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Publication numberUS3773111 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1973
Filing dateApr 5, 1971
Priority dateApr 5, 1971
Also published asCA968318A1, DE2216178A1
Publication numberUS 3773111 A, US 3773111A, US-A-3773111, US3773111 A, US3773111A
InventorsDunn B
Original AssigneeDunn B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire extinguishing apparatus
US 3773111 A
Abstract
An automatic fire extinguishing apparatus in which a pyrotechnic wire or cord is stretched above the area to be protected, and leads to a fire extinguisher mounted adjacent the area to be protected. The fire extinguisher includes a propellant container operatively connected to the pyrotechnic cord and containing a suitable material adapted to generate gas pressure, plug means closing the propellant container and removable as a result of the burning of the pyrotechnic cord and an outer container having a propellant container mounted therein and containing a suitable fire extinguishing material such as carbon tetrachloride or sodium carbonate, the outer container also having a plurality of apertures oriented such that the entire area to be protected will be blanketed by the fire extinguishing material when the fire extinguishing material is forced through the apertures under pressure and frangible sealing means covering the apertures and adapted to rupture when the propellant applies sufficient pressure to the fire extinguishing material in the outer container. The extinguishing apparatus is particularly useful for Class B fires and is conveniently mounted in a range hood over a cooking range, beneath the hood of an automobile, as an ornament at the top of a Christmas tree, in a laboratory hood over a laboratory bench or as a self-contained unit above a furnace, an air conditioning motor or the like.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Dunn [ Nov. 20, 1973 FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS [76] Inventor: Byron G. Dunn, 6831 Orchid Ln.,

Dallas, Tex.

[22] Filed: Apr. 5, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 131,333

[52] US. Cl. 169/26, 169/31 P, 169/33 [51] Int. Cl. A62c 13/26 [58] Field of Search 169/2 R, 2 A, 26, 169/28, 31 R, 31 P, 33

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,317,507 9/1919 Kopf 169/33 2,723,722 11/1955 Hicks 169/26 2,754,913 7/1956 McFarlin 169/28 3,401,750 9/1968 Larsen 169/28 X 576,026 1/1897 Bunker et al. 169/28 2,417,374 3/1947 Morton 169/26 2,674,324 4 1954 Mascarini.. 169126 2,822,877 2/1958 Post 169/28 3,132,695 5/1964 Peltier 169/26 3,583,491 6/1971 Lindeberg 169/33 X Primary Examiner -M. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant ExaminerMichael Y. Mar Attorney-Charles F. Steininger [57] ABSTRACT An automatic fire extinguishing apparatus in which a pyrotechnic wire or cord is stretched above the area to be protected, and leads to a fire extinguisher mounted adjacent the area to be protected. The fire extinguisher includes a propellant container operatively connected to the pyrotechnic cord and containing a suitable material adapted to generate gas pressure, plug means closing the propellant container and removable as a result of the burning of the pyrotechnic cord and an outer container having a propellant container mounted therein and containing a suitable fire extinguishing material such as carbon tetrachloride or sodium carbonate, the outer container also having a plurality of apertures oriented such that the entire area to be protected will be blanketed by the fire extinguishing material when the fire extinguishing material is forced through the apertures under pressure and frangible sealing means covering the apertures and adapted to rupture when the propellant applies sufi'lcient pressure to the fire extinguishing material in the outer container, The extinguishing apparatus is particularly useful for Class B fires and is conveniently mounted in a range hood over a cooking range, beneath the hood of an automobile, as an ornament at the top of a Christmas tree, in a laboratory hood over a laboratory bench or as a self-contained unit above a furnace, an air conditioning motor or the like.

51 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures INVENTOR BYRON G. DUNN SHEET 10? 5 PATENTEU NOV 2 0 I975 ATTORNEY PAnENIEnuuvm 1975 3773.111 sum 2 0; 5

INVENTOR BYRON G. DUNN BY Z 42 ATTORNEY PAIENIEUuuvzo I975 SHEET 3 0F 5 HGJS INVENTOR BYRON G. DUNN BY iz Me ATTORNEY PAIENIEDnnvzo I975 SHEET u 0F 5 3,773.11 1

FICLQ INVENTOR BYRON G. DUNN ATTORNEY PAIENIEUNOv20 191s SHEET 5 or 5 3773.1 1 l FIG.I4

I66 Q I82 168 FIGJ5 E210 208 H 64 6 INVENTOR BYRON G. DUNN ATTORNEY FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an automatic fire extinguisher actuatable by a flame as opposed to heat. More particularly, the present invention relates to a fire extinguishing apparatus suitable for use in extinguishing Class B fires, particularly as a part of a hood over a cooking range or the like.

