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Publication numberUS3774325 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1973
Filing dateJun 14, 1972
Priority dateJun 14, 1972
Publication numberUS 3774325 A, US 3774325A, US-A-3774325, US3774325 A, US3774325A
InventorsJohnson C, Johnson R, Johnson S
Original AssigneeJohnson C, Johnson R, Johnson S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composite needle work frame structure
US 3774325 A
Abstract
Composite needle-work frame structure incorporating a small hoop frame for embroidery and crewel-work and also a large, rectangular frame suitable for needle-point and tapestry. The composite frame structure may be designed solely for utility purposes or may be configured and made as an attractive piece of furniture. Opposite shaft structure means are advancable in and out of the journals of provided uprights so as to facilitate the mounting and securement, in desired orientation, of the small hoop frame and also of the large, rectangular frame. The shaft structures have expandable ends for facilitating releasable securement, in desired orientation, both as to their journals in the uprights and also to the mounting structure of the respective frames. Height adjustment is provided, and means are also provided for tensioning and releasably retaining fabrics being worked on the respective frames.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Nov. 27, 1973 United States Patent 1 Johnson et al.

1 1 COMPOSITE NEEDLE WORK FRAME STRUCTURE Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson Attorney-M. Ralph Shaffer [57] ABSTRACT Composite needle-work frame structure incorporating a small hoop frame for embroidery and crewel-work and also a large, rectangular frame suitable for needle- [76] Inventors: Stephen W. Johnson; Roma B.

Johnson, Susanlohnson, Cedric E Johnson, all of 1805 West 8660 South, West Jordan, Utah 84084 June 14, 1972 [22] Filed: point and tapestry. The composite frame structure may be designed solely for utility purposes or may be configured and made as an attractive piece of fumi- [21] Appl. No.: 262,771

52 us. 38/1022, 248/122 Opposite Shaft structure means are advancable 51 1m.

and out of the journals of provided uprights so as to facilitate the mounting and securement, in desired ori- 102.2 entation, of the small hoop frame and also of the 211/164 248/122 124 large, rectangular frame. The shaft structures have ex- [58] Field of Search................ 38/102, 102.1

[ References Cited pandable ends for facilitating releasable securement,

UNITED STATES PATENTS in desired orientation, both as to their journals in the uprights and also to the mounting structure of therespective frames. Height adjustment is provided, and means are also provided for tensioning and releasably retaining fabrics being worked on the respective frames.

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12/1960 Ortiz et FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 57,505 8/1912 Switzerland........................ 38/1022 11 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Patented Nov. 27, 1973 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 aft: Q Q :QMM

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Patented Nov. 27, 1973 2 Sheets-Sheet COMPOSITE NEEDLE WORK FRAME STRUCTURE The present invention relates to needle-work frames and, more particularly, to a new and improved composite needlework frame structure suitable for use in needle-point and tapestry work as well as embroidery and crewel-work.

In the present invention a large rectangular frame is provided as well as a smaller double-hoop type frame. The former is designed for tapestry and needle-point work, whereas .the latter resembles existing embroidery frames in the provision of a double-hoop structure for releasably securing desired fabrics. An important point in the present invention is that the upright frame structure thereof, with its extensible shaft structures, accommodates mounting of both the large, rectangular frame and also the small hoop-like frame, this depending upon the particular positions selected for the. shaft structures. Both ends of each of the shaft structures used are expandable so that one end may engage the mounting structure of a selected frame, with the other end being used to releasably secure the same to the upright journal of the composite frame. Thus, when the shaft structures are urged outwardly, the outer ends are suitable for mounting the large frame and frame mounts thereto. When the shaft structures are disposed inwardly in their journals, then the inner ends are employed to releasably secure the lateral extensions of the embroidery hoop-frame structure.

Both longitudinal and lateral means are employed, preferably, to retain the fabric being worked in tension. This is accomplished in one embodiment of the invention by use of the elastomeric clip means disposed along the sides of the large needle-point or tapestry frame. A stitching strip is stapled or otherwise secured to a roller bar in the large frame so as to facilitate the end securement of material being worked. The large frame itself includes a pair of parallel, revolvable bars or rods which can be selectably rotated by hand as the work advances.

Accordingly, a principal object of the presentinvention is to provide a new and improved needle-work support frame structure.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a needle-work frame structure incorporating both needle-point and tapestry frames as well as embroidery type frames.

An additional object is to provide a needle-work support frame having axialy translatable shaft structures, manually enlargeable at their ends, for securing such shaft structures to their uprights and also to the mounting extensions of the particular frame being utilized.

An additional object is to provide for the lateral tensioning of material disposed for work on a needle-point or tapestry frame.

