Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3771185 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1973
Filing dateSep 25, 1972
Priority dateSep 25, 1972
Publication numberUS 3771185 A, US 3771185A, US-A-3771185, US3771185 A, US3771185A
InventorsJessen U, Thorp J
Original AssigneeKolbus A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Presser plate, conveyor mechanism and creasing iron arrangement for book pressing machine
US 3771185 A
Abstract
An improved presser plate conveyor mechanism and creaser iron arrangement for a book pressing machine is presented for a dual channel or tandem machine. The channels of the machine operate in a staggered relationship with double acting pistons employed to operate the presser plates and creasing irons at corresponding stations in the dual channels. Resilient faced grippers on a conveyor chain grip the books on each side in a plane about two inches above the spine to thereby keep the book covers closed at all times and provide balance when moving the books between stations in the book pressing machine.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Thorp et al.

[ Nov. 13, 1973 PRESSER PLATE, CONVEYOR MECHANISM AND CREASING IRON ARRANGEMENT FOR BOOK PRESSING MACHINE [75] Inventors: James Thorp; Uwe Jessen, both of West Hartford, Conn.

[73] Assignee: August Kolbus, Westphalia,

Germany [22] Filed: Sept. 25, 1972 [21] Appl. No.2 291,664

[52] [1.8. CI. ..l1/l CP [51] Int. Cl. B42c 19/00 [58] Field of Search ll/l CP [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,438,075 4/1969 Thorp ll/l CP 3,469,270 9/1969 Thorp 11/1 CP Primary ExaminerLawrence Charles Attorney-David S. Fishman et al.

[57] ABSTRACT An improved presser plate conveyor mechanism and creaser iron arrangement for a book pressing machine is presented for a dual channel or tandem machine. The channels of the machine operate in'a staggered relationship with double acting pistons employed to operate the presser plates and creasing irons at corresponding stations in the dual channels. Resilient faced grippers on a conveyor chain grip the books on each side in a plane about two inches above the spine to thereby keep the book covers closed at all times and provide balance when moving the books between stations in the book pressing machine.

18 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures PRESSER PLATE, CONVEYOR MECHANISM AND CREASING IRON ARRANGEMENT FOR BOOK PRESSING MACHINE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to the field of book making machinery. More particularly, this invention relates to improvements in machinery for book pressing and joint forming for hard cover books.

2. Description of the Prior Art Book pressing machines are generally well known in the art. These machines typically have a plurality of stations arranged in series for simultaneous pressing and creasing of the books. Each station has a pair of opposed presser plates for applying pressure to the cover boards to join together the end paper, the crash and the cover boards. Each of these stations also has a pair of opposed creasing irons to form a crease in the covers adjacent the spine of the book, these creasing irons usually being heated to facilitate softening of the cover material to shape the crease and to accelerate set-up of heat responsive adhesive to bond the side board, crash and paper at the edge of the sideboard. Transfer devices of various types are employed to move the books from one station to the next succeeding station in the machine. Typically, the transfer device has operated intimately by intermittently engaging the books, moving the books to the next succeeding station, then releasing the books in timed relationship with the operation of the presser plates and creasing irons, and then returning to the previous station to grip the next following book for engagement with and advancement of that following book in timed relationship with the operation of the presser plates and creasing irons.

In one known prior art arrangement, the creasing irons themselves have been used to transport the books from station to station by gripping the book, advancing the book, releasing the book and returning to the original station for creasing engagement with the next book. This repetitive type of operation for transfer mechanisms has, inevitably, involved problems in precision of timing and alignment with respect to operation of a presser plate and creasing irons, thereby resulting in machines with undesirable shortcomings. Furthermore, this type of transport mechanism imposes necessarily severe limitations on the operating speed of the overall machine, thus leading to production limitations and inefficient operations.

Another known prior art machine, disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,469,270 has attempted to overcome some of the problems of prior art machines, but the machine of that patent still encounters severe limitations. The machine of that patent employs a conveyor chain arrangement to transport the books from station to station. However, in the machine of that patent a large segment of the presser plates in the vicinity of the crease and back of the book is replaced by the conveyor mechanism which attempts to act as a pressing device as well as a conveyor mechanism. This arrangement results in inadequate pressure in the vicinity of the crease, thus resulting in bubbles, ridges and poor bonds in the vicinity of the crease and crash.

Some prior art machines including the machine disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,469,270, are of the dual channel or tandem arrangement wherein books are operated upon in two parallel channels in the machine.

