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Publication numberUS3773219 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1973
Filing dateJan 20, 1971
Priority dateJan 21, 1970
Publication numberUS 3773219 A, US 3773219A, US-A-3773219, US3773219 A, US3773219A
InventorsY Irie, I Ohyama, S Yamawaki
Original AssigneeTokio Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fuel supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism
US 3773219 A
Abstract
A fuel supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism which comprises a preset operation part provided at a readily reached position on a fuel supply nozzle or on a hose adjacent to the nozzle and a main preset mechanism provided at a position remote from the preset operation part and effecting presetting by signals transmitted from the preset operation part. The preset operation part and the main preset mechanism are connected by relatively few signal transmitting wires. The preset mechanism emits a valve closing signal when a preset numerical value and a numerical value obtained from signals transmitted by the signal emitting part of the flowmeter, corresponding to the quantity of fuel which has been supplied, coincide with each other. The fuel supplying apparatus stops its supply of fuel in response to the valve closing signal.
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United States Patent [1 1 Irie et a1.

[ NOV. 20, 1973 [75] Inventors: Yoshihiko lrie, Kawasaki; Shunro Yamawaki, Tokyo; lsao Ohyama, Yokohama, all of Japan [73] Assignee: Tokico Ltd., Kanagawa-ken, Japan [22] Filed: Jan. 20, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 107,880

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Jan. 21, 1970 Japan 45/5507 Dec. 29, 1070 Japan..... 45/127083 Dec. 29, 1970 Japan 45/127084 [52] US. Cl 222/2, 222/14, 222/20, 222/76 [51] Int. Cl. G07f 7/02 [58] Field of Search 222/14, 16, 20, 76, 222/2 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,199,727 8/1965 Romanowski 222/20 3,497,106 2/ 1970 Clarke 222/20 3,603,480 7/1971 Irie et a1. 222/30 X 3,601,284 8/1971 Shunro.. 222/2 3,312,812 4/1967 Schmitt 222/14 X 3,402,851 7/1968 Ciotti et a1 222/16 2,598,283 8/1971 Krutz et a1 222/14 3,484,020 12/1969 Houle et a1. 222/2 3,448,843 6/1969 Mesh 222/2 X 3,312,372 4/1967 Cooper, Jr 222/2 Primary ExaminerRobert B. Reeves Assistant ExaminerDavid A. Scherbel Attorney-Waters, Roditi, Schwartz & Nissen [57] ABSTRACT A fuel supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism which comprises a preset operation part provided at a readily reached position on a fuel supply nozzle or on a hose adjacent to the nozzle and a main preset mechanism provided at a position remote from the preset operation part and effecting presetting by signals transmitted from the preset operation part. The preset operation part and the main preset mechanism are connected by relatively few signal transmitting wires. The preset mechanism emits a valve closing signal when a preset numerical value and a numerical value obtained from signals transmitted by the signal emitting part of the flowmeter, corresponding to the quantity of fuel which has been supplied, coincide with each other. The fuel supplying apparatus stops its supply of fuel in response to the valve closing signal.

3 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTEDnuvzo ms 3.773.219 sum lUF 7 n m m QBEN SW mmhkktm FUEL SUPPLYING APPARATUS WITH A REMOTE CONTROL PRESET MECHANISM This invention relates to a fuel supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism and more particularly to a fuel supplying system in which a remote control preset mechanism has a preset operation part provided at a position, whereat the part is easily accessible and operable by an operator, on a fuel supply nozzle or a hose adjacent to the nozzle.

Known in the prior art is a conventional fuel supplying apparatus provided with a so-called preset mechanism by which a desired quantity of fuel to be supplied is preset prior to the start of a fuel supplying operation and the operation is stopped when the quantity of fuel which has actually been supplied has reached the preset quantity. In this kind of conventional fuel supplying apparatus, the preset operation part is provided integrally with or adjacent to a flowmeter and is spaced from the place where fuel is actually supplied. Consequently, the fuel supplying operator must proceed to the place where the preset operation part is located, whenever he needs to make preset operation. This is inconvenient to the operator and decreases efficiency in the fuel supplying operation.

In order to diminish the disadvantages inherent in the conventional apparatus, it is possible to extend the electrical wires connecting between the preset operation part and the main preset mechanism thereby disposing only the preset operation part near the place where the fuel supplying operation is performed. However, the preset operation part of the conventional apparatus is fairly large in size. Moreover, if the preset operation part is disposed at the place where the fuel supplying operation is performed, it will obstruct rather than help the fuel supplying operation and will also obstruct the passage of vehicles.