A further object is to provide for height adjustment structure of embroidery frame and/or tapestry frame structures relative to their upright mounts.

An additional object is to provide a stitching or basting strip on a revolvable roller or rod provided in tapestry frame structures.

A further object is to provide revolvable rod means in tapestry frame structures for manually advancing work thereon.

A further object is to provide for the lateral tensioning of material disposed on large tapestry frames.

The features of the present invention may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the needle-work frame structure when the same incorporates a small hoop-like embroidery or crewel-work frame structure.

FIG. 2 is an end view of the structure of FIG. 1 illustrating, in phantom line, the various positionings that can be selected by way of example of the double-hoop embroidery frame used.

FIG 3A is a view, shown principally in longitudinal vertical section, of a representative shaft structure that can be used tosecure the mounting extension of the desired frame to a respective upright of the over-all support frame of FIG. 1. p

FIG. 3B is aperspective view of alternate shaft structure that can be used.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view, partially broken away, of a double-hoop embroidery frame structure that can be employed in practicingthe invention.

FIG. 5 is similar to FIG. 1 but illustrates the large tapestry or needle-point frame being mounted to the basic support structure of the invention; in FIG. 5 the large, rectangular frame is shown in vertical position.

FIG. 6 is a transverse, vertical section, taken along the line 66 and illustrates the manner in which the horizontal rods or rolls may be revolved by the handles so as to advance work positioned on the frame.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary elevation of a representative portion, here the right-hand portion, of the tapestry frame of FIG. 5; in FIG. 7 lateral tensioning means in the form of elastomeric clip structures are employed to supply tension laterally against the material being used, and a stitching strip is illustrated for securing one end of the work so mounted on the frame.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary view, in section, taken along the line 88 in FIG. 7, and illustrates a representative elastomeric clip structure for so applying lateral tension to the work disposed on the tapestry frame.

In FIG. 1 support frame 10 includes upright members 11 .and 12, the same terminating in feet 13 and 14 as indicated. Dowels D1 and D2 connect side foot 15 and 16 to upright member 11 in the manner shown. Crossbar 17 may also comprise a dowel seated and glued in appropriate recesses R for connecting the two upright members 11' and 12 together.

Each upright member 11 and 12 includes upper portions 18 and 19 that have apertures O and O as indicated. Embroidery frame 20 includes outer and inner loop members 21 and 22, with outer member 21 having an open space S and being provided with brackets 23 and 24 secured to the ends of the loop in a conventional means as by rivets, for example. Securing the brackets together is a threaded shank 25 which is routed through receiving apertures 26 and 27 provided with thumb screws 28 and 29, as seen in FIG. 4. It will be understood that the embroidery frame, as to its two loop members 21 and 22, is strictly conventional. Extending laterally from the frame are a pair of support arms 40 and 41, each being provided with a plurality of apertures 42 to accommodate height adjustment.

Of special importance in the invention is the provision of a pair of shaft structures 30 and 30'. These are disposed within apertures O and 0', see FIG. 1, and

mount embroidery frame, in an alternative embodiment of the invention, as shown in FIG. 1, to support frame 10.

As to one embodiment of shaft structure, the same is shown to include a shaft 31, see FIG 3A, which is turned down at shoulder S1 to provide a reduced shank at 32. The interior is threaded at 33 and accommodates the reception of bolt 34. The latter passes through washer 36 and is fixedly keyed to turning knob 35. An elastomeric cylindrical sleeve 35A is disposed over shank area 32 such that when knob 35 is turned down there will be an expansion of the elastomeric sleeve so as to lock the shaft structure 30 securely to upright 12. Shaft structure 30 associated with the remaining upright member 11 operates in the identical fashion and likewise is so constructed.

Accordingly, the left-hand of FIG. 3A illustrates the structure before the shaft structure 30 is locked in place, at the end, through the turning down of handle 35. The righthand of FIG. 3 indicates an expansion of the elastomeric sleeve so as to securely lock, via the elastomeric sleeve 35A, the shaft structure relative to support member 40.

Thus, by the tightening of the handles 35 and 35 and likewise by the loosening thereof, there may be accomplished the tightening and loosening, at the outer ends of the shaft structure 30 and 30', the same relative to the upright members 11 and 12.

