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Publication numberUS3771791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1973
Filing dateApr 21, 1972
Priority dateApr 21, 1972
Publication numberUS 3771791 A, US 3771791A, US-A-3771791, US3771791 A, US3771791A
InventorsN Nelson
Original AssigneeN Nelson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circuit completion game using a rotary, multiple-contact switch
US 3771791 A
Abstract
An electronic game device which incorporates a motor-driven multipe contact switch. The switch comprises a pair of contact brushes which wipe over two sets of circularly arranged stationary contacts. The device includes a plurality of game cards stacked one above the other. A number of these game cards have portions of electrical circuits imprinted thereon and also have a square array of holes formed therein for receiving electrically conductive contact pegs. The contact pegs are inserted into a prearranged number of holes in the stacked game cards in order to complete a circuit through a selected one of the game cards. Upon completion of a circuit on one of the game cards by the insertion of the correct number and arrangement of the contact pegs, a motor will momentarily drive the rotatable brush pair over the fixec contacts. The rotating brushes will then randomly come to rest on another pair of fixed contacts that will require a different number and arrangement of contact pegs to again effect completion of a circuit. The switch can further be used on control panels that control automatic machinery.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Nelson [11] 3,771,791 1 Nov. 13, 1973 CIRCUIT COMPLETION GAME USING A ROTARY, MULTIPLE-CONTACT SWITCH lnventor: Nicholas R. Nelson, 710 West North Street, Bellingham, Wash. 98225 Filed: Apr. 21, 1972 Appl. No.: 246,184

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS l0/19l6 Greenwood 273/139 8/1926 Cultra 200/24 X 9/1936 Mabey 273/139 10/1939 l-luenergardt 273/141 A 10/1943 Goloborodko 273/1 E 2/1957 Ryan 273/141 A X 9/1959 Chalfin 273/141 A X Primary Examiner-Anton O. Oechsle Assistant Examiner-Harry G. Strappello 57 ABSTRACT An electronic game device which incorporates a motor-driven multipe contact switch. The switch comprises a pair of contact brushes which wipe over two sets of circularly arranged stationary contacts. The device includes a plurality of game cards stacked one above the other. A number of these game cards have portions of electrical circuits imprinted thereon and also have a square array of holes formed therein for receiving electrically conductive contact pegs. The contact pegs are inserted into a prearranged number of holes in the stacked game cards in order to complete a circuit through a selected one of the game cards. Upon completion of a circuit on one of the game cards by the insertion of the correct number and arrangement of the contact pegs, a motor will momentarily drive the rotatable brush pair over the fixec contacts. The rotating brushes will then randomly come to rest on another pair of fixed contacts that will require a different number and arrangement of contact pegs to again effect completion of a circuit. The switch can further be used on control panels that control auto matic machinery.

1 Claim, 13 Drawing Figures MENU-1077071131975 W i if m/M PATENYEDRHV 13 ms 3,771, 791

Illllllll II'HIIIHHU CIRCUIT COMPLETION GAME USING A ROTARY,

. MULTIPLE-CONTACT SWITCH This invention relates generally to relay devices.

More specifically it relates to an electronic game which incorporates a novel relay device that comprises the present invention.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a centrifugal relay device which eliminates expensive relay switches, takes up less space, is easier to trouble-shoot, less complicated, and has less things for possibly going wrong.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a Complete The Circuit or Switchboard Checkers game which is electronically operated, and which by incorporating the centrifugal relay device eliminates the need for conventional electro-magnetic relay switches as used in control of automatic machinery.

Other objects are to provide a centrifugal relay device which is simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture, rugged in construction, easy to. use, and efficient in operation.

These and other objects will be readily apparent upon a study of the following specification and the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the game.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the game board face card.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the centrifugal relay device.

FIG. 4 is an electric circuit of the game.

FIG. 4a is a circuit to be incorporated with the circuit illustrated in FIG. 4.

FIG. 5 is a diagram of game card No. l.

FIG. 5a is a chart showing co-ordinates for the remaining four cards. 7

FIG. 6 is a wiring diagram for bonus games. I

FIG. 7 illustrates a cheater circuit placed on a game card No. 4. i

FIG. 8 illustrates a puzzle circuit placed on a game card No. 5. g I

FIG. 9 illustrates the centrifugal relay device controlling automatic machinery. A

I FIG. 10 is a detail view wherein metal wheels substitute metal brushes so to decrease frictional drag.