Furthermore, if the conventional preset operation part is provided separately from the main preset mechanism without any modification, a large number of electric wires are required for connecting the preset operation part with the main preset mechanism. It is to be noted in this connection that in case the liquid to be supplied is of an explosive or inflammable nature such as gasoline, the preset operation part must be of an explosion-proof construction. If the preset operation part is to be made compact, it is difficult to adopt a pressure type explosion-proof construction. The electrical current flowing between the preset operation part and the main preset mechanism must be interrupted and the whole preset mechanism must be made as an intrinsically safe explosion-proof construction. In this intrinsically safe explosion-proof construction, a transmission of signals between a dangerous place and a nondangerous place is generally effected through relays. Accordingly, if there is a large number of wires for transmitting signals as described above, the number of the required relays is necessarily large. The more relays, the more expensive the apparatus will become and also the greater will be the possibility of troubles.

It is, therefore, a general object of the present invention to provide a novel and useful fuel supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism which can eliminate the disadvantages and solve the problem described hereinabove.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fuel supplying apparatus in which the remote control preset operation part is provided at a position which is convenient for operation such as on a fuel supply nozzle or on a hose adjacent to the nozzle. This greatly enhances efficiency in the preset operation and the fuel supplying operation.

A further object of the invention is to provide a fuel supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism in which the number of wires connecting the preset operation part with the main preset mechanism can be greatly reduced. The number of wires can be reduced by adopting a construction in which a preset signal is transmitted from the preset operation part to the main preset mechanism in the form of a train of pulse signals. By reducing, an number of wires the intrinsically safe explosion-proof construction can be attained easily at a relatively low cost. Further, since the wires extending through the hose are few in number, a hose of the same diameter as has heretofore been used can be employed without substantially reducing the effective cross-sectional area of the liquid passage to an appreciable degree.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a fuel supplying apparatus with a novel remote control preset operation part which is compact and of a relatively simple construction and yet is capable of effecting a preset operation easily and accurately.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the description made hereinbelow with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic side elevational view of a fuel supplying apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a planview of a preset operation part;

FIG. 3 is a vertical cross-sectional side elevation taken along line III III of the preset operation part shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4A and FIG. 4B are respectively bottom and side elevational views of a transmission gear;

FIG. 5 is a block diagram showing one embodiment of a main preset mechanism which cooperates with the preset operation part shown in FIGS. 2 and 3;

FIG. 6 is a vertical cross-sectional side elevation of another form of a preset operation part;

FIG. 7 is a transverse cross-sectional plan view taken along line Vll-VII of the preset operation part shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a block diagram showing one form of main preset mechanism ,which cooperates with the preset operation part shown in FIGS. 6 and 7;

FIG. 9 is a block diagram showing another main preset mechanism which cooperates with the preset operation part shown in FIGS. 2 and 3; and

FIG. 10 is a block diagram showing another embodiment of the main preset mechanism which cooperates with the preset operation part shown in FIGS. 6 and 7.

First, one fuel supplying apparatus according to the invention will be described with reference to FIG. 1. A fuel reservoir 10 is provided underground. A fixed pipe 11 one end of which is inserted in the reservoir 10 and extends through a wall 12 and a ceiling 13 of a structure and connects at the other end with a hose reel 14 which is housed in a delivery unit 15 provided at the lower surface of the ceiling 13. A pump 16 is provided at a suitable place on the pipe 11 and is driven by a motor 17. A flowmeter 18 is also provided on the pipe 1 l for measuring the quantity of liquid flowing through the pipe 11. A flow quantity signal emitter 19 is mounted on the flowmeter 18 for emitting a digital signal in proportion to the flow quantity which has been measured by the flowmeter 18. A stop valve 20 provided on the pipe 11 is opened or closed by a solenoid 21 which is energized or deenergized by an action to be described later. The pump 16, motor 17, flowmeter 18, flow quantity signal emitter 19, stop valve 20 and solenoid 21 are housed in a pump unit 22. The unit 22 is provided within the wall 12 so that it will not obstruct the passage of vehicles or operators.

A fuel supplying hose 23 which is made of flexible material such as rubber is connected at one end directly or indirectly with the pipe 11 and is normally in a wound-up state on the hose reel 14. At the other end of the hose 23, there is provided a fuel supplying nozzle 24. For supplying fuel, the hose 23 is pulled down from the hose reel 14 and after completion of the fuel supplying operation the hose 23 is wound up around the hose reel 14 by a winding mechanism (not shown) provided in the delivery unit 15.

