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Publication numberUS3772841 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1973
Filing dateNov 24, 1969
Priority dateNov 24, 1969
Publication numberUS 3772841 A, US 3772841A, US-A-3772841, US3772841 A, US3772841A
InventorsBarak A, Champion W
Original AssigneeBarak A, Champion W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of constructing indoor or patio green and a plug for the golf cup thereof
US 3772841 A
Abstract
A method of constructing an indoor or patio golf green and a plug for a golf cup thereof wherein the plug, of a predetermined depth for insertion in a golf cup, is provided for the purpose of filling the cup and rendering the plane of the top surface of the plug to a uniform level with the planar surface surrounding the cup. The plug having at least a pair of interlocking members, adapted to be disposed in the cup, having bottom end walls conforming to the bottom walls of the cup and a circular disc top of substantially the same diameter as the inside diameter of the cup at the upper edge thereof, with the top being secured to and perpendicularly disposed to the upper end walls of the members.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Bate .1

Barak et Nova 20, 1973 MET HOD 0F CONSTRUCTHNG HNDOOR 0R [58] Field Inventors: Anthony ,1. Baa-alt, 12230 Woolworth St.; Walter 1. Champion, 1141] Elm St., both of Omaha, Nebr.

Nov. 24, 1969 US. Cl. 52/741, 52/173, 273/34 13 Int. Cl A6313 57/00, E0411 14/00 of Search 273/34 R, 34 A, 34 B; 52/741, 221,173

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 12/1926 Jackson 273/34 B 1/1933 Boucher 2/1956 l-loseason 7/1970 Winkler 273/34 B Primary ExaminerFrank L. Abbott Assistant Examiner-Leslie A. Braun Attorney-Henderson & Strom [57 ABSTRACT A method of constructing an indoor or patio golf green and a plug for a golf cup thereof wherein the plug, of a predetermined depth for insertion in a golf cup, is provided for the purpose of filling the cup and rendering the plane of the top surface of the plug to a uniform level with the planar surface surrounding the cup. The plug having at least a pair of interlocking members, adapted to be disposed in the cup, having bottom end walls conforming to the bottom walls of the cup and a circular disc top of substantially the same diameter as the inside diameter of the cup at the upper edge thereof, with the top being secured to and perpendicularly disposed to the upper end walls of the members.

4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENIED NOV 20 ms METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING INDOOR OR PATIO GREEN AND A PLUG FOR THE GOLF CUP THEREOF BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The idea of an indoor installation of a practice golf green has been impractical because of the unique surface and cavity requirements which render the area unusable for other purposes. The process of sinking one or more holes into a floor surface and covering the floor area proximate the hole(s) with a synthetic grass turf will produce an area suitable for use as a practice golf green. This area can then be transformed into one of general living use by the insertion into the hole of a plug having a diameter slightly less than the hole and a depth such that, when inserted, the top surface of the plug is at a uniform level with that of the proximity surrounding the hole. By the choice of removal or insertion of the plug, one can cause the floor surface to take on either of its dual natures; i.e. either that ofa practice golf green or that of general home use, respectively.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to golf and more particularly to a method of constructing an indoor or patio golf green for practicing the art of putting, and a plug for insertion into a golf cup, thus converting the green to a general purpose use.

The method of constructing a golf green includes the steps of drilling a hole or a plurality of holes at least three inches in depth in a surface such as a basement or patio floor, with the diameter of the hole(s) slightly greater than the diameter ofa golf cup; filling the bottom of the hole with a soft plaster-of-paris, concrete, or the like; inserting a cup in the hole on the soft plasterof-paris or concrete, with the top of the cup flush with the top of the hole; removing any plaster-of-paris or concrete that becomes disposed in the cup; covering the area of the green with turf-like carpeting or the like; removing cutouts from the carpeting covering the cups; inserting a removable plug in the hole; covering and securing a turf-like carpeting to the plug wherein, when the plug is inserted in the cup, no uneven or uncarpeted area is present within the vicinity of the cup; and securing the carpeting surrounding the hole to the surface.

The plug comprises a pair of interlocking members adapted to be disposed vertically in a golf cup and having bottom end walls conforming to the interior bottom wall of the cup, and a circular disc top having a diameter substantially equal to the inside diameter of the cup at the upper edge thereof, with the top being-secured to and perpendicularly disposed to the upper end walls of the members, wherein the top edge of thecup and the upper surface of the top lie in the same plane.