While a large number of fire extinguishers and fire extinguishing systems have been developed and are available on the market, numerous problems arise in connection with such fire extinguishers and fire extinguishing systems. Numerous problems are encountered in the operation of such devices and in their usefulness, particularly for Class B fires in oils, greases, flammable liquids, etc. where blanketing or smothering by the extinguishing agent is of greatest importance. A large number of portable fire extinguishers have been designed for extinguishing fires primarily at their inception and before the fire has a chance to develop into a large conflagration. These extinguishers have numerous drawbacks in use. First of all, they are not automatic and must be operated by hand in some fashion or another. The requirement of hand operation causes considerable delay in extinguishing the fire to the extent that the operator is usually not familiar with the operation and usually must read the directions attached to the extinguisher before use. Also, because of unfamiliarity with the operation of the device, the operator usually completely misses the area of the fire by pointing the nozzle in the wrong direction and thereby wastes a substantial amount of the extinguishing agent as well as wasting further valuable time. In addition, such portable extinguishers are not permanently located at the area to be protected and usually, they are in the wrong place when needed.

Automatic fire extinguishing systems have also been developed, but such systems are expensive to purchase and install, they are often unsightly, and they are adapted for use where heat, rather than a flame, will actuate the device. The last drawback of such automatic systems stems from the fact that these systems are actuated as a result of heat along melting a fusible plug or link to actuate the system. As a result, such systems cannot be utilized in areas where considerable heat is generated, such as, above a cooking range, above a laboratory bench, adjacent an automobile engine or in the vicinity of a furnace or a motor which generates considerable heat. Therefore, at the present time, there has been no practical means suggested for protecting areas where considerable heat is generated and particularly, above cooking ranges. While no automatic system is presently available on the market for use in conjunction with cooking ranges, it is a known fact that the vast majority of home fires are caused by Class B fires from cooking-ranges and the like. This problem is further exaggerated where a hood is mounted above a cooking range or the like, and the hood is vented. When a fire occurs on a cooking range, the flames will usually rise through the vent and spread the fire to the roof of the building or elsewhere. When such vented hoods also have an exhaust fan, the exhaust fan accelerates the spreading of the fire. Even beyond this, in many areas, such vents are not even extended through the roof of the building but terminate in an attic area.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises a fire extinguishing apparatus having an outer container with a suitable fire extinguishing agent disposed therein, a plurality of apertures oriented so as to blanket the area to be protected with fire extinguishing agent when pressure is applied thereto and cover means covering the apertures and adapted to fracture when pressure is applied to the fire extinguishing agent; a propellant container mounted within the first container and adapted to apply gas pressure to the fire extinguishing agent, and a closure means in said propellant container adapted to be actuated by flame from a pyrotechnic cord to thereby release gas under pressure into the outer container; and a pyrotechnic cord operatively connected to the closure means and leading from said closure means and said extinguisher across and above the area to be protected.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a simple and economical fire extinguishing apparatus. A further object of the present invention is to provide a fire extinguishing apparatus in conjunction with a cooking range hood or the like. A still further object of the present invention is to provide an automatic fire extinguishing apparatus which will not be actuated by heat but, instead, by flame. These, and other objects and advantages, will be apparent from the following detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 shows in outline form a cooking range and a hood mounted above the cooking range having the fire extinguishing apparatus mounted therein;

FIG. 2 shows a bottom view of the hood of FIG. 1 with the burners of the range in outline form superimposed thereon;

FIG. 3 shows the apparatus of the present invention mounted in an automobile hood;

FIG. 4 shows a self-contained extinguisher apparatus in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 5 shows the extinguisher of the present invention in use as a Christmas tree ornament;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged view of the Christmas tree ornament of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a bottom view of the base of the ornament of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a detailed view, partially in section, of the propellant container and the fire extinguishing container of present invention;

FIG. 9 shows a bracket for suitably mounting the extinguisher of the present invention;

FIG. 10 shows a propellant chamber and means for actuating the propellant container;

FIG. 11 shows another form of propellant container and means for actuating the same;

FIG. 12 shows still another form of propellant container and means for actuating the same;

FIG. 13 shows a further embodiment of a propellant container and means for actuating the same;