Of course, rather than use the elastomeric locking features of FIG. 3A, there may be provided, as at FIG. 3B, shaft structure 43. The same is provided with a shaft 44 which has longitudinal slits 45-48 in the manner indicated. A conventional hardware lead anchor 49 is deposited at each end of the shaft 44 in recess 50 provided therefor. The handle knob 51 is provided with a threaded shank 52 that may comprise a bolt simply anchored into the interior of turning knob 51. Accordingly, the rotating of threaded shank 52 within the lead anchor will accomplish an expansion of the latter so that the end at E will tend to expand outwardly and thereby lock the shaft structure into aperture or O in FIG. 1. It is noted in FIG. 38 that the slot recesses 45, 46, and 47, 48, are 90 removed, this so that there will tend to be no splitting through the shaft portion if hs ams ismss q 9f ws qifq mp e It is most important to note, as to operation of the structure thus far described, that the outer ends of the shaft structure 30, 30 or 43 are employed to frictionally secure the shaft structures to the interior of upright member apertures O and 0'.

The remaining ends of the shaft structures 30 and 30 may be constructed identically to their opposite ends, as in the case of FIG. 38, so that the inner ends may be locked to apertures 42. The same structural condition also exists in connection with both knobs 35 as to shaft structure 30 in FIG. 1 and both knobs 35' as to shaft structure 30' in FiG. 1. Thus, both ends of the shaft structures 30 and 30', by way of example, are operative, lock the shaft structure to the related upright member 11, 12, and also to lock the embroidery frame to the shaft structures 30, This obtains whether the structure shown in FIG. 3A or in FIG. 3B is used.

It is most important to note that where a large tapestry frame 52 is used, see FIG. 5, then the embroidery frame 20 need only be removed, handles and 35' at both ends loosened, and the shaft structure thrust outwardly such that the same may accommodate mounting members 53 and 54 of the large frame. MOunting members 53 and 54, of course, include a series of apertures 55 and 56 for height adjustment. Frame 22 likewise comprises side members 57 and 58 which are apertured at A and B for receiving revolvable rods 59 and 60. These rods include tape strips 61 and 62 which may be secured as by staples 63 to the wooden rods 59, 60, and which provide for the stitched connection thereto of base fabrics 64 by stitches 65, see FIG. 7. Slots 65, 66 may be provided at each end of each of the side members 56, 57, and cross apertures 68 provided for the bolt and wing nut attachment 69, see FIG. 6. The latter are strictly conventional. Accordingly, a loosening of the wing nut attachments will enable the individual rods 59 and 60 to be revolved about their own longitudinal axes. This is accomplished by the use of handles 68' and 69. The latter may comprise simply levers, cranks, or simply transverse ears or knob or other grasping means. Rods 70 may be disposed at either side of the frame and include abutement 71 and washer and nut attachment 72, at each end of the structures.

Mounted over rods 72 are a plurality of material retaining means 73 in the form of elastomeric lengths L provided with alligator clip 75. Clip 75 may be attached to lengths L by suitable pivots 76 or other structure. As to packaging the rod or rod bracket 70 may be supplied with their alligator clip units or strips, as at 73, and ultimate user may mount the same if he chooses. It is eminently preferable to still use the clips so as to provide a tensioning of material 70 in a lateral direction. Tensioning of the material in the opposite direction, namely in the direction of member 57 in FIG. 7, may be accomplished through appropriate manipulation of the rods 59 and 60 through their handles and by the inclusion of a strip 61 and the stitching thereto of the material as at 65.

In operation, it is seen that the support frame 10 may be either the small embroidery frame 20, as indicated in FIG.1 or the latter may be removed and the large frame 52 substituted therefor, as in FIG. 5. In such event the shaft structures 30 and 30' will be loosened at both ends and then urged outwardly, with the outer handles or knobs being removed so as to connect the mounting to the shaft structures of uprights 53 and 54 as seen in FIG. 5. Thereafter, the outer knobs are returned and both inner and outer knobs are tightened. Accordingly, in the case of the mounting of the large frame 52 to the support structure, it is the inner ends of the shaft structures 30 and 30' which are used to secure the large frame and shaft structure to the uprights; the outer ends are used to frictionally lock the shaft structures to members 53 and 54. In the case of FIG. 1, just the reverse is the case wherein the shaft structures are preliminarily urged inwardly, see FIG. 1.

What is provided, therefore, is a new and useful frame structure designed to mount both large and small frames as for example embroidery frames and also tapestry frames. The shaft structure shown at 30 and 30', as per FIG. 1 and the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B, illustrate that both ends are expandable outwardly, with the inner end being used at one time to lock to the frame being attached on the one hand and, on the other hand, being usable alternatively to lock simply to the primary support frame.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art the various changes and modifications which may be made without departing from the essential features of the present invention and, therefore, the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A needle-work support frame including, in combination, support frame structure having a pair of mutually spaced upright members provided with mutually horizontally aligned shaft-structure securement apertures, a pair of shaft structures each respectivelyrslideably disposed in said securement apertures, each, of said shaft structures including a shaft means having opposite, selectively expandable end structures, and plural means engaging respective ones of said opposite end structures for selectively expanding the same, a needlework frame having laterally extending, mutually spaced mounting members, said mounting members being provided with aperture means, said mounting members being mounted over corresponding end structures of said shaft means.