FIG. 11 illustrates a throw clutching means.

This electronic game 10 can be variously entitled either as Complete The Circuit, or Switchboard Checkers.

It includes eleven separate cards or boards 11 which measure 14 by 14 inches. On these cards, a 12 inch square playing field is printed and which is divided by cross lines 12 into 64 squares or spaces 13 just like a common checkerboard. An eighth-of-an-inch hole 14 is made at each intersection of the cross lines, thus making a total of 81 holes on each one of the II boards or cards.

As shown in FIG. I of the drawings, the cards 11 are stacked together so that a metal peg 15 can be fitted into any one of the openings and fitted easily through the entire stack of the cards. 7

The game card, or face card is then designed as shown on FIG. 2. It is color coded into red, green, black, yellow, and white, as illustrated. The reason for the colors is discussed later on. Around the board are inset square or round dishes, each one bearing the color of the outside sections of the playing board. These dishes are used to hold the players pegs.

The cards are electrically wired using the principle of direct current, or in a series much like the old Christmas tree lights that went out when one bulb burned out. In the model, thin strips of aluminum are run from hole to hole. They are passed through each hole to be used in that particular game on both sides of the hole, but not so they touch. When the metal pegs touch each strip of metal, the circuit is completed to the next holes in the series. Beneath each wired card is a buffer, or blank card to act as an insulator between the game cards, as also shown in FIG. 1.

The wires 16 from the cards are then brought through to a unit 17 illustrated in FIG. 3 which is here called a centrifugalrelay device. The two outside wheels 18 are both stationary with contact points 180 at equal positions on the circle. The two inside wheels 19 move in one direction with a pick-up brush 20 on the outside of 'each wheel making contact with the short metal strips on the stationary wheels. A metal contact strip is attached around the complete circumference of each middle wheel and hooked on to the brushes. Two more brushes 21 make contact with the front of each metal wheel sending the current to an electric motor 22 which pulls the middle wheels 19 through the strips completed by the metal pegs.

To signify the end of the game and determine the winner, abell 23 will ring, or a light will flash.

In order to eliminate the problem of keeping the live holes in the game a secret to the players, so that the players cannot cheat by simply removing each peg until the light stayed on with the minimum number of pegs, the game includes a means toovercome this problem.

Hence a centrifugal relay device evolved, and in FIG. 4 it is seen hooked into the game. As the motor pulls the inner wheels of the device through the outer stationary wheels the bell rings for the brief span of time this takes signifying the end of the game. When the contact brushes are free of the live section on the outside wheels, the bell stops as does the small motor. In the model, friction stops the inner wheels in the next game. The pegs are removed and a new game is begun.

The players can-pull out add pegs .to their hearts content, but they will never learn where all of the live holes cell batteries,for purpose of portable convenience and eliminate any danger of a high voltage shock.

It is further understood that all the figures and colors given in this description are variable. It is also understood that the wiring diagrams, and co-ordinates given are also variable. In the wiring of each card, for instance, it can be seen that thousands of possibilities exist.

The invention as made by the inventor in an existing model and as presented in the present application is not to be considered a final form of the product, but can be refined in design for maximum efficiency and appeal, while still conforming to the general over-all game, the game rules and the relay device pictured in FIGS. 3 and 4, all of which are originated by the inventor and to which he therefore claims exclusive rights.

It is speculated that the individual game cards can be easily manufactured with the use of printed circuits, and with proper engineering, and volume purchasing of parts, that the game should not be too expensive to manufacture. The inventor realizes that his mechanical abilities do not reach anywhere near his ability to conceive the finished product.

Reference is now made to FIG. 5 which shows game card No. l and which shows how the holes are wired. Thin strips of aluminum, each one separate of each other, are connected to the metal pegs. There are 21 holes on the card, four in each outer section and five in the middle section. The other four cards have connecting holes, four in each section.

In FIG. 5a, the remaining four cards are given in coordinates. Reading down each card, are the letters A through I. Across from there are number 1 through 9. Thus E-5 is the exact center of the card.

FIG. 6 shows a wiring diagram for bonus games discussed in the game rules.