FIGS. 14, 15 and 16 show still other modifications of the extinguisher of this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 of the drawings shows the conventional cook ing range having burners 12 on its upper surface. Mounted above range 10 is range hood l4. Mounted within hood 14 is a filter unit 16 usually provided with a fan and connected to an appropriate vent to the outside such as vent pipe 18. Detachably coupled to filter 16, for example, by means of the bracket of FIG. 9, are extinguisher units 20. While the system being described shows 2 extinguisher units 20 mounted on either side of filter 16, obviously, a single extinguishing unit may be utilized and the units or unit may be mounted at any convenient place in the hood, for example, in the front or back of the hood and either attached to the hood it self or to the filter unit or a frame of the hood or filter unit. The only requirement so far as the location and number of extinguishing units is concerned is that the apertures in the unit be oriented and angled such that the fire extinguishing agent will blanket the area of the range to be protected when the extinguishing unit is actuated. This will be explained in further detail hereinafter. FIG. 2 of the drawings shows a bottom view of the hood M with the location of the range burners 12 superimposed thereon so that the arrangement of the cordeau detonant 22 is located with respect to the burners 12. It will be observed from FIG. 2 that the cordeau detonant is stretched across hood 14 immediately above the burners 12 of range 10. Thus, to the extent that a fire occurs in a frying pan or the like on one of the burners E2, the flame will contact cordeau detonants 22, ignite the detonant and actuate the extinguisher unit 20. The cordeau detonants 22 are, of course, Operatively coupled to extinguisher units 20.

The cordeau detonant should be selected on the basis of the Conditions to which it is selected. However, the primary requirement is that the cordeau detonant should not be spontaneously ignited by heat alone but will be ignited when a flame strikes it and will burn rapidly. The cordeau detonant may take the form of an organic filament such as cotton, rayon, silk, etc. or a synthetic filament such as nylon (linear polyamide), orlon (linear polyester), dacron (linear polyacrylonitrile), etc. Under certain circumstances, however, such organic filaments may not burn rapidly enough to satisfy the requirements of use. Accordingly, the cordeau detonant may be a conventional blasting fuse, such as, cordite. Preferably, however, the blasting or explosive fuse is a wire type fuse, such as, magnesium ribbon, PYRO FUSE", manufactured by PYROFUSE Company of Mount Vernon, New York and which is a braided wire type fuse. Wire type fuses are preferred for their greater strength and rigidity so that may be tightly stretched across the area to be protected and may readily wound about one another and about hooks or brackets in an installation such as a range hood.

FIG. 3 of the drawings shows the extinguisher apparatus of the present invention mounted on the bottom of a hood 24 of an automobile. Extinguisher units 26 are detachably mounted on the bottom of the hood 24. The apertures on the bottom are oriented such that the two extinguishers 26 will blanket the entire engine compartment of the automobile and they are also shown as mounted on either side of the engine as a matter of space convenience. Coupled to the automobile hood and stretched across the hood are cordeau detonants 28. Cordeau detonants 28 are, of course, operatively connected to extinguisher units 26. Obviously, cordeau detonants 28 should be detachably mounted so that they can be replaced when necessary. It is also obvious that the cordeau detonants may take any suitable configuration, such as that shown in FIG. 3, or a criss-cross mesh-type pattern.

FIG. 4 of the drawings shows a self-contained extinguishing apparatus in accordance with the present invention which may be conveniently mounted above a furnace, or above a motor or compressor of an airconditioning system or other location where spontaneous fires generally originate. The apparatus of FIG. 4 comprises a box type frame structure 30 having a top 32 and sides 34. Mounted against top 32 is extinguisher unit 36. Operatively coupled to extinguisher unit 36 and stretched across the frame 30 is cordeau detonant 38. As previously indicated, the cordeau detonant may be stretched across the area to be protected in any desired configuration which will accomplish the desired result. Similarly, extinguishing unit 36 may have any particular configuration so far as its body it concerned and any particular configuration of apertures, the primary requisite being that when extinguishing agent is forced under pressure out of the apertures, the entire area to be protected will be blanketed by the extinguishing agent.

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 show the extinguishing apparatus of the present invention for use in extinguishing a fire in a Christmas tree 40. In this particular installation, the extinguishing unit 42 may be a tree ornament, such as, an angel at the top of the tree or the like. The cordeau detonant of the apparatus can then take the form of decorative tinsel 44 which is draped about the Christrnass tree as shown in FIG. 5. As shown in FIGS. ti and 7, the bottom of the ornament is preferably a bellshaped bottom 46 with an arrangement of apertures such that the entire tree will be blanketed by the expelled extinguishing agent.

