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Publication numberUS3774600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1973
Filing dateOct 27, 1971
Priority dateOct 27, 1970
Also published asDE2153612A1, DE2153612B2
Publication numberUS 3774600 A, US 3774600A, US-A-3774600, US3774600 A, US3774600A
InventorsM Cognat
Original AssigneeRhone Poulenc Sa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gynaecological surgical device
US 3774600 A
Abstract
A gynaecological surgical device to avoid Fallopian tubes becoming blocked again during cicatrisation following a tuboplasty operation, such device comprising a hollow cone of flexible sheet material and a cord firmly fixed to the apex of the cone. In use after performing a salpingostomy of the blocked portion of a patient's Fallopian tube, the device is placed with the apex extending into the cut end of the tube with the cord extending to the abdominal wall. The base edge of the cone is folded around the end of the tube and secured to the tube exterior to prevent blockage during cicatrisation of the tube. When this is completed, the device can be removed simply by pulling the cord.
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United States Patent 1 Cognat r [30] Foreign Application Priority Data Oct. 27, 1970 France 7038735 [52] US. Cl 128/131, 128/130, 128/341, 128/350 [51] Int. Cl... A611 5/46, A6lm 29/00, A6lm 27/00 [58] Field of Search r. 128/130, 132,131,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 11/1934 Haas 128/130 6/1867 Grant 128/127 1,040,404 8/1912 Poindexter.... 128/341 3 ,467,090 9/ l 969 Zollett 128/131 3,182,662 5/1965 Shirodkar 128/303 R ]v Nov. 27, 1973 3/1967 Strawn 128/348 Primary Examiner-Aldrich F. Medbery Att0rney-Stevens, Davis, Miller & Mosher [57] ABSTRACT A gynaecological surgical device to avoid Fallopian tubes becoming blocked again during cicatrisation following a tuboplasty operation, such device comprising a hollow cone of a flexible sheet material and a cord firmly fixed to the apex of the cone. In use after performing a salpingostomy of the blocked portion of a patients Fallopian tube, the device is placed with the apex extending into the cut end of the tube with the cord extending to the abdominal wall. The base edge of the cone is folded around the end of the tube and secured to the tube exterior to prevent blockage during cicatrisation of the tube. When this is completed, the device can be removed simply by pulling the cord.

12 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Patented Nov, 27, 1973 4 Sheets-Sheet l Patented Nov. 27, 1973 3,774,600

4 Sheets-Sheet 2.

Patented Nov. 27, 1973 3.774,6OO

4 Sheets-Sheet 3 fLgii Patented Nov. 27, 1913 3,774,600

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 GYNAECOLOGICAL SURGICAL DEVICE The present invention relates to a gynaecological surgical device intended to facilitate the surgical treatment of female sterility of tubal origin. It relates, more especially, to a surgical device which makes it possible to avoid the ends of the Fallopian tubes becoming blocked again after a tuboplasty operation (in particular, a salpingostomy) as a result of rapid and correct cicatrisation in the open position of the tubes.

If the blockage is an internal tubal blockage, the surgical devices described in US. Pat. Nos. 3,182,662 and 3,349,770 allow tubo-uterine anastomosis to be carried out.

If the blockage is external tubal blockage, the end of the tubes is opened and a surgical device is placed in position which protects the open end until cicatrisation is complete andwhich prevents the tube from becomingblocked again. In order to place such a surgical device in position, it isnecessary to carry out a laparotomy.

MULLIGAN W. J., ROCK J. and EASTERD AY C. L. (Use of polyethylene in tuboplasty Fertility and Sterility 4 428, 19 53) have in this case proposed a rigid surgical device in-the form of a cone which covers the end of the tubes and which is withdrawn after cicatrisation, after a period of 2 to 3 months, by carrying out a second laparotomy.

CLYMAN M. J. (Silastic hoods in tuboplasty: A new approach to their removal. Fertility and Sterility vol. 19, No. 4, 1968) has proposed replacing the second laparotomy by a colpotomy. However, this latter technique is very delicate to carry out and requires the use of special forceps which are introduced through the natural passages in order to withdraw the surgical-devices 2 to 5 months after it is placed in position. Furthermore, this technique cannotbe practised successfully, especially if the surgical device is covered by adhesions or if it has shifted; it is then necessary to resort to a second laparotomy.