Many of these tandem configurations of prior art machines have encountered alignment and registry prob lems along with twisting of the books in movement from station to station because of a lack of proper coordination between the operation of the presser plates and the creasing irons. Typically, these problems have been caused by arrangements wherein both of the creasing irons are laterally displaceable while only one of the pressing plates is movable and the other remains stationary. U.S. Pat. No. 3,469,270 presented an attempt to avoid those problems by causing both pressing plates to be laterally movable as well as both creasing irons. However, the machine of that patent introduced another problem in that both channels of the machine operate simultaneously and in duplicate fashion, i.e. the presser plates and gripping irons move inwardly and outwardly at the same time in both channels and the books advance from station to station at the same time in each channel. That arrangement requires precise and complicated timing and coordination between the two channels and between the presser plates and creasing irons in a channel, limits the production speed of the machine, and tends to create an unbalanced condition in the machine.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION:

The present invention is directed to overcoming the problems discussed above by its configuration which presents an improved presser plate, creasing iron and transfer mechanism for a book pressing machine. The present invention accomplishes its objectives in the environment of atandem or dual channeled book pressing machine. The presser plates and creasing irons are operated by double acting pistons. In the present invention only one presser plate needs to be operated at each station, and one double acting piston operates that one presser plate in each of the two corresponding stations in the dual channels. In other words, one double acting piston operates the two presser plates, one in each of two corresponding stations in the dual channel machine. Similarly, one double acting piston operates the creasing irons at each of two corresponding stations in the machine, and the same double acting piston is connected to operate both creasing irons in each of the two corresponding stations. In other words, one double acting piston operates the four creasing irons at each of the two corresponding channels in the dual channel machine.

Book transport from station to station is accomplished by a continuous chain conveyor mechanism which has resilient pads in bearing engagement with the sides of the books. The conveyor chains are housed within the presser plates at a position approximately two or three inches above the back or spine of the book. With this arrangement for thetransfer mechanisms, the presser plates are able to engage substantially all of the book during the pressing operation, and especially the pressing plates are able to engage the sides of the book in the area of the crease so there is proper pressure applied at the crash site to avoid bubles, ridges and. poor bonds.

The arrangement discussed above with respect to the double acting pistons which operate the presser plates and creasing irons in both stations of the dual channel machine, in conjunction with the conveyor belt mechanism, leads to significantly improved coordination of operation within each station as well between successive stations in the machine and between corresponding stations in each of the dual channels. Furthermore, the actuating mechanism becomes simplified and more reliable then heretofore known, and a balanced or stable machine operation is achieved by a staggered operating arrangement between the dual channels wherein one channel is advancing the books while the other channel is pressing and creasing.

Accordingly, one object of the present invention is to provide a novel and improved presser plate, conveyor mechanism and creasing iron arrangement for a book pressing machine.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel and improved presser plate, conveyor mechanism and creasing iron arrangement for a book pressing machine wherein a chain conveyor arrangement is employed.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved presser plate, conveyor mechanism and creasing iron arrangement for a book pressing machine wherein a chain conveyor arrangement is employed without reducing the presser plate pressure in the area of the crease and crash of the book.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved presser plate, conveyor mechanism and creasing iron arrangement for a dual channel book pressing machine.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a novel and improved presser plate, conveyor mechanism and creasing iron arrangement for a dual channel book pressing machine wherein double acting pistons are employed for common actuation of the presser plates and creasing irons in both channels of the machine.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent and understood to those skilled in the art from-the following detailed description and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like elements are numbered alike in the two figures:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary top plan view of the improved presser plate, conveyor mechanism and creasing iron arrangement of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary front elevation view of the machine of FIG. 1 taken along line 22 of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As is apparent from FIGS. 1 and 2, the drawings are a fragmentary or partial showing of a book pressing machine, this partial showing being for purposes of clarity by omitting other aspects and details of the machine not directly related to the invention. In particular, the showing of FIG. 1 is a partial plan view showing four stations in a pair of parallel channels and 12. The stations are indicated as stations A, B, C and D, and the stations are shown labeled outboard of theequipment for convenience of illustration. Although only four stations are shown, it will be understood that any desired number of stations can be employed, and the equipment beyond station D is shown in fragmentary designation to indicate the continuance of the machine. Books are fed into channels 10 and 12 either manually or by any known automatic book feeding apparatus, and the books pass through the machine and channels 10 and 12 progressing in the direction of the arrows shown in each of the channels sequentially through each of the stations in the machine. Books 14A through 14D are shown in each of the stations AD, respectively, of channel 10, and books 16A-16D are similarly shown in each of the stations AD of channel 12. As will bedescribed in more detail hereinafter, the books in each of the two channels travel through the machine in a staggered relationship. That is, the books in channel 10 are stationary and are subjected to pressing and creasing action while the books in channel 12 are being advanced from one station to the next successive station, and then the books in channel 12 remain stationary and are subjected to pressing and creasing operations at each of the stations A, B, C and D of channel 12 while the books in channel 10 are advanced from one station to the next successive station.