A preset operation part 25 which will be described later in greater detail is provided adjacent to the nozzle 24 on the hose 23 and at a position convenient for operation. The preset operation part 25 may be provided integrally with the nozzle 24. An indicator 26 is suspended from the ceiling 13 so that it can easily be seen from the place where the fuel supplying operation is performed. The indicator 26 has a preset quantity indicating part 26a and a flow quantity indicating part 26b. The preset operation part 25 is electrically connected to the indicator 26 by a wire 27 extending through the hose 23. The flow quantity signal emitter 19 is connected to the indicator 26 by a wire 28 and the indicator 26 is connected to the solenoid 21 by a wire 29.

Construction and operation of one embodiment of the preset operation part 25 will be illustrated with reference to FIGS. 2, 3, 4A and 4B. In FIGS. 2 and 3, a preset operation part body 40 consists of a liquid flow passage portion 41 and a case 42 for housing a signal emitting mechanism. The flow passage portion 41 is provided at both ends thereof with female screws 43a and 43b which will be in threaded engagement with joints provided on the hose 23. The operation part body 40 is mounted at a suitable place on the hose 23 or at the joint of the hose 23 and the nozzle 24. The case 42 accommodating the signal emitting mechanism having a dial'type presetting part is provided integrally on the flow passage portion 41. A cover 44 which covers the top of the case 42 is marked on its upper surface with digits l," 2," 9" and at positions corresponding to those of apertures 45 formed in a dial 46 for the insertion of a finger. The dial 46 is provided integrally with a center shaft 47 and a transmission gear 48. A spiral spring 49 has a center end fixed to the shaft 47 and an outer peripheral end fixed to the cover 44. The spring 49 is energized to turn the dial 46 in the counterclockwise direction. Stoppers 50 and 51 are respectively provided on the dial 46 and the cover 44. A projection 52 is provided on the lower surface of the gear 48 for closing a leaf spring type switch 53 when the projection 52 comes into abutting contact with the switch 53.

To a gear shaft 54, there are secured a transmission gear 55 which meshes with the gear 48 and a transmission gear 56. A signal emission disc 57 is provided which is freely rotatably about the shaft 54. On the signa] emission disc 57, there are provided two projections 58 on the same circumference. As shown in F 165. 4A and 48, a leaf spring 59 is fixed at its one end to the lower surface of the gear 56. When a free end 59a of the leaf spring 59 engages with the projection 58 of the signal emission disc 57 in the clockwise direction viewed from the dial surface, rotations of the gear 56 are transmitted to the signal emission disc 57. A coil spring 60 urges the signal emission disc 57 by means of a washer 61 toward the gear 56. When a gear 56 rotates in the counterclockwise direction, the free end 59a of the spring 59 passes over the projection 58 and does not engage with the projection 58. As a result, the signal emission disc 57 is at a standstill without rotating. On the lower surface of the signal emission disc 57, there is provided a projection 62. The projection 62 closes a leaf spring type switch 63 when the projection 62 comes into engaging contact with the switch 63.

To a shaft 64 there is secured a transmission gear 65 which meshes with the gear 56. A governor 66 is mounted on the lower end of the shaft 64. Two pairs of wires 68 and 69 which are respectively led from the switches 53 and 63 extend through a wire pipe 67. The wire pipe 67 extends through the flow passage portion 41 and thence through the hose 23 and connects to a later described main preset mechanism provided in the indicator 26. One end of the wire pipe 67 passes through a wall of the flow passage portion 41 through a suitable sealing means (not shown) and opens into the case 42. The wires 68 and 69 enter the wire pipe 67 from this opening. If one of each two wires 68 and 69 is used in common, the number of the wires extending through the wire pipe 67 can be reduced to three.

A manipulation and operation of the preset operation part having the above described construction will next be described. Let it now be assumed, by way of example, that the numerical value to be preset is 456. In this case, the dial 46 is manipulated in the same manner as a telephone dial. First the operator puts his finger in the aperture 45 which corresponds to the numeral 4 on the cover 44 and turns the dial 46 clockwise until the finger engages a finger stopper 70. This clockwise turning of the dial 46 causes the spiral spring 49 to store its energy. Turning of the dial 46 also causes the gear 48 to rotate to release the projection 52 from the contact with the switch 53 thereby opening the switch 53. As the switch 53 is opened, a shunt signal is emitted thereform and is transmitted through the wires 68.

