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Publication numberUS3774272 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1973
Filing dateJun 7, 1971
Priority dateJun 7, 1971
Publication numberUS 3774272 A, US 3774272A, US-A-3774272, US3774272 A, US3774272A
InventorsN Rubaschek, H Rubinstein
Original AssigneeN Rubaschek, H Rubinstein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for forming embossed designs in pile fabrics
US 3774272 A
Abstract
Automatic Apparatus for forming embossed zig-zag line patterns in pile fabrics in which a pile fabric is moved in one direction and a header connected to a source of fluid under pressure and having spaced jet spray nozzles set into it is reciprocated over the fabric in a direction transverse to its line of movement. The apparatus includes mechanism for varying the length and the pitch of the lines of the design produced and also for providing a dwell at the end of each stroke of the header to produce longitudinal embossed line sections that connect the adjacent ends of the zig zag lines.
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[ APPARATUS FOR FORMING EMBOSSED DESIGNS IN PILE FABRICS Inventors: Nathan Rubaschek, 1740 Ocean Ave.; Henry Rubinstein, 43-01 46th Street, Sunnyside, NY. 1 1 104 [22] Filed: June 7, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 150,678

[52] US. Cl 26/2 R [51] Int. Cl. D06c 23/00 [58] Field of Search 26/2 R, 2 E; 91/361; 226/170 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,241,222 5/1941 Sonnino 26/2 R 2,563,259 8/1951 Miller 26/2 R UX 2,714,874 8/1955 Hart 91/361 2,778,342 1/1957 Ringman. 91/361 X 3,010,179 11/1961 Thal 26/2 R X 3,114,957 12/1963 Schaab et a1... 26/2 E 3,256,581 6/1966 Thal et al 26/2 R 3,608,431 9/1971 Pease 91/361 1 Nov. 27, 1973 3,613,186 10/1971 Mazzone et a1 26/2 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 127,163 3/1948 Australia 26/2 R Primary ExaminerRobert R. Mackey Att0rneyVictor M. Helfand [5 7 ABSTRACT Automatic Apparatus for forming embossed zig-zag line patterns in pile fabrics in which a pile fabric is moved in one direction and a header connected to a source of fluid under pressure and having spaced jet spray nozzles set into it is reciprocated over the fabric in a direction transverse to its line of movement. The apparatus includes mechanism for varying the length and the pitch of the lines of the design produced and also for providing a dwell at the end of each stroke of the header to produce longitudinal embossed line sections that connect the adjacent ends of the zig zag lines.

13 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures Patented Nov. 27, 1973 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 N O m A TTORNE Y 1 APPARATUS FOR FORMING EMBOSSED DESIGNS IN PILE FABRICS The present invention relates to apparatus for forming patterns in pile fabrics and, more particularly, for forming patterns in pile fabric by embossing areas of the fabric, as by the applications of jets of heated fluids under pressure to such areas, as steam that may or may not contain chemical vapors, that cause the fluid contacted pile filaments to shrink or shorten by curling.

The formation of patterns on pile fabrics by the application of jets of fluid against selected areas of the fabric, is a well-known practice in the art. l-leretofore, such patterns could be created only in the form of continuous, straight embossed lines longitudinally of a continuously moving pile fabric in the piece, as described, for instance, in U. S. Pat. Nos. 3,010,179 and 3,171,384, or in wavering lines on stationary, relatively short sections of pile fabrics, as described in US. Pat. No. 3,256,581. Heretofore, however, it has not been known to provide broken-line embossed patterns or designs longitudinally of a continuously moving pile fabric, in the piece or in roll form.

The present invention is directed, in general, to the provision of apparatus by which broken-line, embossed designs may be provided on a continuously moving pile fabric in the piece.

It is another object of the present invention to provide apparatus of the character described which may provide broken-line, embossed patterns of varying dimensions on a pile fabric.

