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Publication numberUS3774924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1973
Filing dateSep 13, 1971
Priority dateSep 13, 1971
Publication numberUS 3774924 A, US 3774924A, US-A-3774924, US3774924 A, US3774924A
InventorsA Machatsch
Original AssigneeA Machatsch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roller skates
US 3774924 A
Abstract
A roller skate with a roller frame for the spring suspension of a roller axle on the sole plate of the skate, in which the roller frame comprises a carrier holding the roller axle and pivotally connected to the sole plate and a U-shaped spring bracket connected to the sole plate and to the carrier.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Machatsc h Nov. 27, 1973 ROLLER SKATES [76] Inventor: Adalbert Machatsch,

2301 Blickstedt-Kiel. Germany [22] Filed: Sept. 13, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 179,699

[52] US. Cl. 280/1l.28, 280/11.2 [51] Int. Cl. A63c 17/02 [58] Field of Search 280/1 1.28, 11.27, 280/11.19,l1.1,11.26,11.23,11.2

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 921,102 5/1909 Grout 280/1 1.28 3,649,038 3/1972 l-luckenbeck 280/1 1.28 2,233,355 2/1941 Ware 280/11.28 2,330,338 9/1943 Dekome et al. 280/11.28 3,580,595 5/1971 Ware 280/11.28 2,719,723 10/1955 Ware 280/11.2

Skaggs 1,711,451 4/1929 Gibson 280/1 1.28 875,165 12/1907 Faust et al. 280/11.28 X 2,695,178 1l/1954 Rheinfrank, .l r. 280/11.13 L

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,007,224 4/1957 Germany 280/11.28

871,951 7/1961 Great Britain 743,725 1/1956 Great Britain 280/1 1.2

Primary Examiner-Kenneth H. Betts Assistant ExaminerMilton L. Smith Attorney-Beaman & Beaman [57] ABSTRACT A roller skate with a roller frame for the spring suspension of a roller axle on the sole plate of the skate, in which the roller frame comprises a carrier holding the roller axle and pivotally connected to the sole plate and a U-shaped spring bracket connected to the sole plate and to the carrier.

12 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PAIENTEnuuvm 1975 3.774.924 SHUT IN 3 Fig. 1

Fig.5

ATTORNEYS PATENTEDHUV 27 I975 SHEET 2 OF 3 ATTORNYS PMENIEUuuvm ms SW 3 CF 3 3.774.924

W INVENTOR g ATTORNEY 1 ROLLER SKATES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to roller skates and is particularly concerned with a twin-track sports roller skate of the kind used in particular in competition work such as speed-skating or figure-skating or again in roller skate hockey, and commences from a twin-track sports roller skate with a roller frame designed to provide spring suspension of the roller axle on the sole plate.

Stringent requirements are imposed upon roller skates which are to be used for sporting competition work:

On the one hand, they must withstand the considerable shock loadings which occur during use and on the other hand, with an eye to good running qualities, they musthave spring properties both in the area of the sole plate and in the area of the roller frame while at the same time ensuring that the roller axles do not deflect in an unwanted manner since this would impair the accuracy of running; finally, both low weight and low manufacturing cost are essential'factors.

. Known sports roller skates do not fulfil these requirements adequately; in particular, the spring elements of theroller frames are exposed to heavy loadings with the consequence that while the said spring elements have adequate elasticity, on the one hand wear and fatigue phenomena developduring use and on the other the properalignment of the roller axles is impaired. Also, the known roller skates, which are generally made of steel forreasons associated with cost, although quite capable of withstanding the dynamic alternating loadings are disproportionately heavy.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION By contrast, it is the object of the present invention to create a sportsroller skate which, while having a low weight and being cheap to manufacture, ensures satisfactory spring characteristics to cope with shock loadings while at the same time ensuring that the roller axles are reliably guided.

To this end, the invention provides for a sports roller skate of the kind introductorily described in which the roller frame contains a carrier holding the roller axle, which carrier is linked to the sole plate on the one hand through a pivoting connection and on the other through a U-shaped spring bracket.