Therotation of the transmission gear 48 is transmitted to the gear shaft 54 through the gear 55 causing the gear shaft 54 to rotate in the counterclockwise direction viewed from the dial 46. The transmission gear 56 also rotates in the counterclockwise direction with the gear shaft 54. The free end 59a of the leaf spring 59 provided on the lower surface of the gear 56 passes over the projection 58 and does not engage therewith so that the signal emission disc 57 does not rotate and the switch 63 is kept closed.

When the operator lifts his finger off the turned dial, the dial 46 is turned counterclockwise by the force of the spiral spring 49 which has stored its energy until it returns to its original position where the stopper 50 comes into abutting contact with the stopper 51. By the counterclockwise turning of the dial 46, a rotational force of the dial 46 is transmitted to the gear 56 throughthe, gear 48 and the gear 55 to cause the gear 56 to rotateQAt this time, the shaft 64 also rotates due to receiving a rotational force through the gear 56 and the gear 65. The rotating speed of the shaft 64 is maintained constant by the governor 66. Accordingly, the rotating speed of the gear 56 is also maintained constant. As the gear 56 rotates in the clockwise direction, the free end 59a of the leaf spring 59 comes into abutting engagement with the projection 58 to cause the signal emission disc 57 to rotate integrally with the gear 56.

As the signal emission disc 57 rotates, the projection 58 is disengaged from the switch 63 to open the switch 63. At this time, one pulse signal is emitted from the switch 63 and is transmitted through the wires 69. The gear ratio between the gear 48 and the gear 55 is so selected that the turning of the dial 46 causes the gear shaft 54 to rotate at a suitably increased speed by the number equal to the preset numeral of the dial. Consequently, the signal emission disc 57 makes four rotations together with the gear 56 corresponding to the numeral 4 of the dial. This opens and closes the switch 63 four times thereby emitting four preset pulse signals. Since the rotating speed of the gear 56 is maintained constant by the governor 66 as described hereinabove, intervals of the pulses emitted from the switch 63 are always equal. When the dial 46 has returned to its original position, the projection 52 of the gear wheel 48 engages with the switch 53 whereby the switch 53 closes again.

Similarly, when the numerals 5 and 6 are dialed, shunt signals are emitted from the switch 53 and five and six preset pulse signals are respectively emitted from the switch 63, these signals respectively being transmitted to the main preset mechanism provided in the indicator 26.

Next, one form of the main preset mechanism which effects presetting operation by the shunt signals and the preset pulse signals thus emitted will be illustrated with reference to FIG. 5.

By the first shunt signal transmitted from the switch 53 through the wires 68, the movable contact of a switch 80 is switched from a contact q to a contact p. The preset pulse signals emitted from the switch 63 are transmitted through the wires 69 to a counter circuit 81 in which these pulse signals are counted in a counting part of the first figure. The result of counting in the counter circuit 81 is transmitted through the switch 80 to a register 82. in the register 82, the registered contents are shifted by the next shunt signal transmitted by the switch 53 and the number of pulse next transmitted from the counter circuit 81 is again registered. The above described operation is repeated and the numerical value 456" is preset in the register 82.

The preset value in the register 82 is supplied to the preset quantity indicating part 26a through an indicator driving circuit 83 and drives the indicating part 26a. The preset quantity is indicated on the indicating part 260. The preset value in the register 82 is also supplied to a comparing circuit 86.

When the above described preset operation is completed, the operator opens the valve of the nozzle 24 to supply fuel to a vehicle. Then, gasoline 30 pumped out of the reservoir 10 by the pump 16 passes through the pipe 11 and the hose 23 and is discharged from the nozzle 24 into the tank of the vehicle. As the gasoline 30 .flows through the pipe 11, the flowmeter 18 measures the flow quantity and the signal emitter 19 emits flow quantity pulse signals.

Due to a first flow quantity pulse signal emitted from the signal emitter 19, movable contacts of switches and 84 are switched from contacts p to contacts q. Flow quantity pulse signals emitted from the emitter 19 are supplied to the counter circuit 81 in which these pulse signals are counted in sequence. The result of counting in the counter circuit 81 is supplied to the flow quantity indicating part 26b through an indicator driving circuit 85 and drives the indicating part 26b. The quantity of fuel supplied is momently indicated on the indicating part 2612.