Still referring to FIG. 1, each station in channel 10 has an inboard presser plate 18 and an outboard presser plate 20. Similarly, each station in channel 12 has an inboard presser plate 22 and an outboard presser plate 24.. The phrase inboar refers, of course, to the presser plates in each channel on the side of the channel toward the interior of the machine, while the phrase outboard refers to the presser plates in each channel on the side of the channel closest to the exterior of the machine; and that terminology will also be used with other elements of the machine. Only the presser plates in stations A and D of each channel have been indicated by numeral designations, but the corresponding elements in each of the channels is readily apparent in the drawings; However, as will be noted with regard to station B of channel 12, a part of the machine has been shown broken away in the area of the inboard presser plate whereby creasing iron structure (to be discussed in more detail hereinafter) located beneath the presser plate can be seen.

In most of the following discussion, both with regard to FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, the structure for only one station, e.g. station A, will be described for both channels 10 and 12. It will, however, be clear and understood that the structure in each of the other stations is the same as that which is described, and thus the discussion applies to all stations.

Each of the inboard presser plates 18 and 22 in channels 10 and 12 is connected to a double acting piston and cylinder element 26. As can clearly be seen in FIG. 1, there is one double acting piston-cylinder element 26 for each of the machine stations AD, and the double acting cylinder-piston 26 for each station is operatively connected to the inboard presser plates 18 and 22 by being pinned to a yoke 28 on each of the presser plates 18 and also by being pinned to a yoke 30 attached to a frame bar 32 (a) adjacent the presser plates 22. Inboard presser-plates 18 and 22 at each station are also interconnected by pairs of upper shafts 34 (which can be seen in FIG. 1) and corresponding pairs of lower shafts 36 (which are directly beneath shafts 34 and only one of which can be seen in FIG.'2). The common double acting cylinder-piston element 26 and the physical interconnection between the inboard pressure plates at each station by rods 34 and 36 causes the inboard presser plates at each station to move simultaneously in accordance with the desired staggered operation of the two channels of the machine. The outboard pressure plates 20 and 24 at each of the stations are adjustably supported by a pair of opposed upper rods 38 (which can be seen in FIG. 1) and a pair of lower ajusting rods 40 (only one of which can be seen in FIG. 2).

Referring now to FIG. 2, the details of the presser plate and actuating mechanism and the creasing irons and actuating mechanism are shown. Both channels and 12 are shown in FIG. 2, the view of FIG. 2 being taken to show station A with books 14A and 16A seen in the channels. However, as indicated above, the structure at each of the stations is the same, and thus the description with respect to FIG. 2 is equally applicable to each station in the machine.

Considering first the presser I plate elements, outboard plate 20 is slidably mounted on a pair of upper rods 38 by means of a slidable bearing in a housing 42 which is in turn connected to the upper part of presser plate 20. Rods 38 are mounted to any desired part of the general frame structure of the machine indicated generally at 37. At the lower parts of presser plate 20, a rotatable adjusting screw 40 is threadably connected to a bushing 44 on plate 20 to provide both support and adjustability for outboard presser plate 20. Adjusting screw 40 is supported in the general frame structure of the machine and can be rotated by any desirable means, either manual or automatic. Although only one of the adjusting screws 40 and bushing 44 is shown in FIG. 2 it will be understood that there are a pair of these elements essentially directly below rods 38 and bearing housings 42. As will be readily apparent, outboard presser plate 20 can be selectively moved toward or away from inboard presser plate 18 by rotation of adjusting screw 40. The entire structure just discussed above with respect to outboard plate 20, i.e., rods 38, bearing housings 42, adusting screws 40 and bushings 44 is also present on the right hand side of outboard presser plate 24 but is not seen in fragmentary view shown in FIG. 2.

Inboard presser plates 18 and 22 are connected together by rods 34 and 36 extending between and connected to each of these pressure plates. These rods are slidably supported in frame bars 32(a) through 32(d). The cylinder of double acting cylinder-piston element 26 is pinned to yoke 30 which is in turn connected to frame bar 32(a). The piston of element 26 is connected via shaft 46 to yoke 28. Cylinder-piston unit 26 is hydraulically operated from any suitable pressure source (not shown) whereby either side of the piston may be pressurized and the other side vented to cause the piston and its connected shaft 46 to travel either to the left or to the right. As shown in FIG. 2, the right side of the piston has been pressurized to drive shaft 46 and inboard presser plate 18 to the left to firmly engage book 14(A). Because of the direct physical connection between the presser plates through rods 34 and 36, presser plate 22 has also been moved leftwardly away from book 16(A). A reversal of the pressure loading on the piston whereby the left side of piston is pressurized and the right side vented results in rightward movement of the piston and its associated rod 46 whereby inboard presser plate 18 is moved to the right out of engagement with book 14(A) and inboard presser plate 22 is moved to the right into engagement with book 16(A). Thus, as can be seen, when one inboard presser plate is in pressing engagement with a book at a station in one of the channels, the other inboard pressure plate is out of pressing engagement with the book at that station in the other channel. This alternate or staggered pressing engagement, in coordination with the operation of the rest of the machine, allows books in one channel to be advanced to successive stations while the books in the other channels are being pressed, and vice-versa.