FIG. 8 of the drawings shows in greater detail a typical extinguishing unit 48 in accordance with the present invention. Extinguishing unit 48 includes an outer container 50 provided with appropriately located and angled apertures 52. The primary requisite of outer container 50 is that it be constructed to contain an appropriate fire extinguishing agent 54. As previously indicated, the shape or configuration of outer container 50 may be selected for availability of space, location, the area to be protected and other factors. The configuration will be related in some manner to the adaptability of the configuration to have properly oriented and spaced apertures 52. As previously indicated, the primary consideration and the shape of the container 50 and the location and number of the apertures 52 is that the entire area to be protected by the extinguisher be blanketed when the fire extinguishing agent 54 is forced out apertures 52 under pressure. It should, however, be clearly noted at this point that before actuation of the extinguisher, extinguishing material 54 is not under pressure. Therefore, container 50 may be made of an economical light material, the only criterion being that it be capable of containing without leakage, etc. the fire extinguishing agent 54. Accordingly, since fire extinguishing material 54 is not under pressure until actuated, apertures 54 may be closed by frangible discs 5s. Frangible discs 56 are selected such that they will rupture, thereby opening apertures 52 when pressure is placed on fire extinguishing 54. Accordingly, frangible discs 56 may be made of a very thin foil soldered or otherwise attached over apertures 52 and they need only have sufficient strength to retain fire extinguishing agent 54 in container 50 until pressure is applied to the fire extinguishing material. Obviously, frangible discs 56 will fracture or burst at a pressure substantially lower than the pressure which can be maintained by container 50.

Fire extinguishing agent 54 may take a variety of forms. However, in the preferred embodiments, fire extinguishing agent 54 is a suitable solid material in powder or dust form. For example, a desirable agent is sodium bicarbonate mixed with a suitable desiccant adapted to increase flowability and moisture resistivity. An agent often used as a desiccant along with sodium bicarbonate is magnesium stearate. Other suitable solid extinguishing agents include potassium bicarbonate, useful for Class B fires, and mono and di ammonium phosphate, useful for Class A, B, and C fires. Other suitable desiccants include, silica gel, diatomaceous earth, calcium chloride, etc.

While, in most instances, particularly for Class B fires, a dry powder form of extinguishing agent is preferred, it is also possible to utilize liquid type extinguishing agents. A prime example is carbon tetrachloride which is easily volatilized and forms a heavy, noncombustible vapor which displaces air and smothers the fire. Carbon tetrachloride is effective in Class A, B and C fires. Other suitable liquid extinguishing agents include, a calcium chloride solution, perchloroethylene, bromochloromethane, methyl bromide, etc.

Returning to FIG. 8, mounted within fire extinguishing agent container 50 is propellant container 58. Propellant container 58 may be charged with any suitable gas generating agent, such as, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, dichlorotetrafluoroethane, etc. The developed pressure will, of course, depend upon the amount of extinguishing material 54 and the size of the extinguishing unit. However, generally about 25 to 350 psi pressure will be adequate. Propellant within propellant container 58 can also include a solid material which will burn rapidly to generate gas pressure. Such materials include, phosphorus sesquisulfide, red phosphorus, magnesium filings mixed with powdered potassium chlorate, potassium nitrate mixed with carbon and sulfur or other pyrotechnic solids. Propellant container 58 is sealed in accordance with FIG. 8 with a quantity of the cordeau detonant forming a plug 60. The cordeau detonant which is stretched across the area to be protected is attached to the plug 60, as shown by cordeau detonant element 62. Cordeau detonant 62 then leads through container 50 to the outside and is connected to the cordeau detonant stretched across the area to be protected.

In the operation of the apparatus of FIG. 8, the cordeau detonant stretched across the area to be protected is ignited by the flame of the fire. The cordeau detonant then burns out the cordeau detonant plug 64) releasing the pressurized gas or igniting the gas generating solid. The gas then applies pressure to the fire extinguishing agent 54 in container 50, and this pressure ruptures frangible discs 56 and the extinguishing agent 54 is then sprayed through apertures 52 to blanket the protected area.

It is also possible in a structure such as shown in FIG. 8 to place two materials in containers 50 and 53 which when mixed will generate gas pressure and also expel the material in container 50. For example, a strong acid, such as sulfuric acid, may be placed in container 58 and a carbonate, such as sodium carbonate, may be placed in container 50.

FIG. 9 of the drawings illustrates a simple bracket by which the extinguishing unit may be removably attached to, for example, the filter of the range hood of FIGS. 1 and 2. This bracket comprises a base bracket 64 which would be fixedly attached to the range hood. Base bracket 64 has turned over edges 66 which form appropriate slots. Attached to fire extinguishing unit is mating bracket 68. Mating bracket 68 may be suitably attached to the fire extinguishing unit by means of welding 70 or other appropriate means. The center section of bracket portion 68 consists of a raised portion 72. Slide portions 74 are then formed to slide within the channels of turned over portions 66 of base bracket 64. When utilizing a removable attachment such as that of FIG. 9, the extinguishing unit may be readily removed for recharging or replacement.