On the other hand, the result of counting in the counter circuit 81 is transmitted in sequence to the comparing circuit 86. In the comparing circuit 86, comparison of the aforementioned preset value and the counted value transmitted from the counter circuit 81 is continuously made during the fuel supplying operation and when both values coincide with each other an output is generated. The output generated in the comparing circuit 81 is amplified by an amplifier 87 and then supplied to the solenoid 21 of the stop valve 20. This output deenergizes the solenoid 21 thereby closing the stop valve 20. Thus, the supply of preset quantity of fuel is completed.

The intrinsically safe safety circuit is provided in the indicator 26 between the switches 53 and 63 of the preset operation part 25 and the main preset mechanism of the above described construction, though it is not shown. A conventional safety circuit which comprises relays and relay switches for transmitting signals may be used as the above mentioned safety circuit.

Construction and operation of another form of the preset operation part 25 will be illustrated with reference to FIGS. 6 and 7. In both these figures, a preset operation part body consists of a liquid flow passage portion 101 and a case 102 for housing a signal emission mechanism. The flow passage portion 101 is provided at both ends thereof with female screws 103a and 103b which will be in threaded engagement with joints provided on the hose 23. The operation part body 100 is mounted at a suitable place on the hose 23 or at the joint of the hose 23 and the nozzle 24.

A card guiding case 104 is made of a non-magnetic material and has an open end on one side of the case 102. A card feeder 105 is made of a non-magnetic material and is formed with a plurality of rectangular perforations 106a and 106b arranged in two columns. Pinions 107a and 107b respectively mesh with the two columns of rectangular perforations 106a and 106k. A drive shaft 108 on which the pinions 107a and 107b are fixedly mounted is journalled by supporting plates 109 and 110. A transmission gear 111 is also mounted integrally on the drive shaft 108.

A transmission gear 112 which meshes with the gear 111 is provided integrally on a drive shaft 113 journalled by supporting plates 1 l0 and 1 14. At one end of the drive shaft 113, there is mounted a governor 115. A spiral spring 116 is fixed at one end to the drive shaft 108 and at the other end to the supporting plate 110.

Reed switches 117a, 117b and 117s (generally referred to as 117) are provided on one side of the guiding case 104 and at positions near its opening. Permanent magnets 118 are provided on the other side of the card guiding case 104 and at positions near its opening opposite to the reed switches 1 17 across the card guiding case 104. There are three pairs of combination of the reed switches 117 and the permanent magnets 118.

The reed switches 117 are closed by magnetic force of the magnets 118 if there is no magnetic material between the reed switches 117 and the magnets 118. A microswitch 119 is closed when it is pushed by the card feeder 105 which has moved to the innermost part of the card guiding case 104. Each pair of wires 120a, 120k and 1200 (generally referred to as 120) lead from the reed switches 117a, 117b and 1170 and two wires 121 lead from the microswitch 119 and extend through a wire pipe 122. The wire pipe 122 extends through the flow passage portion 101 and the hose 23 and connects to the main preset mechanism provided in the indicator 26. One end of the wire pipe 122 passes through a wall of the flow passage portion 101 through a suitable sealing means (not shown) and opens into the case 102. The wires 120 and 121 enter into the wire pipe 122 from this opening. If one of each two wires 120a to 1200 and 121 is used in common, the number of the wires extending through the wire pipe 122 can be reduced to five.

A discrimination card 123 for presetting is made of a non-magnetic material such as plastic. The card 123 has hollow parts 125 formed therein. The hollow parts 125 are arranged in three columns each column consisting of nine hollow parts. Ferromagnetic material pieces 124 such as iron pieces are received in the hollow parts 125 according to the numerical value to be preset which is proper to the card 123. If, for example, the predetermined numerical value which the card 123 has is 123, one ferromagnetic material piece 124 in the left column, two in the middle column and three in the right column in FIG. 7 are respectively received in the hollow parts 125.

A manipulation and operation of the preset operation part having the above described construction will be described. The card 123 is inserted into the card guiding case 104 from the opening thereof and is pushed inwardly in the direction of an arrow A whereby the card feeder 105 is pushed by the fore end of the card 123. As the card feeder 105 moves in the direction of the arrow A, the pinions 107a and l07b which are meshed with the rectangular perforations 106a and l06b are rotated with the shaft 108 in the counterclockwise direction in FIG. 6. The counterclockwise rotation of the shaft 108 energizes the spiral spring 116. When the card 123 has completely been inserted into the card guiding case 104 and the card feeder 105 has moved to the right end in FIG. 6, the microswitch 119 is closed by the fore end of the card feeder 105. The microswitch 119 upon its closing emits a signal indicating that the card has completely been inserted. The signal is transmitted through the wire 121.