The U-shaped spring bracket, which, advantageously,

only has to cope with the load peaks, ensures together with the pivoting connection that the carrier and roller axle are reliably guided so that in particular misalignment of the roller axle under the influence of transverse forces developed during running, is avoided. Moreover, the special design of the roller frame yields a robust load-bearing structure with afavourable load distribution characteristic so that theweight of the roller skate can be kept very low, in the manner which is desired.

Where roller skates are concerned, it is desirable and indeed necessary that the impact forces shall be absorbed not only in the roller frame but also in the sole plate, and at thesame' time sole plate must be sufficiently stiff to withstand the applied loads without undergoing any unwanted distortion. Yet again, the sole plate, as indeed the roller frame, must have a low weight. Unlike the case with the known roller skates in which the steel sole plate has a considerable weight, in the roller skate in accordance with the invention the sole plate, in a specially preferred embodiment, consists of fibre-glass reinforced synthetic material. The use of this material yields the substantial advantage that the sole plate, while having adequate elasticity and dimensional stability, only has a low weight.

Conveniently, both the carrier and the spring bracket will likewise be made of fibre-glass reinforced synthetic material, and this is also an advantage since it secures a further saving in weight and the spring properties of thismaterial are good. Advantageously the synthetic material used will be a synthetic resin, preferably polyester.

In order to achieve a compact construction and a favourable distribution of the force applied to the roller frame, the carrier will preferably possess an inclined first carrier arm extending from the roller axle to the sole plate, and a second carrier arm supported on one leg of the spring bracket.

Conveniently, the second carrier arm and the spring bracket leg will extend substantially parallel to one an other and be inclined toward the end of the sole plate, this in particular ensuring that unwanted loadings are isolated from the spring bracket and that the impact forces transmitted through the second carrier arm to the leg of the spring bracket are advantageously di-.

rected substantially perpendicularly to said leg.

For ease of construction, the pivoting connection between carrier and sole plate will conveniently be created by arranging for the first carrier arm to be supported at its free end in such a fashion as to be capable of limited pivoting in all directions in a kind of socket seating provided in the sole plate. For reasons of manufacture, the socket seating will preferably be delimited by an opening in a supporting section formed integrally with that arm of the spring bracket which is attached to the sole plate.

Furthermore, the free end of the first carrier arm can be supported on the sole plate through a metal disc so that in the neighbourhood of the pivoting connection a uniform distribution of forces is achieved and the occurrence of impermissibly high peak forces on the sole plate, in particular when using. fibre-glass reinforced synthetic material for its construction, is avoided.

Conveniently, the first carrier arm of the carrier will be inclined at a relatively small angle vis-a-vis the perpendicular to the sole plates so that the spring bracket openly absorbs the peak loads, while the remaining part of the loads are transmitted directly to the sole plate because of the relatively steep angle of the first carrier arm.

In order to improve further the spring properties, a rubber buffer can be arranged between the carrier and one leg of the spring bracket. This rubber buffer arwill preferably be connected by draw-screws, these lat-.

ter, when using rubber buffers, being employed to tighten up said buffers and to adjust their preload.

Conveniently, washers will be used between the draw-screws and the carrier and/or the associated leg of the spring bracket, these washers likewise having the effect of uniformly distributing the tensile forces and in particular preventing the development of unwanted stress concentration when using fibre-glass reinforced v synthetic material.

A particular benefit offered by the roller skate in accordance with the invention, is that of the provision of facilities for adjusting the stiffness of the spring elements of the roller frame. To this end, conveniently between the legs of the spring bracket, an adjuster bolt is arranged by means of which the preload of the spring bracket can be adjusted. In this case, conveniently a limited clearance will be left between adjuster bolt and spring bracket legs, so that after a predetermined travel on the part of the spring legs, the spring bracket ceases to have a spring action and the force is transmitted directly. In this fashion, impermissibly high loadings on the spring bracket, are avoided. This limited clearance can. readily be produced by providing the adjuster bolt with a shoulder which locates in a countersunk bore located in one leg of the spring bracket and covered by the sole plate.

When using draw-screws between the carrier and one leg of the spring bracket, the adjuster bolt used for adjusting the preload will preferably be screwed into a central through bore in the draw-screw so that the adjuster belt is readily accessible in the assembled condition of the roller skate, in a manner required for individual adjustment of the spring stiffness.

