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Publication numberUS3772809 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1973
Filing dateMar 18, 1970
Priority dateMar 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3772809 A, US 3772809A, US-A-3772809, US3772809 A, US3772809A
InventorsSchneller R
Original AssigneeSchneller R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cocktail pick
US 3772809 A
Abstract
A combination cocktail pick, stirrer and food marker comprising an elongated member pointed at one end thereof, a plaque portion disposed at the opposite end of said elongated portion and operably mounted thereto and clip means operably mounted on said elongated member.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

mite Schneiier Nov. 20, 1973 COCKTAIL iPKCK [76] Inventor: Rudy F. Schnelier, 1 Vanguard Ct.,

OFallon, Mo. 63366 22 Filed: Mar. 18, 1970 21 Appl. No.2 20,553

[52] U.S. C1 410/2 1t [51] Int. Cl. Adds 3/00 [58] Field of Search 132/89, 90, 93; 40/11, 324,1,10,10 PM; 44/2961, 86.11; 416/11 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 0184,335 2/1939 Bergeron D44/29.61 2,079,193 5/1937 Wigen D44/29.61 X 2,070,976 2/1937 Peterden... D44/29.61 X 2,625,760 1/1953 Cleal 40/10 C 2,723,111 11/1955 Lawrence D44/29.61 X 323,598 8/1885 Rosenbaum 40/324 2,925,087 2/1960 Kucher 132/93 2,717,463 9/1955 Sindler 40/324 3,325,929 6/1967 Mauchline 40/11 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 917,115 1/1963 Great Britain. 416/71 1,454,512 8/1966 France 40/10 C Primary ExaminerRobert W. Michell Assistant Examiner-Wenceslao J. Contreras AttorneyRoger M. Hibbits [5 7 ASTRACT A combination cocktail pick, stirrer and food marker comprising an elongated member pointed at one end thereof, a plaque portion disposed at the opposite end of said elongated portion and operably mounted thereto and clip means operably mounted on said elongated member.

7 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures PA'IENIEMuvwm 3.772.809 SHEET 1 BF 2 I [NVE/VTOP w W PATENTEBnnv 20 ms SHEET 2 BF 2 INVEM m @Lz fww/V FIG.4

COCKTAIL PICK This invention relates to, and comprises an improvement in cocktail picks and stir rods such as used in the serving of cocktails and other mixed drinks.

The objects of this invention are to provide a device more convenient for the user and in the case where the Proprietor of an establishment uses these items for advertising purposes, to display his name, insignia, etc., provides a means by which he obtains maximum benefit from his advertising copy. These and other features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

Picks and rods commonly used in the past, and at present are at a decided disadvantage with the growing popularity of the larger sized cocktail, doubles, on the rocks, etc., and this disadvantage is further apparent when these devices are used to convey advertising copy. In answer to the problem some manufacturers have increased the length of their products, but a compromise must still be made, as a pick long enough for a taller drink will be too long for the short or standard sized drink, resulting in the pick extending above the top of the glass, and becoming unstable interfering with consumption of the drink by rolling or pivoting toward the user. The shorter length of the prior types results in the pick being submerged in the taller drink and again interfering with the consumption of the drink necessitating use of the fingers in the liquid to remove the pick.

Along with the foregoing disadvantages of use is added the disadvantage to the proprietor who has spent money to have an advertising message printed on the upper end of these items, as is also commonly done. Here again the shorter pick in the tall glass is submerged as is the copy, and the tall pick angles and rolls thereby not holding the copy on prominent display.

The object of this invention is to eliminate the aforementioned problems and at the same time offer other benefits in the following manner.

Through use of a clip, or holding means, the pick is firmly and securely held to the side of the glass preventing any rolling, pivoting, or submersion, during use or consumption of the drink. Because of this feature the depth of the glass becomes unimportant, since the pick can be designed to accommodate the shortest glass to be encountered, and will then be in exactly the same position above the top rim of the tallest glass, as the top rim of any glass is the gauging factor. This feature also makes it possible to locate a plaque, handle, or suitable surface to hold advertising copy at the upper end of the pick, in the most advantageous position for prominent display, regardless of glass depth.

Another object of this invention is to permit savings of material through use of the shortest design, as extra length is not required. Still another object of this invention is to permit the proprietor to use one pick in either cocktails or in so called tall mixed drinks, if he so chooses. This now requires two different types because of glass depth.

Still another object of this invention is through the design of the clip or holding means be able to accommodate any glass contour or shape encountered.