Still referring to FIG. 2, the creasing iron structure, which has been referred to briefly above, will now be described. Each station in channel 10 has an inboard creasing iron element 48 and an outboard creasing iron element 50. Creasing iron element 48 has a pointed projecting tip 52 and creasing iron element 50 has a similar projecting tip 54. The projecting tips 52 and 54 engage a book to form the crease at the base or spine end of the covers of the book. As is known in the art,

,the projecting tips 52 and 54 of the creasing irons may be heated by any suitable means, not shown. Identical creasing iron structure is also present at each of the stations in channel 12, there being an inboard creasing iron 56 and an outboard creasing iron 58 with projections 60 and 62, respectively. As can be seen with reference to that part of FIG. 1 which has been broken away in channel 12"to reveal the creasing iron, the creasing irons extend in length along the direction of the channels substantially coextensively with the length of each presser plate, and it 'will be observed that inboard creasing iron 56 with its projection 58 is shown at station B in FIG. 1. The projecting tips 52, 54, 60 and 62, although shown integral with the bodies of their creasing iron elements, can be separate detachable elements as is known'in the art.

Referring still to FIG. 2, inboard creasing irons 48 and 56 are rigidly connected to sleeves 64 and 66, and those sleeves are, in turn, slidably mounted on rod 68. The outboard creasing irons 50 and 58 are also mounted on rod or shaft 68, but these outboard creasing elements are adjustably fixed on rod 68 rather than being freely slidable with respect to the rod. The adjustable mounting is shown and will be described with respect to outboard creasing element 50, and it will be understood that the same structure exists for outboard creasing iron 58. A cylindrical sliding bearing element 70 is mounted at one end of a central passage way in creasing element 50 and slidably engages rod 68. A threaded bushing 72 at the end of the central passageway is fixed to the creasing iron and is threadably engaged with a threaded end portion 74 on shaft 68. R0- tation of shaft 68 results in movement of creasing iron 50 toward or away from creasing iron 48 depending on the direction of rotation of the shaft to adjust the machine for books of different thickness. Creasing iron 58 similarly moves toward or away from its associated creasing iron 56 at the same time as creasing iron 50 when shaft 68 is rotated.

Rotation of shaft 68 is accomplished, when desired, through a slotted drive element 76, element 76 having top and bottom slots 78 and 80 which receive and guide a pin 82 which passes through the end of shaft 68. This pin and slot arrangement allows shaft 68 to move along its axis to the left or right during normal operation. However, when it is desired to rotate shaft 68 about its own axis to adjust the position of outboard creasing irons 50 and 58, rotation of drive element 76, which is rotatably supported in the frame structure, is transmitted through pin 82 to shaft 68 whereby the shaft is rotated.

The above described adjustment of creasing irons 50 and 58 is for the purpose of accomodating books of different thicknesses in the machine. The regular cycling of the creasing irons for creasing pruposes is powered through a double acting piston-cylinder unit 84 which serves to actuate all four creasing irons at a station in both channels of the machine. The cylinder 84(a) houses a piston 84(b) fixed to a rod 86. Rod 86 is pinned at its left end to a yoke 88 and at its right end to a yoke 90. Cylinder 84(a) is connected to a sleeve 92 which is mounted on shaft 68 by means of a central passageway which allows shaft 68 to pass through sleeve 92 without interference. However, collars 94 and 96 are fixed to shaft 68 and abut each end of sleeve 92 so that sleeve 92 and cylinder 84(a) are axially stationary relative to shaft 68.

As shown in FIG. 2, the creasing irons 48 and 50 of channel 10 have been brought into engagement with book 14A and the creasing irons 56 and 58 have been moved away from book 16A in channel 12, a condition which resulted from introducing hydraulic pressure to the right side of piston 84(b) while venting the left side of the piston. Assuming that it is desired to disengage the creasing irons of channel 10 and engage the creasing irons of channel 12, hydraulic pressure would be introduced to the left side of piston 84(b) and the right side would be vented. Piston 84(b) is thereby moved to the right from the postion shown in FIG. 2 whereby inboard creasing iron 48 begins to move rightwardly away from book 14A and inboard creasing iron 56 begins to move rightwardly toward book 16A in channel 12. A downwardly projecting finger 98 from sleeve 64 is slidably mounted on a rod 100 which extends from a frame element 102 and has adjustable stops 104 and 106 mounted thereon. When finger 98 contacts stop 104 the rightward movement of creasing irons 48 and 56 and shaft 86 is terminated. Stop 104 is positioned so that projection 60 of creasing iron 56 has engaged book 16A in channel 12 and creased the book to a desired depth at the time stop 104 is engaged.