More specifically, the present invention is directed to apparatus which may provide longitudinally extending embossed zig-zag patterns on a continuously moving pile fabric, either resembling a herringbone pattern formed of end-connected, oppositely directed diagonal lines, or a honeycomb type of embossed pattern, formed of oppositely directed, diagonal lines connected at their ends by longitudinally extending line sections.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide apparatus of the character described which may vary the lengths and pitch of the diagonal line portions of the herring-bone type of pattern as well as the length of the connecting, longitudinal line portions forming the honeycomb type of pattern.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide apparatus of the character described in which the pile fabric in the piece is moved at a constant rate of speed so that the embossed patterns formed thereon remain distinct and uniform throughout the length of the piece. 1

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide apparatus of the character described which, once set for a specific form of pattern, will operate automatically to provide such pattern on the entire length of the moving pile fabric.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide apparatus of the character described which is relatively compact and, operates with a minimum of noise and is of relatively simple construction and relatively simple and easy to adjust for the varying of the patterns that may be produced by it.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the apparatus of the present invention will become more and readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the embodiment thereof shown in the accompanying drawings, and from the des-cription following. It is to be understood, however, that such embodiment is shown by way of illustration only, to make the principles and practice of the invention more readily comprehensible, and without any intent of limiting the invention to the specific details therein shown.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of one embodiment of the apparatus of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the apparatus, taken on line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a shematic view of a electro-pneumatic circuit by which the apparatus of the invention may be operated and controlled; and

FIG. 4 and FIG. 5 are schmatic views illustrating patterns in pile fabric obtainable with the apparatus of the present invention.

Generally stated, the invention provides apparatus in which the pile of a constantly and uniformly longitudinally-moved pile fabric is subjected to fluid under pressure applied from a row of jets that reciprocates transversely over the moving pile fabric, to thereby form a continuous, zig-zag pattern in the pile of the fabric. The apparatus provides for the adjustment of the rate of movement of the row of jets and of the dwell at the end of each stroke of the jet movement, to thereby vary the pitch and also length of the zig-zag lines as well as the length of the dwell lines connecting their ends. The apparatus also provides means for moving the processed fabric out of the apparatus that is synchronized with the rate of movement of the fabric through the apparatus, to thereby subject the fabric to uniform pull through the processing of its entire length.

More specifically stated, the apparatus comprises a frame, generally designated as 10, including spaced, aligned upright members, such as upright posts 12 and 14, and horizontal members, 16, and 18. Joumalled between upright members 12 and 14 are transversely disposed, horizontally spaced, parallel forward and rear shafts, 20 and 22, mounting rollers 24 and 26, respectively, around which is stretched the endless conveyor belt, 28, which may preferably be perforated and preferably formed of wire mesh.

Mounted on the top edge of such horizontal frame member 16 at each side edge of the frame are inwardly extending plates or platforms, 32 and 34, on which is mounted a block, 36 and 38, respectively, each provided with spaced openings, which slideably support a frame, generally designated as 44, comprising horizontally spaced bars 46 and 48 passing through the openings in the blocks 36 and 38 connected at one end by an upright plate, 50, and intermediate their ends, between blocks 36 and 38, by horizontally disposed bars, 52 and 54. Bars 52 and 54 rigidly suspend rods, 56 and 58, respectively, at the ends of which, in turn, are rigidly suspended rings 60 and 62 which support in their openings a header tube, 64, in the underside of which, facing the conveyor belt 28, are set a row of spaced jet nozzles, 66. One end of the header 64 is closed, as at 68, and the other end is connected by an accordionpleated tube, 70, to the outlet of a container of pressurized fluid, 72, which may comprise steam or other heated fluid with or without admixture of vaporized chemical, such as is conventionally used for embossing the filaments of a pile fabric. Frame 44 is so mounted and header 64 is so supported therefrom that the outlet ends of the nozzles 66 are suspended in close proximity to the surface of the endless conveyor 28 and to any pile fabric that may be moved, pile uppermost, thereon. One of the rollers, preferably roller 26 at the fabric outlet end of the apparatus, may be the driven roller whose shaft 22 may mount on its end a sheave 96 which may be driven by belt or chain 98 from the drive of a constant speed motor (not shown).