2. The needle-work support frame of claim 1 wherein said aperture means of said mounting members comprise plural mutually and longitudinally spaced apertures.

3. The needle-work structure of claim 1 wherein said end structures comprise a slit shaft end of said shaft means, an expansion anchor disposed within said shaft end, said plural means comprising a tumable handle having an elongate threaded shank threadedly engaging a respective one of said anchors for selectively expanding the same, to correspondingly expand said shaft end structure.

4. The needle-work structure of claim 1 wherein said shaft structure includes an elastomeric end member, and means, as said expanding means, for compression loading said elastomeric end member to produce a releasable friction lock between said shaft means and said mounting members at said aperture means thereof.

5. In combination, a needle-work support frame structure having a pair of uprights provided with aligned, shaft-mount apertures, aligned shafts disposed in said shaft-means apertures, a needle-work frame having mutually spaced, laterally extending mounting portions each being provided with plural, selectable, mounting apertures, said needle-work frame being mounted to said shafts at selected corresponding ones of said mounting member apertures, and plural means respectively connected to said shafts for securing said mounting portions respectively thereto.

6. A tapestry and needle-point frame including, in combination, a pair of mutually spaced side members having mutually aligned apertures at their opposite ends, a pair of parallel,material retaining and advancing, revolvable rods revolvably disposed in said apertures, spanning said side members, and means for tuming said rods mounted thereto.

7. The frame of claim 6 wherein said side members include means for releasably frictionally securing said rods in said apertures of said side members.

8. A tapestry and needle-poing frame including, in combination, a pair of mutually spaced side members having mutually aligned apertures at their opposite ends, a pair of parallel, revolvable rods revolvably disposed in said apertures, spanning said side members, and means for turning said rods mounted thereto at least one of said rods having an elongate fabric strip longitudinally secured thereto and laterally extending therefrom, for stitching a fabric work piece thereto.

9. The frame of claim 6 wherein a pair of rod members are respectively inwardly mounted to said side members, and resilient clip means secured to said rod members for applying tension forces to a fabric work piece mounted to said frame.

10. The frame of claim 6 wherein said side members include inwardly extending resilient means for releasably and tensioningly securing the side margins of a fabric work piece mounted upon said frame.

11. In combination, an upright support frame having a pair of mutually spaced upright members each provided with an aligned horizontal aperture, shaft means having expandable opposite ends slideably mounted in respective ones of said apertures, plural means for releasably expanding selected ones of said ends coupled thereto, and a selected frame, having laterally extending mounting members disposed a respective distance apart, mounted to said shafts at the respective mounting members thereat, upon proper slideable adjustment of said shafts within their upright mounting apertures, prior to tightening actuation of selected ones of said plural means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1649340 *Mar 31, 1926Nov 15, 1927Domenick DelcielloEmbroidery frame
US2551326 *Feb 18, 1948May 1, 1951Mary HetuCurtain stretcher
US2963249 *Feb 21, 1958Dec 6, 1960Markel Electric Products IncMobile adjustable fan support
CH57505A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3899164 *Nov 5, 1973Aug 12, 1975Newman RaymondAdjustable floor support for needlecraft and art frames
US3938267 *Sep 3, 1974Feb 17, 1976Bard Donald IFancy stitchery working frame support
US4102065 *May 16, 1977Jul 25, 1978Michele R. Selden, TrusteeAdjustable stand for needlework and the like
US4113218 *Sep 13, 1976Sep 12, 1978Linder Gerald SAdjustable frame assembly for supporting a surgical tray
US4549366 *May 21, 1984Oct 29, 1985Gerding Beverly JAdjustable needlework stand
US4827638 *Jan 6, 1988May 9, 1989Peters Gerald AArtwork support apparatus
US5327665 *Mar 8, 1993Jul 12, 1994Paul ManningAdjustable quilting hoop apparatus
US5330143 *Nov 27, 1992Jul 19, 1994Rich Homer CCraft stand
US6662481 *Jul 24, 2002Dec 16, 2003Ronald B. HunterCrewel work stand
US20100192428 *Jan 28, 2010Aug 5, 2010Ina Ruth GosneyQuilting stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification38/102.2
International ClassificationD05C1/00, D05C1/04
Cooperative ClassificationD05C1/04
European ClassificationD05C1/04