It will be noted from the construction of cylinder 84(a) that the cylinder is not grounded, i.e. it is free floating so that it can move laterally along its axis if an appropriate force is applied thereto. A finger 104 is slidably mounted in frame 102 and held extendedas shown in FIG. 2 by a spring 105' to engage a projection 106 on sleeve 92. The force of the spring is sufficient to hold cylinder 84(a) against leftward meovement when the left side of piston 84(b) is initially pressurized, thus allowing piston 84(b) to be moved to the right as described above. However, when the rightward movement of piston 84(b) ceases, the pressure on the left end of cylinder 84(a) then overcomes the force of the spring load on finger 104 and cylinder 84(a) moves leftwardly. The leftward movement of cylinder 84(a) carries with it sleeve 92 and thus shaft 68 is moved to the left by the action of sleeve 92 pushing against collar 94 which is pinned to shaft 68. This leftward movement of shaft 68 causes creasing iron 50 to move leftwardly out of engagement with and away from book 14A while simultaneously moving creasing iron 58 and its projection 62 leftwardly into creasing engagement with book 16A in channel 12. Of course, as will be apparent, the rightward movement of piston 84(1)) and the leftward movement of cylinder 84(a) described above occur somewhat simultaneously so that the end result is that the inboard creasing irons 48 and 56 are moved in opposite directions and the outboard creasing irons S0 and 58 are moved in opposite directions whereby the creasing irons in one channel, (i.e. creasing irons 48 and are moved out of engagement with the book in that channel and the creasing irons in the other channel, (i.e. creasing irons 56 and 58) are moved into creasing engagement with the book in that channel.

Simultaneously with the movement of the creasing irons as discussed above, presser plate 18 is moved away from book 14A in channel 10 and presser plate 22 is moved into pressing engagement with book 16A in channel 12. Thus, book 14A is then free to be advanced to the next succeeding station in the machine while the pressing and creasing of book 16A in channel 10 is taking place.

The return of the creasing irons to the position shown in FIG. 2 is accomplished by reversing the pressure loading across piston 84(b) so that the right side of pis' ton 84(b) is pressurized and the left side is vented. Bearing in mind that the hydraulic pressure on the left face of piston 84(b) is also imposed on the right end of floating casing 84(a), and bearing in mind that casing 84(a) is also loaded to the right by spring 105 which is now in a compressed state, this reversal of the hydraulic pressures in cylinder 84(a) causes cylinder 84(a) to move to the right, whereby shaft 68 is moved to the right and creasing irons 58 and 50 are moved rightwardly to, respectively, disengage from book 16A and engage book 14Aand return to the positions shown in FIG. 2. As floating cylinder 84(a) moves toward the right, spring 105 expands and finger 104 returns to the position shown in FIG. 2 whereby the total rightward loading on cylinder 84(a) decreases. Simultaneously, the hydraulic pressure loading on the right face of piston 84(b) moves piston 84(b) leftwardly whereby creasing iron 56 is withdrawn from book 16A and creasing iron 48 is moved into engagement with book 14A as these creasing irons return to the positions shown in FIG. 2.

Simultaneously with the return of the creasing irons to the positions shown in FIG. 2, the pressure loading on the piston in unit 26 is reversed so that pressure plate 22 is withdrawn from pressing engagement with book 16A in channel 12 and pressure plate 18 is moved into pressing engagement with book 14A in channel 10.

- Book 16A is then free to be advanced to the next station in channel 12 while the pressing and creasing operations are taking place in book 14A in channel 10.

The books are advanced to succeeding stations and through the machine by means of an endless chain conveyor 108 associated with each of the two channels of the machine. Referring now to FIG. 1, each conveyor has a pair of endless chains 110 driven by sprocket wheels 112 at each end of the chain which engage the articulated links 114 which make up the chain. Since the chains are identical, only one of the chains is shown in any detail in FIG. 1, and only the sprocket wheel at the front end of the machine is shown since the fragmentary showing of the machine in FIG. 1 indicates the possible presence of more stations in the machine. However, it will be understood that each channel of the machine has two identical chains 110 which each have sprocket wheel 112 adjacent the front and rear of the machine.