For course adjustment of the stiffness of the spring bracket, one or more preferably likewise U-shaped spring insets can be provided by means of which the stiffness of the spring bracket can be adjusted quite simply in steps.

Frequently it is required to fit sports roller skates with stoppers or, for training purposes, with weights, and therefore fixing brackets can be attached to the sole plate to allow such devices to be fitted. For manufacturing reasons, these'fixing brackets will preferably be made integral with the spring bracket leg which is attached to the sole plate. In order to enable'the stoppers or weights to be exchanged, these will conveniently be detachably fitted to the fixing brackets, for example, by means of screw and/or plug-in connections.

When using fixing brackets, the stiffness of the spring bracket can also be adjusted by an adjuster screw acting between bracket and carrier, in which case the pre load of the spring bracket is regulated not directly but through the carrier.

In order to laterally secure the spring bracket legs to the sole plate, and at the same time to increase the bending strength of the sole plate, the latter will preferably be provided with lengthwise reinforcing ribs in relation to which the spring bracket legs attached to the sole plate are guided.

The spring brackets can, for example, be stuck to the sole plate and as an additional security screwed to it as well, but will preferably be attached to it in a detachable fashion in order to enable the brackets to be exchanged.

In order to be able to alter the axle spacing, the spring brackets will conveniently be attached to the 41 sole plate in such a fashion that they can be adjusted in the longitudinal direction.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will now be further described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of one embodiment of a roller skate in accordance with the invention, illustrated schematically;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the front section of the roller skate shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal section through that section of the sports roller skate, which has been shown in FIG.

FIG. 4 illustrates the draw-screw and adjuster bolt arrangement in the dismantled condition;

FIG. 5 illustrates a side elevation of a spring bracket with a spring insert; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary illustration of the roller skate in longitudinal section, withan adjuster screw arranged between the fixing bracket and carrier in order to regulate the spring stiffness.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In accordance with the figures, the roller skate possesses a sole plate 2 to whose underside two roller frames 4 are fitted each with a carrier 8 holding the roller axle 6, and a spring bracket 10. Between spring bracket 10 and carrier 8, a rubber buffer 12 is located by means of a draw-screw 14 which seats through a washer 16 preferably formed in situ with the head 48 of the screw, on the carrier 8, and through a nut 18 on the leg 36 of the spring bracket 10. Between the legs 34 and 36 0f the spring bracket 10 an adjuster bolt 20 is arranged by means of which the legs 34 and 36 of the spring can be drawn together and thus the preload of the spring bracket regulated. In order to prevent any excessive deflection (towards one another) of the spring bracket legs 34 and 36, their travel is restricted to a certain figure by virtue of the fact that the adjuster bolt 20 only allows a certain predetermined amount of play between the said legs 34'and 36. To this end, the adjuster bolt 20 is provided with a shoulder 44 which seats in a countersunk bore 68 in one leg 34 of the spring bracket, this countersunk bore 68 being masked, when the roller skate is assembled, by the sole plate 2 and indeed preferably, in order to ensure uniform distribution of forces, by a metal plate 54 inset in a recess in the soleplate.

The adjuster bolt 20 can be screwed as required to the other leg 36 of the spring bracket but will preferably be screwed into a threaded bore 52 passing through the screw shank 50, the washer l6 and the head 48 of the draw-screw 14, and be provided at the end connected to the draw-screw 14 with a slot 46 so that the preload of the spring bracket 10 can also be adjusted when the roller skate has been assembled.

The carrier 8, which is a one-piece item and, like the sole plate 2 and the spring bracket 10, can particularly advantageously be made of fibre-glass reinforced synthetic material such as polyester for example, has two carrier arms 30 and 32 between which the roller axle 6 is' mounted in situ. The carrier arm 32, which is connected through the rubber buffer 12 and the drawscrew 14 to the leg 36 of the spring bracket, extends substantially parallel to this leg, arm 32 and leg 36 being inclined towards the end of the sole plate 2 (see FIG. 1), in order to largely exclude the application to the rubber buffer and the spring bracket leg of loads acting in directions other than perpendicular to the spring bracket leg 36 and in the axial direction of the buffer 12. The second carrier arm 30 is supported at its free end 62 in a pivoting connection formed by a seating 60. The seating 60 possesses an opening 64in a supporting section 38 which can be formed separately from the spring bracket leg 34 (FIG. 6) but will preferably bean integral part thereof (FIGS. 2, 3 and 5), and is likewise made of fibre-glass reinforced synthetic material.