An object of this invention is to provide an indoor or patio putting green for the home.

Another object of this invention is to provide an area in the home which will serve the dual purpose of an indoor putting green and one of general home use.

A further object is to provide for the installation of a cavity into the floor surface of a home, and a turf-like carpet surrounding the cavity for use as a golf green in putting.

A still further object is to provide for the fabrication of a plug comprised of two interlocking perpendicular planar members joined perpendicularly to a circular disc-like top, to which a synthetic turf-like carpet of substantially the same diameter is fastened.

Yet another object is to provide for the insertion of a plug into a golf hole to render the entire surface a uniform level with a turf-like carpet throughout.

Another object of this invention is the provision of an indoor or patio green and cup plug which is economical to construct, which is extremely effective in use, and which is adaptable for a golf green and general purpose use.

These objects and other features and advantages of this invention will become more readily apparent upon reference to the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of an indoor putting green.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along the lines 2-2 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view ofa plug as taken along the lines 3-3 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the cup.

FIG. 5-is a bottom plan view of the plug of FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, the golf green of this invention is indicated generally at 10 in FIGS. 1 and 2 as constructed indoors in a conventional building having a floor 11 of concrete or thelike and sidewalls 12. The green comprises a putting surface 13 having at least one hole 14 formed therein of predetermined depth and diameter, into which a standard golf hole cup 15 is set. The cup 15 is adapted to receive a plug 16 which is insertable therein so that the floor surface immediately surrounding the hole and the top surface of the plug lie in the same plane. The plug 16 may be removed from or inserted into the cup 15, allowing a dual purpose use of the green; i.e., either that of a practice golf green or that of general home use, respectively.

The positioning of the hole 14 (or holes) relative to the edges of the green is determined by the layout of the green and each hole is formed or drilled to a predetermined depth of at least three inches. The surface of the floor may be of wood, tile, concrete or any other suitable material; however, most basements and patio floors will generally be formed of concrete and usually are-at least four inches in depth. It is desirable to drill the hole not more than the depth of the floor, thus maintaining the seal provided by the floor and to prevent water from seeping or flowing thereinto from under the floor. The hole 14, whether the surface of the floor is horizontal or sloping, is cylindrical with the side walls thereof being substantially vertical and the bottom wall substantially horizontal.

A filler 17 of soft plaster-of-paris, concrete, or the like, which hardens after drying, or sets up, is deposited in the bottom of the hole 14 to provide a base for the cup and to prevent the seepage of water or to close an inlet passage for bugs in the event the hole 14 is drilled too deep and breaks the seal of the floor.

Disposed in the hole 14 is the cup 15, a standard commercially available golf cup, formed with a cylindrical wall 18, which is open at the top and bottom. Integrally formed with the wall 18 and disposed substantially intermediate of the wall 18 top and bottom edges, 19 and 21 respectively, is an inwardly projecting annular flange 22. Four arcuately spaced, vertically and radially disposed webs 23 are integrally connected at the outer edges to the flange 22 and wall 18, and the inner edges of the webs 23 are integrally connected to a vertically disposed flag holder 24. The top edges of the webs depend at an angle from the flange 22 to a smaller annular flange 26 integrally connected to the top edge of the flag holder 24, thus forming a saucer shaped bottom wall 25, see FIG. 2, from which the flag holder depends. In the event the hole 14 is not of sufficient depth to receive the cup 15, or if the surface of the floor is sloping, the upper portion of the cup is cut off so that the upper edge of the cup and the surface of the floor are co-planar. If the hole is too deep to receive the cup, additional filler is deposited therein to bring the cup top edge and floor surface into alignment.

The cup 15, as viewed in FIG. 2, having an outside diameter substantially equal to the diameter of the hole 14, thus providing minimum clearance therebetween, and with the base of the cup set in filler 17, is solidly secured in the hole. Before the filler 17 sets up, any portion thereof that flows into the flag holder 24 is removed.

As viewed in FIGS. 2 and 3, the plug 16 is formed from two interlocking members 27 and 28 disposed normally to each other. Secured to the top edges of the members 27 and 28 is a cylindrical disc-like top member 29. The bottom edges of the members are formed to mate with the saucer-shaped bottom wall 25 of the cup.