Referring again to FIG. 2, details of the conveyor mechanism are more clearly seen. Since the conveyor mechanism is identical for each channel, the description of the conveyor mechanism will be primarily directed to the chains associated with channel 10, and it will be understood that the description is equally applicable to the chains in both channels. The chains 110 are each made up of the connected articulated links 114, and each of the links has a resilient pad 116 on the outer face thereof. Pads 116 may be of rubber or'other suitable resilient material capable of firmly engaging the books and supporting the books for transportation while being flexible enough to compress slightly upon engagement with the books so as to avoid any marking or marring of the books. In the operation of the present invention it is important that the conveyor chains be properly aligned and positioned at all times in the vicinity of the books. Accordingly, a horizontal support platform 118 mounted on vertical frame elements 119 extends through the machine for each chain in the direction of the travel of the books, and support platform 118 serves to rigidly support and accurately position each chain. A wear block 120 runs along the length of each side of support element 118, and a support platform 122 is attached to each link 114 and extends into and rides in a groove in wear block 120. Thus, the chain and each link thereof is firmly and precisely supported.

As can perhaps best be seen with reference to the outboard chain associated with outboard presser plate 24 of channel 12, the resilient pad 116 extends slightly beyond the pressing surface of presser plate 24. Bearing in mind that presser plate 24, although being adjustable to accommodate books of different sizes, does not move during the normal operation of the machine, this relationship wherein the pad 116 extends slightly beyond the pressing surfaces of the plate is very important to the proper support and transporting of the book. The resilient pads 116 of each chain firmly engage book 16A at all times when the machine is in the position shown in FIG. 2, i.e. when presser plate 22 has been withdrawn and the creasing irons 56 and 58 have been withdrawn so that book 16A is free to be transported to the next successive station. In that condition, the pads 116 on the links of either side of book 16A are equalized in a state of compression, i.e., they are each equally compressed sufficiently to firmly grip and hold book 16A without any vertical slippage of the book. Of course, as will be understood, the book is grabbed on both sides by the resilient pads on several links so that the book is firmly supported. Actually, since pads 116 on the outboard chain extends slightly beyond the inner surface of compressor plate 24, the equalizing of the compression conditions of the pads on both chains result in book 16A actually being slightly spaced from the inner surface of presser plate 24 (on the order of about 0.2 inches) so that the book is free to be moved to the next successive station without any binding or interference on presser plate 24 or the next succeeding outboard presser plate. The separation between the right cover of book 16A and pressure plate 24 is shown exaggerated in FIG. 2 for purposes of illustration. There is, of course, no interference problem with either presser plate 22 or creasing irons 56 and 58 since they are cycled out of engagement and with the book. Thus, inthe situation shown in FIG. 2, book 16A is firmly supported by the chains 110 and the pads 116 on each link of the chain, and the book can be moved to the next succeeding station merely by selectively activating the two chains, either manually or in a programmed fashion, to move the book.

Referring now to the book in channel of FIG. 2, it can be seen that the book is firmly engaged for pressing by both presser plates 18 and 20. When that book was free to be transported as described above with respect to book 16, book 14 would also have been spaced from stationary presser plate 20 as well as movable presser plate 18. The movement of presser plate 18 to the position shown in FIG. 2 wherein it engages book 14A causes book 14A to be moved slightly to the left to close the slight separation with respect to presser plate 20 and become firmly pressed against presser plate 20. This slight leftward movement (bearing in mind that the gap only on the order of 0.2 inches) merely results in a slight additional compression of the pads 116 on the outboard chain associated with pressure plate 20. Thus, in this situation, the loadings on pads 1 16 of the two chains are slightly unbalanced with the pads associated with the outboard pressure head 20 being slightly more compressed and the pads associated with the inboard presser plate 18 expanding very slightly but still being compressed and remaining in firm engagement with the book 14A which has been slightly displaced against the outboard presser plate. When inboard presser plate 18 is withdrawn along with the withdrawal of the associated creasing irons, the previously compressed pads 116 associated with the outboard presser plate and the previously expanded pads 116 associated with the inboard presser plate return to their normal balanced state of equal compression loading thereby establishing a slight gap between the book and the outboard presser plate (i.e. establishing the situation shown and previously described with respect to the book in channel 12) so that the book is now free to be transported to the next succeeding station. Of course, it will be apparent and understood that the sequencing discussed above occurs for the books in both channels as the books are pressed and creased in one channel while being transported in the other channel in staggered relationship.

It is of utmost importance to maintain firm and uniform pressing pressure on the books during the pressing cycle as well as preventing any twisting or canting which would interfer with the transporting of the book from one station to the next. To this end, the positioning of the chains is very important in the present invention. As can be seen in FIG. 2, the chains are positioned above the spine about one-third of the distance of the spine to the front of the book. While this posi tioning might range anywhere from one-quarter of the distance from the spine to the front of the book to onehalf or more of that distance, it is very important that the chain be positioned substantially above the spine and the location of the crease in the books. The positioning is accomplished in the present invention by the formation of pockets 124 in the presser plates. These pockets allow substantial segments of the presser plate to exist both above and below the chain so that the book during the pressing operation is firmly engaged by presser plate structure both above and below the position of the chain, and especially in the area of the crease and 'the location of the crash". Thus, the presser plates extend along substantially the entire length of the covers of the book from the back edges of the covers in the vicinity of the crease to the front edges of the covers whereby uniform pressure is applied across substantially the entire covers, the only interruption from the full presser plate pressure being at the intermediate location of the chains substantially removed from the vicinity of the crease. This arrangement is also important in assuring that the books will not become twisted or canted when the presser plates are being engaged or withdrawn since the uniform presser plate engagement and pressures above and below the chain assure steady and even application and withdrawal of pressure when the books are either being pressed after being transported or are being released from the pressing operation in preparation for being transported to the next station.