FIGS. 7 and 8 are the wiring diagrams for the puzzle which is separate from the circuit wheel on the model. The player is asked to take one peg and insert it in hole C-S. He is then asked to take eleven more pegs making 12 in all and construct six straight lines on the board, using C-5 as a start. All six lines must have four pegs in a line. If and when he solves this puzzle, a light will come on and stay on. If he elects to cheat by using more than 12 pegs to make the light come on, he will eventually be caught cheating by FIG. 7, and the bell will ring.

FIG. 8 is just a six sided star which completes the puzzle requirements. Six straight lines with four pegs in each line, FIG. 8 has 13 holes to catch most of the cheaters.

FIG. 7 is wired on game card No. 4, and FIG. 8 is wired on game card No. 5.

RULES OF THE GAME The game can be played as a solitary diversion or with two, three, or four players pitted against one another, or as partners.

The 81st or extra peg is placed in E-5 and left there. When two players play, each player takes forty pegs, and selects two of the colored sections as his own. Then the players begin taking turns inserting one peg at a time into any of his own sections, or the white neutral zone in the middle. There is no limitation placed on how many pegs a player may place in the neutral zone, but he must remember that whoever rings the bell signifying the end of the game, is the winner, and the winner collects all the pegs in the neutral zone.

After the spoils have been collected by the winner, he inserts a peg into the bonus game shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, then the loser followssuit until the bell again rings with the last peg put in and the winner of the bonus game collects those pegs in the bonus section.

Then a new game is started with the winner of the first game going first and continues until the bell rings again. Then bonus points are tried again. The game continues in this fashion until finally one player exhausts his supply of pegs before the next sounding of the bell. He is then the ultimate loser of the game.

If the winner feels very lucky, he can elect to loan his opponent enough pegs to continue to the next bell ring. Or he can declare himself the winner and start fresh. If

he decides to loan the pegs, he should keep track of those loaned out and can foreclose on his loan anytime after a bell has rung.

The rules are the same for four players as they are for two, when four players play, with the exception that each player has only one color and 20 pegs instead of 40. Also, when one player runs out of pegs before the bell rings, the other players are obligated to loan him up to one half the amount of pegs they have over their original 20. Example: If one player has accumulated 30 pegs, he must loan five of them to his opponent, keeping track of the loan for his own protection. When one player has forty or more pegs both in his possession and inserted in the board, and on loan to others, he may bump the firstperson to run out of pegs out of the game and take over his section. The bumped player keeps the number of pegs left to him after paying his loans and can still play the bonus games until he either accumulates l5 pegs or goes broke. If he goes broke, he is out of the game for good. If he somehow manages to get back his l5 pegs, he can rightfully reclaim his color and get back into the game.

This game continues until one player acquires pegs and three sections, or until mutual consent when all the pegs are counted up and the player with the most wins.

The two or four players may simply play one game at a time (from bell ring to bell ring), collecting their own pegs after each ring, and determine the winner by comparing the number of times each one has won a game. The playerwith the most wins to his name at the end of the session is the winner.

With this method the game itself is in the game in the form of the bonus section. Only two pegs per colored section can be played in the bonus holes, making a total of eight pegs in all. If the bell does not ring by the eighth peg, then it falls to the winner of the last or preceding game to keep the game itself from having a win jotteddown in its column. He must insert one more peg in the bonus section. If the bell rings, he collects another win under his name. If the bell does not ring on the ninth peg,then the previous winner loses his original win, and the game collects two wins in its column. After each bell ring, everyone re-collects his 20 pegs. Of course, when the bell rings before the eighth peg, the player who caused it collects the win. Once it has been determined that the game is won, the players then continue to finish off the bonus section to determine who is to start the next round. They must do this to recycle the wheels into the next game card.

When three players play the game, the rules are essentially the same except each player receives 27 pegs instead of 20, and when one player runs the total of his pegs to 40 and captures the colored section belonging to the game he wins, but players are warned that the I game could end up with the 40 pegs, and you all lose.

With three players, each person places-one of his pegs on the board after his own play, and announces that it is the games peg. Then each player puts in one of his own pegs, then it is the games turn, and the last man to play the third peg in the turn places in another game peg, and so on around the board. The game is always in on the turn, and each player in sequence makes the play for the game. In this way, each player is responsible for his own moves and also for a third of the games plays, so if the game wins, no one player has to take the blame for letting a thing beat them all. The

game cannot loan pegs, but the players can if they wish. When playing alone, the line puzzle is oneform of solitary, and the other is to simply pit yourself against the game, taking two colors and 40 pegs and giving the game two colors and 40 pegs. Use the rules for two players, and make the gamesplays for it.