When the operator releases the card 123 which he has pushed by his hand, the pinions 107a and 10712 rotate in the clockwise direction due to the force of the spiral spring 116 which has stored its energy. Due to the rotation of the pinions 107a and 107b, the card feeder 105 moves in the direction reverse to the arrow A to discharge the card 123 from the card guiding case 104. Since the pinions 107a and 107b are connected to the governor 1 through the drive shaft 108, transmission gear 1 11, pinion 1 12 and drive shaft 1 13, the rotating speed of the pinions 107a and 107b is controlled by the governor 115 so that they rotate at a constant speed. Accordingly, the card 123 is removed and discharged at a constant speed.

The reed switches 117 are opened when the magnetic material pieces 124 exist between the reed switches 117 and the magnets 118 and interrupt the magnetic force of the magnets 118. At this time, preset pulse signals are emitted respectively from the reed switches 117a to 117C and transmitted through the wires 120a to 1200. Accordingly, as the card 123 is discharged, the reed switches 117a, 117b and 1170 respectively emit one, two and three pulse signals. Since the card 123 is discharged at a constant speed, a speed of pulse signal emission is maintained substantially constant.

One embodiment of the main preset mechanism which effects presetting operation by the card insertion completion signal and preset pulse signals emitted in the manner described hereinabove will be illustrated with reference to FIG. 8.

Switches a, 130i) and 130c (generally referred to as 130) are closed by the card insertion completion signal transmitted from the microswitch 119 through the wire 121. The pulse signals representing three figures of numerical value are transmitted from the reed switches 117a to 117s to a counter circuit 131 through wires 120a to 1200 and are counted by every figure in the counter circuit. The result of counting in three figures made in the counter circuit is transmitted to a memory circuit 132 through the switches 130. The preset numerical value is stored in the memory circuit 132. The preset numerical value is further transmitted from the memory circuit 132 to the preset quantity indicating part 26a through an indicator driving circuit 133 and drives the indicating part 26a. The preset quantity is indicated on the indicating part 26a. The preset numerical value stored in the memory circuit 132 is also supplied to a comparing circuit 134.

As previously described in the first embodiment, the operator opens the valve of the nozzle 24 to start the fuel supplying operation. As fuel is supplied, the flowmeter 18 measures the flow quantity of the supplied fuel and the signal emitter 19 emits pulse signals. The switches 130 are opened by a first pulse signal transmitted from the signal emitter 19. The flow quantity pulse signals from the signal emitter 19 are supplied to the counter circuit 131 and are counted in sequence. The result of counting in the counter circuit 131 is supplied on one hand to the flow quantity indicating part 26b through the indicator driving circuit 135 and drives the indicating part 26b. The quantity of fuel supplied is momentarily indicated on the indicating part 26b.

On the other hand, the result of counting in the counter circuit 131 is transmitted in sequence to the comparing circuit 134. In the comparing circuit 134, a comparison of the preset value and the counted value transmitted from the counter circuit 131 is always made during the fuel supplying operation and when both values coincide with each other an output is produced. The output produced in the comparing circuit 134 is amplified in an amplifier 136 and then is supplied to the solenoid 21 of the stop valve 21. This output deenergizes the solenoid 21 to close the stop valve 20. Thus, the supply of the preset quantity of fuel is completed.

In each foregoing embodiment, the comparing circuit 86 and 136 consist of a coincidence circuit comprising an AND gate which produces an output when both values coincide with each other. However, the invention is not limited to this but other arrangements may be adopted as the comparing circuit. For example, the circuit may be constructed in such manner that the preset value is sequentially subtracted by the flow quantity value transmitted from the counter circuit until the preset value becomes zero, at which time a signal is emitted.

In each of the above described embodiments, a desired quantity of fuel to be supplied is preset and a quantity of fuel actually supplied is indicated for comparison with the preset quantity. It is possible, however, to construct the device in such a manner that presetting, indication and comparison corresponding to the quantity of fuel supplied can be effected by using a monetary amount and according to a certain unit price instead of using the numerical value showing the quantity of fuel. One embodiment of such construction will now be described.

FIG. 9 shows another form of the main preset mechanism which cooperates with the preset operation part shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. In FIGS. 5 and 9, like reference numerals designate like component parts and explanation thereof will be omitted.