For ease of explanation, the foregoing discussion has been directed to one station in each channel of a machine. It will, of course, be apparent and understood that the operations discussed above occur simultaneously at all of the stations of a channel. Thus, in the situation shown in FIG. 2, the books 14A, 14B, 14C and 14D in the respective stations in channel are all being pressed and creased while the books 16A, 16B, 16C and 16D in channel 12 .are all being advanced to the next station, with the last book being discharged from the machine and a new book being loaded into the machine for station A. Upon completion of the transporting of books in channel 12 and completion of the pressing and creasing operation on the books in channel l0, cylinder-piston elements 26 associated with the presser plates in each station and cylinder-piston units 84, associated with the creasing irons in each station are simultaneously cycled in the manner fully discussed above whereby the books at each station in channel 12 become engaged by the presser plates and creasing irons and the books at each station in channel 10 are disengaged from the presser plates and creasing irons and are transported to the next succeeding station in the machine. Then upon completion of the pressing and creasing operation of the books in channel 12, cylinder-piston elements 26 and 84 are again cycled, in the manner fully discussed above, so that the books in channel 10 become engaged by the presser plates and creasing irons and the books in channel 12 are free to be transported.

This staggered operation of the machine wherein pressing and creasing takes place in one channel while the books are being advanced in the other channel provides a convenient, speedy and particularly effective and balanced operation for the entire machine.

While a preferred embodiment has been shown and described, various modifications and substitutions can be made thereto without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the present invention has been described by way of illustration and not limitation.

What is claimed is:

l. A book pressing machine having a pluralty of book pressing and creasing stations in a sequential array extending from the entrance to the machine to the exit from the machine, the machine including:

a pair of opposed presser plates at each of said stations, each of said presser plates having a book engaging surface of such size and shape so as to extend along substantially the entire side of -a book at the station from adjacent the spine to the front edge;

first actuating means to move one of said presser plates at each station relative to the other to engage and disengage a book therebetween;

a pair of creasing irons at each of said stations;

second actuating means to move said creasing irons at each station to engage and disengage a book to form a crease adjacent the spine of the book;

a pocket in each of said presser plates intermediate of each of said presser plates; and

transfer means for moving books sequentially from one station to the next in the machine, said transfer mechanism including conveyor means in said pockets of said presser plates and resilient gripping means on said conveyor means for engaging a book to be transported, the engagement with the book being effected at a location on the covers removed from the spine and crease of the book.

2. A book pressing machine as in claim 1 wherein:

said conveyor means is a chain conveyor; and

said resilient gripping means includes resilient pads on the links of the chain.

3. A book pressing machine as in claim 2 wherein:

one of said presser plates is stationary; and

said resilient gripper pads in the pocket of said stationary presser plate extend beyond the book engaging surface of said stationary pressure plate toward the position of a book to be pressed at a station.

4. A book pressing machine as in claim 1 wherein:

said pockets are located in said presser plates so as to effect engagement of the gripping means with a book in a station at a location of from approximately one-quarter to one-half of the distance from the spine to the front edge of the book.

5. A book pressing machine as in claim 4 wherein:

said location is approxmately one-third of the distance from the spine to the front edge of the book.

6. A book pressing machine as in claim 1 wherein:

said second actuating means is a common actuating means for both of said creasing irons.

7. A book pressing machine as in claim 6 wherein:

said actuating means is a piston and floating cylinder;

said floating cylinder housing said piston, said piston being connected to one of said creasing irons and said floating cylinder being connected to the other of said creasing irons.

8. A book pressing machine as in claim 7 wherein:

a common fluid pressure signal actuates both of said floating cylinder and piston, each of said piston and floating cylinder being actuated in coordination with forces acting on the other.