Header 64 may be automatically reciprocated in a direction transverse to the movement of belt 28 in any number of ways, such as the electro-pneumatic system schematically illustrated in FIG. 3. The pneumatic elements of the system are shown to comprise an air cylinder, generally designated as 74, mounted on platform 32 to one side of frame and having a piston, 75, provided with a rod, 76, that projects from the end of the cylinder closest to frame 10. Cylinder 74 is provided with inlet-outlet ports 77 and 78 at its ends which may be connected, respectively, by conduits 79 and 80 to a common conduit 81 that is, in turn, connected to a compressed air tank 82, which may, in turn, be connected to a compressor (not shown). Piston rod 76 is connected to plate 50 of header supporting frame 44 (FIGS. 1 and 3), whereby cylinder 64 is reciprocated upon reciprocation of piston 75.

Conduits 79 and 80 have interposed in them volume control valves CV2 and CV1, respectively, to control the volume of compressed air admitted into the cylinder through the respective ports 77 and 78, to thereby control the speed of reciprocation of piston 75 and connected header 64 relative to the speed of movement of the endless belt 28, and the fabric supported thereon, to thereby vary the pitch of the transversely extending zig-zag lines of the embossed fabric design,

as clearly seen in FIGS. 4 and 5.

Conduits 79 and 80 also have interposed in them, preferably intermediate the respective valves CV2 and CV1 and ports 77 and 78, direction control valves DV2 and DV1, respectively, which may alternately connect ports 77 and 78, respectively, to the source of compressed air 82 and to atmosphere.

Valves DV2 and DV1 are respectively controlled by solenoids S2 and S1 which are spring-tensioned to normally maintain valve DV2 in connecting position and valve DV1 to atmosphere position. Solenoids S2 and S1 are connected to an electric circuit which includes a normally open switch LS1 and normally closed switch LS2; the latter being shown closest to cylinder 74 and the former remote therefrom. Switches LS1 and LS2 are actuated to be respectively closed and opened by pref-erably threaded rods which may set into suitably threaded openings in plate 50, which is disposed intermediate switches LS1 and LS2, as shown in FIG. 1, or in a separate plate dependently supported on piston rod 76 intermediate the switches, as shown in FIG. 3. Switch LS1 is connected to a relay R1 and switch LS2 is connect-ed to a relay R2; relay R1 being connected to solenoid S1 and relay R2 being connected to solenoid S2, whose windings are interconnected. Relays R1 and R2 may also include timers such as diagrammatically illustrated at RlT and R2T, respectively. While such timers are illustrated as being structurally separate from their respective relays R1 and R2, it will be readily understood that the timers may be structurally combined with their respective relays, as they are commercially found.

, Referring now to FIG. 3 of the drawings, valve DV2 is shown in its air-connecting position and piston 75 is shown at the end of the inwardly directed storke of its cycle and rod with its switch contacting head 83 approaching the closing of the normally open switch LS1. Valve DV1 is shown in atmosphere connected position permitting escape of air from port 78. When switch LS1 is closed, solenoid S1 is deenergized to move it into air-connecting position and solenoid S2 is energized to move valve DV2 to connect port 77 to atmosphere.

Movement of air into cylinder 74 through port 78 initiates the return stroke of the cycle of piston 75, which moves head 83 of rod 85 away from switch LS1 to open it. Relays R1 and R2 delay the effect of the opening of switch LS1 and maintain valves DV2 and DV1 respectively in their last assumed positions until head 84 of rod 86 engages normally closed switch LS2 to open it, to break the circuit through the solenoids causing valves DV2 and DV1 to assume their normal positions to feed air into port 77 and discharge air through port 78 through valve DV1 which is set to atmosphere; thus completing a cylinder and piston cycle.