Still another object of this invention is to permit the proprietor to use the pick in another way to identify the manner or degree to which a steak or other meat is broiled or cooked. This now commonly is done by use of a device made solely for the purpose being marked rare well done, etc., and is therefore limited to that use only. Some enterprising proprietors desiring to use their existing picks for this purpose, and since these are commonly furnished to them in various colors, use these colors to identify the degree of cooking and have so trained their staffs. This leaves the serving to the customer open to error through slip of memory, absenteeism, new help, poor lighting, etc., and does not indicate to the customer himself whether or not he has received his order as specified. In this practice the proprietors have shown a need or desire to use one matching device in their drinks as well as in other uses, both to avail themselves of their advertising to the public wherever possible, and at the same time benefit from the purchase of a single item in more attractive quantity prices.

This invention by utilizing the clip or holding means permits a small tab to be snapped under the clip resulting in a marking device which still retains the identity of the establishment, and at the same time offers the economies aforementioned, as the printed items are the costliest. Use in this manner is not limited to meat cooking identification, as other, or blank tabs can be furnished making the device available to the proprietors own ingenuity for such other uses as sandwich identifiers, place settings, etc.

In the accompanying drawings in which the practical embodiment of the invention is illustrated, the construction shown therein is to be understood as illustrative, only, and not as defining the limits of the invention.

FIGS. la, lb, 10, and 1d, illustrate two possible embodiments of the invention. FIG. la is a front elevation view and FIG. llb is a side elevation view which shows the clip or holding means disposed adjacent to and below the plaque or handle. FIG. 1c is a front elevation view and FIG. lid is a side elevation view which shows the clip or holding means disposed adjacent to and to the side of the plaque or handle. FIGS. 20, 2b, 2c, 2d, and 2e, illustrate how the devices shown in FIGS. 110, 1b, 1c, and 1d, are universally adaptable to the various types and shapes of glasses commonly used, and also illustrates that the plaque with the advertising copy, or handle is held above the glass in prominent display, or convenient position.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the clip or holding means, and shows the construction that permits adaptation to the different glass shapes.

FIGS. 3a and 3b show various applications of the FIG. 3 device.

FIG. 4 illustrates use of the device in combination with a tab to form the identifier previously mentioned.

Referring now to FIG. 1 numeral 1 shows an embodiment of the invention wherein the upper end 3 is a plaque for decorative purposes, which may or may not carry advertising copy, and also serves as a handle by which to lift or manipulate the device. The blade 4 terminates at its lower end in the form of a barb S which serves to retain or hold the appetizer or cordial usually served in Cocktails, particularly wherein a short pick is used in a tall glass. The holding clip 2 is located in its most advantageous position to display or hold the plaque or handle in a convenient position above the top of the glass as shown in FIG. 2.

Referring to FIG. 2 illustrated is attachment of the holding clip 2 to various styles and shapes of glasses now in common use. Single" size cocktail types appear at 6, 7, and 8. At 9 is shown attachment to a larger similar type used for single on the rocks and also for double size cocktails. At 10 is illustrated attachment to a type of tall drink glass. All aforementioned views show how the plaque or handle 3 is held in position above the top of the glass for prominent display of the advertising copy.

Referring now to FIG. 3 the particular view shown is an enlargement of the clip type shown in FIG. la. The clip in this instance emanates from and is a part of the blade 4 proper. Its inner rigid portion has a downwardly angularly sloping surface 11 terminating at its lower end in a radius 12. Extending from the upper end of surface 1] is a crook shaped form 13 constituting the resilient or flexible half of the clip 2. Flexibility is obtained jointly from the nature of the material and the shape of the crook member 13. Member 13 is so formed that its cross sectional area is gradually decreasing from its origin at surface 11 to its extremity at radius 14. in order that stress distribution and biasing pressure will be uniformly divided through out the member.

When in use, entry of a glass rim between radius 12 and radius 14 results in a separating force wherein radius l4 and member 13 move in an outwardly direction away from rigid portion 15 initially giving a snapping action over the glass rim bead. Further entry until the rim bead stops against the upper inner surface of member 13 results in the plaque or handle 3 being at the desired height above the glass rim, and further results in the side wall of the glass being securely held between radius 12 and 14 by the inwardly biasing action of the flexible member 13. Radius 14 is so disposed relative to radius 12 that a line laterally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of blade 4 passing through the origin of radius 14 will be slightly higher in the direction of surface 11, than a similar line passing through the origin of radius 12. In effect this adds to the existing clamping force between said radii, an additional urgeing force in the direction of surface 11 net resulting effect biases blade 4 in a direction away from the side of the glass held between radius 12 and 14. This feature insures against excessive pressure between the glass wall and the appetizer or cordial held on the lower or barbed end of the blade 4, thereby preventing its being pulled off and dropping to the bottom of the glass when the clip is unlatched and the pick removed from the drink by the user. It also when used in conjunction with the meat identifier holds the tab at a desireable angle from the horizontal as shown in FIG. 4 for better viewing by the user. Radius 12 and 14 along with their disposition serve the further purpose of effectively clamping between them the side wall of various glass shapes or contours. Angularly or curved walls while riding upwardly on either radius 12 or radius 14 will in turn be riding downwardly on the opposite or other radius. The curvature of these radii and their disposition are such that the commonly encountered glass shapes are accommodated while maintaining the previously mentioned additional urgeing force in the direction of surface 11. The clearance provided within the upper confines of member 13 accomodates the rim of the various glass shapes, two examples of which are shown in FIG. 3a and 3b.