Various means, other than that previously described in connection with FIG. 8, may be utilized for opening the propellant container to release the propellant material. For example, in FIG. 10, the propellant cartridge 76 is attached to the outer container of the extinguisher unit 78. Propellant container 76 is sealed with a thin, frangible disc 80. Welded or otherwise attached to propellant container 78 and extending over the neck of the propellant chamber is a cylindrical or tube type support structure 82. Support structure 82 has formed therein, apertures 84 through which the propellant may escape into chamber 78. Mounted within support structure 82 is a piercing spear 86 with a sharp point adapted to puncture the disc 80. The puncturing spear 86 is spring-loaded by means of a spring 88 which rests against shoulder 90 of spear 86 and retaining ring 92 of support chamber 82. Spear 86 is held with spring 88 in tension by means of cordeau detonant 94 which passes through outer container '78, support tube 82, thence through spear 86 and is then fixedly attached to the center of support tube 82. When the cordeau detonant 94 burns, the spear is released, and the spring forces the spear to puncture disc 80.

FIG. llll shows still another means of releasing propellant from the propellant container. In this instance, propellant container 96 is sealed with a small, explosive charge 98. When cordeau detonant 100 burns, it sets off the explosive cap $8, thereby opening container 96.

Still another method of releasing propellant from the propellant container is shown in FIG. 12. In accordance with FIG. 12, the propellant container 102 is provided with appropriate holes 1 on the side of its neck. In sealing engagement over the neck of container m2 and over the holes 104 is a suitable cordeau detonant or readily flammable material 1%. In this instance, when the cordeau detonant E08 burns, it will also burn off the covering lilbpnd propellant will be released through apertures Hi2.

FIG. 1 .3 shows still another configuration of propellant chamber and means for releasing propellant from the propellant chamber. In accordance with FIG. 13, propellant chamber is mounted inside fire extinguishing agent container 112. Propellant chamber l W is provided with appropriate apertures 114 covered by frangible discs 1116. Propellant chamber 110 is separated into two sections, 1 18 and 120, by means of a thin membrane 122. Two chemical materials which will react rapidly and generate gas pressure are disposed in sections 1.18 and of the propellant chamber 110,

for example, sulfuric acid and sodium carbonate. Mounted above membrane 122 is a puncturing spear 124. Puncturing spear 12$ extends through the top of propellant chamber 111) and into housing 126 mounted on top of the outer container 112. A spring 128, under compression between shoulder 1311 of spear 124 and the wall of propellant chamber 1 lliLis held in tension by means of a latch system mounted in the housing 126. Spear 124 is held in its upper position by means of protrusion 132 forming a part of spear 124 and latch 1341. Latch 134 is pivotally mounted on post 136 by means of pivot 138. Latch 134 is held in its horizontal position, thus holding spear 124 in its uppermost position by means of a cordeau detonant link or flammable link 140. Connected to link 1411 is cordeau detonant 1&2 which then extends, and is connected to, the cordeau detonant stretched across the area to be protected. In operation, the cordeau detonant 142 burns burning link 140. Latch 134 then pivots, releasing spear 124 and the spring 128 drives spear 124 through membrane 122. This, then, mixes the two chemicals in sections 118 and 120 of propellant chamber 110, generating gas pressure which ruptures frangible discs 116, releasing the gas into outer chamber 112 to propel the tire extinguishing agent from container 112.

FIG. 14 shows still another variation of an extinguisher in accordance with the present invention. In accordance with FIG. 14, the extinguisher comprises an outer container 144 filled with an appropriate fire extinguishing agent, such as powder 146. Mounted within container 144 is free-floating piston 148. Piston 148 may be provided with an appropriate guide sleeve 150 or similar spaced guide legs adapted to guide piston 148 along container 144. In accordance with FIG. 1%, the propellant means includes pressurized container 152 filled with an appropriate pressurized gas or the like. Piston 148 and pressurized cylinder 152 make up the entire propellant means in this embodiment. Pressure cylinder 152 is closed with a cordeau detonant plug d. Cordeau detonant plug 154 is operatively connected to cordeau detonant 156 which is stretched across the area to be protected. Formed as a part of container 144 or attached thereto and in open communication therewith is distributing means 158. Distributing means 158 may, as shown, take the form of the distributing head as shown having appropriate apertures 160 therein. Apertures 160 of distributing means 158 are normally closed by a pressure-fit cap 162. Obviously, frangible discs, such as those previously described, can be utilized to close apertures 160 if de sired. In operation, cordeau detonant 156 is ignited when a fire in the area protected touches the cordeau detonant. Cordeau detonant 156, in turn, burns the cordeau detonant plug 15d releasing the pressurized gas from cylinder 152. The released gas forces piston 148 to the left developing pressure on the fire extinguishing agent 146. The pressure on the fire extinguishing agent 146 forces cap 162 off distributor means 158 and also forces fire extinguishing agent 1146 through apertures 160 of distributing head 158.