USES OF THE SPECIAL RELAY DEVICE After incorporating the centrifugal relay device into the game, it occurred that other uses could be found for this interesting piece of equipment other than routing electricity along the tracks of a simple game. If it does this job of switching from one circuit to another, then it will work on a grander scale, in a more advantageous manner. Instead of large panels full of complicated electro-magnetic relay switches used in controlling automatic machinery, the present centrifugal relay device provides a space saving, simple unit that is easier and quicker to service than myriads of conventional relay switches.

THE CENTRIFUGAL RELAY DEVICE PER SE FIG. 9 shows an illustration of one way the device might control automatic machinery. Points A, B, C, and D represent conventional micro switches which hold the current in place until the operation it represents has finished. Point E is the off and on switch and plug to the power source. The juice flows from the power source, through the switch, then through the brushes labeled F, and through the circular inner wheels of the device. From there the power passes through the brushes, G, to the micro switch which allows the particular operation to begin as represented by the arrows going nowhere. Once the desired operation has ceased its immediate function, the micro switch diverts the electricity to the second group of wheels, through the brushes marked B, into the inner wheels, through the brushes I, and to the electrical-magnetic device which pushes the first set of inner wheels into the next circuit so as to provide juice for the operation of micro switch B. It must be understood that this last described operation requires but a fraction of a second to start and finish, for switch A will return to its original position almost immediately, but the diversion of electricity should be long enough to trip the device which turns the first wheel to the desired point to operate switch B. With the power gone from device J, a spring will return the moving apparatus in J, and in so doing will turn the second wheel into the next circuit so that when the operation of B is complete, the juice can be diverted to operation D, and so on around until A is again reached, and the whole process is begun again or stopped according to what is required of the piece of automatic equipment being used.

Properly made, and miniaturized, 50 or a hundred circuits can be put on one set of wheels. Frictionwill be a problem in designing, but a well balanced and properly engineered device should have a minimum of friction. Perhaps small metal wheels 24 could be used as brushes as illustrated in FIG. 10, instead of dragging metal brushes.

FIG. 11 represents one way to turn the wheels. The throw of the small drive wheels 25 would determine the distance between contact points on the outer wheels of the device, and the number of circuits then would determine the circumference of the wheels themselves. Obviously, other methods of motive power can be thought of such as the small motor used in the model, but the one illustrated appears workable and practical.

While various changes may be made in the detail construction, it is understood that such changes will be within the spirit and scope of the present invention as is defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a centrifugal relay device the game, of a pair of stationary outside wheels in spaced apart relation on a common axis, and contact points in a circular arrangement on an inner side of each said wheel for engagement by a brush, a pair of spaced apart inside, movable wheels being between said outside wheels, and which carry said brushes, each of a second pair of brushes engaging an edge of said movable wheels and being connected to an electric power source, said outer wheel contact points being connected to a plurality of stacked game cards of a game and said second pair of brushes to said power source being also in a circuit that includes a motor that drives said inner wheels, and a signal bell and lamp, said game cards each including a plurality of openings therethrough for receiving contact pegs, said openings of said cards being aligned and being electrically, selectively wired so that said peg effect said circuit.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1200340 *May 22, 1916Oct 3, 1916Samuel G GreenwoodGame apparatus.
US1597061 *Oct 20, 1924Aug 24, 1926Cultra James AElectrotherapeutic appliance
US2054516 *Oct 16, 1935Sep 15, 1936Charles W MabeyGame
US2177066 *Jul 16, 1937Oct 24, 1939Clarence H HuenergardtAmusement game
US2333002 *Nov 15, 1940Oct 26, 1943Goloborodko Simon MDevice for games of numbers
US2780461 *Nov 27, 1951Feb 5, 1957Ryan Francis JAutomatic player-diversified scoring game
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5460381 *Oct 20, 1994Oct 24, 1995Smith; Raymond W.Pirate game apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/238, 273/236, 200/19.7
International ClassificationA63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00678, A63F2009/2451, A63F2009/2426, A63F2009/2472, A63F9/24, A63F2009/2482
European ClassificationA63F9/24