The free end 62 of the carrier arm seats on a metal disc 56 located in arecess formed in the sole plate 2.

In order to attach extra weights or stoppers 58, fixing brackets 40 are provided which can likewise be separately manufactured and either adhered or screwed to the sole plate, but will preferably however beformed integrally with the supporting section 38 and be made of fibre-glass reinforced synthetic material. The extra weights or stoppers 58 are detachably connected to the fixing bracket by plugging them in and/or by means of screws which engage in holes 26 in the brackets 40.

For strength reasons, the spring bracket is provided in the neighbourhood of the nut 18 with a reinforcing head 66 and furthermore reinforcing ribs 28 are formed on the sole plate 2 these ribs simultaneously guiding the spring bracket leg 34 the integral supporting section 38 and the fixing bracket 40 formed thereon, in the lateral sense. The spring bracket leg 34, with the sections 38 and 40 formed on it, can be stuck to the sole plate 2 and also additionally screwed to it, but will preferably be attached to the sole plate in such a fashion as to be detachable therefrom and adjustable longitudinally in relation thereto by means of fixing screws22 and 24, the fixing screws 24 adjacent the end of the sole plate if required serving simultaneously to locate the boot.

The roller axles 6 are provided at their ends with grooves 42 to which, afte rollers 74 have been slipped on, retaining rings which are not shown can be inserted in order to prevent the rollers from being displaced axially. The rollers 74 are made of synthetic material (polyamide), and on the rimspolyamide rings of different hardnesses can be assembled depending upon the nature of the surface of the skating rink.

As FIG. 5 shows, the stiffness of the spring brackets 10 can be modified additionally or arbitrarily by inserting one or more spring inserts 70.

A further possible way of adjusting the stifiness of the spring brackets 10 is shown in FIG. 6; here, the adjustment of the preload of the spring bracket is effected through the medium of the carrier 8 using an adjuster screw 72 which operates between the fixing bracket 40 and the first carrier arm 30. i

Various other embodiments and modifications of the invention are envisaged without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1.In a roller skate having a sole plate, rollers and roller axles, a roller frame from the spring suspension of a roller axle mounted on said sole plate, said roller frame comprising a carrier supporting the roller axle and pivotally connected to said sole plate, a U-shaped spring bracket connected to said sole plate and said carrier, said carrier being connected to one arm of said spring bracket through a draw-screw, and an adjuster bolt threaded into a central bore defined in said drawscrew, said adjuster bolt being located between the arms of said spring bracket.

2. In a roller skate having a sole plate, rollers and roller axles, a roller frame for the spring suspension of a roller axle mounted on said sole plate, said roller frame comprising a carrier supporting the roller axle and pivotally connected to said sole plate, a U-shaped spring bracket connected to said sole plate and to said carrier, and an adjuster bolt located between the arms of said spring bracket for adjusting the pre-load of said spring bracket.

3. A roller skate as claimed in claim 2, in which there is a limited amount of play between said adjuster bolt and the arms of the spring bracket.

4. A roller skate as claimed in claim 3, in which said adjuster bolt is provided with a shoulder which seats in a countersunk bore formed in one arm of the spring bracket and covered by the sole plate.

5. In a roller skate having a sole plate, rollers and rol ler axles, a roller frame for the spring suspension of a roller axle mounted on said sole plate, said roller frame conprising a carrier supporting the roller axle and pivotally connected to said sole plate, a U-shaped spring bracket connected to said sole plate and to said carrier, a fixing bracket mounted to said sole plate for supporting a stop member or weights, and an adjuster screw interposed between said fixing bracket and said carrier for adjusting the stiffness of said spring bracket.