FIG. 15 shows still another modification similar to that of FIG. 14. Specifically, outer container 164 contains fire extinguishing agent 166. Mounted within outer container 164 is piston 168. Piston 168 is mounted on cylindrical rod 170 which is attached to outer container 16d at either end. Rod 1'71) acts as a guide for piston 168 and, for this purpose, piston 168 may carry guide sleeve 172. However, it should be noted here that piston 168 may contain a guide sleeve such as that shown in FIG. 14 or guide legs as previously mentioned. In addition to piston 168, the propel lant means includes spring 178 which is held under tension behind piston 168. Under normal conditions, piston 168 is held in the position shown in the Figure by means of cordeau detonant pin 18!]. Cordeau detonant pin 180 is operatively attached to cordeau detonant 182 which leads outside container 164 and is stretched across the area to be protected. Formed as a part of container 164 or attached thereto is distributing means 1811. Distributing means 180 has formed therein appropriate apertures 182. Mounted within container 16$,and closing the inlet to distributor means 180 is frangible disc 184. In operation, cordeau detonant 182 is ignited and burns out cordeau detonant plug 181 The tension on spring 173 is then released forcing piston 168 to the left as shown in the drawing. Piston 168 applies sufficient pressure to fire extinguishing agent 166 to rupture frangible disc 184 and disperse fire extinguishing agent 16o through the apertures 182 of distributing head 180.

FIG. 16 shows still another embodiment similar to that of FIG. 15. In accordance with FIG. 16, an outer container 188 is filled with an appropriate fire extinguishing agent 1%. Mounted within outer container 190 is piston 192 provided with guide legs 194. Piston 192 is mounted on cylindrical guide rod 196 which, in turn, is fixedly attached at either end of container 188. In addition to piston 192, the propellant means includes spring 198, which is under tension, and spring 2110, which is under compression. Spring 198 is attached to container 18% at one end and the piston 192 at the opposite end. Obviously, spring 198 may be used alone or in combination with spring 2011. Piston 192 is held in place by cordeau detonant pin 202. Cordeau detonant pin 2112 is operatively attached to cordeau detonant 204 which leads to the outside of container 188 and is stretched across the area to be protected. Container 18% is provided with aperture 2114 which is covered by frangible disc 206. Depending downwardly from container 188, in cooperative relationship with aperture 20 1, is distributing disc 208 which is freely rotatable on post 2111. Distributing disc 2118 is provided with appropriate fins 212. In operation, the cordeau detonant 2114 burns plug 2112 thereby releasing piston W2. Springs 198 and 2011 force piston 192 to the left as shown in the Figure and piston 192 applies pressure to fire extinguishing agent 1911. The pressure applied to fire extinguishing agent 190 ruptures frangible disc 206 and forces fire extinguishing agent 1% out aperture 204 under pressure. The pressure of fire extinguishing agent 1911 on distributing disc 2118 causes disc Zfifi to rotate as a result of the fire extinguishing agent working against fins 212 of the distributing disc. As disc 208 rotates, the fire extinguishing agent is distributed over the area to be protected.

Various other modifications of the present invention would include; pressureresponsive valves or nozzles mounted in the apertures and adapted to open when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on the fire extinguishing agent in the outer container is reached and to spray the fire extinguishing agent through said apertures, or the diaphram of FIG. 13 can be a cordeau detonant which is connected to the cordeau detonant stretched across the area to be protected.

While various embodiments and variations of the present invention have been illustrated previously, it is to be understood that the present invention is not to be limited to these specific embodiments and variations but is to be limited only in accordance with the following claims.

I claim:

1. An automatic fire extinguishing apparatus, comprising; an outer container adapted to be mounted above the area to be protected and to hold a solid, powder-form fire extinguishing agent at essentially ambient pressure and having aperture means therein adapted to distribute extinguishing agent over said area to be protected; closure means normally sealing said aperture means, retaining said extinguishing agent in said outer container and adapted to open when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on said fire extinguishing agent is reached; propellant means within said outer container adapted to generate a gas pressure on said fire extinguishing agent sufficient to open said closure means and force said fire extinguishing agent through said aperture when actuated; actuating means within said outer container, operatively associated with said propellant means and adapted to energize said propellant means and cause said propellant means to generate gas pressure on said fire extinguishing agent; and a flame-responsive cordeau detonant means resistant to spontaneous ignition at temperatures normally encountered in said area to be protected, operatively connected to said actuating means to actuate said actuating means, and stretched across and above said area to be protected.

2. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 which additionally includes a vented hood mounted above the area to be protected and in which the outer container is mounted in said hood and the cordeau detonant is stretched across said hood.

3. Apparatus in accordance with claim 2 wherein the vented hood is mounted above a cooking range.

4. Apparatus in accordance with claim 3 wherein the vented hood is mounted above a laboratory bench.

5. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the apparatus is detachably mounted above the area to be protected.

6. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the closure means is a frangible disc adapted to rupture when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on the fire extinguishing agent is reached.

7. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the closure means is a pressure responsive valve adapted to open when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on the fire extinguishing agent is reached.

8. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the propellant means includes a container adapted to hold a pressurized gas.

9. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the propellant means includes a container adapted to hold a gas generating agent.

10. Apparatus in accordance with claim 9 wherein the gas generating agent is a liquid.

11. Apparatus in accordance with claim 9 wherein the gas generating agent is a solid.

12. Apparatus in accordance with claim 9 wherein the propellant container is divided into two sections,

the two sections contain two different chemical agents which react with one another to generate a gas when mixed and in which the divider between the two sections is ruptured by the actuating means.

13. Apparatus in accordance with claim 9 wherein the propellant container is adapted to hold a chemical agent adapted to react with the fire extinguishing agent in the outer container to generate gas.

14. Apparatus in accordance with claim I wherein the propellant means is a section of the outer container separated from the fire extinguishing agent by a divider which can be ruptured by the actuating means.

15. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the propellant means includes a container adapted to hold a propellant and the actuating means is a mechanical puncturing means adapted to puncture said container.

16. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the actuating means is a flammable cordeau detonant closing an opening in a container adapted to hold the propellant.

17. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the actuating means is an explosive charge closing an opening in a container adapted to hold the propellant.

18. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the propellant means includes a propellant two-section container adapted to hold two separate chemical agents which react to generate a gas, the actuating means is adapted to rupture a divider between said two sections and said container includes a pressure responsive means adapted to release said gas into the fire extinguishing agent when a pressure is built up within said propellent container.

19. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the outer container is mounted on the underside of an automobile hood and the cordeau detonant is stretched across the underside of said hood.

20. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 which additionally includes a frame means adapted to be mounted above the area to be protected, the outer container is mounted on said frame, and the cordeau detonant is stretched across said frame.

21. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the outer container is in the form of a Christmas tree ornament adapted to be mounted at the top of said tree.

22. Apparatus in accordance with claim 21 wherein the cordeau detonant is an ornamental tinsel-type structure adapted to be draped about the tree.

23. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the closure means is a pressure-fit cap adapted to be forced off the closure means when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on the fire extinguishing agent is reached.

24. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein the actuating means is a portion of a cordeau detonant.

25. An automatic fire extinguishing apparatus, comprising; an outer container adapted to be mounted above the area to be protected and to hold a solid, powder-form fire extinguishing agent at essentially ambient pressure and having aperture means therein adapted to distribute extinguishing agent over said area to be protected; closure means normally sealing said aperture, retaining said extinguishing agent in said outer container and adapted to open when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on said fire extinguishing agent is reached; propellant means within said outer container including a piston slidably mounted in said outer container and adapted to displace said fire extinguishing agent from said outer container when pressure is applied to said piston and pressure means adapted to generate a gas pressure on said piston sufficient to open said closure means and force said fire extinguishing agent through said aperture means when actuated; actuating means within said outer container, operatively associated with said pressure means and adapted to cause said pressure means to generate gas pressure on said piston; and flame-responsive cordeau detonant means resistant to spontaneous ignition at temperatures normally encountered in said area to be protected, operatively connected to said actuating means to actuate said actuating means and stretched across and above said area to be protected.

26. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the pressure means is a spring held under compression behind the piston.

27. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the pressure means includes a spring under tension attached to the piston means at the front end thereof.

28. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the pressure means includes a spring under compression behind the piston means and a spring under tension attached to the piston means at its forward end.

29. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 which additionally includes a vented hood mounted above the area to be protected and in which the outer container is mounted in said hood and the cordeau detonant is stretched across said hood.

30. Apparatus in accordance with claim 29 wherein the vented hood is mounted above a cooking range.

31. Apparatus in accordance with claim 29 wherein the vented hood is mounted above a laboratory bench.

32. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the apparatus is detachably mounted above the area to be protected.

33. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the closure means is a frangible disc adapted to rupture when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on the fire extinguishing agent is reached.

34. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 and wherein the closure means is a pressure responsive valve adapted to open when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on the tire extinguishing agent is reached.

35. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the pressure means is a container adapted to hold a pressurized gas.

36. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the pressure means is a container adapted to hold a gas generating agent.