The members 27 and 28 are secured by means of a tongue-in-groove construction whereby a rectangular shaped cutout 31 is removed from the lower one-half part of member 28 at its vertical centerline which corresponds in width to the width of member 27 and a corresponding rectangular-shaped cutout 32 is removed from the upper one-half part of member 27 at its vertical centerline. On assembly, the two members are positioned normally to each other with the top edges and bottom edges respectively in alignment. The lateral dimension of each member is substantially equal to the internal diameter of the cup whereby, on insertion of the plug in the cup, substantially no lateral movement of the plug is possible. The height of the members 27 and 28 and the top member 29 is substantially equal to the depth of the cup above the top surface of the flanges, webs and flag holder thus, upon insertion therein, the top edges of the cup and thetop surface of the top member effectively provide a planar top surface. In the event the floor surface surrounding the hole is not horizontal, the top edges of the members will be cut at an angle to correspond with the angle of slope thereof.

A vertical hole 34 is drilled through the center of the plug 16 for the purpose of receiving a tool (not shown) for removing the plug from the cup.

Disposed on the floor surface 11 and secured thereto around the holes 14 is a turf-like carpeting 34 having circular cutouts 36 cut therefrom over the plugs 16. The cutouts 36 are secured to the top surface of the top member 29. When the carpeted plugs are inserted in the cups, the surface of the green is adaptable for general living use with no projections or holes evident to the observer. Furthermore, upon walking on the surface, the walker would be unable to determine the location of the holes, nor would the holes create any hazard. Upon removal of the plug, the surface would be adaptable as a putting green. Flags 37 (FIG. 1) are provided for removable insertion in the cups with the base of the flag pole disposed in the flag holder.

We claim:

1. A method of constructing a dual purpose golf green in a floor surface, wherein the green is adapted to be used for practicing the art of putting and for general purpose use, the method comprising:

drilling a vertical hole in the floor surface;

covering the floor surface with a turf-like carpeting;

removing cutout from said carpeting covering said drilled hole;

depositing a filler material in the bottom of said hole to seal the bottom thereof; inserting a golf cup in said drilled hole on said filler material with the top edge of said cup and the floor surface adjacent said hole lying in the same plane;

inserting a removable plug in said cup, wherein the top surface of said plug and the surrounding floor surface lie in the same plane;

covering and securing a turf-like carpeting to said top surface of said plug wherein, when said plug is inserted in said hole, no uneven and uncarpeted area is present within the vicinity of said hole.

2. A method of constructing a dual purpose golf green as defined in claim 1 and including the removal of any filler which may become disposed in said cup.

3. A method of constructing a dual purpose golf green as defined in claim 2 wherein said filler is a soft, concrete-like material that hardens upon setting up.

4. A method of constructing a dual purpose golf green as defined in claim 3 and including the provision ofa flag for removable insertion in said cup when said plug is removed, thus providing visible assistance in locating said cup.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1612291 *Dec 29, 1925Dec 28, 1926Jackson George PIndoor golf game
US1893268 *Dec 9, 1929Jan 3, 1933Boucher Creed HUnderfloor wiring duct system
US2515847 *Apr 13, 1945Jul 18, 1950Carl W WinklerSurfacing material
US2735166 *Aug 6, 1953Feb 21, 1956 Hand hole forming method for cellular
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3870301 *Jan 11, 1974Mar 11, 1975Lynam S BrisendineGolf ball putting cup
US3938295 *Feb 27, 1975Feb 17, 1976Tate Donald LMethod for assembling an access floor system
US6110053 *Apr 22, 1998Aug 29, 2000H.A.C. Invent AbGolf cup insert
US6267688 *Aug 11, 1999Jul 31, 2001Alan J. Morelli, Sr.Apparatus and method for the creation and covering of holes on golf greens and the like
US6508719 *Jul 10, 2001Jan 21, 2003Randolph S. ReddickGolf cup retaining holder for artificial greens
US6902491 *May 23, 2003Jun 7, 2005David R. BarlowFloating golf ball cup insert
US7942754Sep 9, 2009May 17, 2011Miller Jr Walter LGolf green for a patio
US20140128170 *Mar 2, 2013May 8, 2014Robert Treat Grant, JR.Golf Cup Guard
US20140295981 *Mar 28, 2013Oct 2, 2014Jason Alan KingGolf course greens cup chemical protector
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/741.1, 473/409, 473/176, 473/179
International ClassificationA63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0056
European ClassificationA63B57/00D