Referring to FIG. 4 shown in perspective is the use of pick and tab to form in this instance a steak identifier. As illustrated in FIG. 4a the tab is so constructed that it will snap into the clip and has suitable indentations 17 to prevent its accidental dislodgement. It also has guide rails 18 surrounding the clip side surfaces to hold it in a level plane and prevent oscillatory or side motion. The design of the tab 19 also makes use of the aforementioned additional urgeing force between radius 12 and 14 which in this instance holds the tab at an angle to the blade 4 more readily seen by the viewer. The body of the tab can be furnished imprinted with various standard wording or left blank for the users individual choice of words.

Although the invention has been described herein more or less precisely as to details, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited thereby, as changes may be made in the arrangement and proportion of parts, and equivalents may be substituted with out departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, whatl claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A cocktail pick and stirrer comprising,

an elongated member, one end of said elongated member being shaped to provide a point thereon,

plaque means operably mounted to the opposite extremnity of said elongated member, and

gripping clip means operably mounted to said elongated member, said gripping clip means is integrally formed with said elongated member and comprises,

a triangular shaped portion disposed with a base of said triangle abutting a longitudinal side of said elongated member and an apex thereof extending away from said elongated member, and

a curved elongated portion disposed vertically above said triangular portion with a portion thereof disposed in spaced proximate relation to said apex, said curved elongated portion thus providing a teardrop shaped space between said curved elongated portion and said triangular shaped portion.

2. A cocktail pick and stirrer as described in claim 1 wherein said curved elongated member of said gripping clip means is shaped such that it includes two oppositely curved portion such that the portion nearest said elongated member curves away from said triangular and the next portion curves near to said apex.

3. A cocktail pick and stirrer as described in claim I wherein said curved elongated portion of said gripping clip means is contructed of spring like material.

4. A cocktail pick and stirrer comprising,

an elongated member, one end of said elongated member being shaped to provide a point thereon,

plaque means operably mounted to the opposite extremnity of said elongated member, and

gripping clip means operably mounted to said plaque means, said gripping clip means comprising,

a triangular shaped portion disposed with a base of said triangle abutting a vertical side of said plaque means and an apex thereof extending away from said plaque means, and

a curved elongated portion disposed vertically above said triangular portion with a portion thereof disposed in spaced proximate relation to said apex, said curved elongated portion thus providing a teardrop shaped space between said curved elongated portion and said triangular shaped portion, said elongated member, plaque means and gripping clip means being integrally formed.

5. A cocktail pick and stirrer as described in claim 4 wherein said curved elongated portion of said gripping clip means is constructed of spring like material.

6. A cocktail pick and stirrer or food marker comprising,

an elongated member, one end of said elongated member being shaped to provide a point thereon,

plaque means operably mounted to the opposite extremnity of said elongated member, and

clip means operably mounted to said elongated member, said clip means being integrally formed with said elongated member and comprising,

a triangular shaped portion disposed with a base of said triangle abutting a longitudinal side of said elongated member and an apex thereof extending away from said elongated member, and

a curved elongated portion disposed vertically above said triangular portion with a portion thereof disposed in spaced proximate relation to said apex, said curved elongated portion thus providing a teardrop shaped space between said curved elongated portion and said triangular shaped portion. in combination with indicator means removably mounted to said clip means, said indicator means comprising,

an elongated member of I cross section, said elongated I member provided with recesses in the surfaces of the middle portion of said I, and provided with a slot at one end of said elongated 1 member, and

plaque means removably mounted in said slot, said plaque means including a sheet portion of thickness slightly greater than the width of said slot, providing a force fit of said plaque means into said slot.