It will be apparent that while the pitch of the zig-zag, Z, lines of the patterns shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 are controlled by valves CVl and CV2, their length may be controlled by adjusting rods 85 and 86 to reduce the distance between heads 83 and 84 to thereby lengthen the zig-zag lines, Z, of the pattern, or by increasing the distance between heads 83 and 84 to thereby shorten the length of the zig-zag lines.

As stated above, each of relays R1 and R2 may be associated with a timer RlT and R2T, respectively, that will delay action of solenoids S1 and S2 to provide a time interval between the strokes of piston 75, to provide a dwell which, because the endless belt and the fabric thereon continues its constant movement, will produce the longitudinal dwell lines, D, between each pair bf zig-zag Z lines at each of their ends, to produce the bee-hive pattern of FIG. 5.

It will be clear that by adjusting the timer, the length of the longitudinal lines D may be varied and that if the timer is set at zero, the effect will be as if no timer is present and the design of FIG. 4 will be produced.

The apparatus of the invention is provided with means for withdrawing the processed pile fabric therefrom at a constant rate equal to the rate of movement of the fabric through the apparatus, to thereby avoid any distortion of the design created on the fabric due to variance in the rate of its removal; such as bunching up when the removal rate is slower or stretching or slipping, when the removal rate is faster. To that end, a rough surfaced friction roller, 90, is mounted on a shaft, 92, which is supported in bearings, 94, secured on the sides posts 12 and 14, in advance of, immediately adjacent to, and substantially on a level with roller 26, in position to receive thereon and frictionally engage the underside of a fabric discharged from the apparatus. Shaft 92 mounts a sheave, 96, that is driven by the same belt 98 that drives belt driven shaft 22, so that rollers and 26 rotate at all times at the same, constant speed.

Preferably, the friction exerting surface of shaft 90 may be in the form of a stiff-bristled cylindrical brush, as illustrated, whose bristles may be formed of stiff synthetic or wire material.

This completes the description of the apparatus of the present invention. It will be readily apparent that such apparatus is automatic; that it is adjustable to vary both the size and shape of the designs that may be formed thereby; that it is of relatively simple, compact construction and simple, easy and economical to maintain and use. i I

It will be further apparent that numerous variations and modifications may be made in the apparatus of the present invention, by anyone skilled in the art, in accordance with the principles of the invention hereinabove set forth, and without the exercise of any inventive ingenuity.

What we claim is:

1. Apparatus for forming patterns in pile fabrics comprising a stand, means on said stand for moving a pile fabric in one direction at a constant rate of speed, a header having a plurality of spaced spray nozzles set thereinto and in proximity to said pile fabric, means at one end of the stand for flexibly connecting said header to a source of fluid under pressure, means at the other end of the stand for reciprocally moving said header in a movement transverse to the direction of said fabric, means controlling the rate of movement of said header and timing means for providing a time-regulated dwell in the movement of said header for providing an embossed pattern on the pile fabric including a stroke extending in the direction of movement of said fabric.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said timing means includes limit means for providing said timeregulated dwell at the end of a recipro-cal movement of said header.

3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said means reciprocally moving said header, comprises a cylinder having a port at each end, a piston within said cylinder having a piston rod extending from one end of said cylinder, said piston connected to said header, a conduit connecting each of said ports to a source of fluid under pressure, each said conduit including a two-way valve adapted to alternately connect the connected port with said source of fluid under pressure and with atmosphere and means alternately actuating each said valve to connect the port associated therewith to said source of fluid under pressure while the other of said valves is actuated to connect the other of said ports to atrnosphere.

4. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein means are provided in each said conduit for controlling the volume of fluid passing therethrough.

5. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein said means alternately actuating said valves to connect their associated ports to said source of fluid under pressure and to atmosphere includes electrical control means.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said electrical control means includes a solenoid operatively connected to each said valve for moving said valve alter nat'ely to connect the associated port to said source of fluid and to atmosphere, each said solenoid connected in an electric circuit.