The operator turns the dial shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 according to the amount of money corresponding to the quantity of fuel to be supplied. In the same manner as described with reference to the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, a numerical value representing a desired amount of money is stored in the register 82 according to the turning of the dial 46 by the preset pulse signals transmitted from the switches 53 and 63. The result of counting is supplied from the register 82 to a preset amount indicating part 260 through the indicator driving circuit 83 and drives the indicating part 260. The preset amount of money is indicated on the indicating part 260.

As the fuel supplying operation is started, pulse signals corresponding to the flow quantity are transmitted from the signal emitter 19 to the counter circuit 81 and counted in this circuit. The movable contact of the switch 80 is switched from a contact p to a contact q by a first pulse transmitted from the signal emitter 19. The

result of counting in the counter circuit 81 is supplied to an operation circuit 140. The operation circuit 140 has a unit price setting part 141. A unit sales price is set according to a kind of fuel to be supplied and its customer by the unit price setting part 141. The operation circuit 140 converts by its operation the result of counting of the quantity of fuel supply transmitted from the counter circuit 81 into a monetary value according to the unit price set by the unit price setting part 141. As a result of operation in the operation circuit 140, the quantity of fuel supplied is momently indicated in monetary amount on an indicating part 26d.

The numerical value transmitted from the operation circuit 140 and the numerical value transmitted from the register 82 are compared in dimension of monetary value in the comparing circuit 86. When both values coincide with each other, a valve closing signal is emitted in the same manner as described with reference to the foregoing embodiments.

FIG. shows another embodiment of the main preset mechanism which cooperates with the preset operation part shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. In FIGS. 8 and 10, like reference numerals designate like component parts and explanation thereof will be omitted.

The operator inserts the card such as described with reference to FIG. 7 which is constructed to represent monetary value corresponding to the quantity of fuel to be supplied into the card guiding case 104. In the same manner as described with reference to FIGS. 6 and 7, preset pulse signals are emitted from the switches 119 and 117a to 1170 and are transmitted to the main preset mechanism shown in FIG. 10. Movable contacts of switches 151a to 151a (generally referred to as 151) are switched from contacts q to contacts p. Pulse signals in each figure corresponding to the amount of money transmitted from the switches 117a to 1170 are counted by each figure in the counter circuit 131. The result of counting in the counter circuit 131 is supplied to the memory circuit 132 through a switch 151 and stored there. The result of counting stored in the memory circuit 132 is indicated in monetary value on the preset amount indicating part 260.

As the fuel supplying operation is started, the movable contacts of the switches 151a to 1516 are switched from the contacts p to the contacts q by a first pulse signal transmitted from the signal emitter 19. Pulse signals transmitted from the signal emitter 19 corresponding to the flow quantity are counted in the counter circuit 131 and the result of counting is supplied to an operation circuit 150 through the switches 151. The operation circuit150 has a unit price setting part 152. A unit sales price is set according to a kind of fuel to be supplied and its customer by the unit price setting part 152. The operation circuit 150 converts by its operation the result of counting of the quantity of fuel supply transmitted from the counter circuit 131 into a monetary value according to the unit price set by the unit price setting part 152 As a result of operation in the operation circuit 140, the quantity of fuel supplied is momentarily indicated in monetary amount on the indicating part 26d.

The numerical value transmitted from the operation circuit 150 and the numerical value transmitted from the memory circuit 132 are compared in dimension of monetary value in a comparing circuit 134. When both value coincide with each other a valve closing signal is emitted in the same manner as described with reference to the foregoing embodiments.

In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, the unit price setting parts 141 and 152 provided in the operation circuits and may be replaced by a construction in which the unit price can be set manually in the main preset mechanism or by a construction in which an operating means is provided in the preset operation part for setting a unit price by remote control.

Further, although in each foregoing embodiment the numerical value to be preset is given in three figures, the number of figures can freely be selected and each construction can be modified according to the number of figures. Other various modifications and variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What we claim is:

1. A fuel-supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism comprising a structure means ex tending above a fuel-supplying service area, a fuel reservoir, a fixed conduit having one open end in the fuel reservoir and extending through the structure means, said fixed conduit having a second open end, a movable fuel-supplying conduit having one end connected to said second open end of the fixed conduit and a forward end including a delivery nozzle, said movable fuel-supplying conduit being suspended from the structure means and adapted to be raised upwardly and lowered downwardly, a stop valve provided on the fixed conduit, a flowmeter located in the fixed conduit to measure the quantity of fuel discharged from the nozzle through the fixed conduit and the movable fuelsupplying conduit, said flowmeter including a signal emitting part for emitting signals corresponding to the measured flow quantity, an indicator provided on the structure means and displaying the measured amount of the flowmeter, a preset operation part provided on the movable fuel-supplying conduit at a position such that said preset operation part can be readily operated by an operator supplying the fuel and emitting preset pulse signals corresponding to a desired preset numerical value of the fuel to be supplied, said preset operation part comprising a dial which can be turned through an angle corresponding to the desired numerical value, means for sequentially emitting the preset pulse signals corresponding to the turning angle of said dial, and means for emitting shunt signals at the start and completion of the turning of said dial, preset means provided in the indicator and presetting said desired numerical value by counting the pulse signals transmitted from the preset operation part, and wires extending from the preset operation part to the preset means through the movable fuel-supplying conduit and transmitting the pulse signals emitted by the preset operation part to the preset means, said preset means comprising a counting circuit for counting pulse signals, a register which receives and registers the result of the counting by said counting circuit of the presetting pulse signals transmitted from said pulse signal emitting means of said preset operation part and effects shifting by the shunt signal transmitted from said shunt signal emitting means of said preset operation part thereby presetting said desired numerical value, means for comparing the preset value transmitted from said register and the result of counting by said counting circuit of the pulse signals transmitted from said signal emitting part of the flowmeter and emitting a valve closing signal when the preset value and said result of counting coincide with each other, and means for transferring said valve closing signal to said stop valve as a signal for closing said stop valve. I

2. A fuel-supplying apparatus with a remote control preset mechanism comprising a structure means extending above a fuel-supplying service area, a fuel reservoir, a fixed conduit having one open end'in the fuel reservoir and extending through the structure means, said fixed conduit having a second open end, a movable fuel-supplying conduit having one end connected to the second open end of the fixed conduit and a forward end including a delivery nozzle, said movable fuelsupplying conduit being suspended from the structure means and adapted to be raised upwardly and lowered downwardly, a stop valve provided on the fixed conduit, a flowmeter located in the fixed conduit to measure the quantity of fuel discharged from the nozzle through the fixed conduit and the movable fuelsupplying conduit, said flowmeter including a signal emitting part for emitting signals corresponding to the measured flow quantity, an indicator provided on the structure means and displaying the measured amount of the flow-meter, a preset operation part provided on the movable fuel-supplying conduit at a position such that said preset operation part can be readily operated by an operator supplying the fuel and emitting preset pulse signals corresponding to a desired preset numerical value of the fuel to be supplied, preset means provided in the indicator and presetting said desired numerical value by counting the pulse signals transmitted from the preset operation part, and wires extending from the preset operation part to the preset means through the movable fuel-supplying conduit and transmitting the pulse signals emitted'by the present operation part to the preset means, said preset operation part comprising an insertion mechanism, a card having a construction corresponding to a desired preset numerical value adapted for being inserted in said insertion mechanism, a mechanism for discharging said inserted card from said insertion mechanism at a constant speed, a first signal emitting means for emitting by each figure pulses in a number corresponding to the preset numerical value of said card as preset pulse signals in cooperation with the discharging of said card by said card discharging mechanism, and a second signal emitting means for emitting a card insertion completion signal when said card is completely inserted into said insertion mechanism, and said preset means including means for receiving and counting the signals transmitted from the signal emitting part of the flowmeter and sending out a signal for closing the stop valve when the counted value coincides with the preset numerical value.

3. The fuel-supplying apparatus as claimed in claim 2 wherein said preset mechanism comprises a counting circuit for counting pulse signals, a memory circuit for receiving and storing the result of the counting by said counting circuit of the preset pulse signals transmitted by each figure from said first signal emitting means of said preset operation part thereby effecting presetting of said desired numerical value, a switch means provided between said counting circuit and said memory circuit closing by the signal transmitted from said second signal emitting means and opening by a first signal transmitted from said signal emitting part of the flowmeter, means for comparing the preset value transmitted from said memory circuit and the result of counting by said counting circuit of the pulse signals transmitted from said signal emitting part of the flowmeter and emitting a valve closing signal when said preset value and said result of counting coincide with each other and means for transferring said valve closing signal to said stop valve as a signal for closing said stop valve.

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US3858758 *Sep 4, 1973Jan 7, 1975Keene CorpPost-pay fuel dispensing systems
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/2, 222/14, 222/20
International ClassificationB67D7/08, B67D7/30
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/303
European ClassificationB67D7/30C2