6. In a roller skate having a sole plate, a spring suspension comprising, in combination, an elongated carrier having an intermediate portion and first and second arm portions extending from said intermediate portion angularly related to each other, each arm portion having an end region spaced from said intermediate portion, a roller axle mounted on said intermediate portion, rollers mounted on said axle, pivot means pivotally connecting said first arm portion end region to the sole plate, a U-shaped deflecfible spring bracket having a first leg connected to the sole. plate and a sec-j ond leg extending adjacent the end region of said second arm portion, elastomer bufier meansinterposed between and engaging said second leg and said end region of said second arm portion, and lost-motion fastening means extending between said second leg and said second arm portion maintaining engagement thereof with said elastomer buffer means and permitting compression of said elastomer buffermeans.

7. In a roller skate as in claim *6 wherein said second leg and said end region of said second arm portion are substantially parallel to each other and are obliquely related to the sole plate.

8. In a roller skate as in claim 6 wherein said pivot means pivotally connecting said first arm portion end region to the sole platecomprises a socket defined in the sole plate receiving the end of said first arm permitting universal pivoting of said carrier with respect to the sole plate.

9. In a roller skate as in claim 6 wherein said fastening means comprises a draw screw, adjustment of said draw screw varying the precompression imposed on said elastomer buffer means.

10. In a roller skate as in claim 9 wherein said draw screw extends through said elastomer buffer means.

frame comprising an elongated carrier having arm portions and an intermediate portion, said roller axle mounted on said intermediate portion and one of said arm portions being pivotally connected to said sole plate, a U-shaped spring bracket having a first leg connected to said sole plate and a second leg connected to the other carrier arm portion and a spring insert incorporated into said spring bracket adjusting the stiffness of said spring bracket.

Patent Citations
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US875165 *Sep 5, 1907Dec 31, 1907Claude M FaustRoller-skate.
US921102 *May 13, 1908May 11, 1909Martin B GroutRoller-skate.
US1711451 *Feb 20, 1928Apr 30, 1929Gibson Percy ORoller skate
US2233355 *Jan 20, 1940Feb 25, 1941Chicago Roller Skate CoRoller skate
US2330338 *May 27, 1939Sep 28, 1943Arthur E DekomeRoller skate
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3862763 *Oct 25, 1973Jan 28, 1975Chicago Roller Skate CoRoller skate construction with releasably, lockable and adjustable action screw
US4251087 *Feb 21, 1979Feb 17, 1981Royalty InvestorsTruck apparatus for skate and skateboard devices
US4398735 *Sep 28, 1981Aug 16, 1983D. BeamSolid state skate truck
US4596396 *Nov 21, 1983Jun 24, 1986Rudolph MerblerRoller skate
US4861054 *Jul 28, 1987Aug 29, 1989Wade SpitalPedal-powered skateboard
US4915399 *Apr 5, 1988Apr 10, 1990Marandel Jean BernardSuspension system for roller skates and similar devices
US5704620 *Jun 30, 1995Jan 6, 199899 Innovations, Inc.Flexible skate frame
US5823543 *Jan 11, 1996Oct 20, 1998John Aloysius SullivanRoller skate shock absorber system
US5904360 *Nov 25, 1996May 18, 199999 Innovations, Inc.Flexible skate frame
US5961131 *Apr 1, 1997Oct 5, 1999Fancyform Design EngineeringShock absorber device for roller skates
US6722670 *Jun 20, 2002Apr 20, 2004Yan-Yee LeeRoller skate provided with means to absorb shock
US7175187Jul 28, 2003Feb 13, 2007Lyden Robert MWheeled skate with step-in binding and brakes
US7464944Oct 19, 2006Dec 16, 2008Lyden Robert MWheeled skate
US8302977 *May 4, 2009Nov 6, 2012Crutchfield Patrick Elton QFlexible skateboard truck
US20130175774 *Jan 5, 2012Jul 11, 2013Robert Lininger, JR.Skateboard truck and caster with suspension mechanism
EP0835154A1 *Jun 28, 1996Apr 15, 1998Eduard Willem H. OliemansFlexible skate frame
EP1009498A1 *Nov 25, 1997Jun 21, 200099 Innovations, Inc.Flexible skate frame
WO1997002072A1Jun 28, 1996Jan 23, 1997Eduard Willem H OliemansFlexible skate frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.28, 280/11.209, 280/11.208
International ClassificationA63C17/06, A63C17/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/02, A63C17/0046
European ClassificationA63C17/00G, A63C17/02