7. The apparatus of claim 6, wherein said electric circuit includes a pair of spaced switches, each actuated by said piston at the end of one of its strokes, and relay means interposed in said circuit between said switches and said solenoids to maintain each said solenoid in fixed position during each piston stroke.

8. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein said timing means comprises an adjustable timing mechanism interposed in said circuit with each said relay and its connected solenoid whereby an embossed zig-zag pattern may be produced on the pile fabric, including a stroke extending in the direction of movement thereof.

9. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein means are provided for regulating the length of the reciprocating strokes of said piston whereby zig-zag patterns having strokes of varying length may be embossed on the pile fabric.

10. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein said means for regulating the length of said piston strokes comprises a pair of threaded rods and means connected to said piston inter-mediate said switches threadedly supporting said rods, each said rod arranged to contact one of said switches, said rods adapted to be adjusted to vary the distance between their switch con-tacting ends.

11. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said means for moving a pile fabric comprises an endless conveyor belt and means mounting said conveyor belt for movement including a pair of spaced rollers, one of said rollers connected to a driving mechanism to be actuated thereby.

12. The apparatus of claim 11, wherein said spaced rollers are mounted on a frame and a third roller is mounted on said frame in close proximity to and substantially on a level with said one roller, said third roller adapted to have the fabric pass thereover and having a roughened surface adapted to frictionally engage and move said pile fabric from said belt, said third roller operatively connected to the driving mechanism of said one roller to be, thereby, rotated at the same speed as said one roller. 7

13. The apparatus of claim 12, wherein said roughened surface of said third roller comprises a stiffbristled cylindrical brush sleeve mounted on said third roller.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2241222 *Aug 28, 1937May 6, 1941Sonnino BrunoProcess for raising and curling the fluffs of fabrics
US2563259 *Oct 8, 1945Aug 7, 1951Behr Manning CorpPile surfaced fabric and method of and apparatus for making the same
US2714874 *Apr 18, 1951Aug 9, 1955Hi Voltage Equipment CompanySwitch operating mechanism
US2778342 *Aug 10, 1953Jan 22, 1957Sumner Iron Works IncPoppet type valve distributing system for a servo-motor
US3010179 *Nov 18, 1959Nov 28, 1961Alamac Knitting Mills IncMethod of treating pile fabrics
US3114957 *Apr 18, 1960Dec 24, 1963Amphenol Borg Electronics CorpElectrifiers for the processing of fur and pile fabrics
US3256581 *Jan 7, 1964Jun 21, 1966 Apparatus for creating designs in pile fabrics
US3608431 *Jul 14, 1969Sep 28, 1971Lummus IndustriesControl system for the ram of vertically disposed fluid pressure cylinders
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AU127163A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4034446 *Feb 25, 1976Jul 12, 1977Paris Processing CorporationDouble-tiered swirling machine for pile fabric
US4383404 *Aug 26, 1981May 17, 1983Milliken Research CorporationMethod and apparatus to produce post heated textured yarn
US4499637 *Dec 14, 1979Feb 19, 1985Milliken Research CorporationMethod for the production of materials having visual surface effects
US5202077 *Jul 10, 1990Apr 13, 1993Milliken Research CorporationMethod for removal of substrate material by means of heated pressurized fluid stream
US5404626 *Oct 25, 1993Apr 11, 1995Milliken Research CorporationMethod and apparatus to create an improved moire fabric by utilizing pressurized heated gas
US5674581 *Apr 15, 1996Oct 7, 1997Milliken Research CorporationTextile fabric having a thermally modified narrow channel to facilitate separation
US5865933 *Nov 12, 1996Feb 2, 1999Milliken Research CorporationMethod for selectively carving color contrasting patterns in textile fabric
EP0121290A1 *Jan 9, 1984Oct 10, 1984Milliken Research CorporationMethod and apparatus for thermal patterning of textile subtrates
Classifications
U.S. Classification26/2.00R
International ClassificationD06C23/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06C23/00, D06C2700/31
European ClassificationD06C23/00