According to the invention there is provided a surgical device to avoid Fallopian tubes becoming blocked again during cicatrisation following a tuboplasty operation, such device comprising a hollow cone of flexible sheet material and a cord-like member firmly fixed to the apex of the cone.

Such a surgical device only requires a single operation (when it is placed in position), it is easily held in position in the patient, it can be withdrawn very easily and it ensures rapid cicatrisation (within a period of l to 3 weeks) of the end of the tubes in the open position.

The invention also provides a method of surgically treating female sterility of tubal origin comprising performing a salpingostomy on the blocked portion of a patients Fallopian tube, placing a surgical device according to the invention with the apex of the cone extending into the end of the tube and the cord extending to the abdominal wall, folding the edge of the cone around the end of the tube and securing it to the exterior of the tube to prevent blockage during cicatrisation of the tube.

The invention will be better understood from the fol lowing description, which is given by way of example, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FlGS. l, 3 5, 7, 8 and 9 are schematic perspective views of three embodiments of the device according to the invention; and

FIGS. 2, 4 and 6 are similar views showing the devices of FIGS. 1, 3 and 5 respectively after being placed in position in the patient.

The surgical device shown in FIG. 1 consists of a flexible sheet rolled up in the shape of a cone 1, the angle a at the apex being between 5 and 80 and preferably between 10 and A cord 2 is firmly fixed to the apex 3 of the cone 1, the length of this cord being between 200 and 600 mm, and its diameter being generally between 0.2 and 6 mm. This cord 2 for example consists of polyamide, which gives it a certain flexibility as well as sufficient tensile strength during removal of the device.

The cone 1 consists of a sterilisable plastic tolerated by the organism, which is sufficiently flexible that it can easily be folded over on itself and remain in this position when it has been brought thereto when placing the device inposition. Organopolysiloxane elastomers, in particular, are suitable for this application. Generally, the thickness of the wall of the cone 1 is between 0.1 and 0.8 mm, whilst its height is between 20 and 200 The cone 1 can, for example, be obtained by the socalled slush-coating technique, that is to say, by depositing successive thin layers of material on a shaping device of the desired shape. It is also possible to obtain the cone from a sheet which is cut and of which the edges 'are joined by welding or gluing.

The apex 3 of the cone can be attached to the cord 2 by, for example, passing the cord 2 through the apex 3 ofthe coneand knotting the cord two or three times onto itself atits end which is near the apex of the cone. Then some silicone elastomer, for example, is deposited on the excess thickness formed by the knots and the part of the cord which is outside the cone is pulled gently so that the knotted end comes to lie against the apex of the cone and to stick thereto, either under hot of the cone. 1

It isalso possible, after knotting the end of the cord, to pre-mould the knob on the knotted thread and to fix itthereafter to the end of the cone by wedging and gluing. It is thus possible to impart the desired shape to the knob and to proceed in such a way that when the device is placed in the partially invaginated position in the patient (FIG. 2) is practically has a first, solid cone (forming the knob) of which the angle at the apex is less than that of the cone 1.

FIG. 2 shows the device of FIG. 1 after being placed in position. To achieve this, the surgeon carries out a laparotomy and then a salpingostomy (he cuts the end of the blocked tube). He places the device, which has shall cover the tube better. He then attaches the cone 7 l to the end of the tube by making a few stitches (not shown in FIG. 2) using a resorbable material, for example catgut, the resorption time of this material corresponding substantially to the time required for cicatrisation. The cord 2 is thereafter anchored to the abdominal wall 5. The surgeon places an identical surgical device in position in the same manner on the other tube if the blockage is bilateral.

When sufficient cicatrisation has occurred, which merely requires from about I to 3 weeks (thanks to the flexible cone, which completely covers the end of the tube), the surgical device is withdrawn by simply pulling the cord 2 through the abdominal wall 5 in the manner of a simple drain, without anaesthetic.

FIG. 3 represents a preferred embodiment of the surgical device. This comprises all the elements described in the preceding device of FIG. 1, that is to say a cone 6 with a cord fixed firmly to its apex 7. However, the cord of this embodiment passes through the cone practically along its axis and has substantially equal portions (marked 8 and 9), of between 200 and 600 mm, ex-

tending on either side of the apex. The sizes and the materials of which this device is made up are the same as those mentioned for the device of FIG. I.

