in the perimeters of either the jacket body or sleeves. In addition to the zipper 24, zipper halves 26 and 28 are installed at one side of the front opening zipper 24 in laterally spaced, generally parallel relation therewith and extending divergently from a point on the shoulder position 12a to the bottom edge of the jacket body 12 where they work in cooperation with the sleeve zipper halves 18-20 going over the top of the shoulders to force water from the entire area around the top of the chest, the extra material between the zipper halves 24 and 26 being taken-up and folded inside the jacket when the halves are drawn together to tighten the jacket around the body of the wearer.

The positioning of the pair of long divergent sleeve zipper halves 18-20 in relation to the long divergent body zipper halves 26-28 enables them to work cooperatively to loosen the jacket body and sleeves when out of the water; and, further, upon a partial release of the frontal zipper 24 a full release of body heat is easily achieved. It requires the complete operation of all four of these zippers working together to accomplish this practical result. Any motion of the body now tends to cause air to flow in and out of the waist area of the jacket 12 or in and out of the upper part of the jacket through the released collar 12b and the top frontal portion of the jacket.

The separate pants 14 (shown more clearly in FIGS. 7 to 12) have long zipper halves 32 and 34 extending from laterally opposite frontal points 14d on the lower abdomen above the crotch 14c (FIG. 9) in downward divergent and inwardly spiral formation around the inner sides of the knees 39 and thence continuing downwardly to a termination at their lower ends on the inner sides of the ankles, as shown at 14e in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9. The extra material between the zipper halves 32 and 34 are taken-up when the halves are drawn together to tighten the pants legs around the legs of the wearer, and thereby folding the take-up material 35 inside the pants legs in the same manner that the take-up material of the jacket 12 and sleeves 16 is folded, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

Additional zipper halves 40 and 42 are installed in the upper portion of the pants waist portion 140, these halves extending upwardly in divergent relation from laterally opposite points 14f on the exterior surfaces of the hips 14g to the top edge 14b of the waist portion 14a, the material 43 between the zipper halves being taken-up and folded inside the waist portion 14a in the same manner as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 when the zipper halves 40 and 42 are drawn together to tighten the waist portion around .the body of thewearer. The leg and waist zipper units working together effectively re lease the body heat and constriction of the legs, hip and waist areas. Having released the constriction of the suit material any motion of the body now tends to circulate air through the pants.

An important feature of the jacket and pants construction described resides in the fact that the zippers are all installed on the exterior perimeters of the jacket, sleeves and pants so that the continuity of the material, except for the frontal opening 120 of the jacket 12, is maintained, and the extra material taken-up and folded inside the garment when the zipper halves are drawn together to tighten the garment.

As shown in FIG. 9 the upper terminals of the zipper halves 32 and 34 and the lower terminals of the zipper halves 40 and 42 are in approximately the same horizontal plane above the crotch 14c, that having been developed to be the best arrangement for the effective functioning of the zipper, as described. A

From the foregoing description it will be seen that my invention comprises not only an adjustable size wet suit, but also a vital system of zipper installations and construction whereby such a suit is rendered far more effective in providing protection, comfort and convenience to the wearer engaged in water activities than any adjustable garments heretofore devised for such purpose. It is initially loose fitting so that it can quickly and easily be donned and worn in comfort when the wearer is out of the water and quickly tightened to control the needed limited entry of water, as desired.

Although the fasteners used in the wet suit of the present invention are referred to as zippers" it is recognized that the term Zipper is a trade name for a slidable device of a certain construction for closing openings in fabrics and other flexible sheet material, and that other zipper-like means of different construction are now in use; and the term zipper as used in the foregoing description is intended to apply to any of such devices found suitable for the purpose described.

Since various detail changes or modifications may be made in my improved adjustable wet suit within the spirit and scope of my invention it should be understood that the embodiment of my invention shown and described is intended tobe illustrative only and restricted only by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A two piece underwater diving wet suit of insulating foam sheet material including:

a jacket adapted for enclosing the upper body of the wearer from neck to waist having a pair of roughly tubular portions adapted to receive a pair of arms and shoulders, respectively from hand to neck, parts embracing the waist and neck and a roughly tubular upper torso enclosing portion connected to said arm portions and slit along its length down the front thereof from said part which embraces the neck to said part which embraces the waist, first zipper with zipper halves engaging opposite sides of said slit forclosing said slit,

a second zipper which engages material on the exterior and front of said jacket and extending roughly parallel to said first zipper from said part which embraces the waist to a location adjacent said part which embraces the neck, said second zipper having zipper halves with material extending between said zipper halves for a distance which increases along said zipper halves from said part which embraces the waist to said location so that said extending material is folded inside the said upper torso enclosing portion as the two second zipper halves are drawn together into closed relation,

third and fourth zippers which respectively engage material on the exterior of said pair of arm receiving portions, and extending from the termination of said arm receiving portions to a shoulder location on the part adapted to receive the shoulder, said third and fourth zippers having zipper halves with material extending between said third and fourth zipper halves for a distance which increases along said third and fourth zipper halves from said termination of said arm receiving portions to said shoulder location so that said material extending between said third and fourth zipper halves is folded inside the respective arm receiving portions as the two third and fourth zipper halves respectively are drawn together into closed relation,

pants adapted for enclosing the lower body of the wearer from waist to feet having a pair of roughly tubular portions adapted to receive the legs and a roughly tubular lower torso, hips and crotch enclosing portion connected to said leg receiving portions,

fifth and sixth zippers which respectively engage material on the exterior of said pair of legs receiving portions and extending from the termination of said leg receiving portions to a crotch location near the crotch receiving part of said torso, hips and crotch enclosing portion, said fifth and sixth zippers having zipper halves with material extending between said fifth and sixth zipper halves for a distance which increases along said fifth and sixth zipper halves from said termination of said leg receiving portions to said crotch location so that said material extending between said fifth and sixth zipper halves is folded inside the respective legs receiving portions as the two fifthand sixth zipper halves respectively are drawn together into closed relation, and

seventh and eighth zippers which engages material on 2. A suit as in claim 1, wherein said sheet material is insulating unicellular shcct foam.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3934290 *May 20, 1974Jan 27, 1976Le Vasseur Kenneth WSwimming system
US4293957 *Jan 25, 1980Oct 13, 1981Melarvie Joel DWet suit
US4416027 *Jan 31, 1983Nov 22, 1983Perla Henry LDiving suit seam construction
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Classifications
U.S. Classification2/2.17, D02/732, 2/79, 2/125
International ClassificationB63C11/04
Cooperative ClassificationB63C11/04, B63C2011/046
European ClassificationB63C11/04