37. Apparatus in accordance with claim 36 wherein the gas generating agent is a liquid.

38. Apparatus in accordance with claim 36 wherein the gas generating agent is a solid.

39. Apparatus in accordance with claim 36 wherein the propellant container is divided into two sections, the two sections contain two different chemical agents which react with one another to generate a gas when mixed and in which the divider between the two sections is ruptured by the actuating means.

4!). Apparatus in accordance with claim 36 wherein the propellant container is adapted to hold a chemical agent adap-ted to react with the tire extinguishing agent in the outer container to generate gas.

41. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the pressure means is a container adapted to hold a propellant and the actuating means is a mechanical puncturing means adapted to puncture said container.

42. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the actuating means is a portion of a flammable cordeau detonant.

43. Apparatus in accordance with claim 42 wherein the actuating means is a flammable cordeau detonant closing an opening in a container adapted to hold the pressure means.

44. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the actuating means is an explosive charge closing an opening in a container adapted to hold the pressure means.

45. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the pressure means includes a two-section, propellant container adapted to hold two separate chemical agents which react to generate a gas, the actuating means is adapted to rupture a divider between said two sections and said propellant container includes pressure responsive means adapted to release said gas against the piston when a pressure is built up within said propellant container.

46. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the outer container is mounted on the underside of an automobile hood and the cordeau detonant is stretched across the underside of said hood.

47. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 which additionally includes a frame means adapted to be mounted above the area to be protected, the outer container is mounted on said frame, and the cordeau detonant is stretched across said frame.

d8. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the outer container is in the form of a Christmas tree ornament adapted to be mounted at the top of said tree.

49. Apparatus in accordance with claim 4% wherein the cordeau detonant is an ornamental tinsel-type structure adapted to be draped about the tree.

50. Apparatus in accordance with claim 25 wherein the closure means is a pressure-fit cap adapted to be forced off the closure means when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on the fire extinguishing agent is reached.

511. An automatic tire extinguishing apparatus, comprising; an outer container adapted to be mounted above the area to be protected and to hold a solid, pow der-form fire extinguishing agent at essentially ambient pressure and having aperture means therein adapted to distribute extinguishing agent over said area to be protected; frangible, disc-type closure means normally retaining said extinguishing agent in said outer container, separating said extinguishing agent from said aperture and adapted to rupture when a predetermined pressure above the pressure normally on said fire extinguishing agent is reached; propellant means within said outer container adapted to generate a gas pressure on said fire extinguishing agent sufficient to rupture said closure means and force said fire extinguishing agent through said aperture when actuated; actuating means within said outer container, operatively associated with said propellant means and adapted to energize said propellant means and cause said propellant means to generate gas pressure on said fire extinguishing agent; and a flame-responsive cordeau detonant means resistant to spontaneous ignition at temperatures normally encountered in said area to be protected, operatively connected to said actuating means to actuate said actuating means, and stretched across and above said area to be protected.

=1 t a Q "4

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Classifications
U.S. Classification169/26, 169/65, 169/56, 169/33
International ClassificationA62C3/04, A62C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C3/04, A62C3/006, A62C3/008
European ClassificationA62C3/00C, A62C3/00E, A62C3/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 22, 1990AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: DUNN, BYRON G.
Effective date: 19880407
Owner name: FIRE FOX CORPORATION, 1963 KEARNEY STREET, PORTLAN
Feb 22, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRE FOX CORPORATION, A CO. OF DE, OREGON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:DUNN, BYRON G.;REEL/FRAME:005270/0550
Effective date: 19880407
Feb 16, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRE FOX CORPORATION, OREGON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:DUNN, BYRON G.;REEL/FRAME:005243/0612
Effective date: 19900207
Feb 16, 1990AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: DUNN, BYRON G.
Effective date: 19900207
Owner name: FIRE FOX CORPORATION, 1963 KEARNEY STREET, PORTLAN
Aug 24, 1988AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: DUNN, BYRON G.
Owner name: FIREFOX CORPORATION, 220 W. GRUNDEY, TULLAHOMA, TN
Effective date: 19880527
Aug 24, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: DUNN, BYRON G.
Free format text: LICENSE;ASSIGNORS:ALLEN, TRACY H.;GLOVER, JOHN A.;REEL/FRAME:005004/0307
Effective date: 19880420
Owner name: FIREFOX CORPORATION, A DE CORP., TENNESSEE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:DUNN, BYRON G.;REEL/FRAME:005004/0298
Effective date: 19880527
Aug 24, 1988AS04License
Owner name: ALLEN, TRACY H.
Owner name: DUNN, BYRON G.
Owner name: GLOVER, JOHN A.
Effective date: 19880420