In order to place the device in position (see FIG. 4), if only the end (10) of the tube (shown in broken lines) is blocked, the surgeon follows substantially the same procedure as when placing the device of FIG. 1 in position. He first of all carries out a laparotomy and then cuts the end of the tube. He now leaves the cord 9 to be the length required so that after it has been introduced through the end 10 of the open tube, it can reach into the uterine cavity 1 1 if the cone 6 is in position on the end of the tube. The cone 6 is folded over onto the tube, the surgeon being able to cut its base 12 to the desired length. The surgeon now attaches the cone to the end of the tube by a few stitches (not shown in FIG. 4) using a resorbable material, for example catgut, and anchors the other end of the cord 8 to the abdominal wall 13. To withdraw this surgical device, the surgeon follows exactly the same procedure, and with equal ease, as for withdrawing the device previously described.

The device of FIG. 3, whilst it can be withdrawn as easily as that of FIG. 1, has the advantage of allowing the cone 6 to be positioned better during the period of cicatrisation and of resorption of the stitches. The part 9 of the cord which is in the tube in effect assists better stability of the device during cicatrisation.

This device can be used with advantage in the case where the external and internal portions of one and the same tube are blocked. In effect the cord 9 acts as a cicatrisation tutor for the duct 14 whilst the cone 6 ensures rapid cicatrisation in the open position of the tube. In order to place the prosthesis in position, the surgeon can operate as follows: he carries out a laparotomy and then a salpingostomy, he adjusts the part 9 of the cord to the desired length for it to reach the uterine cavity 11, he introduces the part 9 of the cord through the open tube until it can slide no further in the duct, he cuts the duct in two places so as to remove the obstructed part, effects a termino-terminal anastomosis and continues to slide the cord 9 until the cone 6 is in position on the end of the tube. The continuation of the operation is then identical to that previously carried out.

It is also possible to use this surgical device if only the duct is blocked.

Another embodiment of the invention is shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. The cord 17 extending from externally beyond the apex 16 of the cone 15 to the abdominal wall 19 is surrounded by a sheath 20, for example consisting of an organosilicon elastomer. This sheath forms a drain as a result of transverse orifices 21 and 22 located near the apex of the cone 15.

This latter device, in addition to having the advantages quoted for the device shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, additionally makes it possible to inject, from the abdominal wall 19, any liquid which can, for example, activate cicatrisation or arrest a possible infection.

This latter embodiment furthermore has the advantage of making it even easier to withdraw the device because the external diameter of the sheath 20 forming the drain is substantially the same as the cross-section which th cone assumes if it is folded up on itself during its removal.

As materials for making these devices it is possible to use plastics of medical quality, which can be sterilised and which do not allow adhesions of human tissues to their surface, whilst being well tolerated by the organism. The cone must have sufficient flexibility that it can easily be folded onto itself and can maintain this position after it has assumed it. The cord must have sufficient tensile strenth after sterilisation to allow the surgical device to be withdrawn; it must alsohave sufficient flexibility to match the shape of the duct of the tube all the way into the uterine cavity (in the case of the devices shown in FIGS. 3 and 5) and to remain as far as possible in the position in which it has been placed.

For example, organopolysiloxane elastomers are used for the manufacture of the cone and of the drain. The cone can also be produced from a textile material, for example a polyethylene terephthalate'fabric, which is coated with organopolysiloxane elastomer.

The cord can for example be made of polyamide or of polyester.

Numerous embodiments will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art. It is for example possible to make up a surgical device,'such as that shown in FIG. 7 in which the cord 2 is sheathed with a drain 20 provided with lateral orifices 21 and 22 in the zone located near the apex of the cone. A further embodiment of the device (FIG. 8) replaces the solid cord by ahollow cord 30 forming a drain and provided with lateral orifices 31 and 32 in the zone located near the apex of the cone 6.

A modification of the deviceof FIG. 3 is shown in FIG. 9 in which a cord 38 extends from the apex of the cone to the abdominal wall, of greater diameter than the part of the cord 39 which extends from thetube into the uterine cavity. This favours the withdrawal of the surgical device, the cross-section of the cord 38 being of greater diameter, for example corresponding substantially to the cross-section which the cone assumes when it is folded up on itself during its withdrawal. I I

It is also possible to provide all these devices with a mark which is opaque to X-rays, for example in the position of the knob or on the wall of the cone, longitudinally or transversely.