9. A dual channel book pressing machine having parallel and adjacent channels, each of the channels having a plurality of corresponding pressing and creasing stations in a sequential array extending from the entrance to the machine to the exit from the machine, the machine including:

a pair of opposed presser plates at each of said corresponding stations in each channel, each of said presser plates having a book engaging surface of such size and shape so as to extend along substantially the entire side of abook at the station from adjacent the spine to the front edge;

first actuating means to simultaneously move the inboard presser plate at each station relative to the outboard presser plate at each station, the inboard presser plates in one channel moving toward the outboard presser plates in that channel and the inboard presser plates of the other channel moving toward the outboard presser plates during one operation of the actuating means, and vice versa during another operation of the actuating means plates. whereby the presser plates are operated in Mag 13. A dual channel book pressing machine as in gered relationship in said channels; CLAlM 9 wherein: a pair of creasing irons at each of said corresponding said pockets are located in said presser plates so as stations in each channel; to effect engagement of the gripping means with a second actuating means to move the creasing irons at book in a station at a location of from approxieach station, the outboard creasing irons in corremately one-quarter to one-half of the distance from sponding stations moving in one direction with rethe spine to the front edge of the book. spect to its channel and the outboard creasing irons 14. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim in corresponding stations moving in an opposite di- 9 wherein: rection with respect to its channel, whereby said said location is approximately one-third of the discreasing irons are alternately moving toward each tance from the spine to the front edge of the book. other in one channel and away from each other in 15. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim the other channel in staggered relationship; 9 wherein: a pocket in each of said presser plates intermediate 15 said second actuating means is a common actuating of each of said presser plates; and means for all the inboard and outboard creasing transfer means for moving books sequentially from irons at a corresponding station in each channel of one station to the next in the dual channels of the the machine. machine in staggered relationship, said transfer 16. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim mechanism including conveyor means in said pock- 15 wherein: ets of said presser plates and resilient gripping said actuating means is a piston and a floating cylinmeans on said conveyor means for engaging a book to be transported, the engagement with the book being effected at a location on the covers of the der housing, said piston being connected to both of the inboard creasing irons at corresponding stations in both channels, and said floating housing book removed from the spine and crease of the being connected to both of said outboard creasing book. irons at corresponding stations in both channels. 10. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim 17. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim 9 wherein: 16 wherein:

a common fluid pressure signal actuates both of said floating cylinder and piston, each of said piston and floating cylinder being actuated in coordination with forces acting on the other.

said conveyor means is a chain conveyor; and

said resilient gripping means includes resilient pads on the links of the chain.

11. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim 10 wherein: 18. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim said outboard presser plates in each station are sta- 17 including:

tionary. adjustable stop means for limiting travel of said in- 12. A dual channel book pressing machine as in claim board creasing irons in one direction; and 1 wherein: resilient means for biasing said outboard creasing irons in one direction.

said first actuating means is double acting piston means connected to each of said inboard presser

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3438075 *Dec 7, 1967Apr 15, 1969Smyth Mfg CoBook pressing machine with removable creaser irons and tool for removing same
US3469270 *Oct 20, 1967Sep 30, 1969Smyth Mfg CoBook pressing machine with improved presser plate and conveyor mechanism and with improved dual channel arrangement
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5437534 *Jan 21, 1992Aug 1, 1995R. R. Donnelley & Sons CompanyLift index table
US5441375 *Dec 3, 1993Aug 15, 1995Am International Inc.Cover breaker assembly and method
US5626452 *Jun 27, 1995May 6, 1997Heidelberg Finishing Systems, Inc.Method of applying covers to books
US5800110 *Aug 4, 1997Sep 1, 1998Kolbus Gmbh & Co. KgBook case joint forming method and apparatus
US6186721 *Jun 27, 2000Feb 13, 2001Grapha-Holding AgDevice for pressing a book cover onto the adhesive-coated outer surfaces of inner books to be inset into book covers by means of an insetting machine
US7008503Feb 10, 2004Mar 7, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdMethod of binding pages of a volume
US7073551 *Dec 4, 2002Jul 11, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdStack pressing apparatus with integral glue dispenser
US7172672Nov 18, 2005Feb 6, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdMethod of adhesively binding a stack of sheets
US7380580Jan 8, 2007Jun 3, 2008Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinting arrangement with an adhesive application station
US7798191May 7, 2008Sep 21, 2010Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinting arrangement having a page binding support tray
US20040154740 *Feb 10, 2004Aug 12, 2004Kia SilverbrookMethod of binding pages of a volume
DE9015358U1 *Nov 8, 1990Mar 12, 1992Stahl Gmbh & Co Maschinenfabrik, 7140 Ludwigsburg, DeTitle not available
DE19513813A1 *Apr 12, 1995Nov 16, 1995Kolbus Gmbh & Co KgMethod of annealing book cover folds
DE19513813B4 *Apr 12, 1995Oct 19, 2006Kolbus Gmbh & Co. KgVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Einbrennen von Buchdeckenfalzen
EP0377793A2 *Oct 11, 1989Jul 18, 1990R. R. Donnelley & Sons CompanyFlat gathering system cover breaker
EP1674285A1 *Dec 20, 2005Jun 28, 2006Kolbus GmbH & Co. KGMachine for pressing and joint-creasing books
Classifications
U.S. Classification412/22
International ClassificationB42C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42C13/003
European ClassificationB42C13/00B