7. A cocktail pick and stirrer or food marker comprising,

an elongated member, one end of said elongated member being shaped to provide a point thereon,

plaque means operably mounted to the opposite extremnity of said elongated member, and

gripping clip means operably mounted to said elongated member, in combination with indicator means removably mounted to said gripping clip means, said indicator means comprising,

an elongated member of I cross section, said elongated I member provided with recesses in the surfaces of the middle portion of said 1", and provided with a slot at one end of said elongated l member, and

plaque means removably mounted in said slot, said plaque means including a sheet portion of thickness slightly greater than the width of said slot, providing a force fit of said plaque means into said slot.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4483622 *Jun 9, 1980Nov 20, 1984Charles MuhiDrink identifying mixer
US5799815 *Nov 25, 1996Sep 1, 1998Tony DavidDevice and kit for identifying pop-top cans
US6085453 *Aug 24, 1998Jul 11, 2000Volk; Daniel J.Flavor tag for poultry and meat
US6226911 *Nov 25, 1997May 8, 2001Graeme Leslie James WescombeTag
US6305832 *Jul 12, 2000Oct 23, 2001Jin Yu HuangDrink stirrer having a light device
US6308718Oct 6, 2000Oct 30, 2001John L. PearsonCocktail pick and canopy
US6471391 *Jul 14, 2000Oct 29, 2002Francisco OpitzDrink stirring device
US8025314 *May 14, 2003Sep 27, 2011Target Brands, Inc.Medication packaging and labeling system
US8250791 *Aug 28, 2012Gladman Jamie EVisual presentation clip assembly
US8465069 *Apr 6, 2011Jun 18, 2013Andrew McCartorGarnish pick
US8807610 *Jun 18, 2013Aug 19, 2014Andrew McCartorGarnish pick
US20040076074 *Oct 16, 2002Apr 22, 2004Shubeck Daniel W.Combination container, dispenser, and stirrer
US20050202748 *Feb 18, 2005Sep 15, 2005Beanhead Toys & EntertainmentFreestanding, reconfigurable, disposable character form and kit for making same
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US20110042343 *Aug 24, 2009Feb 24, 2011Bartucci Jeffery SFruit Wedge Containment Clip For Beverage Bottle
US20110114525 *Jul 29, 2010May 19, 2011Donald HoffmanNovel reusable apparatus for affixing gift material to a presentation device
US20110241363 *Oct 6, 2011Mccartor AndrewGarnish pick
US20120107455 *May 3, 2012Paul Gregory BriggsNon-floating beverage infuser and rigid clamp
US20130277994 *Jun 18, 2013Oct 24, 2013Andrew McCartorGarnish pick
USD663237Jul 10, 2012Scott Eben DunnBanner display holder for a cord
USD663238Jul 10, 2012Scott Eben DunnDonkey display holder for a cord
USD665701 *Aug 21, 2012Scott Eben DunnCross display holder for a cord
USD666124Aug 28, 2012Scott Eben DunnStar display holder for a cord
USD666125Aug 28, 2012Scott Eben DunnFootball display holder for a cord
USD666937Sep 11, 2012Scott Eben DunnElephant display holder for a cord
USD666938Sep 11, 2012Scott Eben DunnRibbon display holder for a cord
USD666939Sep 11, 2012Scott Eben DunnWedge display holder for a cord
USD666940Sep 11, 2012Scott Eben DunnCircle display holder for a cord
USD667337Sep 18, 2012Scott Eben DunnFlag display holder for a cord
USD667751Sep 25, 2012Scott Eben DunnGem display holder for a cord
USD668995Oct 16, 2012Scott Eben DunnPennant display holder for a cord
USD669392Oct 23, 2012Scott Eben DunnRectangle display holder for a cord
USD670196Nov 6, 2012Scott Eben DunnTriangle display holder for a cord
USD670598Nov 13, 2012Scott Eben DunnRectangle display holder for a cord
USD688594Jan 19, 2012Aug 27, 2013Scott Eben DunnCross display holder for a cord
USD688595Jan 19, 2012Aug 27, 2013Scott Eben DunnOval display holder for a cord
USD688596Jan 19, 2012Aug 27, 2013Scott Eben DunnSquare display holder for a cord
USD688975Jan 19, 2012Sep 3, 2013Scott Eben DunnCross display holder for a cord
USD688976Aug 31, 2012Sep 3, 2013Scott E. DunnSquare display holder for a cord
USD693731Aug 31, 2012Nov 19, 2013Scott E. DunnOval display holder for a cord
USD693732Aug 31, 2012Nov 19, 2013Scott E. DunnFlag display holder for a cord
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WO2010049767A2 *Sep 15, 2009May 6, 2010Kennedy Jorge Martin RiveroDevice for decorating recipients and utensils used in juices and cocktails
WO2010049767A3 *Sep 15, 2009Jun 23, 2011Kennedy Jorge Martin RiveroDevice for decorating recipients and utensils used in juices and cocktails
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/637, 294/61, D07/300.2, 294/5.5
International ClassificationA47J43/28, A47J43/00, G09F23/00, G09F23/06
Cooperative ClassificationG09F23/06, A47J43/283
European ClassificationG09F23/06, A47J43/28D