EXAMPLE 1 A device corresponding to that shown in FIG. 3, was produced, the cone having an angle of at the apex, being 150 mm high and having a wall thickness of 0.16

The cord was passed through the cone 6 at its apex 7 along its axis and then extended on either side of the apex 7 to equal lengths of 500 mm. The cord was 0.5 mm in diameter and consisted of polyamide 6,6, its tensile strength being 45.3 kg/mm before sterilisationand its elongation being 40 percent.

The cone was obtained by the slush-moulding technique, that is to say by successively steeping a shaping device into a liquid elastomer until the desired thickness was obtained. For this, a diluted hot-vulcanisable organopolysiloxane elastomer, of the same composition as that described in the example of French Patent No. 1,499,305, was used.

The shaping device used was of polished stainless steel. 1

It was steeped in the elastomer and then left to drain for 20 seconds, and the shaping device was rotated so as to distribute the material well and allow the solvent to evaporate. The operation was repeated six times so as to obtain a thickness of 0.16 mm. The article was vulcanised in a ventilated oven at 140C for 30 minutes and was then reheated for 18 hoursat between 180 and 200C.

In order to attach the cone to the cord, the cord was first of all passed through the end of the cone and. was knotted substantially in its middle, on the inside of the cone. A ball of undiluted silicone elastomer was placed around the knot and was shaped into an olive-shaped knob. The part of the cord which was outside the cone was then pulled until the knob obtained pressed against the apex of the cone. The whole was vulcanised at 180 200C for 4 hours.

This prosthesis was heat-sterilised at 180C for 4 hours. The tension required to break the cord was then 16.6 kg/mm and the elongation of the cord was 17 percent.

The same device can be sterilised with y rays. The tension to break the cord was then 41 kg/mm*, its elongation being 36 percent, after an irradiation under 2.5 Megarads.

EXAMPLE 2 A device as shown in FIG. 5, was made starting from a device identical to that described in Example 1, of the same dimensions and made of the same materials.

A drain of heat-vulcanisable organopolysiloxane elastomer of 3 mm internal diameter, 5 mm external diameter and 300 mm length was added. The distal end of the drain was provided with two pairs of lateral oridevice to avoid Fallo- I a single hollow cone of flexible sheet material having an apex and a base edge and closed at its apex, ane a cordlike member fixed firmly to the apex of the cone.

2. A device .as claimed in claim 1, and further comprising a drain tube sheathing the cord and means defining lateral orifices in the tube located near the apex of the cone.

3. A device as claimed in claim 2, wherein said drain tube is formed of organosilicon elastomer.

4. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein said cord is hollow effective to form a drain tube and further comprising means defining lateral orifices in the tube located near the apex of the cone.

5. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein said cord comprises a first portion extending externally beyond the apex of the cone and a second portion extending through the interior of the cone.

6. A device as claimed in claim 5, wherein the first portion is of larger diameter than the second portion, the cross-section of the first portion corresponding substantially to that of the cone folded upon itself.

7. A device as claimed in claim 5, and further comprising a drain tube sheathing the first portion of the cord and means defining lateral orifices in the tube located near the apex'of the cone.

8. A device as claimed in claim 5, wherein the apex angle of the cone is between 5 and wherein the height of the cone is between 20 and 200 mm, wherein the wall thickness of the cone is between 0.1 and 0.8 mm and wherein the first and second portionsare of substantially equal length of between 200 and 600 mm.

9. A device as claimed'in claim 1, wherein the cone consists of organosilicon elastomer and the cord of.

polyamide.

10. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the apex angle of the cone is between 5 and 80, wherein the height of the cone is between 20 and 200 mm. and wherein the wall thickness of the cone is between 0 1 and 0-8 mm.

11. A method of surgically treating female sterility of tubal origin said method comprising the steps of performing a salpingostomy of the blocked portion of the patients fallopian tube, providing a surgical device comprising a single hollow cone of flexible sheet material having an apex and a base edge and closed at its apex with a cord-like-member fixed firmly to the apex of the cone, placing said device with the apex of the cone extending intothe end of the fallopian tube and extending the cord like member from the inside of said cone to the abdominal wall, folding the base edge of the cone around the end of said tube and securing it to the exterior of the tube to hold it in place to prewardly to'the abdominal wall;

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4288012 *Sep 6, 1979Sep 8, 1981Doak Roni KCoathanger suspender
US5273054 *Sep 19, 1991Dec 28, 1993Walker John WContraceptive device
US6145505 *May 28, 1999Nov 14, 2000Conceptus, Inc.Electrically affixed transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices
US6176240Jun 7, 1995Jan 23, 2001Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
US6526979Jun 12, 2000Mar 4, 2003Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US6634361Jun 1, 1999Oct 21, 2003Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US6684884Jul 23, 2001Feb 3, 2004Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US6705323Jun 8, 1998Mar 16, 2004Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US6709667Aug 22, 2000Mar 23, 2004Conceptus, Inc.Easy, fast and reliable insertion and engagement
US6763833Aug 22, 2000Jul 20, 2004Conceptus, Inc.Insertion/deployment catheter system for intrafallopian contraception
US7237552Jul 15, 2004Jul 3, 2007Conceptus, Inc.Insertion/deployment catheter system for intrafallopian contraception
US7428904May 14, 2004Sep 30, 2008Alien Technology CorporationContraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
US7506650Feb 23, 2004Mar 24, 2009Conceptus, Inc.Deployment actuation system for intrafallopian contraception
US7591268Jun 15, 2005Sep 22, 2009Conceptus, Inc.Deployment actuation system for intrafallopian contraception
US7686020Aug 31, 2006Mar 30, 2010Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US7921848Aug 13, 2003Apr 12, 2011Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US7934504Jul 21, 2009May 3, 2011Conceptus, Inc.Deployment actuation system for intrafallopian contraception
US8048086Feb 24, 2005Nov 1, 2011Femasys Inc.Methods and devices for conduit occlusion
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US8052669Sep 29, 2008Nov 8, 2011Femasys Inc.Methods and devices for delivery of compositions to conduits
US8066007Jul 31, 2006Nov 29, 2011Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
US8079364Mar 28, 2011Dec 20, 2011Conceptus, Inc.Deployment actuation system for intrafallopian contraception
US8171936Oct 20, 2010May 8, 2012Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US8316853Jul 17, 2009Nov 27, 2012Femasys Inc.Method and devices for conduit occlusion
US8316854Oct 31, 2011Nov 27, 2012Femasys Inc.Methods and devices for conduit occlusion
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US8356599Nov 11, 2011Jan 22, 2013Conceptus, Inc.Occlusion devices and methods
US8381733Nov 11, 2011Feb 26, 2013Conceptus, Inc.Deployment actuation system
US8584679Feb 8, 2012Nov 19, 2013Conceptus, Inc.Deployment actuation system
US8613282May 7, 2012Dec 24, 2013Conceptus, Inc.Occlusion devices and methods
US8695604May 10, 2012Apr 15, 2014Bayer Essure Inc.Deployment actuation system
US8695606Nov 24, 2012Apr 15, 2014Femasys Inc.Methods and devices for conduit occlusion
US8726906Nov 25, 2012May 20, 2014Femasys Inc.Methods and devices for conduit occlusion
US8733360Aug 20, 2012May 27, 2014Bayer Essure Inc.Occlusion devices and methods
US8733361Nov 19, 2012May 27, 2014Bayer Essure Inc.Occlusion devices and methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/33, 128/831
International ClassificationA61F2/04, A61B17/42
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/04, A61B17/42
European ClassificationA61B17/42, A61F2/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 23, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: HOSPAL INDUSTRIE
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:HOSPAL SODIP S.A.;REEL/FRAME:004247/0046
Effective date: 19831004
May 17, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: HOSPAL SODIP S.A., A SOCIETE ANONYME, MEYZIEU 6933
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SOCIETE DES INDUSTRIES PLASTIQUES SODIP;REEL/FRAME:003999/0832
Effective date: 19811019
Oct 29, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SOCIETE DES INDUSTRIES PLASTIQUES-SODIP 7 AVENUE L
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:RHONE-POULENC S.A.;REEL/FRAME:003923/0349
Effective date: 19791122
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:RHONE-POULENC S.A.;REEL/FRAME:003923/0349
Owner name: SOCIETE DES INDUSTRIES PLASTIQUES-SODIP, FRANCE
Oct 29, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: RHONE-POULENC S.A.
Owner name: SOCIETE DES INDUSTRIES PLASTIQUES-SODIP 7 AVENUE L
Effective date: 19791122